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  • 1.
    Anderson Boström, Sally
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    “Caribbean English and The Wine of Astonishment2016In: Panel Discussion: “Language and Translation in the Caribbean and Beyond”, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does current scholarship on literary translingualism and the “monolingual paradigm” (Yasemin Yildiz) reflect on the richly multilingual setting of the Caribbean? Drawing on Edgar Schneider’s dynamic model of postcolonial Englishes and Rebecca Walkowitz’s work on born-translated novels, this paper considers notions of monolingualism in conjunction with Earl Lovelace’s fourth novel, The Wine of Astonishment (1982). I argue this novel offers fertile ground for discussion on how the postcolonial Caribbean “writes back” to the imperial center in a decidedly local language that shatters notions of monolingual, Standard English literature. Lovelace utilizes a range of voices from the creole continuum to reveal issues of power related to religion, race and education. This paper evaluates how Lovelace’s use of Trinidadian Creole for not only the dialogue, but the narration of the novel, validates it as a literary language and challenges norms of standardizing local tongues for literary use. An engagement with concepts of linguistic imperialism and the scholarly work historically specific to the novel elucidate these points.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Fia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sundh, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Russian and Swedish Young Learners in Communication in English with the Use of Digital Tools2013In: Conference Proceedings of the 6th edition of ICT for Language Learning, Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2013, 259-263 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigates Swedish and Russian young learners’ uses of modern technology in international communication in English. Modern technology plays an increasing role in children’s documentation and international communication at schools. The role of the English language in new ways of communicating and interacting is therefore relevant to investigate. The development of new digital tools implies that young learners are not only consumers but also producers of information in English, and that new forms of representations can be used when communicating in English. The present study is a project of cooperation between the universities in Uppsala, Sweden and Kaliningrad, Russia and describes communication between three schools in Sweden and three schools in Russia. The communication at the websites provides useful material of 12-year-olds who used English as their lingua franca and as means of communicating at three common websites with the help of blogs, podcasts and films from September 2012 to May 2013. All the young learners’ productions at the three websites were studied in terms of modes of communication, length of contributions, structural complexity in the English language and topics selected in the messages. The results show that young Russian and Swedish learners are able to use the English language in authentic communication by using different digital tools within the topic fields of the levels A1 and A2 of the CEFR. The learners’ production showed evidence of the occurrence of complex structures and current non-standard features of the English language with very few instances of misunderstandings or communication breakdowns.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Fia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholms universitet.
    Sundh, Stellan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Young Learners: Communication and Digital Tools2015In: Contemporary Approaches to Activity Theory: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Behavior / [ed] Thomas Hansson, Hershey PA, USA: IGI Global, 2015, 19-37 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes a project aiming at investigating Swedish and Russian 12-year-old learners’ use ofICT. They communicate in English on three shared blogs. Their exchanges and contributions are analyzed with a focus on mediating tools, modes of communication and motives for collaboration. Ongoing activities are studied through classroom observations, interviews and a research circle. Results show that ICT plays a vital role as a mediating tool and a motive for collaboration. Results indicate that Russian and Swedish learners manage to interact in authentic communication in English with the help of digital tools. Opportunities to explore a variety of digital tools resulted in new forms of representation. International collaboration through ICT indicates that conflicting issues and developmental opportunities may challenge the current education system.

  • 4.
    Anglemark, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Språket på Internet: mer än förkortningar2006In: Humanister forskar: Humanistdagarna vid Uppsala universitet 2006, 2006, 183-187 p.Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 5.
    Anglemark, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'well folks im signing off here': Vocatives in Chat Room Conversation2006In: Dialogic language use = Dimensions du dialogisme = Dialogischer Sprachgebrauch / [ed] Irma Taavitsainen, Juhani Härmä & Jarmo Korhonen, Helsinki: Société Néophilologique , 2006, 295-304 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anglemark, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Address Terms in Computer Mediated Communication: Email, Chat and Weblogs2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation focuses on the use of address phrases in three forms of computer mediated communication (CMC) in English. The aim of the study is to examine how people address each other in email, online chat and weblogs. The three forms of CMC included in the study represent different types of communicative situations online as regards synchronicity, speed of production, number of participants and permanency. The study also investigates how the use of address phrases varies between the three forms and in relation to usage in spoken and other forms of written English.

    For the purposes of the project, three corpora were collected, one for each form of CMC. The email corpus comprises business email from the United States, the chat corpus includes data from a range of different types of multi-person chat rooms, and the weblog corpus consists of text from a number of personal weblogs. I then investigated the lexical and syntactic characteristics and the pragmatic functions of the address phrases found in the corpora. In the email and weblogs material, I also examined gender-related differences in the use of address phrases.

    The results of the investigation show that CMC users employ different types of address phrases in different forms of CMC; first names and online nicknames dominated in the email and chat material, while the weblogs included a large number of common nouns as headwords in the address phrase. Address phrases are also used for different pragmatic purposes in different types of CMC.

  • 7.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    A Revolution in Taste2009In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. August 13Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Aguecheek’s Beef, Belch’s Hiccup, and other gastronomic interjections: literature, culture and food among the early moderns2006Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An account of the way food culture has been put into language and language has been put into food, from 1470 to 1740.

  • 9.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘AIDS, Death, and the Analytic Frame’1998In: Free Associations, ISSN 0267-0887, E-ISSN 2047-0622, Vol. 48, 81-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Anti-geography’1998In: Early modern literary studies, ISSN 1201-2459, E-ISSN 1201-2459, Vol. 12, no 2, 1-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Anything is possible!’: MasterChef, World-Wide Illusion2016In: Food and Communication: Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery / [ed] Mark McWilliams, Devon: Prospect Books , 2016, 35-43 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A look at how MasterChef has spread through the world, based on an anglophone model, but expressing national culinary and cultural differences.

  • 12.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Cake: A Global History2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Celebrating Solitude: M.F.K. Fisher on Dining Alone2012In: Celebrations : Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 2011 / [ed] Mark Williams, Prospect Books , 2012, 23-30 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance theory and the idea of dining alone as it appears in the early writings of M.F.K. Fisher.

  • 14.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Celebrating Solitude: M.F.K. Fisher on Dining Alone2012In: Celebrations: Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery / [ed] Mark Mc Williams, Devon: Prospect Books , 2012, 23-30 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Disaster and the Response of Art in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale2015In: Leaves, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Dishing It Out: In Search of the Restaurant Experience2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    From the hamburger haven to the temple of gastronomy, the restaurant is a fixture of modern life. But why is that so? What needs has the restaurant come to satisfy, and what needs has it come to impose upon the experience of the modern world? In Dishing It Out, Robert Appelbaum travels around America and Europe and through the annals of literature and history to explore the social meaning of the restaurant – and to discover what we ought to be asking of the restaurant experience today.

  • 17.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Empires of the Atlantic World, in Historian2008In: The historian, ISSN 0018-2370, E-ISSN 1540-6563, Vol. 70, no 1, 186-188 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Eve’s and Adam’s Apple: Horticulture, Taste, and the Flesh of the Forbidden Fruit in Paradise Lost’,2002In: Milton quarterly, ISSN 0026-4326, E-ISSN 1094-348X, Vol. 36, no 4, 461-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Fantasias of Terrorism2013In: Journal for Cultural Research, ISSN 1479-7585, Vol. 18, no 2, 99-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An introduction to this special issue of the Journal for Cultural Research, this essay explains how terrorism may be said to equate to a “fantasia”, and how this fantasia has operated in different times and places. It also takes a close look at the popular fantasia promoted by the entertainment industry today, beginning with representations of the enemies of James Bond. In popular culture, terrorism is a spectre (along the lines of Ian Fleming’s SPECTRE) bent on the destruction of society, and yet it is also a sign of disorder at the heart of the very society which it attacks. Jacques Derrida’s comments on 9/11, using the metaphor of an auto-immune disorder, are pertinent. Film and television fantasias of terrorism offer critiques of the modern world order, but they offer the wrong critique.

  • 20.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Fast Food, Happiness, and the Misery of Behavioral Science’2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Fast Food, Happiness and the Misery of Behavioural Science2017In: Journal for Cultural Research, ISSN 1479-7585, Vol. 21, no 2, 169-189 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beginning with a journalistic criticism, written by a humanist, of studies by behavioural scientists of fast-food cues, this essay goes on to describe the nature of fast-food environments today. It then develops a critique of the underlying assumptions and methods of behavioural science as exemplified in these studies, whose basic context is the field of ‘happiness studies’. This essay argues that happiness cannot be quantified; that attempts to quantify it, though well-meaning, and generally aimed toward a critique of neoliberal utilitarianism, actually reflect neoliberal ideology. It also suggests that social thought today is a long way off from understanding the roles of sensuality in the pursuit of the good life, or for that matter the enjoyment of food.

  • 22.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Flowing or Pumping?: The Blood of the Body Politic in Burton, Harvey, and Hobbes2015In: The Cultural Politics of Blood 1500-1900 / [ed] Coles, KA; Bauer, R; Nunes, Z; Peterson, CL, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 171-190 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the nature of the blood is discovered, according to Harvey's model of circulation, the metaphorical value of blood changes too, as in Hobbes's expression, 'Money is the blood of the commonwealth'.

  • 23.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Food2010In: Ben Jonson in Context / [ed] Sanders, Julie, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2010, 314-321 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Food Fuss in London’2009In: International Literary Quaterly, Vol. 6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A literary account of the sociology of an individual, as he seeks to penetrate the hype about the culture of food in London today.

  • 25.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Genres utopiques en Angleterre, 1516-1640'2008In: Histoire transnationale des utopies littéraires et de l’utopisme / [ed] Fortunati, Vita and Raymond Trousson, Paris: Champion , 2008, 231-238 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Hamlet and Violence2014In: New Pilgrimage: Selected Papers from the IAUPE Beijing Conference in 2013, Beijing: Tshungua University Press , 2014, 30-47 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Hamlet and Violence2014In: New Pilgrimages: : Selected Papers from the IAUPE Beijing Conference in 2013, Tsinghua University Press (2014): 30-47., Beijing: Tsinghua University Press, 2014, 30-47 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Islam and Early Modern English Literature2009In: Modern language quarterly (Seattle), ISSN 0026-7929, E-ISSN 1527-1943, Vol. 70, no 3, 387-390 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Judith Dines Alone: From the Bible to Du Bartas2014In: Modern philology, ISSN 0026-8232, E-ISSN 1545-6951, Vol. 111, no 4, 683-710 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of how translations of the Bible and Du Bartas's La Judit have tried to render the feasting that comes before the climax of the Book of Judith.

  • 30.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘”Lawful as Eating”: Art, Life and Magic in The Winter’s Tale2014In: Shakespeare Studies, ISSN 0582-9399, Vol. 42, 32-41- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leontes’s speech in the middle of the statue scene in The Winter’s Talemakes a puzzling analogy, put in the form of a conditional proposition. “If this be magic,” he says as the statue comes to life, “let it be an art lawful as eating.” But why “lawful as eating?”, one may ask. What is it about eating, in this context, that makes it a fit term for the comparison Leontes is making, and a completion of Leontes’s thought?  Is there is a kind of lawfulness to eating, different from or akin to other kinds of lawfulness, to which “magic” of some sort might aspire? What is the meaning and value of “eating” here? The ultimate answer is that eating stands for that which cannot be prohibited, the right to life.

  • 31.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Lawful as Eating: Art, Life and Magic in The Winter’s Tale2014In: Shakespeare Studies, ISSN 0582-9399, Vol. 42, 32-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Literature and Utopian Politics in Seventeenth-Century England2002Book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Milton, the Gunpowder plot, and the mythography of terror2007In: Modern language quarterly (Seattle), ISSN 0026-7929, E-ISSN 1527-1943, Vol. 68, no 4, 461-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John Milton's early poems on the Gunpowder Plot are put in their historical and literary context and compared to Paradise Lost.  One of the origins of Milton's Satan derives not only from the gunpowder poems but also from early modern conceptions of terrorists.  But Paradise Lost renounces the nationalist position from which the early gunpowder poems take their departure.  Satan becomes in effect the universal terrorism, and terrorism itself emerges as a 'symptom of the other', that is, as an expression of universal alterity.

  • 34.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Milton, the Gunpowder Plot, and the Mythography of Terror’2007In: Modern Language Quarterly, ISSN 0026-7929, Vol. 68, no 4, 461-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the Gunpowder poems to Paradise Lost ...

  • 35.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘New Worlds’2008In: Clio - A Journal of Literature History & the Philosophy of History, ISSN 0884-2043, Vol. 38, no 1, 61-74 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of current literature on the subject of the founding of Jamestown.

  • 36.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Notes Toward an Aesthetics of Violence2013In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 85, no 2, 119-132 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Author's Preface. In trying to think about violence, aesthetics and the relation between the two, I found that I had to start over from the beginning. I had to allow my own preconceptions about violence and aesthetics - borrowed from any of a number of places, respectable (like Freud, Elias and Huizinga) and unrespectable (like my personal experiences of violence, and of Hollywood movies) - to be put into brackets, stored away for use at some other time. I had to submit my thinking to a kind of violence. And as for aesthetics, since I was sure that I was interested, precisely, in the subjective quality of experiencing violence in an artistic or ritualistic form, I had to put aside presumptions of a thesis, a vision of what violence was objectively, or a knowledge of what the artwork was in its objective, material condition. Hence these notes, where Freud, Elias, Huizinga, my personal experience and Hollywood movies all return, but in the condition of hypotheses and observations, from which, someday in the future, I might compose a real aesthetics of violence.

  • 37.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    '"O Power": Gerrard Winstanley and the Limits of Communist Poetics’1999In: Prose Studies, ISSN 0144-0357, E-ISSN 1743-9426, Vol. 22, no 1, 39-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    One Dinner Too Far: Posh and The Riot Club2015In: The BafflerArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A review of the play and the film.

  • 39.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Political Gastronomy: Food and Authority in the English Atlantic World: Michael A. Lacombe, Early American Studies series. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012.2013In: Journal of British Studies, ISSN 0021-9371, E-ISSN 1545-6986, Vol. 52, no 3, 760-762 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Pomodoro! A History of the Tomato in Italy2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Reconsidering Frank Lestringant’s Cannibale2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'Rhetoric and Epistemology in Early Printed Recipe Collections’2003In: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, ISSN 1531-0485, Vol. 3, no 2, 1-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Shakespeare and Terrorism2015In: Criticism. A Quarterly for Literature and the Arts, ISSN 0011-1589, E-ISSN 1536-0342, Vol. 57, no 1, 23-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Standing to the Wall’: The Pressures of Masculinity in Romeo and Juliet1997In: Shakespeare Studies, ISSN 0582-9399, Vol. 48, no 3, 81-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Sunken Treasure: The Cultural Meaning of Austerity’2014In: Symploke, ISSN 1069-0697, E-ISSN 1534-0627, Vol. 22, no 1-2, 77-95 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Austerity is a 'keyword': its meaning is unstable, and yet it is critical to political and cultural struggle. The Ealing Studio films, Passport to Pimlico and Whiskey Galore dramatised austerity as an imposition which signified types of social cohesion as well as coercion. It signified hope as well as weariness. The symbol of sunken treasure shows up in both films as a marker of this dual attitude, and a similar symbol shows up in a key passage in Keynes. Today austerity above signifies anxiety -- and economists and politicians use the word to discipline an anxious citizenry in the interest of the preservation of capital. 

  • 46.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Taste: A Literary History2007In: Food, Culture and Society, ISSN 1528-9796, Vol. 10, no 1, 151-153 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Terrorism Before the Letter: Mythography and Political Violence in England, Scotland, and France 1559 - 16422015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beginning around 1559 and continuing through 1642, writers in England, Scotland, and France found themselves pre-occupied with an unusual sort of crime, a crime without a name which today we call 'terrorism'. These crimes were especially dangerous because they were aimed at violating not just the law but the fabric of law itself; and yet they were also, from an opposite point of view, especially hopeful, for they seemed to have the power of unmaking a systematic injustice and restoring a nation to its 'ancient liberty'. The Bible and the annals of classical history were full of examples: Ehud assassinating King Eglon of Moab; Samson bringing down the temple in Gaza; Catiline arousing a conspiracy of terror in republican Rome; Marcus Brutus leading a conspiracy against the life of Julius Caesar. More recent history provided examples too: legends about Mehmed II and his concubine Irene; the assassination in Florence of Duke Alessandro de 'Medici, by his cousin Lorenzino. Terrorism Before the Letter recounts how these stories came together in the imaginations of writers to provide a system of 'enabling fictions', in other words a 'mythography', that made it possible for people of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to think (with and about) terrorism, to engage in it or react against it, to compose stories and devise theories in response to it, even before the word and the concept were born. Terrorist violence could be condoned or condemned, glorified or demonised. But it was a legacy of political history and for a while an especially menacing form of aggression, breaking out in assassinations, abductions, riots, and massacres, and becoming a spectacle of horror and hope on the French and British stage, as well as the main theme of numerous narratives and lyrical poems.

  • 48.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Canon: Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. November 4Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'The Civility of Eating’2008In: Food and Morality / [ed] Susan Friedland, Devon: Prospect Books , 2008, 29-38 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘The Comestible Commodity, Subject of History’2010In: Clio - A Journal of Literature History & the Philosophy of History, ISSN 0884-2043, Vol. 39, no 2, 213-226 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
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