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  • 1.
    Bönnemark, Margit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Binamn i det forntida Egypten: En undersökning av personnamn, särskilt rn nfr, under Gamla riket, Förstaintermediet och Mellersta riket samt under Senperioden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Ancient Egypt, names were very important, in this life and the next. Gods had a multitude of names, and kings were usually given five names, but also private individuals could have several names, given at birth or later. One of these names was called rn nfr (the good name), and it was especially prevalent during the Old Kingdom. The term rn nfr slowly disappeared during the First Intermediate Period and the Middle Kingdom, but reappeared during the Late Period.The characteristics of all occurrences that could be found of rn nfr from the Old Kingdom and the First Intermediate Period and the Middle Kingdom were studied and compared to the occurrences of rn nfr in the Late Period. They were also compared to the first names of the individuals who wore these rn nfr.The results of this investigation show that there are great differences between the earlier periods and the Late Period, especially in that the names of gods and kings are often prevalent in the rather long rn nfr of the Late Period, possibly used for official and religious purposes. The rn nfr of earlier periods are often short names, which people were probably called, on an everyday basis. They sometimes constitute abbreviations of first names, with phonological changes taking place, in the majority of cases only consisting of three consonants without any apparent meaning, perhaps used from a very early age, and in a few cases taking on the characteristics of true nicknames.

  • 2.
    Davidsson, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Khopesh: Den rike mannens yxa?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With its exotic appearance and depictions in ancient Egyptian art and literature, the curved sword referred to as ’khopesh’ has been the source of much speculation. While its actual use as a weapon of war is debated, as is its level of effectiveness, there can be no doubt that it was a highly prestigious symbol of power. This essay aims to shed light on not only the practical aspects of such a weapon but also to delve into the cultural and in particular royal ideological roles. This is achieved through studying textual sources, representations in art and preserved examples of the weapon. Comparisons will also be made with other contemporary bladed weapons in Egypt and its vicinity. Aspects of metallurgy which allows for the making of swords will also be touched upon.

  • 3.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Differential object marking in Coptic2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    La reconstitution du verbe en égyptien de tradition 400–30 avant J.-C.2003Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two variants of ancient Egyptian were used for different categories of written communication during the last millennium B.C. The vernacular, known as Demotic, served as the written language for administrative, legal and literary documents. Traditional Egyptian (égyptien de tradition), written in the hieroglyphic script and with linguistic structures that are purported to imitate those of the Classical Egyptian, was still used to compose mainly religious documents.

    The present work treats the verbal system of Traditional Egyptian using texts dated to the period 400-30 B.C. These documents include royal stelae and priestly decrees, among these the Rosetta Stone, as well as biographical inscriptions. After a general introduction, and a presentation of morphological characteristics, the study takes up the basic verbal patterns. The suffix conjugations, the sDm=f and sDm.n=f , in its various meanings and combinations, affirmative and negative, are dealt with, as is the pseudoparticiple. The infinitive, as it appears in e.g. pseudoverbal constructions and the sDm pw ir.n=f is examined in a separate section, with an additional chapter covering the passive forms of the suffix conjugation.

    A summary of the conclusions that are reached by this study are presented in the final chapter. Graphic variations show that morphemes formerly used to distinguish verbal classes are largely ignored. Only a few irregular verbs still display, at times, writings that retain the old inflections, often, however, without corresponding to the category that would be expected given the context. These writings are unevenly distributed among the documents, testifying to the existence of local, or perhaps rather individual, grammatical systems. Similarly, the co-existence in Traditional Egyptian of the two forms of the suffix conjugation sDm.n=f and sDm=f, both used to express a completed event, is best understood when each document is studied separately. There is a general avoidance of forms and expressions that parallel those found in Demotic. This appears to have been of greater importance than following the rules of Classical Egyptian. The use of the conjunctive and infinitival constructions, under certain conditions, confirms this observation.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Philip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    An Investigation into the Swine of Ancient Egypt2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Grisen var en viktig del av kosten för delar av befolkningen i Egypten från den för-Dynastiska perioden och framåt. Trots omfattande benfynd är grisen sällan avbildad eller noterad i egyptisk ikonografi eller litteratur. Den här studien har som mål att beskriva varför grisen sällan var avbildad eller nedtecknad under den Dynastiska perioden från det Gamla Riket fram till det Nya Riket. Det finns flera teorier som beskriver varför grisen är sällan förekommande i bild och skrift från tidsperioden, främst ekonomiska, sociala och kulturella. Dessa teorier beskrivs och analyseras i uppsatsen.

    Källorna består av tidigare forskning och utgrävningsrapporter: Fynden är i huvudsak gjorda i bosättningar för arbetarklassen. Ett fåtal egyptiska texter och avbildningar med relevans för grisar kommer också att analyseras.

    Fynd från bosättningar indikerar att grisen var en viktig källa till protein i de byar som dominerades av hantverkare och bönder. Teorier som bygger på att det fanns religiösa eller kulturella tabun mot grisen har knappast stöd av fynd eller andra ursprungliga källor. Istället indikerar frånvaron av grisen i tidens litteratur och andra avbildningar att den hade ett begränsat ekonomiskt värde för den styrande klassen. Det torde vara det huvudsakliga skälet till varför man inte ansåg grisen vara värdig eller relevant att avbilda.

  • 6.
    Gröhn Nordin, Mimmi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Den Fula Sanningen: En studie om definitionen av fulhet i forntidens Egypten2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Ancient Egypt, the concept of beauty is well-known and discussed by modern scholars. This concept is known from the old Egyptian language as ‘nfr’. In contrast to this, the term and concept of ancient Egyptian ugliness is neither understood nor analyzed. Since the Egyptians indeed had a perception of societal beauty, then logically, they would have had a perception of ugliness as well. This study aims to uncover the truth about the ugly and grotesque in ancient Egypt, questioning how this would have been expressed and manifested in Egyptian society. The research in this study is conducted through the hermeneutic method of comparison and analyzation, which of mostly is pictorial, however includes some textual evidence as well.      

  • 7.
    Hallström, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    The False Doors of Hershefnakht, Nyankhanty and Senetites2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns the false doors of Hershefnakht, Nyankhanty and Senetites that are currently on display in the Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities in Stockholm. None of these doors has received much attention in the past, and certainly not their own dedicated study. Previously, these doors have only been roughly dated, and the status of their owners in society were practically unknown. This study seeks to narrow down the dating of these false doors and to more precisely make a judgement on their owners’ social standing within society. To more precisely date the false doors, relevant features are presented together with relevant information concerning the characteristic in question. As such, a more precise date is built from the various relevant elements of the door. The false doors are translated with appropriate commentary on the short texts. The most important parts of these texts are the titles and through comparisons to other holders of the same titles and discussion of what is known about these titles; a judgement of their social status is made. In the end, Hershefnakht’s and Senetites’ doors can be dated to, at earliest, the reign of Pepy II though their latest possible date is more difficult to establish with any certainty. Nyankhanty’s false door can be dated, at earliest to King Nyuserre Ini’s reign with the latest possible date being the end of the 5th dynasty. Due to only having a single title, Hershefnakht’s social standing is somewhat uncertain and it would be possible to both over- and underplay his status. On the other hand, Nyankhanty’s status can be established with more certainty and it seems he was a high-ranking priest and a commander of a force of men. Senetites can quite easily be placed in or close to the court, but the position therein is more difficult to define.

  • 8.
    Hein, Irmgard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Excursus A: La céramique importée palestinienne du 2e millénaire av.J.C. provenant de la fouille du Trésor de Thoutmosis Ier2012In: Karnak North X: Le trésor de Thoutmosis Ier. La céramique. Vol. 1: texte. Vol. 2: figures et planches. / [ed] Helen Jacquet-Gordon, Le Caire: Institut Francais d'archéologie oriental , 2012, p. 147-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of potsherds have been recovered from the treasury of Thutmosis Ist, a large architectural complex at Karnak North, Luxor/Thebes/Egypt.  The various strata within the perimeter revealed a rich material from the early Middle Kingdom until Roman times, showing the evolution of the indigenous pottery as well as the extent of contacts between Thebes and its neighbours, from Nubia in the south towards the Oases, the Levante and the Mediterranean areas.

    The excursus A is a detailed analysis of the Palestinian imports, mainly amphorae from the 2nd Millenium B.C. The Palestinian material is extremly important for the reconstruction of Theban trade connections and exchange with the Canaanite region starting already during the late Middle Kingdom. Wheras Canaanite contacts are already well testified from the Eastern Nile Delta from this period, it is the first large collection of Canaanite jars from Upper Egypt, which is studied in detail.

  • 9.
    Hein, Irmgard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Gaza och Egypten på 1000-talet f.Kr.2011In: Gaza: porten mot havet / [ed] Sofia Häggman, Stockholm: Medelhavsmuseet , 2011, p. 61-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ingvarsson-Sundström, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Museum Anatomicum Upsaliense2012In: Uppsala mitt i Sámpi: Rapport från ett symposium arrangerat av Föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Upplandsmuseet 4-5 maj 2011 / [ed] Håkan Tunón, Märit Frändén, Carl-Gösta Ojala, May-Britt Öhman, Uppsala: Centrum för biologisk mångfald , 2012, p. 66-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jansson, Wilhelm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    To Move an Obelisk2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are more Egyptian obelisks outside of Egypt than there are left where they were made. The obelisks are certainly beautiful, but what lies beneath are uncountable hours, days and years of work. Work which made the obelisks end up where they are today. From quarrying these enormous pieces of stone by smashing rock against rock, to building ships without equal for their transportation. It is hard to understand the amount of resources, manpower and organization that went into creating these tall monuments. Therefore, this study will attempt to examine each step in transporting the obelisks, from the quarry to their destination. Where theories collide, the study will weigh them against each other critically to give a fuller account of the transportation of the obelisks of Egypt.

    This study will begin by presenting a background, or basis, which will be further built upon as it progresses. The first chapter is mainly focused around the circumstance of transportation, along with giving a basic description of obelisks as individual objects.

    The next step lies in studying the general shipbuilding techniques used in ancient Egypt. This in turn will help in understanding the obelisk ships and the loading and unloading of these vessels. The obelisk ships and their loading will be the focal point of this study.

    The mainstay of the sources used for this study comes from earlier theories. The primary sources of this study will mainly consist of textual remains along with depictions. 

  • 12.
    Kyllenius, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Synen på Kenherkhepshef2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract

    Kyllenius, B. 2019. Synen på Kenherkhepshef

    Kyllenius, B. 2019. The view of Kenherkhepshef

    How do we treat biographies of historical persons? Do subjective judgements of them change in the course of time, or are they uncritically repeated by the researchers? Kenherkhepshef was a scribe in Deir el-Medina in the 19th dynasty, when the big pharaoh tombs in the Kings Valley were being built. He had a high position as a senior scribe of the tomb. He also collected papyri with different kinds of texts, which were inherited and sometimes changed by his relatives after his death. The czech egyptologist Jaroslav Černý, who was making research from the 1920s and onwards about the community of workmen in Deir el-Medina, was the first to write a characterisation of Kenherkepshef. His opinion of him was not very positive. Many egyptologists after him have been writing about Kenherkepshef. Most of them seem to continue and even strenghten the judgement that Černý gave him, often with little reconsideration, and so this scribe has got a bad reputation among egyptologists. There are some negative epithets that often appears. Some authors however do praise his collection of texts and his intellectual interests. In this respect their judgements differ from Černý’s. Four egyptologists have written popular works on subjects related to Deir el-Medina, where Kenherkhepshef has been treated. One of them wrote fiction. These authors have felt more free in their opinions. The authors who have written positive judgements of him often add the traditional negative opinions as well. Two authors have tried to rehabilitate him.

    Many authors have been fascinated by him, he is considered a gratifying person for a narrative. Maybe we are more interested in a historical person who is not altogether sympathetic and can show us some human traits, good or bad. Černý’s sources – and ours –are very few, and Kenherkhepshefs work in the royal necropolis went on for many years, so there is much we do not know.

    I am making a survey of what the egyptologists after Černý have written about Kenherkhepshef. I have made a critical analysis of their interpretations. My study has shown that often the same subjective judgements are being uncritically passed on.

    A late work is Silvia Štubňovás unpublished master’s thesis on Kenherkhepshef. She is writing objectively in a scholarly way quite different from most earlier egyptologists. She has collected a broad range of material on this scribe and tries to draw a portrait of him. She discusses the subjective judgements thoroughly.

  • 13.
    Ljungkvist, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Billing, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Svensk arkeologi i Egypten: Kom-el-Khawaled - en stad från romersk tid i Nildeltat2007In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X , no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract
  • 14.
    Maleh, Armani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    'Is there no nurse to offer you protection?': Ammors betydelse gällande beskydd av barn i det antika Egypten2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study discusses the role of a wet nurse regarding the protection of a child in ancient Egypt. There is evidence of the phenomenon of the wet nurse dating from the Old Kingdom’s Pyramid texts, depictions in tombs from the New kingdom, to contracts between the wet nurse and her employer from the Late Period. They were most frequent in royal and elite families and made it possible for the mother to participate in social activities without worrying about feeding her baby, as well as being a symbol for economic wealth. 

    Wet nurses have been found depicted in funerary contexts, holding ritual protective objects, and been mentioned in protective spells targeted towards children. This shows that the wet nurse had a part in the protection of a child and the intention behind this study is to discuss her participation in it and what it involves. The sources used in this study are to contain two subjects to be of relevance: wet nurse and the protection of a child, which lead to a restricted amount of material to analyse. The material studied contains of amulets, serpent staffs, three apotropaic wands, depictions from two graves and one protective spell. The analysis resulted in a conclusion claiming that the practice of protection is a part of the wet nurse’s occupation and were practiced with at least an apotropaic wand. Moreover, the depiction of her holding apotropaic wands in funerary contexts representing rebirth shows that the wet nurse is present and offering protection in the events of a child’s birth.

  • 15.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Uppsala University Museum.
    Döden i det gamla Egypten2003In: Memento Mori: Kom ihåg att dö / [ed] Kerstin Smeds, Stockholm: Statens historiska museum , 2003, 1, p. 46-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Uppsala University Museum.
    Egyptens djur2002 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Uppsala University Museum.
    Skelett i sanden och mumier i garderoben: Fornegyptiska begravningstraditioner i gränslandet2009In: I tillvarons gränsland: Perspektiv på kroppen mellan liv och död / [ed] Fredrik Ekengren & Liv Nilsson Stutz, Lund: Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2009, 1, p. 146-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Uppsala University Museum.
    The Animals of Egypt2002 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Imboden, Silvano
    Dept. of Information, University of Pisa.
    Facial Reconstruction and the Uppsala Mummy Survey2002In: Proceedings of the 14th Table ronde Informatique et Égyptologie, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Metz, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Uppsala University Museum.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Mumier på röntgen: En vetenskaplig belysning av fornegyptiska mumier2009In: Medlemsforum för SFMR (Svensk förening för medicinsk radiologi), ISSN 1654-2827, no 4, p. 13-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Meyer-Dietrich, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    ”Bind mig väl, ni krigare,men lämna mitt öra fritt! Allt som hörs och syns och känns ska bli mitt.”: Örats betydelse i det gamla Egypten2013In: Institutionens historier: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist / [ed] E. Weiberg / S. Carlsson/ G. Ekroth, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2013, first, p. 61-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    artikeln illustrerae med hälp av texter örat och hörandets betydelse i det gamla egypten

  • 22.
    Meyer-Dietrich, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Die Opetprozession – mehr als nur eine rituelle Verbindung von Karnak mit Luxor: Die Verwendung von Schall zur Erzeugung eines symbolischen Raumes bei der Opetprozession2010In: 8. Ägyptologische Tempeltagung: Interconnections between Temples / [ed] Dolinska, Monika / Beinlich, Horst, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz , 2010, p. 123-136Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Meyer-Dietrich, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    "Du weisst, was du getan hast!": Die Übertretung akustischer Normen für Priester2011In: Laut und Leise: Der Gebrauch von Stimme und Klang in historischen Kulturen / [ed] Erika Meyer-Dietrich, Bielefeld: transcript Verlag , 2011, p. 121-146Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    the papers deals with the violation of rules for sonic behaviour

  • 24.
    Meyer-Dietrich, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Laut und Leise: Der Gebrauch von Stimme und Klang in historischen Kulturen2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The papers deal with sonic practices, sound symbolism and discourse in ancient cultures.

  • 25.
    Pedersén, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Troy, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Egyptians in Nineveh1993In: N.A.B.U., ISSN 0989-5671, no 48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Piili, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Dans i det forntida Egypten: En studie om kvinnor och män i dansscener2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research about dance has chiefly been focused on categorization of dance but no earlier study has specifically dealt with dance scenes where men and women occur in the same register, or over a longer time frame. This study concerns scenes where men and women dance in the same register and scenes included comes from the Old, Middle and New Kingdoms. The study investigates in what contexts men and women occur in the same register, and why and the study grasps dance at its widest sense with movements that also could be related to acrobatics and play. The study is an iconographic investigation and analyses will be made according to culture-specific art-conventions. 12 scenes and one fragment are included and analyzed. The conclusion shows that in each time period the occurrence of scenes are concentrated to specific places, and sometimes they are located in close approximation geographically, had the same artist or have tomb-owners that are related to each other. This points to a local expression of dance scenes with mixed gender rather than it was usual nation-wide. The men and women occur in contexts that where usual for dance scenes to be in such as presentation, procession and funerary scenes. Physical contact between the two genders is rare, and is only seen once in the tomb of Baqet III of the Middle Kingdom. Even though the female and male dancers are in the same register they are likely to be seen separated by people clapping their hands or by empty spaces between them. If this separation reflects the reality is hard to tell but the Egyptians seemed to have preferred, esthetically, to depict the two genders separated in these ways in dance scenes. 

  • 27.
    Sandström, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Ancient Egyptian Philosophy: or a chimaera of the popular significance2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis investigates a continuously held assumption, within the field of Egyptology, that undertakes to derive classical Hellenic philosophy from a previous philosophical tradition, initiated centuries before in ancient Egypt. The study will proceed with an initial clarification of ancient Greek philosophy, and a brief outline of some topics from its main research fields: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and philosophy of mind. The essential properties that signifies Greek philosophy, and indeed modern philosophy, will be formalised in a model appropriate for textual analysis. The Egyptian texts, that have been characterized as philosophy by the Egyptologists, will then be analysed, and the concluding result will be compared against the model of philosophy, to ascertain if the selected Egyptian texts can be classified as philosophy, or not.

  • 28.
    Saxén, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    En praktisk aspekt av döden: Kvinnlig arvsrätt under Mellersta och Nya Riket2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about female inheritance in ancient Egypt. Death had a very important part in the Egyptian culture. The goal in this essay is to put focus on an everyday aspect of death, which is often left out. That is, how the living was affected by the death of a close relative. Since women had a weaker economic position than men, they are likely to have been more affected. Hence, the essay will focus on women. Most of the existing research is based on primary sources from the Late and Ptolemaic Period. But since that is relatively late in the Egyptian history, it is important to see what female inheritance looked like earlier in history. It is also important to compare different periods in order to see if inheritance developed during time or stayed unchanged. The issues will be how the death of the husband and a family member affected the woman, and how her death affected other persons close to her. In order to answer this, primary sources consisting of texts from Lahun (the Middle Kingdom) and Deir el-Medina (the New Kingdom) will be analyzed in a comparative study. The most important results are that inheritance was based on the relationship between the individual rather than on gender and the death of the husband had the biggest influence on the woman’s life. How big the influence was depended on whether or not she inherited as a widow.

  • 29.
    Strandberg, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    The Gazelle in Ancient Egyptian Art: Image and Meaning2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis establishes the basic images of the gazelle in ancient Egyptian art and their meaning. A chronological overview of the categories of material featuring gazelle images is presented as a background to an interpretation.

    An introduction and review of the characteristics of the gazelle in the wild are presented in Chapters 1-2. The images of gazelle in the Predynastic material are reviewed in Chapter 3, identifying the desert hunt as the main setting for gazelle imagery.

    Chapter 4 reviews the images of the gazelle in the desert hunt scenes from tombs and temples. The majority of the motifs characteristic for the gazelle are found in this context. Chapter 5 gives a typological analysis of the images of the gazelle from offering processions scenes. In this material the image of the nursing gazelle is given particular importance.

    Similar images are also found on objects, where symbolic connotations can be discerned (Chapter 6). References to healing and regeneration are found, particularly in relationship to the context of the objects.

    The gazelle is found in a divine context in a limited material (Chapter 7). A discussion of these sources sees a focus on the gazelle as representative for the desert mountains as the setting for death and rebirth. This relates to the gazelle as a feminine image with a connection to the models of female divinity (Chapter 8).

  • 30.
    Troy, Lana
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Hommages à Fayza Haikal2008In: Chronique d'Égypte, ISSN 0009-6067, Vol. LXXXIII, no 165-166, p. 118-122Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Troy, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    'The Men behind the King': 6th Symposium on Egyptian Royal Ideology2015In: Journal of the American Oriental Society, ISSN 0003-0279, E-ISSN 2169-2289, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 892-894Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Troy, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    The queen as the divine counterpart of the pharaoh2008In: Queens of Egypt: from Hetepheres to Cleopatra, Monaco: Somogy Editions D'Art , 2008, p. 154-173Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Earlier Egyptian cataphora2018In: Lingua Aegyptia, ISSN 0942-5659, Vol. 26, p. 203-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview and a structural inventory of the various cataphoric uses of pronouns in Earlier Egyptian. It is shown that although the most commonly recognised types of cataphora are attested in the data, in this language a reference of pronouns is usually not established by following material. Much of the discussion centers on the issue of covert (zero) expletive cataphoric pronouns, which have been proposed to be common, but which in fact are probably equally, or even more, infrequent than their overt counterparts.

  • 34.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Illocution and speaker intent in Coptic: the case of the 'Autofocal' Second Tenses2015In: Zeitschrift für Ägyptischen Sprache und Altertumskunde, ISSN 0044-216X, Vol. 142, no 2, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is suggested that the so-called ‘autofocal’ second tenses attested in Coptic are characterised by uniform illocutionary properties. In most and perhaps all cases these constructions seem to appear when speakers view the propositional content of what is said as unacceptable, invalid, or, less often, defective interms of its information value. It is shown that cross-linguistic parallels to these uses are readily forthcoming from other languages, where propositions of similar sort are regularly coded with subjunctive and corresponding forms.

  • 35.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Various sorts of nothing: a typology of ellipsis in Earlier Egyptian2014In: Lingua Aegyptia, Vol. 22, p. 215-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief survey of thevarious kinds of grammatical ellipsis attested in Earlier Egyptian in addition to the already well-documented subject- and object omission. The various species of ellipsis attested are discussed along with remarks on the possible reasons for the absence in the data of certain further types thereof

  • 36.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Where to stick an adverbial in Earlier Egyptian2017In: Lingua Aegyptia, Vol. 25, p. 391-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a brief formal discussion, the syntactic and syntagmatic placement of (non-clausal) adverbials in Earlier Egyptian is shown to follow a set of morphological and semantic principles ranging from clitic-like status and iconicity to argument- and complement- versus adjunct role. However, they turn out to be of a rather flexible sort, and in case of clusters of adjunctive expressions the determining parameters seem increasingly to give way to pragmatically based decisions. The present study is a sequel to an earlier paper by the present author on the positioning of clausal adjuncts in Earlier Egyptian.

  • 37.
    Uljas, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Müller, Matthias
    Basel University, Basel, Switzerland.
    Loprieno, Antonio
    Basel University, Basel, Switzerland.
    Non-Verbal Predication in Ancient Egyptian2017Book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Winkler, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Egyptology.
    Looking at the Future: Divination and Astrology in Ancient Egypt2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study discusses divination in ancient Egypt, from the New Kingdom onwards in order to highlight the Egyptian elements in later astrological practices in Graeco-Roman Egypt. The first chapter treats divination and its study in general terms. Chapter two begins with a brief review of the concept of fate and continues with a discussion of the ancient Egyptians vocabulary that express contact with the divine and includes technical terms related to predicting the future. The third chapter treats the sage as specialist, with the competency to interpret divine messages and the movement of the celestial bodies. Chapter four examines ancient Egyptian deductive techniques with a focus on the dream interpretation and more particular the formalisation of those techniques in manuals form. The so-called Calendars of Good and Bad Day are also examined from this perspective. This is done in order to establish a pattern possibly employed for the other divinatory techniques, labelled here as chronomancy. The fifth chapter treats the first evidence for celestial divination in Egypt, involving the interpretation of heavenly phenomena as signs. In the sixth chapter, the Demotic evidence for astrology is described and discussed. First the general technical terminology of the ancient Egyptian astrologers is outlined. This is followed by an examination of the so-called Sothis Omina. The last part of this chapter treats the genethlialogical tradition of the birth horoscope as it is found in the Demotic astrological manuals. The chapter concludes with a brief study of the other tools of the astrologers. The last chapter outlines the major points of the study.

1 - 38 of 38
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