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  • 1.
    Arketeg, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    An Aesthetics of Resistance:: The Open-Ended Practice of Language Writing2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates the relation between poetry and theory in the poetic practice of language writing. The topic is approached from the idea that language writing takes place in the tension of an open-ended state. In Chapter 1 it is argued that language writing is constituted in relation to a poetic context, and that it reactivates traits intrinsic to the avant-garde discourse, which corresponds to some characteristics in poststructuralism and critical theory. These perspectives appear in the poetic practice of language writing in terms of a rejection of transparency and separation. The stress on construction in language and writing eliminates the distinction between theory and poetry. It is argued that language writing cannot be seen as a movement in the traditional sense of the word since the poetic work resists aesthetic coherence. The heterogeneity of language writing confirms theory's contribution to the poetic practice but without creating a separation between the two. The first section of Chapter 2 addresses the l=a=n=g=u=a=g=e journal with a focus on a poetological context, avant-garde discourse, theory and criticism. The texts in this journal activate the open-ended state by acknowledging context and theory while they simultaneously reject the conventional style of the essay or the review. In the second section of this chapter, in the analysis of four language writers, Bruce Andrews, Charles Bernstein, Lyn Hejinian and Ron Silliman, it is argued that their poetic practice eliminates the distinction between poetry and poetics since poetry emerges as a critical study in itself, where self-reflexivity prevents the creation of poetry in a conventional sense and prevents a separation from poetics. Although poetry is connected with society, the autonomy of poetry, form and poetic language is stressed as a critical, transgressive potential in relation to conventional distinctions between poetry, theory, poetics and criticism.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Joseph Addison and General Education: Moral Didactics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain2009In: Estetika, ISSN 0014-1291, Vol. 46, no 2, 144-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Joseph Addison's (1672-1719) essays in The Spectator occupy contradictory positions in the history of aesthetics. While they are generally considered central to the institution of aesthetics as a scholarly discipline, their reception has throughout history entailed a strong questioning of their philosophical and scholarly importance. In the following paper, I consider this dual feature as regards reception, and set out to clarify how this has come about. A re-examination of the arguments advanced by Addison makes clear that his role is not that of a philosopher, but that of a public educator. As such he aims to raise the standard of general education of the British 'middling orders' in the early eighteenth century, and by using art for didactic purposes he seeks to contribute to the shaping of morally accomplished individuals.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Könsspecifika erfarenheter och transpersonen i akademin2009In: Tidningen kulturen, ISSN 2000-7086Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Hyllning till osäkerhetens skönhetsvärde2007In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Drömmandet som politisk närvaro2007In: Stockholms fria tidning, ISSN 1650-4674Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Någonstans vid världens kant2007In: Stockholms fria tidning, ISSN 1650-4674Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Konst och moral i 1700-talets Storbritannien: folkbildande publicist lade grunden till dagskritiken2009In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, no 3, 35-38 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Estetik, historia, kontext2008In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, no 2, 94-98 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Joseph Addison och The Spectator: Borgerlighetens folkbildare2008In: Noesis, ISSN 1651-4920, no 4, 5-13 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Från idé till fantasi: om modernitet och modernism2003In: Valör, ISSN 0283-751X, no 2-3, 7-21 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Queer på film: förr eller senare tar mainstreamfilmen över det undergroundscenen skapar2001In: Upsala Nya Tidning (UNT)Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Var är ovanlighetens politiker?2010In: Fria Tidningen, ISSN 1654-9449Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Höjd över livets medelmåttiga stunder2005In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Mannen i upplösningstillstånd2007In: Stockholms fria tidning, ISSN 1650-4674Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Den (o)föränderliga naturen: Smakomdöme och bildning i The Tatler, The Spectator och The Guardian i början av 1700-talet2011In: Sjuttonhundratal, ISSN 1652-4772, 72-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    De brittiska moralisterna: Konsten att bilda ett smakomdöme och förnedra en slav2012In: Subaltern, ISSN 1652-7046, no 4, 60-63 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Recension av Davidson, Jenny: Breeding: A Partial History of the Eighteenth Century2012In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, ISSN 0013-838X, Vol. 93, no 4, 493-495 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Recension av Music as a Science of Mankind in Eighteenth-Century Britain (förf. Maria Semi)2013In: Eighteenth-Century Music, ISSN 1478-5714, Vol. 10, no 1, 134-136 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    "Taste is not to conform to the art, but the art to the taste": aesthetic instrumentalism and the British body politic in the neoclassical age2013In: Journal of Aesthetics and Culture, ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 5, 1-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eighteenth century witnessed the historical change from aesthetic instrumentalism to aesthetic autonomy. Aesthetic research has often attempted to capture this change in teleological terms, wherein British aesthetic instrumentalism appears to contain the seeds of its own decline. The purpose of this article is to restore a balance between these two major historical modes of appreciating art, and to display the uniqueness of British aesthetic instrumentalism. During especially the first half of the eighteenth century, aesthetic instrumentalism was revitalised due to a new rationale for art in the reinforcement of a national body politic and in the strengthening of a British identity. In order to recognise the distinctiveness of aesthetic instrumentalism, as well as to acknowledge by what means it operated, I make essentially two claims: (1) aesthetic instrumentalism rediscovered its effective interaction with a national body politic by exploring a possible nexus between Britain and classical antiquity, and (2) although the philosophy of art advanced by Joseph Addison (1672-1719) frequently is held as a possible commencement of aesthetic autonomy, it was, first and foremost, characterised by a systematic aesthetic instrumentalism intended to reinforce the British body politic.

  • 20.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Shaftesbury auf Deutsch: Estetik, Bildung och ett intresselöst intresse2013In: Biblis, ISSN 1403-3313, no 63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Mellan känslor och normer: Hume om smakomdömet och kritikern2011In: Förnuft, känsla och moral: perspektiv på David Hume / [ed] Robert Callergård, Stockholm: Thales, 2011, 13-33 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The Sublime: Precursors and British Eighteenth-Century Conceptions2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation studies the attraction of the sublime in British criticism during the eighteenth century, with particular emphasis on the arguments that served as precursors to the interest in the experience of the sublime.

    The first part explores Samuel H. Monk’s standard work on the British eighteenth-century sublime, along with more recent studies. In order to expand the contextual features of Monk’s established account, and to be able to connect the sublime with the impact of the criticism of intellectual literature during the second half of the seventeenth century, this study needs to begin by considering the arguments put forth by Longinus in his treatise Peri Hupsous, a work that exerted considerable influence on eighteenth-century critics.

    Thus, the second part addresses the relevance of the arguments made by Longinus, who reflected on the significance of the concentrated exercise of the imagination and drew attention to the inner carriage required to bring about the experience of the sublime. The third part, then, demonstrates the importance assigned by critics of the sublime to the intense exercise of the imagination. However, to fully understand the attraction of the Longinian sublime, this demonstration also needs to take into account the attention given to the exercise of the imagination in criticism of intellectual literature during the second half of the seventeenth century. Finally, I illustrate the relevance of including such criticism in the interpretation of the attraction of the sublime during the eighteenth century by considering Thomas Hobbes’ claims on the subject of the imagination.

  • 23.
    Axelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    A Realized Disposition: Shaftesbury on the Natural Affections and Taste2014In: New Ages, New Opinions: Shaftesbury in his World and Today / [ed] Patrick Müller, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, 27-44 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Axelsson, Karl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Onödig: kulturindustrin klarar sig utmärkt utan Johan Staël von Holstein2008In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Dahllöv, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Jordens sång: Naturfilosofi och musik hos Gilles Deleuze2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay provides a thorough reading of Gilles Deleuze’s (1925–95) philosophy of nature and the way music relates to this philosophy. It does so with regards to changes in the view of nature in 20th century science, especially in the theories of self-organisation as developed by, among others, Ilya Prigogine. Deleuze’s metaphysics is viewed in relation to these theories, and is also compared to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, which is related to classical science. The essay then investigates certain key issues in Deleuze’s philosophy concerning difference and univocity (or immanence), developed in his doctoral thesis Différence et répétition (1968). Also, certain aspects of the further evolution of this philosophy of immanence in Mille plateaux (1980), co-written with Félix Guattari, are examined. The essay then studies the role of aesthetics in Deleuze’s philosophy, and the way he transforms the aesthetics of Kant. The following chapter deals with Deleuze & Guattari’s primary text concerning music, ”De la ritournelle” in Mille plateaux. In this text, they develop a highly abstract concept of music, which, in their philosophy, is: 1) granted a cosmological reach regarding rhythms and motives; 2) made an essential aspect of the emergence of art, which they find in animals creating a territory (especially in the songbird); 3) used to discuss Baroque/Classicist, Romantic and 20th century musical styles. Apart from analysing these aspects, this chapter focuses on 20th century music, with a thorough examination of Gustav Mahler and of spectral music, demonstrating that Deleuze’s philosophy can deepen the understanding of this music. The chapter also discusses problematic tendencies in Deleuzian research on contemporary music, which does not take the entirety of Deleuze’s philosophy of nature into account. This essay argues that such knowledge is necessary to correctly examine the implications of Deleuze & Guattari’s philosophy of music. The lack of awareness of Deleuze’s philosophy of nature is also significant in the critique that Deleuze’s aesthetics has received by Jacques Rancière, which is analysed in the final chapter. This chapter also discusses Michael Gallope’s reading of Deleuze & Guattari, in which he makes a distinction between a metaphysical and an ethical-aesthetic philosophy of music. Although the relation between metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics, is key to understanding their philosophy of music, this essay argues that Gallope’s idea of what sort of music they advocate is incorrect.

  • 26.
    Ekholm, Rikard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Identical, But Still Different: On Artistic Appropriation in Visual Art2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation about artistic appropriation I acknowledge that something indeed has happened in art. Visual art does not have to look in any special way anymore, or have historically validated content that can be visually grasped. Within this precondition artistic appropriation is situated. An artistic appropriation artwork is visually identical to a pre-existing artwork, but is still an independent artwork that is about something other than what the pre-existing artwork is about.The dissertation ties into, and separates itself from, two discussions: On the one hand, a discussion about the difference between a mere thing and an artwork that looks exactly like it. Duchamp’s Fountain is an example; it looks exactly like an ordinary urinal. On the other, the various ways artists have used pre-existing art throughout history to make new art. One historical example is the paraphrase. Previously, there has been no sufficient discussion about artists who make artworks that look exactly like pre-existing artworks and what this artistic practice says about the identity of art. I argue that artistic appropriation unveils the constitution of the artwork. In chapter one, a definition of artistic appropriation is introduced. Then there follows a discussion regarding previous research about appropriation and closely related concepts like adaptation and intertextuality. In chapter two, artistic appropriation is situated in relation to the historical avant-garde and later changes that made conceptual art possible. Present is also a discussion about how artistic appropriation both challenges and affirms traditional notions in art, such as originality, authorship and creativity. In chapter three there is a discussion about three artistic appropriators and their work: The artists are Elaine Sturtevant, Sherrie Levine and Michael Mandiberg. They must be understood in relation to a different set of backgrounds, which means that their artworks emerge differently.

  • 27.
    Entzenberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The Art to End All Arts2013In: The Nordic Journal of Aesthetics, ISSN 2000-1452, Vol. 23, no 46, 63-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The death of art has been a notion used in connection with the development and progress of art. This view of the development of art, the movement from one position to another, can go on forever. From another view, we see art as part of a narration, which makes the death of art absolute and final, even though art is still produced (Hegel’s version). In our time, the American philosopher A. C. Danto uses Hegel’s developmental view on history to explain pictorial Western art from the Renaissance up until now. In Danto’s philosophy of art, the final end means that a certain theory of art ends; the development of the theory of art as a sensuous object cannot be developed further. I agree that something happens during the 60s that is extremely important. But what happens is that old systems evaporate and pluralism enters the art scene. To understand this new scene we must give up old grand systems, and see the theory-boundedness of the practices of art we meet today. Yes, this death concerns grand theories, and, by no means, art as theory.

  • 28.
    Entzenberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Art from Death Orginated2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every artwork is the first and last of it kind. Nothing happens the same way twice. But if this is the case, then what limits can we impose on our understanding of the historical development of art? The poles in our conceptual schema of the development of art are analogous to human life, which is placed between the poles of non-existence. This schema is used in our understanding of art, interpretation, and metaphor. Being a complex part in the intersection between life and death, this becomes transposed from experiences to things, reified objects that can make the analysis of these entities cognitively respectable. To transfer them back to experience is to see them as part of our cultural understanding:  the movement from death to life and back again is grounded in the dynamic tension between the creative/deviant and conventional/established sense-making determinations.  By these experiences our views of the world are both transgressed and confirmed.

  • 29.
    Entzenberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Grounds of Representation: An Essay on a Dilemma in the Fiction of Jorge Luis Borges and Samuel Beckett2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In their fiction, Samuel Beckett and Jorge Luis Borges find themselves caught on the horns of a dilemma: they accept neither a literature that imitates not a literature that refuses to imitate. This book proposes the following understanding of their project, against the context of contemporary trends in science and art: that only when the writer begins to extricate himself from realism and anti-realism can he or she keep suspense to a minimum. In creating a literature aware of itself and its own limits, both writers create a self-destructive fiction that places the reader in the same relation to the text as the writer to the act of writing.

  • 30.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Adorno on Nature2013In: Florida Philosophical Review, ISSN 1535-3656, Vol. XIII, no 1, 60-63 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The Voice of Nature2012In: Translucence, Malmö: Bokförlaget Arena , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    "Jag är en noshörning": Adorno om konsten och människans djurlikhet2010In: Hjärnstorm, ISSN 0348-6958, no 102-103, 3-8 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Konsten och den hota(n)de naturen2009In: Glänta, ISSN 1104-5205, no 4, 86-91 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Of Mice and Men: Adorno on Art and the Suffering of Animals2011In: Estetika, ISSN 0014-1291, no 2, 139-156 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theodor W. Adorno's criticism of human beings' domination of nature is a familiar topic to Adorno scholars. Its connection to the central relationship between art and nature in his aesthetics has, however, been less analysed. In the following paper, I claim that Adorno's discussion of art's truth content (Wahrheitsgehalt) is to be understood as art's ability to give voice to nature (both human and non-human) since it has been subjugated by the growth of civilization. I focus on repressed non-human nature and examine Adorno's interpretation of Eduard Mörike's poem 'Mausfallen-Sprüchlein' (Mousetrap rhyme). By giving voice to the repressed animal, Mörike's poem manages to point towards the possibility of a changed relationship between mice and men, between nature and humanity, which is necessary in order to achieve reconciliation amongst humans as well.

  • 35.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The Wor(l)d of the Animal: Adorno on Art’s Expression of Suffering2011In: Journal of Aesthetics and Culture, ISSN 2000-4214, no 3, -12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Adorno takes modern, autonomous art as the starting point for his aesthetics, this does not mean that his idea of art’s truth content is restricted to the artworks of modernity. In the article, I wish to show that Adorno’s discussion of art’s truth content is intimately connected with its capacity to express the suffering that nature has undergone and still undergoes in the name of enlightenment. I focus on art’s expression of the suffering of nonhuman nature, and particularly non-human animals. I examine the interpretation Adorno makes in Dialectic of Enlightenment of an episode from The Odyssey, to show that even an artwork before the modern conception of art can be said to have truth content. Few commentators have considered this, and those who have, have not recognized Adorno’s conviction that what is significant in authentic artworks is their ability to give voice not only to repressed human nature but also to repressed non-human nature. Giving voice to suffering nature and animals is something that unites The Odyssey with subsequent artworks, such as Mahler’s Third Symphony.

  • 36.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Koltrastens klagan2010In: Nutida Musik, ISSN 1652-6082, no 4, 26-27 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Art and Threatening/Threatened Nature2010In: Eurozine, ISSN 1684-4637Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Naturens röst2012In: Translucence, Malmö: Bokförlaget Arena , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Att uttrycka det undanträngda: Theodor W. Adorno om konst, natur och sanning2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines a central, but neglected aspect of the aesthetic theory of Theodor W. Adorno, namely his notion of art as mediator between mankind and nature. The analysis focuses on Adorno's discussion of art's truth content, understood here as art's ability to give voice to nature as it has been subjugated by the growth of civilization.

    Chapter one examines the notion of the domination of nature in Dialectic of Enlightenment. This notion serves as important background for the understanding of how art can preserve the memory of nature.

    Dialectic of Enlightenment also contains an outline of the genealogy of art. This genealogy is the focus of chapter two, which explores how the birth of art is connected to the domination of nature.

    Chapter three considers Adorno's criticism of the priority of human reason over nature in both Kant's and Hegel's aesthetics. Adorno claims instead that art which manages to mediate natural beauty reveals human being's likeness to nature and animals rather than her superiority over them.

    Chapter four explores the issue of how something created by man can give voice to nature, which is usually considered as mankind's opposite.

    Chapter five develops the discussion from chapter four and further examines Adorno's notion of art as a placeholder for that which is not yet, i.e. the reconciliation between mankind and nature.

    Chapter six deals with the relationship between art and society. Adorno regards art as both autonomous and social, and claims that it is necessary for art to participate in nature-dominating society in order to be able to give voice to repressed nature.

    In the concluding remarks an interpretation of Adorno's idea of art as a placeholder for the reconciliation between mankind and nature is outlined in a way that enables the inclusion of art after the modernist era as well.

  • 40.
    Flodin, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Naturen som "alls icke omyndig" vs. "Det finns ingen natur längre."2009In: Codex and Code: Aesthetics, Language and Politics in an Age of Digital Media, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2009, 105-113 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För Adorno är idén om att konsten medlar mellan människa och natur central, liksom den var för det stora flertalet romantiska filosofer och konstnärer. Adorno återkommer till Hölderlins dikt "Bergvinkeln i Hardt" ("Der Winkel von Hardt") i sin essä "Parataxis", i Ästhetische Theorie och i sina föreläsningar om historia och frihet. I Hölderlins dikt beskrivs naturen som "alls icke omyndig" ("nicht gar unmündig"). Naturen bär i dikten spår av det förflutna och vittnar om ett historiskt skeende. I sina föreläsningar om historia och frihet menar Adorno att denna dikt är den bästa modellen för att förstå vad han själv menar med sitt begrepp "naturhistoria". Jag vill utreda varför så är fallet samt på vilket sätt Adorno menar att den modernistiska konsten vänder sig mot (den romantiska) idén om konsten som en försoning mellan människa och natur, så att denna försoning endast kan gestaltas negativt. I Becketts Slutspel (Fin de partie) säger en av huvudpersonerna: "Det finns ingen natur längre." Pjäsen framställer enligt Adorno en komplett förtingligad värld, där ingenting som inte tillverkats av människor har någon plats. På vilket sätt kan Becketts verk ändå sägas peka mot en möjlig försoning mellan människa och natur? Hur talar naturen i detta verk jämfört med i Hölderlins dikt?

  • 41.
    Forsberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Metaphysics.
    Jansson, SusanneUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Acknowledging Stanley Cavell2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Gao, Jianping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The expressive act in Chinese art: from calligraphy to painting1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Simo, Säätelä
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Kvalitet – en gåta?2007In: En fråga om kvalitet, Stockholm: Santérus , 2007, 199-226 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Sukla, Ananta Ch.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics. Sambalpur Univ, Dept English, Sambalpur, India..
    Fiction and Art Explorations in contemporary theory: Introduction2015In: Fiction And Art: Explorations In Contemporary Theory, BLOOMSBURY PUBL INC , 2015, 1-+ p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Sukla, Ananta Ch.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics. Sambalpur Univ, Dept English, Sambalpur, India..
    Fiction and Art Explorations in contemporary theory: Concluding Note2015In: Fiction And Art: Explorations In Contemporary Theory, BLOOMSBURY PUBL INC , 2015, 389-389 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Åhlberg, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Norman Bryson och "The New Art History". En kritisk presentation1992In: Nordisk Estetisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0284-7698, Vol. 5, no 7, 19-31 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Åhlberg, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Heidegger's Van Gogh: Reflections on Heideger's Philosophy of Art1993In: Nordisk Estetisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0284-7698, no 8, 109-131 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Åhlberg, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Concepts and Conceptions of Art1993In: Nordisk Estetisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0284-7698, no 10, 127-155 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Åhlberg, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    Form and Content Revisited1991In: Filozofski vestnik (Tiskana izd.), ISSN 0353-4510, Vol. 12, no 1, 9-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Åhlberg, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Aesthetics.
    The Nature and Limits of Analytic Aesthetics1993In: The British Journal of Aesthetics, ISSN 0007-0904, Vol. 33, no 1, 5-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 63
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