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  • 1.
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Species Limits and Systematics in Some Passerine Birds2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I use morphological, vocal, molecular, behavioural, ecological and distributional data to re-evaluate the systematics of three passerine bird groups, the Mirafraassamica complex (bush-larks), the genus Seicercus ("spectacled-warblers"; with emphasis on the the S. burkii complex) and the genus Motacilla (wagtails). Two new species are described: Seicercus soror and Motacilla samveasnae. I propose that the polytypic species M. assamica should be treated as four separate species: M. assamica, M. affinis, M. microptera and M. marionae (it is also remarked that the proper name of the latter is M. erythrocephala). That is primarily supported by vocalisations and mitochondrial DNA. The latter data set also suggests that M. assamica sensu lato is paraphyletic, since M. erythroptera, which is always treated as a separate species, is nested within the M. assamica complex. I propose that the polytypic species S. burkii comprises six sibling species. Some of these are found to breed sympatrically, although mainly or entirely segregated altitudinally. Mitochondrial DNA suggests that the S. burkii complex is non-monophyletic, and also that the divergence of the different taxa is much older than indicated by morphological and vocal data. According to the molecular phylogeny, both the genera Seicercus and its assumed sister genus Phylloscopus are paraphyletic. That is corroborated by independent data. The phylogenetic study of the genus Motacilla reveals incongruence between mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA and non-molecular data. I conclude that the nuclear gene tree reflects the organismal phylogeny more faithfully than the mitochondrial gene tree. The latter is likely to have been affected by introgressive hybridisation, possibly also stochastic lineage sorting. The most remarkable result that is strongly supported by both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA is that M. flava is non-monophyletic.

  • 2. Becker, N D
    et al.
    Petric, MZgomba, CBoase, CDahl, ChristineUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.Lane, JKaiser, A
    Mosquitoes and their Control2003Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3. Becker, N D
    et al.
    Petric, MZgomba, CBoase, CMadoon, MDahl, ChristineUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.Kaiser, A
    Mosquitoes and their control2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4. Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Nylander, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.
    Ericson, Per
    Phylogeneticrelationships of typical Antbirds (Thamnophilidae) and test of incongruence2004In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, no 4, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The typical antbirds (Thamnophilidae) form a monophyletic and diverse family of suboscine passerines that inhabit neotropical forests. However, the phylogenetic relationships within this assemblage are poorly understood. Herein, we present a hypothesis of the generic relationships of this group based on Bayesian inference analyses of two nuclear introns and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The level of phylogenetic congruence between the individual genes has been investigated utilizing Bayes factors. We also explore how changes in the substitution models affected the observed incongruence between partitions of our data set.

    Results

    The phylogenetic analysis supports both novel relationships, as well as traditional groupings. Among the more interesting novel relationship suggested is that the Terenura antwrens, the wing-banded antbird (Myrmornis torquata), the spot-winged antshrike (Pygiptila stellaris) and the russet antshrike (Thamnistes anabatinus) are sisters to all other typical antbirds. The remaining genera fall into two major clades. The first includes antshrikes, antvireos and the Herpsilochmus antwrens, while the second clade consists of most antwren genera, the Myrmeciza antbirds, the "professional" ant-following antbirds, and allied species. Our results also support previously suggested polyphyly of Myrmotherula antwrens and Myrmeciza antbirds. The tests of phylogenetic incongruence, using Bayes factors, clearly suggests that allowing the gene partitions to have separate topology parameters clearly increased the model likelihood. However, changing a component of the nucleotide substitution model had much higher impact on the model likelihood.

    Conclusions

    The phylogenetic results are in broad agreement with traditional classification of the typical antbirds, but some relationships are unexpected based on external morphology. In these cases their true affinities may have been obscured by convergent evolution and morphological adaptations to new habitats or food sources, and genera like Myrmeciza antbirds and the Myrmotherula antwrens obviously need taxonomic revisions. Although, Bayes factors seem promising for evaluating the relative contribution of components to an evolutionary model, the results suggests that even if strong evidence for a model allowing separate topology parameters is found, this might not mean strong evidence for separate gene phylogenies, as long as vital components of the substitution model are still missing.

  • 5.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.
    Bustamante, Dulce Maria
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Enriquez, Eunice
    Rosales, Regina
    Habitats, dispersion and invasion of sylvatic Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera:Reduviidae:Triatominae) in Peten, Guatemala2003In: Journal of medical entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, E-ISSN 1938-2928, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersion and invasion capacity of sylvatic populations of Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) were investigated during 14 mo by means of experimental chicken coops installed in a nature reserve within the Maya Biosphere, Petén, Guatemala. In addition, palm trees, underground archeological holes (chultunes) and piles of limestones within the forest were inspected as potential sylvatic habitats of T. dimidiata. From the three types of sylvatic habitats we inspected, all served as shelter and breeding sites for T dimidiata. The natural infection of these bugs (n = 72) with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas) was high (25%) and represent a risk for humans who colonize the forest. T. dimidiata quickly invaded the experimental chicken coops installed in the primary forest, albeit at very low densities. However, only one adult bug was encountered in the chicken coops installed in a secondary forest. Dispersal of adult T. dimidiata was most apparent at the end of the dry season. Overall, our results indicate a potential risk for invasion by sylvatic T. dimidiata of domestic environments in this area, with a risk of T. cruzi transmission to humans. We suggest that a system of community-based surveillance should be developed to detect new infestations and organize prompt treatment of any new cases of acute Chagas disease that may result.

  • 6.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Bustamante, Dulce Maria
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Rosales, Regina
    Mejia, Mildred
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    Geographic distribution and morphometric differentiation of Triatoma nitida Usinger 1939 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) in Guatemala2003In: Memorias Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Marroquin, Ricardo
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Rosales, Regina
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Colonization and Mobility of Triatoma ryckmani (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in artificial environments in a semiarid region of a Chagas disease endemic area in GuatemalaIn: Acta TropicaArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Mejia, Mildred
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Rosales, Regina
    Horio, Masahiro
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    Comparison of indor searches with whole house demolition collections of the vectors of Chagas disease and their indoor distribution1998In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 195-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Mejia, Mildred
    Rosales, Regina
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    Epidemiology of Chagas disease in Guatemala: Infection rate of Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma nitida and Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) with Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae)2003In: Memorias Instituto Oswaldo Cruz., Vol. 98, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Mejia, Mildred
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    Wall plastering and paints as methods to control vectors of Chagas disease in Guatemala1998In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Monroy, Maria Carlota
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Ecology and Control of Triatomine (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Vectors of Chagas Disease in Guatemala, Central America2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses several factors affecting the control of triatomines in Guatemala. There are three synantropic triatomines in Guatemala, i.e., Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata and T. nitida. Their distibution is mainly at an altitude between 800 and 1500 m a.s.l. R. prolixus and T. nitida have localized but scaterred distibution while T. dimidiata is present in 21 of the 22 departments in the country. Several investigations have shown that R. prolixus could be relatively easily eradicated while T. dimidiata may be more difficult to control, since it is present in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments showing high diversity and a variety of epidemiological characteristics. Based on the incidence of Trypanosma cruzi infection in humans in the distributional areas of the triatomines, R. prolixus appear to be a more competent vector than T. dimidiata. This is despite the fact that these vectors have similar infection rates. Inside houses, R. prolixus and T. dimidiata and in artificial environments, T. ryckmani and T. dimidiata, preferred the northern side of the walls. Therefore, selective application of insecticides should focus on walls and furniture located in the northern part of the house. House improvements reduced the infestation of triatomines, and could be used as a complement to insecticidal spraying. Although T. dimidiata is not an efficient vector its wide distribution, versatility in occupying different habitats and capacity to disperse render this species difficult to control in Central America. Thus, only few months after insecticidal spraying T. dimidiata had reinfested the domestic environments. Morphometic methodology and genetic markers have been developed to differentiate within-species populations of T. dimidiata and T. nitida. Studies on the migration patterns of sylvatic T. dimidiata and T. ryckmani have been performed in order to clarify the colonization patterns. The adults migrate, in particular, in the dry part of the year. This finding may be of help in attempts to control T. dimidiata.

    List of papers
    1. Comparison of indor searches with whole house demolition collections of the vectors of Chagas disease and their indoor distribution
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of indor searches with whole house demolition collections of the vectors of Chagas disease and their indoor distribution
    Show others...
    1998 In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 195-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90905 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Wall plastering and paints as methods to control vectors of Chagas disease in Guatemala
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wall plastering and paints as methods to control vectors of Chagas disease in Guatemala
    1998 In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90906 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    3. The Geographical distribution of vectors of Chagas disease and populations at risk of infection in Guatemala
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Geographical distribution of vectors of Chagas disease and populations at risk of infection in Guatemala
    Show others...
    1999 In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90907 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    4. Incidence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in two Guatemalan communities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in two Guatemalan communities
    Show others...
    2002 In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0035-9203, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90908 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    5. Geographic distribution and morphometric differentiation of Triatoma nitida Usinger 1939 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) in Guatemala
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geographic distribution and morphometric differentiation of Triatoma nitida Usinger 1939 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) in Guatemala
    Show others...
    2003 In: Memorias Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90909 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    6. Epidemiology of Chagas disease in Guatemala: Infection rate of Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma nitida and Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) with Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of Chagas disease in Guatemala: Infection rate of Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma nitida and Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) with Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae)
    Show others...
    2003 In: Memorias Instituto Oswaldo Cruz., Vol. 98, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90910 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
    7. Habitats, dispersion and invasion of sylvatic Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera:Reduviidae:Triatominae) in Peten, Guatemala
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Habitats, dispersion and invasion of sylvatic Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera:Reduviidae:Triatominae) in Peten, Guatemala
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Journal of medical entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, E-ISSN 1938-2928, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersion and invasion capacity of sylvatic populations of Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) were investigated during 14 mo by means of experimental chicken coops installed in a nature reserve within the Maya Biosphere, Petén, Guatemala. In addition, palm trees, underground archeological holes (chultunes) and piles of limestones within the forest were inspected as potential sylvatic habitats of T. dimidiata. From the three types of sylvatic habitats we inspected, all served as shelter and breeding sites for T dimidiata. The natural infection of these bugs (n = 72) with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas) was high (25%) and represent a risk for humans who colonize the forest. T. dimidiata quickly invaded the experimental chicken coops installed in the primary forest, albeit at very low densities. However, only one adult bug was encountered in the chicken coops installed in a secondary forest. Dispersal of adult T. dimidiata was most apparent at the end of the dry season. Overall, our results indicate a potential risk for invasion by sylvatic T. dimidiata of domestic environments in this area, with a risk of T. cruzi transmission to humans. We suggest that a system of community-based surveillance should be developed to detect new infestations and organize prompt treatment of any new cases of acute Chagas disease that may result.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90911 (URN)10.1603/0022-2585-40.6.800 (DOI)14765656 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    8. Colonization and Mobility of Triatoma ryckmani (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in artificial environments in a semiarid region of a Chagas disease endemic area in Guatemala
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colonization and Mobility of Triatoma ryckmani (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in artificial environments in a semiarid region of a Chagas disease endemic area in Guatemala
    Show others...
    In: Acta TropicaArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90912 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-10-16 Created: 2003-10-16Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Paz-Bailez, Gabriela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Monroy, Carlota
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Rosales, Regina
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    Davies, Clive
    Lines, Jo
    Incidence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in two Guatemalan communities2002In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0035-9203, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Seyoum, A
    et al.
    Pålsson, K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Systematic Zoology.
    Kung'a, S
    Kabiru, E W
    Lwande, W
    Killeen, G F
    Hassanali, A
    Knols, B G J
    Traditional use of mosquito-repellent plants in western Kenya and their evaluation in semi-field experimental huts against Anopheles gambiae: ethnobotanical studies and application by thermal expulsion and direct burning2002In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0035-9203, E-ISSN 1878-3503, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 225-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnobotanical survey in 2 communities in western Kenya revealed that the most commonly known repellent plants were Ocimum americanum L. (64.1%), Lantana camara L. (17.9%), Tagetes minuta L. (11.3%) and Azadirachta indica A. Juss (8.7%) on Rusinga Island, and Hyptis suaveolens Poit. (49.2%), L. camara (30.9%) and O. basilicum L. (30.4%) in Rambira. Direct burning of plants is the most common method of application for O. americanum (68.8%), L. camara (100%) and O. basilicum (58.8%). Placing branches or whole plants inside houses is most common for H. suaveolens (33.3 and 57.8% for the respective locations), A. indica (66.7 and 100%), and T. minuta (54.8 and 56.0%). The repellency of plants suggested by the ethnobotanical survey and other empirical information was evaluated against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s. Giles in experimental huts within a screenwalled greenhouse. Thermal expulsion and direct burning were tested as alternative application methods for the selected plants O. americanum, O. kilimandscharicum Guerke, O. suave Willd., L. camara, A. indica, H. suaveolens, Lippia uckambensis Spreng and Corymbia citriodora Hook. When thermally expelled, only H. suaveolens failed to repel mosquitoes, whereas the leaves of C. citriodora (74.5%, P < 0.0001), leaves and seeds of O. suave (53.1%, P < 0.0001) and O. kilimandscharicum (52.0%, P < 0.0001) were the most effective. Leaves of C. citriodora also exhibited the highest repellency (51.3%, P < 0.0001) by direct burning, followed by leaves of L. uckambensis (33.4%, P = 0.0004) and leaves and seeds of O. suave (28.0%, P = 0.0255). The combination of O. kilimandscharicum with L. uckambensis repelled 54.8% of mosquitoes (P < 0.0001) by thermal expulsion. No combination of plants increased repellency by either method. The semi-field system described appears a promising alternative to full-field trials for screening large numbers of candidate repellents without risk of malaria exposure.

  • 14.
    Tabaru, Yuichiro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Systematic Zoology.
    Monroy, Carlota
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Mejia, Mildred
    Rosales, Regina
    The Geographical distribution of vectors of Chagas disease and populations at risk of infection in Guatemala1999In: Medical Entomology and Zoology, ISSN 0424-7086, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 14 of 14
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