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  • 1.
    Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Phys, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge, England.
    Pazoki, Meysam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Dar, M. Ibrahim
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Alsari, Mejd
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Phys, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge, England.
    Sadhanala, Aditya
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Phys, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge, England.
    Diyitini, Giorgio
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Mat Sci & Met, Charles Babbage Rd, Cambridge, England.
    Imani, Roghayeh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lilliu, Samuele
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Phys & Astron, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England; UAE Ctr Crystallog, Dubai, U Arab Emirates.
    Kullgren, Jolla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Rensmo, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Gratzel, Michael
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Friend, Richard H.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Phys, Cavendish Lab, JJ Thomson Ave, Cambridge, England.
    Dedoping of Lead Halide Perovskites Incorporating Monovalent Cations2018In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 7301-7311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report significant improvements in the optoelectronic properties of lead halide perovskites with the addition of monovalent ions with ionic radii close to Pb2+. We investigate the chemical distribution and electronic structure of solution processed CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite structures containing Na+, Cu+, and Ag+, which are lower valence metal ions than Pb2+ but have similar ionic radii. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction reveals a pronounced shift in the main perovskite peaks for the monovalent cation-based films, suggesting incorporation of these cations into the perovskite lattice as well as a preferential crystal growth in Ag+ containing perovskite structures. Furthermore, the synchrotron X-ray photoelectron measurements show a significant change in the valence band position for Cu- and Ag-doped films, although the perovskite bandgap remains the same, indicating a shift in the Fermi level position toward the middle of the bandgap. Such a shift infers that incorporation of these monovalent cations dedope the n-type perovskite films when formed without added cations. This dedoping effect leads to cleaner bandgaps as reflected by the lower energetic disorder in the monovalent cation-doped perovskite thin films as compared to pristine films. We also find that in contrast to Ag+ and Cu+, Na+ locates mainly at the grain boundaries and surfaces. Our theoretical calculations confirm the observed shifts in X-ray diffraction peaks and Fermi level as well as absence of intrabandgap states upon energetically favorable doping of perovskite lattice by the monovalent cations. We also model a significant change in the local structure, chemical bonding of metal-halide, and the electronic structure in the doped perovskites. In summary, our work highlights the local chemistry and influence of monovalent cation dopants on crystallization and the electronic structure in the doped perovskite thin films.

  • 2.
    Adamovic, Nadja
    et al.
    TU Wien, ISAS, Vienna, Austria..
    Asinari, Pietro
    Politecn Torino, Dept Energy, Turin, Italy..
    Goldbeck, Gerhard
    Goldbeck Consulting Ltd, St Johns Innovat Ctr, Cambridge, England..
    Hashibon, Adham
    Fraunhofer Inst Mech Mat IWM, Freiburg, Germany..
    Hermansson, Kersti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hristova-Bogaerds, Denka
    DPI, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Koopmans, Rudolf
    Koopmans Consulting GmbH, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Verbrugge, Tom
    Dow Benelux BV, Hoek, Netherlands..
    Wimmer, Erich
    Mat Design, Le Mans, France..
    European Materials Modelling Council2017In: Proceedings Of The 4Th World Congress On Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (Icme 2017) / [ed] Mason, P Fisher, CR Glamm, R Manuel, MV Schmitz, GJ Singh, AK Strachan, A, Springer Publishing Company, 2017, p. 79-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the European Materials Modelling Council (EMMC) is to establish current and forward looking complementary activities necessary to bring the field of materials modelling closer to the demands of manufacturers (both small and large enterprises) in Europe. The ultimate goal is that materials modelling and simulation will become an integral part of product life cycle management in European industry, thereby making a strong contribution to enhance innovation and competitiveness on a global level. Based on intensive efforts in the past two years within the EMMC, which included numerous consultation and networking actions with representatives of all stakeholders including Modellers, Software Owners, Translators and Manufacturers in Europe, the EMMC identified and proposed a set of underpinning and enabling actions to increase the industrial exploitation of materials modelling in Europe. EMMC will pursue the following overarching objectives in order to bridge the gap between academic innovation and industrial application: enhance the interaction and collaboration between all stakeholders engaged in different types of materials modelling, including modellers, software owners, translators and manufacturers, facilitate integrated materials modelling in Europe building on strong and coherent foundations, coordinate and support actors and mechanisms that enable rapid transfer of materials modelling from academic innovation to the end users and potential beneficiaries in industry, achieve greater awareness and uptake of materials modelling in industry, in particular SMEs, elaborate Roadmaps that (i) identify major obstacles to widening the use of materials modelling and (ii) elaborate strategies to overcome them.

  • 3.
    Ahlstrand, Emma
    et al.
    Linnus Univ, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden.;Linnus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Hermansson, Kersti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnus Univ, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden.;Linnus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Interaction Energies in Complexes of Zn and Amino Acids: A Comparison of Ab Initio and Force Field Based Calculations2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 121, no 13, p. 2643-2654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc plays important roles in structural stabilization of proteins, eniyine catalysis, and signal transduction. Many Zn binding sites are located at the interface between the protein and the cellular fluid. In aqueous solutions, Zn ions adopt an octahedral coordination, while in proteins zinc can have different coordinations, with a tetrahedral conformation found most frequently. The dynainics of Zn binding to proteins and the formation of complexes that involve Zn are dictated by interactions between Zn and its binding partners. We calculated the interaction energies between Zn and its ligands in complexes that mimic protein binding sites and in Zn complexes of water and one or two amino acid moieties, using quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM). It was found that MM calculations that neglect or only approximate polarizability did not reproduce even the relative order of the QM interaction energies in these complexes. Interaction energies calculated with the CHARMM-Diode polarizable force field agreed better with the ab initio results,:although the deviations between QM and MM were still rather large (40-96 kcallmol). In order to gain further insight into Zn ligand interactions, the free energies of interaction were estimated by QM calculations with continuum solvent representation, and we performed energy decomposition analysis calculations to examine the characteristics of the different complexes. The ligand-types were found to have high impact on the relative strength of polarization and electrostatic interactions. Interestingly, ligand ligand interactions did not play a significant role in the binding of Zn. Finally) analysis of ligand exchange energies suggests that carboxylates could be exchanged with water molecules, which explains the flexibility in Zn:binding dynamics. An exchange between earboxylate (Asp/Glii) and imidazole (His) is less likely.

  • 4.
    Ahlstrand, Emma
    et al.
    Linnæus University Centre for Biomaterials Chemistry.
    Spångberg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hermansson, Kersti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Friedman, Ran
    Interaction Energies Between Metal Ions (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and Biologically Relevant Ligands2013In: International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, ISSN 0020-7608, E-ISSN 1097-461X, Vol. 113, no 23, p. 2554-2562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactions between the group XII metals Zn2+ and Cd2+ and amino acid residues play an important role in biology due to the prevalence of the first and the toxicity of the second. Estimates of the interaction energies between the ions and relevant residues in proteins are however difficult to obtain. This study reports on calculated interaction energy curves for small complexes of Zn2+ or Cd2+ and amino acid mimics (acetate, methanethiolate, and imidazole) or water. Given that many applications and models (e.g., force fields, solvation models, etc.) begin with and rely on an accurate description of gas-phase interaction energies, this is where our focus lies in this study. Four density functional theory (DFT)-functionals and MP2 were used to calculate the interaction energies not only at the respective equilibrium distances but also at a relevant range of ion–ligand separation distances. The calculated values were compared with those obtained by CCSD(T). All DFT-methods are found to overestimate the magnitude of the interaction energy compared to the CCSD(T) reference values. The deviation was analyzed in terms of energy components from localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis scheme and is mostly attributed to overestimation of the polarization energy. MP2 shows good agreement with CCSD(T) [root mean square error (RMSE) = 1.2 kcal/mol] for the eight studied complexes at equilibrium distance. Dispersion energy differences at longer separation give rise to increased deviations between MP2 and CCSD(T) (RMSE = 6.4 kcal/mol at 3.0 Å). Overall, the results call for caution in applying DFT methods to metalloprotein model complexes even with closed-shell metal ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+, in particular at ion–ligand separations that are longer than the equilibrium distances.

  • 5.
    Aktekin, Burak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Electrochemistry of LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-δ in Li-ion Batteries: Structure, Side-reactions and Cross-talk2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Li-ion batteries in portable electronic products is today widespread and on-going research is extensively dedicated to improve their performance and energy density for use in electric vehicles. The largest contribution to the overall cell weight comes from the positive electrode material, and improvements regarding this component thereby render a high potential for the development of these types of batteries. A promising candidate is LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO), which offers both high power capability and energy density. However, the instability of conventional electrolytes at the high operating potential (~4.7 V vs. Li+/Li) associated with this electrode material currently prevents its use in commercial applications.

    This thesis work aims to investigate practical approaches which have the potential of overcoming issues related to fast degradation of LNMO-based batteries. This, in turn, necessitates a comprehensive understanding of degradation mechanisms. First, the effect of a well-known electrolyte additive, fluoroethylene carbonate is investigated in LNMO-Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) cells with a focus on the positive electrode. Relatively poor cycling performance is found with 5 wt% additive while 1 wt% additive does not show a significant difference as compared to additive-free electrolytes. Second, a more fundamental study is performed to understand the effect of capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure in high-voltage based full-cells. Electrochemical characterization of LNMO-LTO cells in different configurations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behaviour. Unexpectedly fast capacity fading at elevated temperatures is found to originate from a high sensitivity of LTO to cross-talk.

    Third, in situ studies of LNMO are conducted with neutron diffraction and electron microscopy. These show that the oxygen release is not directly related to cation disordering. Moreover, microstructural changes upon heating are observed. These findings suggest new sample preparation strategies, which allow the control of cation disorder without oxygen loss. Following this guidance, ordered and disordered samples with the same oxygen content are prepared. The negative effect of ordering on electrochemical performance is investigated and changes in bulk electronic structure following cycling are found in ordered samples, accompanied by thick surface films on surface and rock-salt phase domains near surface.

    List of papers
    1. The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells
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    2017 (English)In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. A942-A948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the electrolyte additive fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) for Li-ion batteries has been widely discussed in literature in recent years. Here, the additive is studied for the high-voltage cathode LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) coupled to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) to specifically study its effect on the cathode side. Electrochemical performance of full cells prepared by using a standard electrolyte (LP40) with different concentrations of FEC (0, 1 and 5 wt%) were compared and the surface of cycled positive electrodes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that addition of FEC is generally of limited use for this battery system. Addition of 5 wt% FEC results in relatively poor cycling performance, while the cells with 1 wt% FEC showed similar behavior compared to reference cells prepared without FEC. SEM and XPS analysis did not indicate the formation of thick surface layers on the LNMO cathode, however, an increase in layer thickness with increased FEC content in the electrolyte could be observed. XPS analysis on LTO electrodes showed that the electrode interactions between positive and negative electrodes occurred as Mn and Ni were detected on the surface of LTO already after 1 cycle. (C) The Author(s) 2017. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELECTROCHEMICAL SOC INC, 2017
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323509 (URN)10.1149/2.0231706jes (DOI)000400958600056 ()
    Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    2. Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 21, p. 11234-11248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, (LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode because of its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs Li/Li+) and high power capability. However, problems including electrolyte decomposition at high voltage and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures, have limited its potential use in practical full cells. In this paper, a fundamental study for LNMO parallel to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) full cells has been performed to understand the effect of different capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure. Electrochemical characterization of cells in different configurations (regular full cells, back-to-back pseudo-full cells, and 3-electrode full cells) combined with an intermittent current interruption technique have been performed. Capacity fade in the full cell configuration was mainly due to progressively limited lithiation of electrodes caused by a more severe degree of parasitic reactions at the LTO electrode, while the contributions from active mass loss from LNMO or increases in internal cell resistance were minor. A comparison of cell formats constructed with and without the possibility of cross-talk indicates that the parasitic reactions on LTO occur because of the transfer of reaction products from the LNMO side. The efficiency of LTO is more sensitive to temperature, causing a dramatic increase in the fading rate at 55 degrees C. These observations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behavior. Additionally, internal resistance measurements showed that the positive electrode was mainly responsible for the increase of resistance over cycling, especially at 55 degrees C. Surface characterization showed that LNMO surface layers were relatively thin when compared with the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on LTO. The SEI on LTO does not contribute significantly to overall internal resistance even though these films are relatively thick. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements showed that the Mn and Ni observed on the anode were not in the metallic state; the presence of elemental metals in the SEI is therefore not implicated in the observed fading mechanism through a simple reduction process of migrated metal cations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357732 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b02204 (DOI)000434236700007 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, 42031-1
    Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells
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    2019 (English)In: ACS APPLIED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 3323-3335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) as the positive electrode are prone to fast capacity fading, especially when operated in full cells and at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure of LNMO can adopt a P4(3)32 (cation-ordered) or Fd (3) over barm (disordered) arrangement, and the fading rate of cells is usually mitigated when samples possess the latter structure. However, synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiencies and rock-salt impurities and as a result generate Mn3+. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was performed on disordered and slightly Mn-rich LNMO samples to follow cation ordering-disordering transformations during heating and cooling. The study shows for the first time that there is not a direct connection between oxygen release and cation disordering, as cation disordering is observed to start prior to oxygen release when the samples are heated in a pure oxygen atmosphere. This result demonstrates that it is possible to tune disordering in LNMO without inducing oxygen deficiencies or forming the rock-salt impurity phase. In the second part of the study, electrochemical testing of samples with different degrees of ordering and oxygen content has been performed in LNMO vertical bar vertical bar LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells. The disordered sample exhibits better performance, as has been reported in other studies; however, we observe that all cells behave similarly during the initial period of cycling even when discharged at a 10 C rate, while differences arise only after a period of cycling. Additionally, the differences in fading rate were observed to be time-dependent rather than dependent on the number of cycles. This performance degradation is believed to be related to instabilities in LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states. Therefore, it is suggested that future studies should target the individual effects of ordering and oxygen content. It is also suggested that more emphasis during electrochemical testing should be placed on the stability of samples in their delithiated state.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
    Keywords
    high-voltage spinel, neutron diffraction, LNMO, cation ordering, oxygen deficiency
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387975 (URN)10.1021/acsaem.8b02217 (DOI)000469885300040 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, 42758-1Swedish Energy Agency, 39043-1StandUp
    Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    4. The role of anionic processes in Li1xNi0.44Mn1.56O4 studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of anionic processes in Li1xNi0.44Mn1.56O4 studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389847 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-13
    5. How Mn/Ni ordering controls electrochemical performance in high-voltage spinel LiNi0.44Mn1.56O4 (LNMO) with fixed oxygen content
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Mn/Ni ordering controls electrochemical performance in high-voltage spinel LiNi0.44Mn1.56O4 (LNMO) with fixed oxygen content
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    High voltage spinel, LNMO, cation ordering, oxygen deficiency, rock-salt, anionic redox activity
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389799 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-07-28 Created: 2019-07-28 Last updated: 2019-08-13
  • 6.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Marzano, Fernanda
    Scania CV AB.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO)—In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li-Ion Full Cells2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is a promising spinel-type positive electrode for lithium ion batteries as it operates at high voltage and possesses high power capability. However, rapid performance degradation in full cells, especially at elevated temperatures, is a problem. There has been a considerable interest in its crystal structure as this is known to affect its electrochemical performance. LNMO can adopt a P4332 (cation ordered) or Fd-3m (cation disordered) arrangement depending on the synthesis conditions. Most of the studies in literature agree on better electrochemical performance for disordered LNMO [1], however, a clear understanding of the reason for this behaviour is still lacking. This partly arises from the fact that synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiency, rock-salt impurities and therefore generate some Mn3+ [2]. Most commonly, X-ray diffraction is used to characterize these materials, however, accurate structural analysis is difficult due to the near identical scattering lengths of Mn and Ni. This is not the case for neutron diffraction. In this study, an in-situ neutron diffraction heating-cooling experiment was conducted on slightly Mn-rich LNMO under pure oxygen atmosphere in order to investigate relationship between disordering and oxygen deficiency. The study shows for the first time that there is no direct relationship between oxygen loss and cation disordering, as disordering starts prior to oxygen release. Our findings suggest that it is possible to obtain samples with varying degrees of ordering, yet with the same oxygen content and free from impurities. In the second part of the study, highly ordered, partially ordered and fully disordered samples have been tested in LNMO∥LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells at 55 °C. It is shown that differences in their performances arise only after repeated cycling, while all the samples behave similarly at the beginning of the test. The difference is believed to be related to instabilities of LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states.

    [1] A. Manthiram, K. Chemelewski, E.-S. Lee, Energy Environ. Sci. 7 (2014) 1339.

    [2] M. Kunduraci, G.G. Amatucci, J. Power Sources. 165 (2007) 359–367.

  • 7.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB, SE-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, D-38436 Wolfsburg, Germany.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 21, p. 11234-11248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, (LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode because of its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs Li/Li+) and high power capability. However, problems including electrolyte decomposition at high voltage and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures, have limited its potential use in practical full cells. In this paper, a fundamental study for LNMO parallel to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) full cells has been performed to understand the effect of different capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure. Electrochemical characterization of cells in different configurations (regular full cells, back-to-back pseudo-full cells, and 3-electrode full cells) combined with an intermittent current interruption technique have been performed. Capacity fade in the full cell configuration was mainly due to progressively limited lithiation of electrodes caused by a more severe degree of parasitic reactions at the LTO electrode, while the contributions from active mass loss from LNMO or increases in internal cell resistance were minor. A comparison of cell formats constructed with and without the possibility of cross-talk indicates that the parasitic reactions on LTO occur because of the transfer of reaction products from the LNMO side. The efficiency of LTO is more sensitive to temperature, causing a dramatic increase in the fading rate at 55 degrees C. These observations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behavior. Additionally, internal resistance measurements showed that the positive electrode was mainly responsible for the increase of resistance over cycling, especially at 55 degrees C. Surface characterization showed that LNMO surface layers were relatively thin when compared with the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on LTO. The SEI on LTO does not contribute significantly to overall internal resistance even though these films are relatively thick. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements showed that the Mn and Ni observed on the anode were not in the metallic state; the presence of elemental metals in the SEI is therefore not implicated in the observed fading mechanism through a simple reduction process of migrated metal cations.

  • 8.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Rapid Capacity Fading of LNMO-LTO Lithium-ion Cells at Elevated Temperature2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) has an average operating potential around 4.7 V vs. Li/Li+ and a gravimetric charge capacity of 146 mAh/g making it a promising high energy density positive electrode for Li-ion batteries. Additionally, the 3-D lithium transport paths available in the spinel structure enables fast diffusion kinetics, making it suitable for power applications [1]. However, the material displays large instability during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Therefore, significant research efforts have been undertaken to better understand and improve this electrode material.

    Electrolyte (LiPF6 in organic solvents) oxidation and transition metal dissolution are often considered as the main problems [2] for the systems based on this cathode material. These can cause a variety of problems (in different parts of the cell) eventually increasing internal cell resistance, causing active mass loss and decreasing the amount of cyclable lithium.

    Among these issues, cyclable lithium loss cannot be observed in half cells since lithium metal will provide almost unlimited capacity. Being a promising full cell chemistry for high power applications, there has also been a considerable interest on LNMO full cells with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) used as the negative electrode. For this chemistry, for an optimized cell, quite stable cycling for >1000 cycles has been reported at room temperature while fast fading is still present at 55 °C [3]. This difference in performance (RT vs. 55 °C) is beyond most expectations and likely does not follow any Arrhenius-type of trend.

    In this study, a comprehensive analysis of LNMO-LTO cells has been performed at different temperatures (RT, 40 °C and 55 °C) to understand the underlying reasons behind stable cycling at room temperature and rapid fading at 55 °C. For this purpose, testing was made on regular cells (Figure 1a), 3-electrode cells (Figure 1b) and back-to-back cells [4] (Figure 1c). Electrode interactions (cross-talk) have been shown to exist in the LTO-LNMO system [5] and back-to-back cells have therefore been used to observe fading under conditions where cross-talk is impossible [4]. Galvanostatic cycling combined with short-duration intermittent current interruptions [6] was performed in order to separately observe changes in internal resistance for LNMO and LTO electrodes in a full cell. Ex-situ characterization of electrodes have also been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES).

    Our findings show how important the electrode interactions can be in full cells, as a decrease in lithium inventory was shown to be the major factor for the observed capacity fading at elevated temperature. In this presentation, the effect of other factors – active mass loss and internal cell resistance – will be discussed together with the consequences of cross-talk.

    References

    [1] A. Kraytsberg et al. Adv. Energy Mater., vol. 2, pp. 922–939,2012.

    [2] J. H. Kim et al., ChemPhysChem, vol. 15, pp. 1940–1954, 2014.

    [3] H. M. Wu et al. J. E. Soc., vol. 156, pp. A1047–A1050, 2009.

    [4] S. R. Li et al., J. E. Soc., vol. 160, no. 9, pp. A1524–A1528, 2013.

    [5] Dedryvère et al. J. Phys. C., vol. 114 (24), pp. 10999–11008, 2010.

    [6] M. J. Lacey, ChemElectroChem, pp. 1–9, 2017.

  • 9.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode due to its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs. Li/Li+) arising from the Ni2+/Ni4+ redox couple. In addition to high voltage operation, a second advantage of this material is its capability for fast lithium diffusion kinetics through 3-D transport paths in the spinel structure. However, the electrode material is prone to side reactions with conventional electrolytes, including electrolyte decomposition and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures1. It is important to understand how undesired reactions originating from the high voltage spinel affect the aging of different cell components and overall cycle life. Half-cells are usually considered as an ideal cell configuration in order to get information only from the electrode of interest. However, this cell configuration may not be ideal to understand capacity fading for long-term cycling and the assumption of ‘stable’ lithium negative electrode may not be valid, especially at high current rates2. Also, among the variety of capacity fading mechanisms, the loss of “cyclable” lithium from the positive electrode (or gain of lithium from electrolyte into the negative electrode) due to side reactions in a full-cell can cause significant capacity loss. This capacity loss is not observable in a typical half-cell as a result of an excessive reserve of lithium in the negative electrode.

    In a full-cell, it is desired that the negative electrode does not contribute to side reactions in a significant way if the interest is more on the positive side. Among candidates on the negative side, Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) is known for its stability since its voltage plateau (around 1.5 V vs. Li/Li+) is in the electrochemical stability window of standard electrolytes and it shows a very small volume change during lithiation. These characteristics make the LNMO-LTO system attractive for a variety of applications (e.g. electric vehicles) but also make it a good model system for studying aging in high voltage spinel-based full cells.

    In this study, we aim to understand the fundamental mechanisms resulting in capacity fading for LNMO-LTO full cells both at room temperature and elevated temperature (55°C). It is known that electrode interactions occur in this system due to migration of reaction products from LNMO to the LTO side3, 4. For this purpose, three electrode cells have been cycled galvanostatically with short-duration intermittent current interruptionsin order to observe internal resistance for both LNMO and LTO electrodes in a full cell, separately. Change of voltage curves over cycling has also been observed to get an insight into capacity loss. For comparison purposes, back-to-back cells (a combination of LNMO and LTO cells connected electrically by lithium sides) were also tested similarly. Post-cycling of harvested electrodes in half cells was conducted to determine the degree of capacity loss due to charge slippage compared to other aging factors. Surface characterization of LNMO as well as LTO electrodes after cycling at room temperature and elevated temperature has been done via SEM, XPS, HAXPES and XANES.

    References

    1. A. Kraytsberg, Y. Ein-Eli, Adv. Energy Mater., vol. 2, pp. 922–939, 2012.

    2. Aurbach, D., Zinigrad, E., Cohen, Y., & Teller, H. Solid State Ionics, 148(3), 405-416, 2002.

    3. Li et al., Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 160 (9) A1524-A1528, 2013.

    4. Aktekin et al., Journal of The Electrochemical Society 164.4: A942-A948. 2017.

    5. Lacey, M. J., ChemElectroChem. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1002/celc.201700129, 2017. 

  • 10.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the capacity loss in LNMO-LTO lithium-ion cells at ambient and elevated temperaturesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 11.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Massel, Felix
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Ahmadi, Majid
    Delft University of Technology, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Faculty of Applied Sciences.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG.
    Marzano, Fernanda
    Scania CV AB.
    Duda, Laurent
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    How Mn/Ni ordering controls electrochemical performance in high-voltage spinel LiNi0.44Mn1.56O4 (LNMO) with fixed oxygen contentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Smith, Ronald I.
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, ISIS Pulsed Neutron & Muon Source, Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon, England.
    Sörby, Magnus H.
    Inst Energy Technol, Dept Neutron Mat Characterizat, POB 40, NO-2027 Kjeller, Norway.
    Marzano, Fernanda Lodi
    Scania CV AB, SE-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, D-38436 Wolfsburg, Germany.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells2019In: ACS APPLIED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 3323-3335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) as the positive electrode are prone to fast capacity fading, especially when operated in full cells and at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure of LNMO can adopt a P4(3)32 (cation-ordered) or Fd (3) over barm (disordered) arrangement, and the fading rate of cells is usually mitigated when samples possess the latter structure. However, synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiencies and rock-salt impurities and as a result generate Mn3+. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was performed on disordered and slightly Mn-rich LNMO samples to follow cation ordering-disordering transformations during heating and cooling. The study shows for the first time that there is not a direct connection between oxygen release and cation disordering, as cation disordering is observed to start prior to oxygen release when the samples are heated in a pure oxygen atmosphere. This result demonstrates that it is possible to tune disordering in LNMO without inducing oxygen deficiencies or forming the rock-salt impurity phase. In the second part of the study, electrochemical testing of samples with different degrees of ordering and oxygen content has been performed in LNMO vertical bar vertical bar LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells. The disordered sample exhibits better performance, as has been reported in other studies; however, we observe that all cells behave similarly during the initial period of cycling even when discharged at a 10 C rate, while differences arise only after a period of cycling. Additionally, the differences in fading rate were observed to be time-dependent rather than dependent on the number of cycles. This performance degradation is believed to be related to instabilities in LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states. Therefore, it is suggested that future studies should target the individual effects of ordering and oxygen content. It is also suggested that more emphasis during electrochemical testing should be placed on the stability of samples in their delithiated state.

  • 13.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg, Germany..
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB, Södertalje..
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells2017In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. A942-A948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the electrolyte additive fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) for Li-ion batteries has been widely discussed in literature in recent years. Here, the additive is studied for the high-voltage cathode LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) coupled to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) to specifically study its effect on the cathode side. Electrochemical performance of full cells prepared by using a standard electrolyte (LP40) with different concentrations of FEC (0, 1 and 5 wt%) were compared and the surface of cycled positive electrodes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that addition of FEC is generally of limited use for this battery system. Addition of 5 wt% FEC results in relatively poor cycling performance, while the cells with 1 wt% FEC showed similar behavior compared to reference cells prepared without FEC. SEM and XPS analysis did not indicate the formation of thick surface layers on the LNMO cathode, however, an increase in layer thickness with increased FEC content in the electrolyte could be observed. XPS analysis on LTO electrodes showed that the electrode interactions between positive and negative electrodes occurred as Mn and Ni were detected on the surface of LTO already after 1 cycle. (C) The Author(s) 2017. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Alvi, Muhammad Rouf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Jahn, Burkhard O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Tibbelin, Julius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Baumgartner, Judith
    Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Technische Universität Graz, Stremayrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Gómez, Cesar Pay
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Ottosson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Highly Efficient and Convenient Acid Catalyzed Hypersilyl Protection of Alcohols and Thiols by Tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl-N,N-dimethylmethaneamide2012Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl-N,N-dimethylmethaneamide, herein named hypersilylamide, is a convenient and efficient source of the hypersilyl group in the first widely applicable acid catalyzed protocol for silyl group protection of primary, secondary, tertiary alkyl as well as aryl alcohols and thiols in high yields. The sole by-product is N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and a range of solvents can be used, including DMF. A high selectivity in the protection of diols can be achieved, also for diols with very small differences in the steric demands at the two hydroxyl groups. Moreover, in the protection of equivalent alcohol and thiol sites the protection of the alcohol is faster, allowing for selective protection in high yields. Quantum chemical calculations at the M062X hybrid meta density functional theory level give insights on the mechanism for the catalytic process. Finally, the hypersilyl group is easily removed from all protected alcohols and thiols examined herein by irradiation at 254 nm.

  • 15.
    Anaraki, Elham Halvani
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Esfahan 8415683111, Iran.
    Kermanpur, Ahmad
    Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Esfahan 8415683111, Iran.
    Mayer, Matthew T.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Young Investigator Grp Electrochem Convers CO2, Hahn Meitner Pl 1, D-14109 Berlin, Germany.
    Steier, Ludmilla
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Imperial Coll London, Dept Chem, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Ahmed, Taha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Turren-Cruz, Silver-Hamill
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Seo, Jiyoun
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Luo, Jingshan
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammad
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Tress, Wolfgang Richard
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Graetzel, Michael
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Photon & Interfaces, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Inst Chem Sci & Engn, Lab Photomol Sci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;MIT, Dept Mech Engn, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Low-Temperature Nb-Doped SnO2 Electron-Selective Contact Yields over 20% Efficiency in Planar Perovskite Solar Cells2018In: ACS Energy Letters, ISSN 2380-8195, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 773-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-temperature planar organic inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells have been at the center of attraction as power conversion efficiencies go beyond 20%. Here, we investigate Nb doping of SnO2 deposited by a low-cost, scalable chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. We study the effects of doping on compositional, structural, morphological, and device performance when these layers are employed as electron-selective layers (ESLs) in planar-structured PSCs. We use doping concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10 mol % Nb to Sn in solution. The ESLs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. ESLs with an optimum 5 mol % Nb doping yielded, on average, an improvement of all the device photovoltaic parameters with a champion power conversion efficiency of 20.5% (20.1% stabilized).

  • 16.
    Andersson, Anna M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Henningsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Electrochemically lithiated graphite characterised by photoelectron spectroscopy2003In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 119-121, p. 522-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to study the depth profile of the solid–electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on a graphite powder electrode in a Li-ion battery. The morphology of the SEI-layer, formed in a 1 M LiBF4 EC/DMC 2:1 solution, consists of a 900 Å porous layer of polymers (polyethylene oxide) and a 15–20 Å thin layer of Li2CO3 and LiBF4 reduction–decomposition products. Embedded LiF crystals as large as 0.2 μm were found in the polymer matrix. LiOH and Li2O are not major components on the surface but rather found as a consequence of sputter-related reactions. Monochromatised Al Kα XPS-analysis based on the calibration of Ar+ ion sputtering of model compounds combined with a depth profile analysis based on energy tuning of synchrotron XPS can describe the highly complex composition and morphology of the SEI-layer.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Synthesis of polycarbonate polymer electrolytes for lithium ion batteries and study of additives to raise the ionic conductivity2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer electrolyte films based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) mixed with LiTFSI salt in different compositions were synthesized and investigated as electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, where the ionic conductivity is the most interesting material property. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and DSC were used to measure the ionic conductivity and thermal properties, respectively. Additionally, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine ion coordination in the material. Additives of nanosized TiO2 and powders of superionically conducting Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 were investigated as enhancers of ionic conductivity, but no positive effect could be shown. The most conductive composition was found at a [Li+]:[carbonate] ratio of 1, corresponding to a salt concentration of 74 percent by weight, which showed an ionic conductivity of 2.0 × 10–6 S cm–1 at 25 °C and 2.2 × 10–5 S cm–1 at 60 °C, whereas for even larger salt concentrations, the mechanical durability of the polymeric material was dramatically reduced, preventing use as a solid electrolyte material. Macroscopic salt crystallization was also observed for these concentrations. Ion coordination to carbonyls on the polymer chain was examined for high salt content compositions with FTIR spectroscopy, where it was found to be relatively similar between the samples, possibly indicating saturation. Moveover, with FTIR, the ion-pairing was found to increase with salt concentration. The ionic conductivity was found to be markedly lower after 7 weeks of aging of the materials with highest salt concentrations.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Högström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Furlan, Andrej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Deposition and characterization of magnetron sputtered amorphous Cr-C films2012In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 86, no 9, p. 1408-1416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films in the Cr-C system with carbon content of 25-85 at.% have been deposited using non-reactive DC magnetron sputtering from elemental targets. Analyses with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm that the films are completely amorphous. Also, annealing experiment show that the films had not crystallized at 500 degrees C. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that the films consist of two phases, an amorphous CrCx phase and an amorphous carbon (a-C) phase. The presence of two amorphous phases is also supported by the electrochemical analysis, which shows that oxidation of both chromium and carbon contributes to the total current in the passive region. The relative amounts of these amorphous phases influence the film properties. Typically, lower carbon content with less a-C phase leads to harder films with higher Young's modulus and lower resistivity. The results also show that both films have lower currents in the passive region compared to the uncoated 316L steel substrate. Finally, our results were compared with literature data from both reactively and non-reactively sputtered chromium carbide films. The comparison reveals that non-reactive sputtering tend to favour the formation of amorphous films and also influence e.g. the sp(2)/sp(3) ratio of the a-C phase. 

  • 19.
    Andersson, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lewin, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Magnetron sputtering of Zr-Si-C thin films2012In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 520, no 20, p. 6375-6381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phase composition and chemical bonding of Zr-C and Zr-Si-C films deposited by magnetron sputtering has been studied. The results show that the binary Zr-C films at higher carbon contents form nanocrystallites of ZrC in an amorphous carbon matrix. The addition of Si induces a complete amorphization of the films above a critical concentration of about 15 at.%. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm that the amorphous films contain no nanocrystallites and therefore can be described as truly amorphous carbides. The amorphous films are thermally stable but start to crystallize above 500 degrees C. Analysis of the chemical bonding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that the amorphous films exhibit a mixture of different chemical bonds such as Zr-C, Zr-Si and Si-C and that the electrical and mechanical properties are dependent on the distribution of these bonds. For higher carbon contents, strong Si-C bonds are formed in the amorphous Zr-Si-C films making them harder than the corresponding binary Zr-C films.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Rassmus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Silicon-based graphite electrodes for Li-ion batteries2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The cycling performance of silicon containing graphite electrodes as the anode in lithium-ion batteries has been investigated. Different electrode compositions of silicon, graphite, carbon black, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Na), styrene–butadiene rubber (SBR) and using water as the solvent have been prepared and evaluated electrochemically by constant-current-constant-voltage (CCCV) cycling. To understand the impact on the cycling performance of the electrodes, the process parameters in the coating process have been evaluated by rheological measurements of the electrode slurries.

    The highest and most stable capacity was found for the electrode containing 5 wt% silicon (vs. graphite), 3 wt% binder, equal amount of the binders CMC-Na and SBR and 70 wt% solvent in the initial electrode slurry. It showed a stable capacity retention of 360 mAh/g after 315 cycles, before it faded. It was found that the CMC-Na and the solvent have a strong impact on the properties of the electrode slurry and the processing parameters. CMC-Na, the solvent and SBR were also found to be important for the adhesion of the electrode coating on the current collector. The worst cycling performance was obtained for electrodes containing 15 wt% silicon, a solvent amount below 65 wt% and a binder ratio of CMC-Na:SBR below 1:1. Different rheological behaviour for different silicon particles was found to depend on the surface area of the particles.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-01 08:00
  • 21.
    Arkhypchuk, Anna I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Orthaber, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Mihali, Viorica Alina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Ehlers, Andreas
    Lammertsma, Koop
    Ott, Sascha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Oxaphospholes and Bisphospholes from Phosphinophosphonates and alpha,beta-Unsaturated Ketones2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 41, p. 13692-13704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reaction of a {W(CO)(5)}-stabilized phosphinophosphonate 1, (CO)(5)WPH(Ph)P(O)(OEt)(2), with ethynyl- (2a-f) and diethynylketones (7-11, 18, and 19) in the presence of lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) is examined. Lithiated 1 undergoes nucleophilic attack in the Michael position of the acetylenic ketones, as long as this position is not sterically encumbered by bulky (iPr)(3)Si substituents. Reaction of all other monoacetylenic ketones with lithiated 1 results in the formation of 2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphospholes 3 and 4. When diacetylenic ketones are employed in the reaction, two very different product types can be isolated. If at least one (Me)(3)Si or (Et)(3)Si acetylene terminus is present, as in 7, 8, and 19, an anionic oxaphosphole intermediate can react further with a second equivalent of ketone to give cumulene-decorated oxaphospholes 14, 15, 24, and 25. Diacetylenic ketones 10 and 11, with two aromatic acetylene substituents, react with lithitated 1 to form exclusively ethenyl-bridged bisphospholes 16 and 17. Mechanisms that rationalize the formation of all heterocycles are presented and are supported by DFT calculations. Computational studies suggest that thermodynamic, as well as kinetic, considerations dictate the observed reactivity. The calculated reaction pathways reveal a number of almost isoenergetic intermediates that follow after ring opening of the initially formed oxadiphosphetane. Bisphosphole formation through a carbene intermediate G is greatly favored in the presence of phenyl substituents, whereas the formation of cumulene-decorated oxaphospholes is more exothermic for the trimethylsilyl-containing substrates. The pathway to the latter compounds contains a 1,3-shift of the group that stems from the acetylene terminus of the ketone substrates. For silyl substituents, the 1,3-shift proceeds along a smooth potential energy surface through a transition state that is characterized by a pentacoordinated silicon center. In contrast, a high-lying transition state TS(E-F)(R=Ph) of 37kcalmol(-1) is found when the substituent is a phenyl group, thus explaining the experimental observation that aryl-terminated diethynylketones 10 and 11 exclusively form bisphospholes 16 and 17.

  • 22.
    Asfaw, Habtom D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Maibach, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Ångström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Sahlberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Boosting the thermal stability of emulsion–templated polymers via sulfonation: an efficient synthetic route to hierarchically porous carbon foams2016In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 784-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchically porous carbon foams with specific surface areas exceeding 600 m2 g−1 can be derived from polystyrene foams that are synthesized via water-in-oil emulsion templating. However, most styrene-based polymers lack strong crosslinks and are degraded to volatile products when heated above 400 oC. A common strategy employed to avert depolymerization is to introduce potential crosslinking sites such as sulfonic acids by sulfonating the polymers. This article unravels the thermal and chemical processes leading up to the conversion of sulfonated high internal phase emulsion polystyrenes (polyHIPEs) to sulfur containing carbon foams. During pyrolysis, the sulfonic acid groups (-SO3H) are transformed to sulfone (-C-SO2-C-) and then to thioether (-C−S-C-) crosslinks. These chemical transformations have been monitored using spectroscopic techniques: in situ IR, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Based on thermal analyses, the formation of thioether links is associated with increased thermal stability and thus a substantial decrease in volatilization of the polymers.

  • 23.
    Asfaw, Habtom Desta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Multifunctional Carbon Foams by Emulsion Templating: Synthesis, Microstructure, and 3D Li-ion Microbatteries2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon foams are among the existing electrode designs proposed for use in 3D Li-ion microbatteries. For such electrodes to find applications in practical microbatteries, however, their void sizes, specific surface areas and pore volumes need be optimized. This thesis concerns the synthesis of highly porous carbon foams and their multifunctional applications in 3D microbatteries. The carbon foams are derived from polymers that are obtained by polymerizing high internal phase water-in-oil emulsions (HIPEs).

    In general, the carbonization of the sulfonated polymers yielded hierarchically porous structures with void sizes ranging from 2 to 35 µm and a BET specific surface area as high as 630 m2 g-1. Thermogravimetric and spectroscopic evidence indicated that the sulfonic acid groups, introduced during sulfonation, transformed above 250 oC to thioether (-C-S-) crosslinks which were responsible for the thermal stability and charring tendency of the polymer precursors. Depending on the preparation of the HIPEs, the specific surface areas and void-size distributions were observed to vary considerably. In addition, the pyrolysis temperature could also affect the microstructures, the degree of graphitization, and the surface chemistry of the carbon foams.

    Various potential applications were explored for the bespoke carbon foams. First, their use as freestanding active materials in 3D microbatteries was studied. The carbon foams obtained at 700 to 1500 oC suffered from significant irreversible capacity loss during the initial discharge. In an effort to alleviate this drawback, the pyrolysis temperature was raised to 2200 oC. The resulting carbon foams were observed to deliver high, stable areal capacities over several cycles. Secondly, the possibility of using these structures as 3D current collectors for various active materials was investigated in-depth. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, positive active materials like polyaniline and LiFePO4 were deposited on the 3D architectures by means of electrodeposition and sol-gel approach, respectively. In both cases, the composite electrodes exhibited reasonably high cyclability and rate performance at different current densities. The syntheses of niobium and molybdenum oxides and their potential application as electrodes in microbatteries were also studied. In such applications, the carbon foams served dual purposes as 3D scaffolds and as reducing reactants in the carbothermal reduction process. Finally, a facile method of coating carbon substrates with oxide nanosheets was developed. The approach involved the exfoliation of crystalline VO2 to prepare dispersions of hydrated V2O5, which were subsequently cast onto CNT paper to form oxide films of different thicknesses.

    List of papers
    1. Boosting the thermal stability of emulsion–templated polymers via sulfonation: an efficient synthetic route to hierarchically porous carbon foams
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boosting the thermal stability of emulsion–templated polymers via sulfonation: an efficient synthetic route to hierarchically porous carbon foams
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 784-792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchically porous carbon foams with specific surface areas exceeding 600 m2 g−1 can be derived from polystyrene foams that are synthesized via water-in-oil emulsion templating. However, most styrene-based polymers lack strong crosslinks and are degraded to volatile products when heated above 400 oC. A common strategy employed to avert depolymerization is to introduce potential crosslinking sites such as sulfonic acids by sulfonating the polymers. This article unravels the thermal and chemical processes leading up to the conversion of sulfonated high internal phase emulsion polystyrenes (polyHIPEs) to sulfur containing carbon foams. During pyrolysis, the sulfonic acid groups (-SO3H) are transformed to sulfone (-C-SO2-C-) and then to thioether (-C−S-C-) crosslinks. These chemical transformations have been monitored using spectroscopic techniques: in situ IR, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Based on thermal analyses, the formation of thioether links is associated with increased thermal stability and thus a substantial decrease in volatilization of the polymers.

    Keywords
    Emulsion-templated polymer, sulfonation, pyrolysis, spectroscopy, carbon foam
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283174 (URN)10.1002/slct.201600139 (DOI)000395395900026 ()
    Projects
    3D microbatteries
    Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Emulsion-templated bicontinuous carbon network electrodes for use in 3D microstructured batteries
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emulsion-templated bicontinuous carbon network electrodes for use in 3D microstructured batteries
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 1, no 44, p. 13750-13758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    High surface area carbon foams were prepared and characterized for use in 3D structured batteries. Twopotential applications exist for these foams: firstly as an anode and secondly as a current collector supportfor electrode materials. The preparation of the carbon foams by pyrolysis of a high internal phase emulsionpolymer (polyHIPE) resulted in structures with cage sizes of 25 mm and a surface area enhancement pergeometric area of approximately 90 times, close to the optimal configuration for a 3D microstructuredbattery support. The structure was probed using XPS, SEM, BET, XRD and Raman techniques; revealingthat the foams were composed of a disordered carbon with a pore size in the <100 nm range resultingin a BET measured surface area of 433 m2 g-1. A reversible capacity exceeding 3.5 mA h cm2 at acurrent density of 0.37 mA cm-2 was achieved. SEM images of the foams after 50 cycles showed thatthe structure suffered no degradation. Furthermore, the foams were tested as a current collector bydepositing a layer of polyaniline cathode over their surface. High footprint area capacities of500 mA h cm-2 were seen in the voltage range 3.8 to 2.5 V vs. Li and a reasonable rate performancewas observed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    United Kingdom: , 2013
    Keywords
    Carbon foam, High internal phase emulsion polymer, microbattery, 3D microbattery, Lithium ion
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences Materials Chemistry
    Research subject
    Materials Science; Chemistry; Materials Science; Physical Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210659 (URN)10.1039/C3TA12680C (DOI)000326463400009 ()
    Projects
    STEM-VR-Microbattery
    Funder
    Swedish Energy AgencySwedish Research Council
    Available from: 2013-11-12 Created: 2013-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Emulsion-templated graphitic carbon foams with optimum porosity for 3D Li-ion microbatteries
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emulsion-templated graphitic carbon foams with optimum porosity for 3D Li-ion microbatteries
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    carbon, foam, graphitic, anode, three-dimensional, microbattery, lithium
    National Category
    Polymer Technologies Chemical Process Engineering Materials Chemistry Polymer Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry Physical Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312893 (URN)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012–4681StandUp
    Available from: 2017-01-14 Created: 2017-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    4. Nanosized LiFePO4-decorated emulsion-templated carbon foam for 3D micro batteries: a study of structure and electrochemical performance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanosized LiFePO4-decorated emulsion-templated carbon foam for 3D micro batteries: a study of structure and electrochemical performance
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 6, no 15, p. 8804-8813Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we report a novel 3D composite cathode fabricated from LiFePO4 nanoparticles deposited conformally on emulsion-templated carbon foam by a sol–gel method. The carbon foam is synthesized via a facile and scalable method which involves the carbonization of a high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) polymer template. Various techniques (XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical methods) are used to fully characterize the porous electrode and confirm the distribution and morphology of the cathode active material. The major benefits of the carbon foam used in our work are closely connected with its high surface area and the plenty of space suitable for sequential coating with battery components. After coating with a cathode material (LiFePO4nanoparticles), the 3D electrode presents a hierarchically structured electrode in which a porous layer of the cathode material is deposited on the rigid and bicontinuous carbon foam. The composite electrodes exhibit impressive cyclability and rate performance at different current densities affirming their importance as viable power sources in miniature devices. Footprint area capacities of 1.72 mA h cm−2 at 0.1 mA cm−2 (lowest rate) and 1.1 mA h cm−2 at 6 mA cm−2(highest rate) are obtained when the cells are cycled in the range 2.8 to 4.0 V vs. lithium.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Royal Society of Chemistry: , 2014
    National Category
    Physical Chemistry Polymer Chemistry Materials Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228630 (URN)10.1039/C4NR01682C (DOI)000339861500051 ()
    Projects
    STEM-VR-Microbattery
    Available from: 2014-07-18 Created: 2014-07-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Surface-oxidized NbO2 nanoparticles for high performance lithium microbatteries
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface-oxidized NbO2 nanoparticles for high performance lithium microbatteries
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    niobium, oxide, nanoparticle, power, energy, carbon, foam, lithium, microbattery
    National Category
    Natural Sciences Inorganic Chemistry Materials Chemistry Physical Chemistry Condensed Matter Physics Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312894 (URN)
    Projects
    3D Lithium-ion microbattery
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012–4681StandUp
    Available from: 2017-01-14 Created: 2017-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    6. A one-step water based strategy for synthesizing hydrated vanadium pentoxide nanosheets from VO2(B) as free-standing electrodes for lithium battery applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A one-step water based strategy for synthesizing hydrated vanadium pentoxide nanosheets from VO2(B) as free-standing electrodes for lithium battery applications
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 4, no 46, p. 17988-18001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) materials from transition metal oxides, chalcogenides, and carbides mostly involve multiple exfoliation steps in which hazardous solvents and reagents are used. In this study, hydrated vanadium pentoxide (V2O5[middle dot]nH2O) nanosheets with a thickness of a few nanometers were prepared via a facile environmentally friendly water based exfoliation technique. The exfoliation process involved refluxing the precursor, vanadium dioxide (VO2(B)), in water for a few days at 60 [degree]C. The proposed exfoliation mechanism is based on the intercalation/insertion of water molecules into the VO2(B) crystals and the subsequent cleavage of the covalent bonds holding the layers of VO2(B) together. The thermal and chemical analyses showed that the approximate chemical composition of the nanosheets is H0.4V2O5[middle dot]0.55H2O, and the percentage of VV content to that of VIV in the nanosheets is about 80(3)% to 20(3)%. The exfoliated aqueous suspension of the V2O5[middle dot]0.55H2O nanosheets was successfully deposited onto multi-walled carbon nanotube (MW-CNT) paper to form free-standing electrodes with a thickness of the V2O5[middle dot]0.55H2O layer ranging between 45 and 4 [small mu ]m. A series of electrochemical tests were conducted on the electrodes to determine the cyclability and rate capability of lithium insertion into V2O5[middle dot]0.55H2O nanosheets. The electrodes with the thinnest active material coating ([similar]4 [small mu ]m) delivered gravimetric capacities of up to 480 and 280 mA h g-1 when cycled at current densities of 10 and 200 mA g-1, respectively.

    Keywords
    2D materials, vanadium oxides, free-standing, battery, lithium
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311357 (URN)10.1039/C6TA06571F (DOI)000388505400010 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-4681Swedish Energy AgencyBerzelii Centre EXSELENTStandUp
    Available from: 2016-12-24 Created: 2016-12-24 Last updated: 2017-12-30
  • 24.
    Asfaw, Habtom Desta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.