uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 194
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abyaneh, Morteza Y
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Electrocrystallization: Modelling and Its Applications2014In: Development in Electrochemistry: Science Inspired by Martin Fleischmann / [ed] Derek Pletcher, Zhong-Qun Tian and David E. Williams, John Wiley & Sons, 2014, 1, 49-64 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematical modeling of the electrocrystallization processes and its applications has long been a subject dear to Martin Fleischmann. The study of nucleation is fundamental to the understanding of crystallization. In the context of electrocrystallization, the terms can be applied to phase formation at preferred sites on the electrode surface and phase formation at surfaces without such sites. Two models of nucleation are presented: a heterogeneous model (nucleation on an indent); and a spherical-cap model representing homogeneous nucleation. The transients are recorded by applying a two-step potential profile to the working electrode. This procedure ensures the reduction of the initial falling background/charging current, so that the magnitude of this initial current cannot mask the very early stages of electrocrystallization. Martin sought to establish an approach to nucleation based on quantum electrodynamics.

  • 2.
    Alanen, Lilli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Svensson, Frans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Descartes on Virtue2007In: Hommage à Wlodek: Philosophical papers dedicated to Wlodek Rabinowicz, Lund: Department of Philosophy, Lund University , 2007, 1-10 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In his correspondence with Princess Elizabeth and Queen Christina, as well as in parts of the Passions of the Soul, Descartes provides the beginnings of a theory of ethics. Descartes argues that the supreme good, or the end that one ought to pursue in all of one’s actions, is virtue. The latter is understood by Descartes as a matter of using one’s absolutely free will as well as one can. In the paper we try to shed some light on what this Cartesian notion of virtue more specifically entails.

  • 3.
    Björk, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology2010In: Hypatia, ISSN 0887-5367, E-ISSN 1527-2001, Vol. 25, no 3, 704-707 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Boberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Displacing the Subject of Knowledge2014In: Analytical and Continental Philosophy: Methods and Perspectives / [ed] Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl & Harald A. Wiltsche, Kirchberg am Wechsel: Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society , 2014, 33-35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines Foucault’s attempt to displace the constitutive role of the subject of knowledge and to replace it with the concrete practices that constitute subjects. The prevalent tendency to transform discourse analysis into a new form of epistemology, here exemplified through the works of Paul Veyne, is criticized. It is suggested that Veyne’s reading of Foucault is subject to an illusion similar to what Kant once called “transcendental illusion,” and gives rise to a new form of metaphysics which repeats the problematic that Foucault originally aimed to overcome.

  • 5.
    Boberg, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Rider, SharonUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.
    Utbildning och demokrati i kunskapssamhället2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bornemark, Jonna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    Kunskapens gräns, gränsens vetande: En fenomenologisk undersökning av transcendens och kroppslighet2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The limit between the proper and the foreign – how this limit is established, but also crossed and dissolved – has remained a crucial issue in phenomenology. Setting these questions in the context of the phenomenology of religion, this thesis develops an analysis of the relation between transcendence and body understood in terms of a certain limit.

    The introductory part is rooted in Edmund Husserl’s discussions of the concept of transcendence, which is shown to have an essential connection to the analysis of inner time-consciousness. Here we encounter a decisive limit to objectifying knowledge, which also comes across in his investigations of the body and its spatiality.

    The second part discusses Max Scheler’s critique of Husserl’s excessively objectifying view of knowledge, with a particular focus on Scheler’s understanding of love as a condition of possibility for any knowledge. Scheler is shown to have developed a new concept of transcendence that avoids the pitfalls of objectivism, although in his philosophy of religion he tends to downplay the importance of the body.

    The third part undertakes a reading of Edith Stein, who develops ideas similar to Scheler’s, though in a phenomenologically more nuanced fashion. Although her philosophy of religion also bypasses the body, Stein provides a more genuine access to the writings of the mystics, the analysis of which forms the core of the fourth and concluding part. Drawing on the work of the 13th century Beguine Mechthild of Magdeburg, this concluding chapter develops a phenomenological understanding of religion with an emphasis on transcendence and limit, while also retaining the centrality of our experience of the body. This means: a phenomenology of the limit is investigated, rather than a limit of phenomenology.

  • 7.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Öberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Om matematiska begrepp: en filosofisk undersökning med tillämpningar2005In: Filosofisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7482, Vol. 26, no 4, 11-17 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Österman, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    John Dewey and mathematics education in Sweden2017In: "Dig where you stand" 4. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of the History of Mathematics Education, Roma: Edizioni Nuova Cultura , 2017, 61-72 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Casini, Lorenzo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Kerry Robin McCarthy. Byrd. The Master Musicians: ISBN: 978-0-19-538875-62014In: Renaissance quarterly, ISSN 0034-4338, E-ISSN 1935-0236, Vol. 67, no 1, 321-U726 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Casini, Lorenzo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Self-Knowledge, Scepticism and the Quest for a New Method: Juan Luis Vives on Cognition and the Impossibility of Perfect Knowledge2009In: Renaissance Scepticisms, Dordrecht: Springer , 2009, 33-60 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    The Medieval Notion of the Superiority of the Will2014In: Swedish Students at the University of Leipzig in the Middle Ages / [ed] O. Ferm & S. Risberg, Stockholm: Centre for Medieval Studies, Stockholm University , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Auktoritet och den fria viljan hos Anselm, Kant och R. P. Wolff.2012In: Tidskrift för politisk filosofi, ISSN 1402-2710, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Practical Rationality and the Wills of Confessions 82014In: Augustine's Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography / [ed] William E. Mann, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, 28-45 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Power and Activity in Early Medieval Philosophy2009In: The World as Active Power: Studies in the History of European Reason / [ed] J. Pietarinen & V. Viljanen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    La volonté abélardienne et la tradition augustinienne2009In: Regards sur la France du Moyen Âge: Mélanges offerts à Gunnel Engwall à l'occasion de son départ à la retraite / [ed] Olle Ferm & Per Förnegård, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et Mediævalia, Centre d'études médiévales de Stockholm , 2009, 263-276 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Voluntary Action and Rational Sin in Anselm of Canterbury2016In: British Journal for the History of Philosophy, ISSN 0960-8788, E-ISSN 1469-3526, Vol. 24, no 2, 215-230 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anselm of Canterbury (1033–1109) holds that freedom of the will is a necessary condition for moral responsibility. This condition, however, turns out to be trivially fulfilled by all rational creatures at all times. In order to clarify the necessary conditions for moral responsibility, we must look more widely at his discussion of the nature of the will and of willed action. In this paper, I examine his theory of voluntariness by clarifying his account of the sin of Satan in De casu diaboli. Anselm agrees with Augustine that the sinful act cannot be given a causal explanation in terms of a distinct preceding act of will or desire or choice. He thus rejects volitionalist accounts of Satan's sin and thus of voluntary action in general. He moves beyond his predecessor, however, in insisting on the necessity of an explanation in terms of reasons, and his theory of the dual nature of the rational will is designed to meet this demand. A comparison of Satan's case with the case of the miser of De casu diaboli 3, finally, shows that Anselm's account requires that acts of the will or ‘willings’ qualify as voluntary, a suggestion as interesting as problematic.

  • 17.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Augustine on Second-Order Desires and Persons2016In: Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy / [ed] Jari Kaukua and Tomas Ekenberg, Springer, 2016, 9-24 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examines Augustine's view of the will and the self and explores parallels between Augustine's and Harry Frankfurt's hierarchical accounts of personhood. Throws new light on Augustine's views on moral responsibility by showing that even if Augustine may have abandoned certain libertarian assumptions as to the nature of human free will in his mature works, he retains the underlying view of personhood as dependent on a capacity for a certain form of second-order desiring.

  • 18.
    Ekenberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Review of Freedom and Self-Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism by Katherin A. Rogers2016In: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, ISSN 1538-1617, E-ISSN 1538-1617Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Eklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Rayo's Metametaphysics2014In: Inquiry, ISSN 0020-174X, E-ISSN 1502-3923, Vol. 57, no 4, 483-497 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his important book The Construction of Logical Space (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), Agustin Rayo lays out a distinctive metametaphysical view and applies it fruitfully to disputes concerning ontology and concerning modality. In this article, I present a number of criticisms of the view developed, mostly focusing on the underlying metametaphysics and Rayo's claims on its behalf.

  • 20.
    Fogal, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Confusion of Tongues: A Theory of Normative Language2016In: Ethics, ISSN 0014-1704, E-ISSN 1539-297X, Vol. 127, no 1, 281-288 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Filosofins tillstånd i Sverige idag2006In: Ikaros, ISSN 1796-1998, no 1, 14-15 p.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Filosofins ordblindhet eller Dyslexin som filosofins början2008In: Tankar:  tillägnade Sören Stenlund, Uppsala: Department of Philosophy, Uppsala University , 2008, 261-285 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Dogma: Vi är alla stygga barn2009In: Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1943, Vol. 44, no 3-4, 176-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Niklas Forsberg: Dogma: We are All Wicked Children

    This paper discusses the question of dogmatism in relation to Wittgenstein’s philosophy. I argue that Wittgenstein’s philosophy is both a break from, yet dependent upon, the analytical philosophical tradition. If this fact is not acknowledged one runs the risk of appropriating Wittgenstein’s philosophy dogmatically.

    Glock’s reading of Wittgenstein is employed to show the mistake in reading Wittgenstein as if he worked entirely within the analytic philosophical tradition. Such readings generally attribute theses to Wittgenstein – in direct contrast to his own intentions – and they tend to disregard or misrepresent Wittgenstein’s deeply critical attitude towards the «scientific spirit» of the age.

    It is also argued that a reading that focuses solely on Wittgenstein’s more methodologically oriented remarks runs the risk of misrepresenting them, if they are disconnected from the particular philosophical problems that they are internally connected to.

    Finally, it is argued that the struggle against dogmatism is a constant struggle. Dogmatism is, in Wittgenstein’s conception of it, not something that can be fully avoided since dogmatism is inherent in the philosophical desire itself. Dogmatism in philosophy is not merely dogmatism in academic philosophy but comes together with a very natural desire to establish one fixed meaning for our words.

  • 24.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Interview. From Positivist Rabbi to Resolute Reader. James Conant in Conversation with Niklas Forsberg, Part 12013In: Nordic Witttgenstein Review, ISSN 2242-248X, Vol. 2, no 2, 131-160 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    R. G. Collingwood on Philosophical and Literary Language2012In: Collingwood and British Idealism Studies. Incorporating Badley Studies, ISSN 1744-9413, Vol. 18, no 1, 31-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on the penultimate chapter of Collingwood’s An Essay on Philosophical Method, this paper offers a re-evaluation of several points in leading interpretations of his philosophy. It is argued that this chapter, ‘Philosophy as a Branch of Literature’, invites us to rethink the relation between a systematic or problem-oriented and an historical or exegetical philosophy; how linguistic analysis (particularly in the form of ordinary language philosophy) relates to the history of philosophy; and how the question of literature in philosophy is not merely a question about literature, but of philosophy.

                In contrast to influential interpreters such as e.g. Connelly and D’Oro, it is here argued that Collingwood (a) offers a profound criticism of the idea that philosophical problems are eternal, (b) invites us to deepen our understanding of ordinary language philosophy as well as (c) the idea of a therapeutic method in philosophy, and (d) problematizes the tendency to think that the question about the form philosophical writing takes is a secondary issue that can be side-stepped.

  • 26.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Knowing and Not Knowing what a Human Being Is2011In: SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 1600-1974, Vol. 12, no 1, 1-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following Iris Murdoch, I argue that much contemporary philosophy is guided by a faulty picture of the human being. In a certain sense, we have forgotten what a human being is. This paper traces Murdoch’s view of that kind of forgetting, and tries to show that we now have good reason to re-open the question “What is a human being?” This question comes in as important for philosophy in two respects: First, negatively, as a reminder that we do not normally treat our fellow humans as merely a biological creature having certain properties. Secondly, treating the question of the nature of the human as an open question also serves the purpose of destabilizing dominating pictures that guide and form much contemporary moral philosophy. On a more general level, this paper argues that Murdoch’s thoughts on how we are guided by pictures in philosophy also shows how a philosophical “illusion of sense” can be the result of what Murdoch calls “a general loss of concepts”. Methodologically, this means that the use of simplified and well-defined concepts as philosophical starting-points run the risk of distorting the subject matter to such a point that it no longer is clear what the philosophy is about.

  • 27.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Different Forms of Forms of Life: A Philosophical Introduction2012In: Language, Ethics and Animal Life: Wittgenstein and Beyond / [ed] Niklas Forsberg, Mikel Burley and Nora Hämäläinen, New York: Bloomsbury Academic , 2012, 1-15 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    A New Conception of Original Sin?2015In: Heythrop Journal, ISSN 0018-1196, E-ISSN 1468-2265, Vol. 56, no 2, 272-284 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    The Categorical and the Everyday: On Coetzee, Murdoch, and Cavell and the Presence of Philosophy in Novels2015In: Philosophy and Literature, ISSN 0190-0013, E-ISSN 1086-329X, Vol. 39, no 1A, A66-A82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a categorical dimension of morality that is part of our everyday lives. Through a reading of Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians, I argue that the philosophical importance of literature cannot be reduced to the ways in which it illustrates philosophical views. Borrowing thrust from Iris Murdoch and Stanley Cavell, I contend that the deeper significance of literature is not dependent upon the presence of "philosophy" in novels. Literature can help us see how moral lives take shape in language, and enable us to gain an understanding of how philosophical problems often arise by means of philosophical abstractions.

  • 30.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Where's the disagreement?: The significance of the ordinary in Austin and Ayer2016In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 49, 45-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    J. L Austin is commonly known as an 'ordinary language philosopher'. Ordinary language philosophy, in turn, is generally known as a philosophy of language which employs everyday language as a standard of correctness - an arbiter between meaningful speech and nonsense. By means of a return to the somewhat heated debate between Austin and A. J. Ayer, this paper challenges this picture. I argue that if there is one philosophical tradition that encourages us to turn 'ordinary language' into a problem for philosophy, it is ordinary language philosophy. There is no simple instruction of the form 'If you are philosophically troubled, then turn to ordinary language and you will see the true sense' coming out of Austin's work (rightly construed).

  • 31.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Language Lost and Found: On Iris Murdoch and the Limits of Philosophical Discourse2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language Lost and Found takes as its starting-point Iris Murdoch's claim that "we have suffered a general loss of concepts." By means of a thorough reading of Iris Murdoch's philosophy in the light of this difficulty, it offers a detailed examination of the problem of linguistic community and the roots of the thought that some philosophical problems arise due to our having lost the sense of our own language. But it is also a call for a radical reconsideration of how philosophy and literature relate to each other on a general level and in Murdoch's authorship in particular.

  • 32.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Smärtans grammatik2009In: Att tänka smärtan / [ed] Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2009, 203-229 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    A Philosophy Less Ordinary2009In: Acknowledging Stanley Cavell, Uppsala: Department of Philosophy, Uppsala University , 2009, 123-146 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Den ensamma tankens tyngd: Ensamhet och språklig gemenskap2006In: Den moderna ensamheten, Stockholm/Stehag: Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposion , 2006, 187-208 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Philosophy, Box 627, SE-75126 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Thinking About A Word: Love, For Example2017In: Metaphilosophy, ISSN 0026-1068, E-ISSN 1467-9973, Vol. 48, no 1-2, 30-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is it we do when we philosophize about a word? How are we to act as we ask the philosophical question par excellence, What is ...? These questions are addressed here with particular focus on Troy Jollimore's Love's Vision and contemporary theories of love. Jollimore's rationalist account of love, based on a specific understanding of reasons for love, illustrates a particular philosophical mistake: When we think about a word, we are prone to believe that even though the sense of the word that we investigate may be up for grabs, the other words we use when we do these investigations are not. Jollimore's exploration of love is guided by specific conceptions of reasons and rationality that remain unquestioned. The article argues that we may have to rethink a great number of words as we embark on the task of uncovering the sense of one word.

  • 36.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Burley, MikelHämäläinen, Nora
    Language, Ethics and Animal Life: Wittgenstein and Beyond2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Jansson, SusanneUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Acknowledging Stanley Cavell2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Rider, SharonUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.Segerdahl, PärUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Tankar: tillägnade Sören Stenlund2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Freyr, Tor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    The Social Aspect in Plato’s Ethics: The Significance of Human Beings’ Social Nature in Approaching Justice, Wisdom, and Partnership2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores whether or to what extent the notion that humans are social animals influences Plato’s ethics. The goal is to develop a line of interpreting Plato that is broadly zoological-based; a line that I call the social approach. It ascribes to Plato the view that the right sort of social interaction is necessary for, or even a part of, happiness or human flourishing. While Aristotle is the one credited in the research literature with a conception of happiness that takes seriously the idea that human beings are social animals, this thesis argues that Plato’s morality of happiness is based on a specific zoological-based view of human beings. This view arises from the observation that Plato compares human beings to social insects living and flourishing in collectives. The dissertation is primarily concerned with Plato’s Euthydemus, Republic, and Statesman. It is argued that Plato understands human beings’ as social by nature, and that this forms a feasible starting point for approaching his philosophy (chapter 1). The social approach is further developed and tested in three separate secondary discussions within contemporary interpretations. These concern Plato’s notion of justice, wisdom, and partnership. It is argued that for Plato, justice is an intrinsic good that is not merely a property of the soul and its internal relations, but something that ties people together in mutually beneficial relations (chapter 2); that social interaction is a part of wisdom, as a virtue, and, consequently, of the good life (chapter 3); and that the right sort of partnership is not only necessary for survival, but also a part of happiness (chapter 4).

  • 40.
    Freyr, Tor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Platon om lykke2013In: Engasjement i praksis: Broer mellom filosofi og praksis i helse- og sosialfeltet / [ed] Thorød et al., Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Freyr, Tor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Urstad, Kristian
    Philosophy as a Way of Life in Xenophon's Socrates2010In: E-Logos, ISSN 1211-0442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important idea in antiquity was that to engage in philosophy meant more than the theoretical inquiry into fundamental questions, it was also conceived of as a way of life modelled on the philosophical life of Socrates. In a recent article, John Cooper defends the thesis that, for Socrates and his all successors, the philosophical life meant to live according to reason, understood as the exercising of one’s capacity for argument and analysis in pursuit of the truth – which he conceives of as wisdom. It is our contention that an inclusion and close reading of Xenophon’s testimony casts doubt on Cooper’s unified model of Socrates and his conception of philosophy as a way of life. Xenophon’s Socrates, we argue, conceived of the philosophical life as essentially the exercise of one’s capacity for self-mastery. Moreover, as we interpret Xenophon, it is this self-mastery, not wisdom, which seems to form the basis or core of Socratic ethics. We try to show that for several of Socrates’ philosophical successors living a philosophical life meant something much closer to Xenophon’s picture of that life than the one Cooper describes.

  • 42.
    Gustavsson, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Färdigheter, bildning och erfarenhet2015In: Om det man inte kan tala måste man sjunga / [ed] Peter Degerman m.fl., Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet , 2015, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gustavsson, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Tänk2013In: Vågar du sticka ut hakan? / [ed] Maria Ericson, Stellan Larsson, Hägersten: Nationella dramaturgiatet , 2013, 1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Gustavsson, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Läsningens villkor: Vad ska en lärare kunna+2016In: Vad ska en svensk kunna?: Utbildningens dilemma - intressenas spel / [ed] Michael Gustavsson m.fl., Göteborg: Daidalos, 2016, 1, 244- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gustavsson, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Österman, ToveHållen, Elinor
    Vad ska en svensk kunna?: Utbildningens dilemma - intressenas spel2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Gustavsson, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Österman, ToveHållen, Elinor
    Vad ska en svensk kunna?: Utbildningens dilemma - intressenas spel2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hansen, Kaj Börge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    An Analysis of the EPR Argument1995In: Logic for a change: essays dedicated to Sten Lindström on the occasion of his fiftieth birthday, Uppsala: Department of Philosophy, Uppsala , 1995Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hansen, Kaj Börge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Remarks on Wittgenstein's Philosophy: Philosophical Method and Contradictions2008In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy, ISSN 0070-2749, Vol. 43, 7-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hansen, Kaj Börge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Conceptual Foundations of Operational Set Theory2011In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy, ISSN 0070-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Hansen, Kaj Börge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Transformation Theory: Relativity Revised 1-52007Report (Other academic)
1234 1 - 50 of 194
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf