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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Lack of mitochondrial DNA structure between chromosome races of the common shrew, Sorex araneus, in Sweden. Implications for chromosomal evolution.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Postglacial Population History of the Common Shrew (Sorex araneus) in Fennoscandia: Molekylära studier av återkolonisation, könsbundet genflöde och kromosomrasbildning.2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The common shrew, Sorex araneus, has one of the most variable karyotypes among mammals, displaying numerous chromosomes races throughout its distribution, which can be categorized into different karyotypic groups. The objective of this thesis was to examine the postglacial population history of Fennoscandian common shrews using autosomal microsatellites, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and a Y chromosome specific microsatellite (L8Y).

    Autosomal microsatellites and mtDNA revealed weak genetic structure over a hybrid zone between the karyotypically divergent Northern and Western karyotypic groups. However, the genetic structure displayed by the Y chromosome microsatellite was orders of magnitude higher. Hence, considerable chromosomal differences between the groups do not prevent female gene flow, while male gene flow is reduced (cf. Haldane's rule). Further, the results suggest that the Haldane effect may be caused by the chromosomal differences between the karyotypic groups.

    No mtDNA differentiation was observed either between chromosome races or between the Northern and Western karyotypic groups in Fennoscandia. The combined pattern of karyotypic and mtDNA variation of Fennoscandian common shrews, suggest bi-directional postglacial recolonisation from a single refugium in Europe. The variation of the Y-linked microsatellite supported this conclusion. In contrast, significant mtDNA structure, discordant with the karyotypic variation, revealed that common shrews in southern Finland belong to a different lineage than remaining Fennoscandian regions, implying postglacial recolonisation from a different source.

    MtDNA variation of the chromosome races in Sweden supports the hypothesis that three races of the Western karyotypic group have been formed through whole arm reciprocal translocations (WARTs), as suggested by their mutual karyotypic variation. The variation of the molecular markers supports the theory of rapid karyotypic evolution in the common shrew.

    List of papers
    1. No apparent reduction of gene flow in a hybrid zone between the West and North European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>No apparent reduction of gene flow in a hybrid zone between the West and North European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus.
    2004 In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1205-1215.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91849 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Lack of mitochondrial DNA structure between chromosome races of the common shrew, Sorex araneus, in Sweden. Implications for chromosomal evolution.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of mitochondrial DNA structure between chromosome races of the common shrew, Sorex araneus, in Sweden. Implications for chromosomal evolution.
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91850 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Fennoscandian phylogeography of the common shrew Sorex araneus. Postglacial recolonisation-combining information from chromosomal variation with mitochondrial DNA data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fennoscandian phylogeography of the common shrew Sorex araneus. Postglacial recolonisation-combining information from chromosomal variation with mitochondrial DNA data
    2011 (English)In: Acta Theriologica, ISSN 0001-7051, E-ISSN 2190-3743, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We examine mtDNA variation of the common shrew in Fennoscandia to explore the incongruence found in previous studies using chromosomal and mitochondrial markers, aiming to reveal post-glacial recolonisation patterns. A total of 241 common shrews from 51 localities in Fennoscandia were analysed. This area includes a secondary contact zone between two groups (the Northern group and the Western group) showing distinct karyotypes. All individuals were sequenced for 447 bp of the mitochondrial control region. No significant differentiation in the mtDNA variation was observed between the two major chromosomal groups in Fennoscandia. The star-like shape of the sequence network for the entire study area shows the most common haplotype A as ancestral in all regions but one, in situ formation of most haplotypes and population expansion. The only significant mtDNA structure observed occurs between south Finland and the rest of Fennoscandia. We propose that the Northern and Western group shared a common refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum but recolonised Fennoscandia via two routes. Karyotypic differences between south and north Finland has led researchers to suggest that both regions originate from the same ancestral population east of Finland. The observed divergence of mtDNA variation between these two regions supports this hypothesis.

    Keywords
    Control region, Common shrew, Glacial refugia, Colonization history, Chromosome race
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91851 (URN)10.1007/s13364-010-0022-9 (DOI)000290689600001 ()
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Reduced levels of male gene flow in a hybrid zone between the North and West European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus. Chromosomally based explanation for Haldane's rule?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced levels of male gene flow in a hybrid zone between the North and West European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus. Chromosomally based explanation for Haldane's rule?
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91852 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Y-chromosome microsatellite variation among common shrews (Sorex araneus) in northern Europe.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Y-chromosome microsatellite variation among common shrews (Sorex araneus) in northern Europe.
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91853 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-13 Created: 2004-05-13 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Alström-Rapaport, Cecilia
    Tegelström, Håkan
    Reduced levels of male gene flow in a hybrid zone between the North and West European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus. Chromosomally based explanation for Haldane's rule?Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Narain, Yolanda
    Tegelström, Håkan
    Fredga, Karl
    No apparent reduction of gene flow in a hybrid zone between the West and North European karyotypic groups of the common shrew, Sorex araneus.2004In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1205-1215.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Utter, Marianne
    Alström-Rapaport, Cecilia
    Tegelström, Håkan
    Y-chromosome microsatellite variation among common shrews (Sorex araneus) in northern Europe.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Goropashnaya, Anna V
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Fedorov, Vadim B
    Pamilo, Pekka
    Recent speciation in the Formica rufa group ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae): inference from mitochondrial DNA phylogeny2004In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 198-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines phylogenetic relationships among six species of the Formica rufa group ants (F. polyctena, F. rufa, F. lugubris, F. paralugubris, F. aquilonia, and F. pratensis). The phylogeny based on a 2051bp fragment of mtDNA including cyt b, tRNASer, and ND1 genes supports the division of the group into three major clusters: one with the species F. polyctena and F. rufa, one with F. aquilonia, F. lugubris, and F. paralugubris, and the third one with F. pratensis. The interspecific divergence estimates (mean 0.98 +/- 0.15% for the main phylogenetic groups) imply that radiation took place during the Pleistocene. Comparison of the divergence estimates among the F. rufa group species with divergence estimates among other closely related species of insects suggests that speciation in the group was relatively fast, and the mitochondrial lineages of F. polyctena and F. rufa have not fully separated. The haplotype tree shows also signs of transfer of mtDNA between species through hybridisation. The distribution of polygyny (multiple queens per nest) along the branches of the tree indicates that the social type characterised by highly polygynous societies and large colonial networks, has originated at least three times. The species F. aquilonia and F. paralugubris that build such large supercolonies, cluster tightly together with very little nucleotide variation, suggesting that this type of social organisation could be a factor promoting speciation in the ants.

  • 7.
    Goropashnaya, Anna V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Fedorov, Vadim B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Conservation Biology and Genetics.
    Seifert, Bernhard
    Pamilo, Pekka
    Phylogeography and population structure in the ant Formica exsecta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) across Eurasia as reflected by mitochondrial DNA variation and microsatellites2007In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 462-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogeography and population structure of the ant Formica exsecta was studied across Eurasia by using mtDNA sequences and microsatellite genotypes. The phylogeny based on 1.5 kb mtDNA fragment including the cytochrome b and part of the ND6 gene showed significant division (1.63% of nucleotide divergence) between a haplotype from Tibet and all other haplotypes. Similar to findings in diverse array of species associated with forest in Eurasia, the mtDNA phylogeny revealed no evidence for vicariant events due to separation in different forest refugia over glacial periods. The haplotype network includes several small clades (with 2-4 haplotypes in each) with geographically limited distribution, but one geographical region may have received haplotypes from two or more of such clades. This pattern could indicate mixing of different gene pools during postglacial colonization of Europe from different forest refugia or from an ancestral source with some spatial genetic differentiation. The genealogy and the haplotype frequencies suggest postglacial colonization of Siberia from a single refugial source of limited size. Maternal and biparental DNA markers indicated a moderate but significant level of population differentiation (mtDNA Phi(ST) = 0.42, microsatellite F-ST = 0.13) across Eurasia. However, no correlation between genetic differentiation estimated for mtDNA and microsatellites was found among the populations. Considerable reduction in microsatellite genetic diversity was found in the small population of F. exsecta in England, giving some basis to classify this population as near threatened.

1 - 7 of 7
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