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  • 1.
    Alexandersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet.
    Andreeff, AlexanderUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Bünz, AnnikaInstitutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet.
    Med hjärta och hjärna: En vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vänboken Med hjärta och hjärna innehåller en mångfald av artiklar som på olika sätt och på flera olika plan knyter an till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladhs forskargärning. Under drygt fyrtio år har Arwill-Nordbladh varit arkeologin trogen och hon har ägnat sin forskning åt arkeologihistoria, genus, kroppslighet och materialitet, perspektiv på yngre järnålder, minne och minnespraktiker samt livsberättelser. Artikelförfattarna tar genom sina perspektiv med läsaren på en rad resor genom tider och rumsligheter, land och hav samt städer och landsbygder. Med hjälp av arkeologiska lämningar och arkivmaterial vidgar artikelförfattarna från olika discipliner vår förståelse av människors verkligheter och föreställningsvärldar.

  • 2.
    Anderson, Atholl
    et al.
    Australian Natl Univ, Dept Archaeol & Nat Hist, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia..
    Stothert, Karen
    Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Anthropol, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Martinsson-Wallin, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Flett, Iona
    Australian Natl Univ, Dept Archaeol & Nat Hist, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia..
    Haberle, Simon
    Heijnis, Henk
    Australian Nucl Sci & Technol Org, Inst Environm Res, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232, Australia..
    Rhodes, Edward
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Geog, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Reconsidering Precolumbian Human Colonization In The Galapagos Islands, Republic Of Ecuador2016In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 27, no 2, 169-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty years ago, Heyerdahl and Skjolsvold (1956, 1990) collected material from five archaeological sites in the Galapagos Islands. They retained earthenwares of possible precolumbian origin and discarded ceramic, metal, and glass artifacts postdating the arrival of the Spanish in A.D. 1535. Consequently, they argued that each site was formed as the results of a series of discard events from unrelated short-term occupations extending from the precolumbian to the historical era, and that the earthenwares represented occasional visits by fishermen from precolumbian Peru and Ecuador. In 2005, we re -excavated the sites and collected all the excavated materials. Our results show that each class of material, irrespective of age or origin, was distributed spatially and stratigraphically in the same pattern, contradicting the former assumption of multiple, unrelated occupations. We reject the palimpsest model in favor of the null hypothesis of single-phase site occupation. Analysis of putatively precolumbian pottery using optically-stimulated luminescence dating indicates that it is mostly of historical age. Radiocarbon dating confirms that the archaeological sites are younger than the sixteenth century. Research on sedimentary cores shows probable anthropogenic impacts as restricted to the last 500 years. We conclude that there was no human occupation in the Galapagos Islands until the historical era.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Med historien i ryggen: Om den arkeologiska uppgiften2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores the boundaries of archaeology. Its subject is an archaeological practice that no longer seems to be able to challenge our modern conception of the world. We are faced with an archaeology that takes the form of a conservative and repetitive practice, because of the discipline’s demand that discussions on epistemology and ontology within its discourse should be incorporated in a presupposed teleological assignment. They must be part of the modern archaeological project or else their critique is irrelevant.

    The initial disappointment is transformed into an inquisitive exploration of archaeology’s limitations. At the archaeological frontier several keywords are used to illustrate the architecture of that archaeological space. Concepts such as narrative, time, the trace and reality act as themes for a conversation on archaeology and the archaeological. Postprocessual archaeology is called upon as a primary discussant in this conversation, playing the part of a textual embodiment of a virtual archaeological formula. One major component of this formula that is discussed is archaeology’s connection to the historical. History as a narrative form, as a perspective on time and as a metanarrative to refer our statements to, is found to be a metaphysical fundament for the archaeological project, delimiting our understanding of the temporal relationship between the past and the present.

    The thesis briefly discusses an alternative nostalgic archaeology but this hypothetical post-historic archaeology can never be articulated, since its destiny will be the same as all other similar attempts within archaeology – i.e. to become part of an updated modern archaeological practice. The exploration then ends with an insight that there is no escape from either archaeology or modernity. What is left is only to point out the boundaries, and to let the dreams of freedom that go beyond them keep us from falling into a discursive sleep.

  • 4.
    Andreasson, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    moyar : hafin : iþra : byn : reta; Flickor, förrätta era böner väl: social struktur i gotländska runinskrifter under medeltid2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses runic inscriptions from the middle ages on Gotland and how they portray social structure. It focuses on three themes: (1) fixed time and space, (2) women and the nuclear family and (3) profession and social status/structure. It also discusses changes brought on by a more structured and established Christianity, as well as differences between medieval rune stones on Gotland and their predecessors Viking Age rune stones in the Mälar Valley.

  • 5.
    Andreeff, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Potter, Rich
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Imaging picture stones: Comparative studies of rendering techniques2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: En vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff, Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet , 2014, 500, 669-689 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results from different rendering techniques will be shown in this article and briefly discussed with regard to investigations of the pictorial surface on three picture stones from Gotland, Sweden. The island is the largest in the Baltic Sea and is well-known for its very rich and outstanding archaeological material, especially from the Viking Age and Early Medieval period. The picture stones that are the case studies for this article originate from three different sites on Gotland: Fröjel Bottarve, Fröjel Stenstugu and Buttle Änge. All of these sites are located in rural areas with rich agricultural lands and an abundance of ancient remains that speak of habitation and land use since at least the Bronze Age to present day. Fröjel Stenstugu and Buttle Änge are still standing at their original sites while Fröjel Bottarve was found re-used in a grave.

  • 6.
    Armstrong, Chelsey
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    McKechnie, Iain
    Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, Hakai Institute, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Szabó, Péter
    Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Lane, Paul J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa .
    McAlvay, Alex C.
    Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America .
    Boles, Oliver
    Institute of Archaeology, University College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Walshaw, Sarah
    Department of History, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Petek, Nik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gibbons, Kevin
    Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
    Quintana Morales, Erendira
    Department of Anthropology, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America .
    Anderson, Eugene
    Department of Anthropology, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States of America .
    Ibragimow, Aleksandra
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Podruczny, Grzegorz
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Vamosi, Jana
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada .
    Marks-Block, Tony
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
    LeCompte, Joyce
    Independent Scholar, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
    Awâsis, Sākihitowin
    Department of Geography, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, Canada, London, Ontario, Canada .
    Nabess, Carly
    Department of Anthropology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Integrated History of Future of People on Earth (IHOPE) Initiative, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, e0171883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural.

  • 7.
    Barregren, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Spjutets plats i kultur och tro: En undersökning av dekorerade spjut i Birkas kammargravar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Viking Age town Birka has since long been a central part of archaeological studies and excavations in Sweden. It has brought much light and information about the people living there from the late 8th century to the late 10th century. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the decorated spears found in a selected number of Birka's chamber graves to see if any visual traces of religious expressions are present. The spears and their context will then be put into contrast with the clear patterns of the worship of Odin in Birka's Garrison area and religious studies from pre-Christian Scandinavia. This is done in the hopes of shedding some light on the spear’s relevance in the Viking Age's culture and religious contexts.

  • 8.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Innovative Memory and Resilient Cities: Echoes from Ancient Constantinople2010In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul J.J. Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herschend and Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2010, 391-405 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter uses insights from resilience thinking in analysing a two-thousand-year period of ancient and modern Constantinople, addressing one of the great challenges of the Urban Anthropocene: how to nurture an ecologically sound urbanisation. One of the lessons is that Constantinople maintained a diversity of insurance strategies to a greater degree than  many historical and contemporary urban centres. It invested heavily not only in military infrastructure but also in systems for supplying, storing, and producing food and water. From major granaries and at least four harbours the citizens could receive seaborne goods, but during sieges the trade networks broke down. At those times, when supplies ran dry, there were possibilities to cultivate food within the defensive walls and to catch fish in the Golden Horn. Repeated sieges, which occurred on average every fifty years, generated a diversity of social-ecological memories – the means by which the knowledge, experience, and practice of how to manage a local ecosystem were stored and transmitted in a community. These memories existed in multiple groups of society, partly as a response to the collapse of long-distance, seaborne, grain transports from Egypt. Food production and transports were decentralized into a plethora of smaller subsistence communities (oikoi), which also sold the surplus to the markets of the city. In this way Constantinople became more self-reliant on regional ecosystems. An additional result was that the defensive walls were moved, not in order to construct more buildings but to increase the proportion of gardens and agricultural land. In a comparison with Cairo, it can be seen that these innovations related to enhanced self-reliance in food production made it possible for Constantinople to bounce back from extreme hardships, such as extended sieges, without collapsing into chaos or moral decay. Transformed urban morphology of the city would simply remind residents, through the visual presence of a living garden culture, of the importance of the latter for food security. Without the gardens the long intervals between sieges would probably have been enough to dissolve living memoryHence, the urban  resilience of Constantinople was enhanced, promoting well-established old regimes and traditions of importance for producing ecosystem services to society while at the same time testing and refining new and successful regimes, or in other words through the interplay of memory and innovation. Currently, and even more so in decades to come, the mindsets of urban people hold power in a global arena. Questions related to how the loss of green space in metropolitan landscapes will affect worldviews are worrisome since it is the desires and demands of urban people that will affect future decisions and essentially determine the fate of the planet. People throughout the world, and not least in Western societies, need to be constantly reminded of our dependence on a living planet and stay motivated to support it. Social-ecological memories related to local food production have to be nurtured in urban landscapes as well, and an urban morphology is needed that strengthens ecological awareness across urban populations rather than the opposite.

  • 9.
    Bergquist, Lars-Göran
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    En enkel till Himlingøje. Dödens mode 1: ett virrvarr av varianter: Praktgravar i Sydskandinavien under 1000 år: ca 150 e.Kr. – ca 1050 e.Kr2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One purpose of this dissertation is to show how these graves, set apart due to their often spectacular exterior and an abundance of rich contents, have been inspired as to construction and ideological contents by Roman influence from the south when local Scandinavian chieftains were buried with finesse extraordinaire – from the earliest Roman Iron Age via the more complex societal forms of the Migration and Vendel Periods to the regulated and strictly stratified society of the Viking Period.

    The dissertation also intends to show how the most magnificent burial customs the Scandinavian Iron Age was not necessarily influenced only by religious beliefs: imported (Roman) prestige goods and, in time, increasingly more lavish local props to bring into the grave became one way for the German farmer and warrior elite groups to manifest and maintain their superior social position and thus accelerating class differences in the Iron Age society of southern Scandinavia. I suggest that this type of German burial customs was dictated by a continuously changing fashion among chieftains and princes of northern Europe as they journeyed from life to death, rather than any ancient religious belief. The main characteristic of the elite strata of the Scandinavian Iron Age was long-distance communication: contacts with distant chiefdoms and the ability to travel themselves.

    The dissertation also aims to reinstate the cultural historical perspective that i.a. sees material remains as the result of culture, rather than as culture itself. In direct opposition to the over-theoretical archaeology of the late 20th century and the early 21st century I propose the use of a methodological analysis for the study of rich graves. The text also proposes to act as a counterpoint to the sort of ghostly impersonal presentations that too often written are by archaeologists.

  • 10. Beronius Jörpeland, Lena
    et al.
    Göthberg, Hans
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Seiler, Anton
    Wikborg, Jonas
    Återigen i Gamla Uppsala: Förundersökningsrapport OKB-projektet i Gamla Uppsala. Utbyggnad av Ostkustbanan genom Gamla Uppsala Uppland; Gamla Uppsala socken; Gamla Uppsala S:3, 20:1, 21:7, 21:13, 21:27, 21:44, 21:56, 21:71, 21:76, 21:78, 26:4, 26:5, 74:3, 77:3, 77:5, 77:7, 77:19 och Dragarbrunn 32:1; Uppsala 134:4, 240:1, 284:2, 547:1, 586:1, 603:1, 604:1, 605:1, 605:2 och 682 Dnr 422-278-2011 och 422-1516-20112011Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bertelsen, Lise Gjedssø
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    De visuelle manifestationer på Bayeuxtapetet af den gudfrygtige kong Edvard og dets få kvinder2014In: Iconographisk post: Nordisk tidskrift för ikonografi, ISSN 0106-1348, ISSN 2323-5586, Vol. 3, no 4, 26-43 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests that the appearances of Edward the Confessor on the Bayeux Tapestry underline Duke William’s entitlement to the English throne and the weakness of Harold Godwinson’s claims. It is argued that King Edward might be depicted six times rather than five. A mediaeval king had two bodies, one natural and the other with divine right to rule by God’s grace. In the first five representations of Edward we witness the gradual decay and peaceful death of his natural body in sharp contrast to Harold Godwinson’s violent death later on the battlefield, and in the sixth, Duke William sits half hidden by a man closely resembling Edward. This might be Edward’s spiritual political body sustaining William’s divine right to the English throne. – The gender balance for individuals depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry is 99 % men and 1 % women. Of the total of six women the three in the main register are high status persons who appear near important buildings, depicted as mistress (probably), wife or mother. Three other women appear in erotic scenes in the margins, but their lack of clothes and attributes makes it difficult to determine their identity.

  • 12.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Lund University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Larsson, Carolina
    Lund University.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Stenborg, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    A Neo-Documentalist Lens for Exploring the Premises of Disciplinary Knowledge Making2016In: Proceedings from the Document Academy, ISSN 2473-215X, Vol. 3, no 1, 1-23 p., 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how documentation analysis with a neo-documentalist lens can help us explore variations (and stabilities) in conceptions and materialities of documents, as intertwined with disciplinary and sub-disciplinary practices of informing and knowing. Drawing on documentation theory, and with previous research on archaeological documentation as a background, by means of autoethnographic vignettes we explore contemporary conceptions of documentation in five areas in or related to archaeology (Intra-site 3D documentation, Development-led archaeology, Aggregating documentation for use outside the organization, Mediating documentation – or documentation mediation, and Documenting and displaying archaeology in a changing environment). Digitization, and how digitization has spurred renegotiations of what counts as documentation, functions as a common denominator discussed in all of the vignettes. The analysis highlights simultaneously ongoing renegotiations of documentation serving each area’s unique epistemic purposes, and pushing document materialities in different directions. This operationalization of documentation analysis creates an understanding for intra-disciplinary variations in documentation but is importantly also a practical tool to uncover documentation-related premises of disciplinary knowledge-making. This tool can be applied for example in processes of information policy development (regulating what purposes documentation should serve, and what it should be like), information systems design (e.g. for creation and communication of documentation), and infrastructure development (e.g. for preservation and accessibility of documentation).

  • 13. Choyke, Alice M.
    et al.
    Vretemark, Maria
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Levels of social identity expressed in the refuse and worked bone from Middle Bronze Age Százhalombatta-Földvár, Vatya culture, Hungury2004In: Behaviour Behind Bones: the zooarchaeology of ritual religion, status and identity / [ed] Sharyn Jones O´Day, Win Van Neer, Anton Ervynck, Durham: Oxbow Books, 2004, 177-189 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Damlien, Hege
    et al.
    Universitetet i Stavanger, Arkeologisk Museum.
    Kjällquist, Mathilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Staten historiska museum.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The pioneer settlment of Scandinavia and its aftermath: New evidence from western and central Scandinavia2016In: The early settlement of Northern Europe -: Economy, Technology and Society, volume 2 / [ed] Görstad, H, Apel, J. Knutsson, H. Knutsson, K., Universitetet i Oslo, Kulturhistorisk museum: Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is a critical analysis of the present archaeological evidence for the pioneer setlment in Scandinavia. Based on a database of lithic blade technology from 63 dated sites dated to the Early Mesolithic, the authors evaluate  the evidence for an east european origin of the Middle Mesolithic culture. Using lithic as a proxy for cultural traditions it is argued that the evidence speaks for an east European origin of the Middle Mesolithic lithic tradition. 

  • 15.
    Edenmo, Roger
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Prestigeekonomi under yngre stenåldern: Gåvoutbyten och regionala identiteter i den svenska båtyxekulturen2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis identifies and discusses some fundamental changes that took place during the middle neolithic period in Sweden, with the introduction of the Boat Axe Culture. The possibility of intrepreting the Corded Ware Cultures by way of networks, identified through the regional designes of battle axes, are proposed. With the aid of a reconsideration of the typology of the Swedish boat axes, ethnographic examples of gift-exchanges, and a theoretical reappraisal of the implications of archaeological praxis for prehistorc life-worlds, new possibillities for interpreting the changing role of such prestige items as the boat-axes are presented. A new chronological scheme is also presented for the Swedish boat axes, with a tripartite division of the latter middle neolithic into MN BI-III. The value of the boat axe is further considered to be explicable only in terms of a prestige item, dependent on a system of exchange for its continual valuation. Central to this discussion is the relationship between value and exchange. Several regions within the Swedish Boat Axe Culture are identified, and the boat axes in two of these regions in the southern part of the Mälar valley are thoroughly examined. It is shown that during the cours of the Boat Axe period, the emphasis gradually changed from a regional to an intra-regional focus concerning the development of types and special designes of the boat axes. Identified similarities and dissimilarities of contemporary boat axes within and between regions are explained as a result of a parallel change in gift exchanges, from a regional focus to an intra-regional focus. An hierarchical ordering of the latter middle neolithic soceity is also identified, where only a portion of the boat-axes were selected as burial gifts. This development is chartered onto the broader neolithic development in Sweden, with special focus on the role of prestige items such as battle axes. A fundamental change is identified as taking place during the Boat Axe period, when the full implications of a prestige economy were implemented and the major strategies for power settled on the inter-regional level.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Albin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Två rum och kök: En jämförande studie om medeltida bokultur på Gotlands landsbygd2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Medieval dwelling houses of a similar type have been documented on Gotland in archaeological investigations. They all have common planning, a rectangular house foundation divided into two rooms and a square-shaped fireplace which is located in one of the corners. In this study the aim is to find out when this type of building was first introduced on Gotland as well as why it was adopted. Another aim is to compare the gotlandic houses with similar buildings from other places in Scandinavia? The method used to answer these questions consists of a comparison between visually similar houses from Gotland and the mainland based on orientation, dimensions, construction and dating.

    The comparison shows that the majority of the foundations investigated frequently are oriented west east, that the average dimensions are approximately 8 × 6 m and that the houses approximately can be dated between the 12th and 13th century. 

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Kärl och social gestik: Keramik i Mälardalen 1500 BC-400 AD2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis aims to study the pottery of the Bronze Age and Early Iron Age societies in Eastern Central Sweden (Uppsala and Västmanlands counties). The basis of the thesis is the material from c. 70 sites in the region. The majority are rescue excavations. The focus is on the function of the pottery, both technically and socially. It is a long-term study where changes in the traditions of handicraft are important. The handicraft is studied by analysis of ware, surface treatments and vessel forms. Lipid analyses have been made to determine probable functions of different vessels. The vessels are regarded as parts of different services or assemblages. The composition of the service is considered to be a signifying the complexity of the table manners. The proportions and degree of the restrictedness of the vessels are seen as an indicator of the table manners were meant to be individual or collective.

    The Bronze Age tradition seems to have been a more collective way of feasting with a service with unrestricted vessels for drinking- and eating. This tradition, influenced by continental ideas, disappears on the transition to the Iron Age. The entire tradition of making and handling with pottery was undergone radical changes around 500 BC. The causes to this change and others are discussed. A multiple causal explanation is presented with ideological, social, economic and climatic causes. The tradition with feasting including more elaborate ceramic vessels reoccurs later on during the Roman Iron Age.  The different ideological backgrounds to the traditions of feasting are considered.

    External influences are considered. They are seen in terms of course of invention, implementation and finally the transformation to tradition. Influences from Central and Eastern Europe are discussed and dated. During some periods external influences are few or even lacks. This is discussed and also the problem with connections between morphological traits and pottery styles versus ethnicity.  Thin-section analyses of the pottery are used to investigate if imported vessels are to be seen.

    The pottery in the graves is studied. The analysis indicates that graves seldom contain remains of entire vessels. The causes behind this phenomenon are discussed. The occurrence of different types of vessels in the graves are studied and correlated to gender. Eschatological causes are argued to be an important reason for choice of material. Pottery in cremations versus inhumation graves are separated due to different conditions for performing rituals. Ceramic vessels in inhumation graves during the Roman Iron Age are rare compared to other regions. The use of drinking vessels seems to have been more exclusive during the period.

     

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Samiska björngravar och dess återspegling av relationen mellan människa och djur.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Sami bear graves is an important source for archaeological research on the indigenous people of the Nordic countries. They bring stories of the past through the bones and through written sources from the 17th century. The mythological stories tell us about interactions between man and the holy creature that is the bear, and the buried bones have their own stories to tell. The aim of this study is to analyse the connection between the Sami and the bear and search for a thicker understanding about the reasons for this animal to be buried in own graves. By close readings of archaeological reports, analyses of the Sami culture and religious practices where the bear is present, and, not the least, thoughts about the fluid borders between human and animal agents, a bigger picture will emerge that explains why the bear were of such importance. This paper will thus be a contribution to the knowledge of the Sami culture and the archaeological research that has emerged over the last century.

  • 19.
    Falck, Anna-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Seglets introduktion i Skandinavien: En undersökning kring indikationer för seglets uppkomst under bronsåldern2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The first image depicted of sail are in Egypt and dated to the late fourth millennium BC. Around the third millennium BC the introduction of sail began in the eastern Mediterranean.Some researchers do not believe that sail have existed in Scandinavia until about 8th century AD. The reason for this is because of the lack of archaeological evidence. The question that may be asked is whether it is reasonable that it took about 3000-3500 years for the sail to getto Scandinavia from the eastern Mediterranean? The purpose of this essay is to examine and describe which indications that are available to support the occurrence of the sail in Scandinavia during the Bronze Age. Indications will be studied in trade contacts, rock art boats, and boat constructions.The study is relevant to gain a greater understanding of the Scandinavia´s movements on the open water, trade contacts and boat construction during the Bronze Age.The result reveals that Scandinavia probably had an indirect contact with areas that used sails. Indications for contact with areas in Europe are shown by imports and exports of amber,metals, artefacts and similarities between rock carvings depicting ships. Some of Scandinavia´s rock art boats seem to show attributes such as mast and sails, but it is difficult to get an understanding by looking at the pictures only. One idea is that a change is required in the keel of the boats for sailing. The result reveals that an alternative to keel may have been double steering oars. From an experimental archaeological survey of Bengtsson & Bengtsson (2011), it seems that Scandinavian Bronze Age boats have managed to get sailed.

  • 20.
    Fallgren, Jan-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Farm and village in the Viking Age2008In: The Viking World, London and New York: Routledge , 2008, 67-76 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Fallgren, Jan-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Fornborgar, bebyggelse och odlingslandskap2008In: Gråborg på Öland: om en borg, ett kapell och en by, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2008, 119-136 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Fallgren, Jan-Henrik
    et al.
    Univ Aberdeen, Kings Coll, Ctr Scandinavian Studies, Aberdeen AB9 1FX, Scotland.;Univ Aberdeen, Kings Coll, Dept Archaeol, Aberdeen AB9 1FX, Scotland..
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The Ritual Use of Brooches in Early Medieval Forts on Öland, SwedenL'usage rituel des fibules dans les enceintes fortifiées de l’île d’Öland en Suède au haut moyen âgeDer rituelle Gebrauch von Fibeln in den frühmittelalterlichen Befestigungen auf der schwedischen Insel Öland2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 4, 681-703 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the largest find of exquisite gilded silver brooches ever made in Scandinavia came to light during a metal detector survey in a small fort on oland in the Baltic Sea. It consisted of five hoards buried in five different houses within the fort. The brooches were of the Dreiknopfbugelfibeln/radiate-headed and relief types. Three of the hoards also contained large quantities of beads and pendants, some quite exclusive and rare. In addition, the upper part of another relief brooch probably belonged to a sixth hoard ploughed up in the late nineteenth century. In 2011, Kalmar County Museum excavations at the site of these hoard finds also revealed the traces of a massacre. Though a connection between the deposition of the hoards and the massacre is plausible, several elements suggest that the deposits are ritual in character and unrelated to the attack on the fort. The regular placing of the hoards in the right corner inside the entrance of the houses suggests ritual acts, and the composition of the hoards demonstrates that the deposits are symbolic. We conclude that the hoards and the brooches are props belonging to the interior of the forts and to activities conducted inside them; they may have been worn by some women during rituals. Why these hoards were left in the Sandby fort is, however, no doubt related to its destruction.

  • 23.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Finsta i Skederid (U ATA3916/47)2013In: Futhark: International Journal of Runic Studies, ISSN 1892-0950, Vol. 3, 125-134 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Roman Imperialism and Runic Literacy: The Westernization of Northern Europe (150-800 AD)2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation discusses Roman imperialism and runic literacy. It employs an interdisciplinary terminology. By means of terms new to archaeology, the growth of a specialized language, a technolect, is traced until it enters the realm of literacy. The author argues that there is more than one way for literacy to appear in prehistoric cultures. The ’normal’ perception is that literacy grows out of a need to keep records of a growing economic surplus. The ’other’ way for a culture to become literate is that someone else forces literacy upon it. This has been the case in many parts of the world subject to Western imperialism. The onslaught of Roman imperialism caused the invention of runic literacy in Northern Europe during the Early Roman Iron Age. The invention of the runic script should thus be seen as a preemptive reaction to the threat of Westernization. A comparison is made with a number of Early Modern Period cases of newly invented scripts caused by the arrival of literate Westerners in West Africa. The invention and introduction of the runes may well have been a dictated shift in literacy, seeking to break away from Latin. A number of dictated shifts in literacy from Early Modern Period America and Modern Period Asia are studied in comparison. The interaction between Germanic and Roman affinities was accentuated by the Roman army’s recruitment of Germanic men. These came to dominate the Roman army. This gave rise to a Germanic kleptocracy, a criminal rule in the post-Roman world. The role of runic literacy changed in the post-Roman aftermath of the Migration and Vendel Periods as the kleptocratic elite found it increasingly difficult to support a lavish lifestyle that included runic literacy. As a result, there was a decline in runic literacy in Northern Europe until the economic revival of the Viking Period. By then, it was clear that the North was soon to be integrated into the Christian West.

  • 25.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lejdegård, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Victor, Helena
    The Fall and Decline of the Roman Urban Mind2011In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herrschend & Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia , 2011, 277-294 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lind, Lennart
    Stockholm University.
    The Coins in the Grave of King Childeric2015In: Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History (JAAH), E-ISSN 2001-1199, no 14, 1-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contextualizes some one hundred mid- to late 5th century solidi and two hundred silver coins found in the grave of King Childeric in Tournai, Belgium. We argue that the coins in the grave must have been assembled for the specific purpose of the burial rite and that some of the participants in the burial rite were allowed to look at the coins before the grave was sealed. We argue that they were capable of identifying the various coins because they were literate and familiar with Roman iconography. It follows that the solidus hoard together with the other coins is a meaningful composition that has been manipulated for ideological purposes by Clovis himself. The coins must hence be explained in a manner that considers Clovis’ ideological motives, as the grave and its contents run contrary to all usual explanations.

  • 27.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Fernando
    Univ Oxford Wolfson Coll, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD, England..
    Subsidies for the Roman West?: The flow of Constantinopolitan solidi to the Western Empire and Barbaricum2016In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 9, 249-269 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the presence of solidi struck in Constantinople found in 5th and early to mid-6th century solidus hoards in the Western Empire, Italy in particular. Some 112 different solidus hoards in eleven regions are compared and evaluated. It is suggested that solidi from Constantinople in most of these hoards may be interpreted as the evidence of subsidies for the Western Empire. A possible cause for the uneven but lengthy supply of gold from Constantinople to the Western emperor could have been the fear of Western insolvency and ultimately a state bankruptcy.

  • 28.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Soulat, Jean
    Fischer, Teodora Linton
    Sword parts and their depositional contexts - Symbols in Migration and Merovingian Period martial society2013In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, Vol. 108, no 2, 109-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key feature of swords from the Migration and Merovingian Periods is that they consist of many different parts, as recently highlighted by the discovery of the Staffordshire hoard. This paper seeks to understand sword parts and their depositional contexts by interpreting them as symbols of kleptocracy, animated by their object biographies in a martial society. This is done by evaluating four important finds from Sweden: a stray intact sword from Scania, a cremation grave from Heberg in Halland, a wetland deposit from Snosback in Vastergotland, and the settlement finds from Uppakra in Scania. The presence of the various different parts varies substantially in the different kinds of contexts. In particular, the Uppakra settlement is missing hundreds of sword parts that ought to have been there given the professional excavations and systematic metal-detecting over many years there. This allows for the interpretation of the Uppakra sword parts as the remains of a battlefield of about AD 600 where most of the sword parts were removed from the site shortly after the battle.

  • 29.
    Flygare, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Den norrländska jakt- och fångstkulturens hällmålningar och deras lokalisation.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rock paintings of the hunter-gatherers in the province of Norrland, and their localisation.

    The aim of this thesis is to find a couple of distinguishing features for the localisation of the rock paintings of the hunter-gatherers in Norrland. This will be done through studies of Swedish and international literature, about ancient rock-art and the belief system of the hunter-gatherers. I will make comparisons  with other groups of hunter-gatherers and try to find analogies. My belief is that there must be a large number of undetected rock paintings in Norrland. They are hard to find because of overgrowth by lichen and damages due to wethering. Theretoo I feel that there hasn´t been enough of structured surveys. I hope that my resulting short list of practical clues of where to find them will help:

    • seek for them in the boreal forest area from 200 meters above the sea level to the present alpine tree line zone
    • in close vicinity to neolithic winter dwellings
    • in close vicinity to pitfall traps
    • on vertical rock walls of cliffs or boulders
    • in close vicinity to standing water/ alternatively in a hillside in the forest
    • the rock faces to the south
    • on imposing natural formations
    • try to find them in cloudy, humid weather

  • 30. Forsberg, Lars
    et al.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Converging conclusions from different archaeological perspectives: The early settlement of northern Sweden1999In: L'Europe des dernier chasseurs: Èpipaléolithique et `Mesolithique / [ed] André Thévenin, 1999, 313-319 p.Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The startingpoint for this paper is two separate but contemporaneous investigations dealing with the Early Stone Age of Northern Sweden. In the first study, Forsberg attempted to study the economic and social aspect of the Mesolithic in Northern Sweden on a macrolevel. In the other, Knutsson on a microlevel, started his research by a source critical evalustaion of a stratified site with early mesolithic components in the same area. The two studies were initiated independently at roughly the same time some years agoand, although different in scope and source material, they shared among other things a chronological interest.

    The separate analyses showed that the previously anticipated cultural and chronological framework of the Norrland Mesolithic had to be abandoned. The two phase periodization with the handle core tradition as the initial phase had to be changed int a three period structure with the handle core tradition in the middle. The fact that this discovery came as a total surprise to the authors, that it was made contemporaneous, independently and with different means, promoted an epistemological discussion on the current opposition between an objectivist and relativist position. In the paper, the authors want to reach beyond this constructed opposition. It is stated that, without having to turn to a passive reflection of how it once was, a meningful study of the past is possible and that the archaeological material itself does not allow that all interpretations are seen as equivalent.

  • 31.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Bunbury, Judith M.
    University of Cambridge.
    Migrating Nile: Augering in Egypt2016In: Science in the Study of Ancient Egypt / [ed] S. Zakrzewski, A. Shortland, and J. Rowland, New York and London: Routledge, 2016, 93-97 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian D.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Peeters, Jan
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Aberystwyth, Dyfed, Wales..
    Pennington, Benjamin T.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Emery, Virginia L.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    Johansson, Carolin
    Medelhavsmuseet Natl Museums World Culture, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Theban Harbours And Waterscapes Survey, Spring 20162016In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 102, no 1, 13-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Report on the 2016 spring season of the Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey (THaWS). The article discusses the geoarchaeological and geophysical survey along a 3.2 km-long transect starting close to the front of the Temple of Millions of Years of Ay and Horemheb and stretching to the village of Geziret el-Bairat on the West Bank of the Nile.

  • 33.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian David
    University of Southampton.
    Hunter, Morag Ann
    University of Cambridge.
    Pennington, Benjamin Thomas
    University of Southampton.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth University.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    University of Southampton.
    Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey, 20142015In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 100, 41-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian David
    University of Southampton.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth University.
    Pennington, Benjamin Thomas
    University of Southampton.
    Löwenborg, Daniel J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Masson-Berghoff, Aurélia
    British Museum.
    Emery, Virginia Leigh
    American University in Dubai.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    University of Southampton.
    Hunter, Morag Ann
    University of Cambridge.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Johansson, Carolin
    Medelhavsmuseet, Museums of World Culture, Stockholm.
    Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey, 20152016In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Försvunnen värld framträder: Rec. av Maja Hagerman Försvunnen värld. Om den stärsta arkeologiska utgrävningen någonsin i Sverige.2011In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423, ISSN 0347-0423, Vol. sept, no 5, 48-51 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Les chiens de la Tapisserie de Bayeux: Quelques éléments de réflection2009In: La Tapisserie de Bayeux: Une cronique des temps vikings? / [ed] Sylvette Lemagnen, Bayeux: Editions Point de Vues Bonsecours , 2009, 132-145 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Runstensbroar i ett kvinnoperspektiv2010In: Bro till evigheten: Brons rumsliga, sociala och religiösa dimension under vikingatid och tidig medeltid / [ed] Andreas Nordberg & Lars Andersson, Stockholm: Stockholms Läns Museum , 2010, 24-31 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Similarities or Differences? Rune Stones as a Starting Point for Some Reflections on Viking Age Identity2011In: Viking Settlements & Viking Society: Papers from the Proceedings of the Sixteenth Viking Congress, Reykjavík and Reykholt, 16th-23rd August 2009 / [ed] Svavar Sigmundsson, Reykjavík: Hid Íslenzka Fornleifafélag & University of Iceland Press , 2011, utkom mars 2012, 147-161 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of identity is discussed and the Scandinavian Late Viking Age rune stones are pointed out as a field of research where we can discover how identity was perceived. The famous Jarlabanke of Täby, who raised several stones in memory of himself is mentioned as an example of a man who obviously had excellent selfconfidence and who was certainly aware of his personal identity. It is argued that the reason for using very similar design of runic carvings could be due to a political system comparable to the goði-institution of the Icelandic Commonwealth, as a wish from the raiser to show his loyalty to the local chieftain who may have erected the first rune stone with a specific design. The distribution of rune sones of great similarity may thus be an expression of such a social organisation.

  • 39.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of Old Norse religion2009In: The Viking World / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, 249-256 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of Old Norse religion2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, 249-256 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of the Christianisation2009In: The Viking world / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, 639-644 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The Material Culture of the Christianisation2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, 639-644 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Valsgärde Studies: the Place and its People, Past and Present2008In: Valsgärde Studies: the Place and its People, Past and Present, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2008, 65-82 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the impressive mound Valsgärde 57, containing a female cremation grave from c. 700 AD, as the starting point, two richly furnished female cremation graves from the first half of the 10th century AD, Valsgärde 85 and 94, are discussed. An analysis of the find assemblages leads to the conclusion that the two vomen represent both social and religious power.

  • 44.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Runestones and the Christian mission2009In: The Viking World / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, 629-638 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Runestones and the Christian Mission2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, 629-638 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Kitzler Åhfeldt, Laila
    Runstenar runt Vallentunasjön2008In: Hem till Jarlabanke: Jord, makt och evigt liv i östra Mälardalen under järnålder och medeltid, Lund: Historiska Media , 2008, 335-359 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Valsgärde revisited2011In: Det 61. Internationale Sachsensymposion 2010 Haderslev, Danmark / [ed] Linda Boye, Per Ethelberg, Lene Heidemann Lutz, Pernille Kruse, Anne Birgitte Sörensen, Neumünster: Wachholtz , 2011, 123-139 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Att leva i gård och by under järnåldern2009In: Folkkultur i fokus: tretton jubileumsföreläsningar / [ed] Maj Reinhammar, Uppsala: Kungl Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2009, 21-32 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Early Humans and Their World2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ekki nýtr sólar: När himlen färgades röd av gudarnas blod2009In: á austrvega. Saga and East Scandinavia: The 14th International Saga Conference. Uppsala 9th - 15th August 2009, Vol. 1. / [ed] Agneta Ney, Henrik Williams & Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist, 2009, 318-326 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
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