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  • 1. Aburto, J.
    et al.
    Gallardo, Gloria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Stotz, W.
    Cerda, C.
    Mondaca-Schachermayer, C.
    Vera, K.
    Territorial user rights for artisanal fisheries in Chile: intended and unintended outcomes2013In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 71, p. 284-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Granting property property rights in fisheries is assumed to provide incentives for sustainable resource exploitation. These rights might also open other income options for fishers, including some that go beyond the original objectives intended by authorities establishing the right. The opportunity for alternative uses is especially high if the details of these rights are not clearly identified. In Chile, a de novo TURF (Territorial User Rights for Fishery) system, called Management Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (Areas de Manejo y Explotacion de Recursos Bentonicos-AMERB) was created to achieve sustainable exploitation of benthic resources. This study compares two small-scale fishing communities in Chile, Guayacan and Huentelauquen, representing two typical contrasting settings, regarding geographical contexts and surroundings, origin, history, location, social embeddedness, main fisheries activities as well as the motivation and the process through which they acquired their AMERB. While in Guayacan the main fishing activity outside the AMERB is the giant squid and finfish fishery, in Huentelauquen the main and traditional activity has been diving for benthic resources. The objectives to acquire their AMERBs were different in both cases. Huentelauquen applied the AMERB for their traditional activity, the fishery of Concholepas concholepas ("loco"), thus in accordance with the official objective of the AMERB. Due to reduced catches of loco, fishers also added the collection of kelps, using their AMERB to control access to the entire coast surrounding their fishing community, beyond the limits of their AMERB. In Guayacan the AMERB, applied for the management of scallops and a species of red algae, began to be used for sea squirt aquaculture. Within the framework of sustainable fisheries implied by the AMERBs, there was in both cases a clear expectation to gain new sources of income. However with time both AMERBs are being used as a tool for territorial exclusion of other fishers beyond the limits of their respective AMERBs. In Huentelauquen fishers mention mostly negative aspects about the performance of their AMERB, given the poor economic results, being unsatisfied with the AMERB system in general, because they feel that the system disrupted their traditional migration along the coast. In Guayacan, fishers mentioned mostly positive aspects for their AMERB, as it was an opportunity to add new activities. Both examples show that rights-based management approaches are very attractive; they could promote new uses or developments, whose sustainability nevertheless needs to be analyzed further. The analyzed case studies show that, contrary to how the system was developed in Chile, a more bottom-up implementation of new management arrangements may make it easier to agree on common objectives, and/or leave more freedom for fishers to adjust and arrange their livelihood. Considering the importance the AMERBs have acquired for fishers, these kinds of systems need flexible regulations in order that fishers can adapt the system to local traditions, uses or needs and also to their learning and adapting capacities.

  • 2. Akerblom, Staffan
    et al.
    Meili, Markus
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Organic Matter in Rain: An Overlooked Influence on Mercury Deposition2015In: Environmental Science & Technology Letters, ISSN 2328-8930, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 128-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of Hg emissions for deposition will be scrutinized in the future as new legislation to control emissions of Hg to the atmosphere comes into effect. We show that mercury (Hg) concentrations in rainfall are closely linked to organic matter (OM) with consistent Hg/TOC ratios over large spatial scales decreasing from that in an open field (OF, 1.5 mu g g(-1)) to that in throughfall (TF, 0.9 mu g g(-1)). The leaf area index was positively correlated with both TF [Hg] and total organic carbon ([TOC]), but not the Hg/TOC ratio. This study shows that the progression in the Hg/TOC ratio through catchments starts in precipitation with Hg/TOCbulk dep > Hg/TOCsoil (water) > Hg/TOCstreamwater These findings raise an intriguing question about the extent to which it is not just atmospheric [Hg] but also OM that influences [Hg] in precipitation. This question should be resolved to improve the ability to discern the importance of changing global Hg emissions for deposition of Hg at specific sites.

  • 3.
    Ameli, A. A.
    et al.
    Univ Western Ontario, Dept Biol, Biol & Geol Sci Bldg, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada.;Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci Air Water & Landscape Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    McDonnell, J. J.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Global Inst Water Secur, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Sch Geosci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity with depth: a novel method for exploring its effect on water flow paths and transit time distribution2016In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 30, no 14, p. 2438-2450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong vertical gradient in soil and subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity is characteristic feature of the hydrology of catchments. Despite the potential importance of these strong gradients, they have proven difficult to model using robust physically based schemes. This has hampered the testing of hypotheses about the implications of such vertical gradients for subsurface flow paths, residence times and transit time distribution. Here we present a general semi-analytical solution for the simulation of 2D steady-state saturated-unsaturated flow in hillslopes with saturated hydraulic conductivity that declines exponentially with depth. The grid-free solution satisfies mass balance exactly over the entire saturated and unsaturated zones. The new method provides continuous solutions for head, flow and velocity in both saturated and unsaturated zones without any interpolation process as is common in discrete numerical schemes. This solution efficiently generates flow pathlines and transit time distributions in hillslopes with the assumption of depth-varying saturated hydraulic conductivity. The model outputs reveal the pronounced effect that changing the strength of the exponential decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity has on the flow pathlines, residence time and transit time distribution. This new steady-state model may be useful to others for posing hypotheses about how different depth functions for hydraulic conductivity influence catchment hydrological response.

  • 4.
    Anderson, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Univ Manchester, Energy & Climate Change, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Peters, Glen
    Ctr Int Climate & Environm Res, Oslo, Norway..
    Act now, not tomorrow2016In: New scientist (1971), ISSN 0262-4079, Vol. 232, no 3098, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anderson, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England..
    Peters, Glen
    Ctr Int Climate & Environm Res Oslo CICERO, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    The promise of negative emissions Response2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, no 6313, p. 714-715Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anderson, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England..
    Peters, Glen
    CICERO, Pb 1129 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    The trouble with negative emissions2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, no 6309, p. 182-183Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Hagberg, Jeannette
    Weidner, Helmut
    Social Science Research Center, Berlin.
    Jänicke, Martin
    Social Science Research Center, Berlin.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Semeniene, Daiva
    Ministry of Environment, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    22. Making and Implementing Environmental Policy2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 662-689Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Tol, Richard S.J.
    Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg.
    Graham, L. Phil
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Bergström, Sten
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Azar, Christian
    University of Gothenburg.
    10. Impacts on the Global Atmosphere: Climate Change and Ozone Depletion2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 294-323Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Balck, Kenneth
    et al.
    Grinchtein, Olga
    Pearson, Justin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Model-based protocol log generation for testing a telecommunication test harness using CLP2014In: 2014 DESIGN, AUTOMATION AND TEST IN EUROPE CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION (DATE), 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within telecommunications development it is vital to have frameworks and systems to replay complicated scenarios on equipment under test, often there are not enough available scenarios. In this paper we study the problem of testing a test harness, which replays scenarios and analyses protocol logs for the Public Warning System service, which is a part of the Long Term Evolution (LTE) 4G standard. Protocol logs are sequences of messages with timestamps; and are generated by different mobile network entities. In our case study we focus on user equipment protocol logs. In order to test the test harness we require that logs have both incorrect and correct behaviour. It is easy to collect logs from real system runs, but these logs do not show much variation in the behaviour of system under test. We present an approach where we use constraint logic programming (CLP) for both modelling and test generation, where each test case is a protocol log. In this case study, we uncovered previously unknown faults in the test harness.

  • 10.
    Berg, Per G
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    11. Urbanisation and Urban-Rural Cooperation2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 141-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    A primer for hydrology: the beguiling simplicity of Water's journey from rain to stream at 30 Preface2015In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 29, no 16, p. 3443-3446Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water's journey from rain to stream by Harald Grip and Allan Rodhe (1985, in Swedish: Vattnets vag fran regn till back) was one of the first textbooks to present groundwater contributions as a major feature of runoff generation, with implications for water quality and management. Three decades later, we have the privilege of presenting a special issue of Hydrological Processes, Runoff Generation in a Nordic Light: 30Years with Water's Journey from Rain to Stream' that seeks to introduce the book to a larger audience and continue the journey of ideas that the authors set in motion with their book.

  • 12.
    Edelstam, Gunilla
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    23. The rule of law2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 308-321Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Chibuene2017In: The Swahili World / [ed] In: Wynne-Jones, S., LaViolette, A. The Swahili World. Routledge., Abingdon: Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    Univ Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Notelid, Michel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Water flow, ecological dynamics, and management in the lower Limpopo Valley: a long‐term vie2017In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, Vol. 4, no 5, article id e1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, we review long-term (millennial-decadal scale) river-flow changes, climate interactions, and interlinkage with vegetation dynamics, as well as society and policy, focusing on the lower Limpopo Valley (from the South African border through Mozambique). Drawing on paleoecological data, we address the valley's potential for defining critical ecological thresholds and managing an adaptive ecological landscape, by focusing on the dynamic relationship between different drivers (fire, hydrology, and grass/tree relationships). We briefly review the long-term interactions between water flow, climate variability, and society using archeological records and written sources. Lastly, we analyze the social and political context of water management, focusing on the last 100 years and transboundary water management. We also discuss planning and mitigation in relation to climate change and rainfall extremes that are projected to increase. It is stressed that forward-thinking policies must heed long-term climate variability, hydrology and biological and social impact and to plan and mitigate for environmental events. The discussion also brings to the fore the importance of an adaptable and equitable strategy in cross-border water sharing.

  • 15. Eklof, Karin
    et al.
    Kraus, Andrea
    Futter, Martyn
    Schelker, Jakob
    Meili, Markus
    Boyer, Elizabeth W.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Parsimonious Model for Simulating Total Mercury and Methylmercury in Boreal Streams Based on Riparian Flow Paths and Seasonality2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 13, p. 7851-7859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry has made it difficult to model surface water concentrations of both total Hg (THg) and especially methylmercury (MeHg), the species of Hg having the highest potential for bioaccumulation. To simulate THg and MeHg variation in low-order streams, we have adapted a conceptual modeling framework where a continuum of lateral flows through riparian soils determines streamflow concentrations. The model was applied to seven forest catchments located in two boreal regions in Sweden spanning a range of climatic, soil, and forest management conditions. Discharge, and simulated riparian soil water concentrations profiles, represented by two calibrated parameters, were able to explain much of the variability of THg and MeHg concentrations in the streams issuing from the catchments (Nash Sutcliffe (NS) up to 0.54 for THg and 0.58 for MeHg). Model performance for all catchments was improved (NS up to 0.76 for THg and 0.85 for MeHg) by adding two to four parameters to represent seasonality in riparian soil water THg and MeHg concentrations profiles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that riparian flow-pathways and seasonality in riparian soil concentrations are the major controls on temporal variation of THg and MeHg concentrations in low-order streams.

  • 16. Eklof, Karin
    et al.
    Schelker, Jakob
    Sorensen, Rasmus
    Meili, Markus
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    von Bromssen, Claudia
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Impact of Forestry on Total and Methyl-Mercury in Surface Waters: Distinguishing Effects of Logging and Site Preparation2014In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 4690-4698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forestry operations can increase the export of mercury (both total and methyl) to surface waters. However, little is known about the relative contribution of different forestry practices. We address this question using a paired-catchment study that distinguishes the effects of site preparation from the antecedent logging. Runoff water from three catchments, two harvested and one untreated control, was sampled biweekly during one year prior to logging, two years after logging, and three years after site preparation. The logging alone did not significantly increase the concentrations of either total or methyl-mercury in runoff, but export increased by 50-70% in one of the harvested catchments as a consequence of increased runoff volume. The combined effects of logging and site preparation increased total and methyl-mercury concentrations by 30-50% relative to preharvest conditions in both treated catchments. The more pronounced concentration effect after site preparation compared to logging could be related to site preparation being conducted during summer. This caused more soil disturbance than logging, which was done during winter with snow covering the ground. The results suggest that the cumulative impact of forest harvest on catchment mercury outputs depends on when and how forestry operations are implemented.

  • 17.
    Engfeldt, Lars-Göran
    et al.
    Ministry of Environment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kjellén, Bo
    Ministry of Environment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liefferink, Duncan
    University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Skou Andersen, Michael
    National Environmental Research Institute, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Ehlin, Ulf
    Stockholm International Water Institute.
    23. International Co-operation for the Environment2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 690-729Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18. Eriksson, Ove
    et al.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Lennartsson, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Concepts for Integrated Research in Historical Ecology2017In: Issues and Concepts in Historical Ecology: The Past and Future of Landscapes andregions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press / [ed] Crumley, C.L., Lennartsson, T., Westin, A., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Forsberg, Curt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Savchuk, Oleg
    Stockholm University.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    9. A New Regime for Nutrient Turnover: Eutrophication2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 256-293Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20. Fritsche, Johannes
    et al.
    Osterwader, Stefan
    Nilsson, Mats B.
    Sagerfors, Jorgen
    Akerblom, Staffan
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Alewell, Christine
    Evasion of Elemental Mercury from a Boreal Peat land Suppressed by Long-Term Sulfate Addition2014In: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, ISSN 2328-8930, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 421-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the evasion of TGM (total gaseous mercury) from experimental plots on a boreal peatland that had been exposed for 15 years to different combinations of atmospheric sulfur (5) and nitrogen (N) deposition as well as greenhouse treatments simulating climate change. Shaded dynamic flux chamber measurements during the summer in 2009 showed emission of TGM to the atmosphere from most of the treated plots (0.7 +/- 0.94 ng m(-2) h(-1)). However, TGM exchange rates were significantly lower, occasionally indicating Hg uptake, on plots subjected to S addition at rates of 20 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Enhanced nitrogen deposition and greenhouse treatment had no significant effect on TGM fluxes. We hypothesize that the lower Hg evasion from the sulfur-treated plots is related to either earlier Hg evasion or Hg binding to S in organic matter, making, Hg less susceptible to volatilization and more prone to transport in runoff.

  • 21.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Saunders, Fred
    Sodertorn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Sokolova, Tatiana
    Boreback, Kristina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    van Laerhoven, Frank
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Kokko, Suvi
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Econ, Umea, Sweden..
    Tuvenda, Magnus
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    We adapt ... but is it good or bad?: Locating the political ecology and social-ecological systems debate in reindeer herding in the Swedish Sub-Arctic2017In: Journal of political ecology, ISSN 1073-0451, E-ISSN 1073-0451, Vol. 24, p. 667-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer herding (RDH) is a livelihood strategy deeply connected to Sami cultural tradition. This article explores the implications of two theoretical and methodological approaches for grasping complex socioenvironmental relationships of RDH in Subarctic Sweden. Based on joint fieldwork, two teams -one that aligns itself with political ecology (PE) and the other with social-ecological systems (SES)-compared PE and SES approaches of understanding RDH. Our purpose was twofold: 1) to describe the situation of Sami RDH through the lenses of PE and SES, exploring how the two approaches interpret the same empirical data; 2) to present an analytical comparison of the ontological and epistemological assumptions of this work, also inferring different courses of action to instigate change for the sustainability of RDH. Key informants from four sameby in the Kiruna region expressed strong support for the continuation of RDH as a cultural andeconomic practice. Concerns about the current situation raised by Sami representatives centered on the cumulative negative impacts on RDH from mining, forestry and tourism. PE and SES researchers offered dissimilar interpretations of the key aspects of the RDH socio-economic situation, namely: the nature and scale of RDH systems; the ubiquitous role of conflict; and conceptualizations of responses to changing socioenvironmental conditions. Due to these disparities, PE and SES analyses have radically divergent sociopolitical implications for what ought to be done to redress the current RDH situation.

  • 22.
    Gallardo, Gloria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Saunders, Fred
    Södertörn Högskola.
    Sokolova, Tatiana
    Börebäck, Kristina
    Stockholm University.
    van Laerhoven, Frank
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Kokko, Suvi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    We adapt … but is it good or bad?: Locating the political ecology and social-ecological systems debate in reindeer herding in the Swedish Sub-Arctic2017In: Journal of political ecology, ISSN 1073-0451, E-ISSN 1073-0451, Vol. 24, p. 667-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer herding (RDH) is a livelihood strategy deeply connected to Sami cultural tradition. This article explores the implications of two theoretical and methodological approaches for grasping complex socioenvironmental relationships of RDH in Subarctic Sweden. Based on joint fieldwork, two teams – one that aligns itself with political ecology (PE) and the other with social-ecological systems (SES) – compared PE and SES approaches of understanding RDH. Our purpose was twofold: 1) to describe the situation of Sami RDH through the lenses of PE and SES, exploring how the two approaches interpret the same empirical data; 2) to present an analytical comparison of the ontological and epistemological assumptions of this work, also inferring different courses of action to instigate change for the sustainability of RDH. Key informants from four sameby in the Kiruna region expressed strong support for the continuation of RDH as a cultural andeconomic practice. Concerns about the current situation raised by Sami representatives centered on the cumulative negative impacts on RDH from mining, forestry and tourism. PE and SES researchers offered dissimilar interpretations of the key aspects of the RDH socio-economic situation, namely: the nature and scale of RDH systems; the ubiquitous role of conflict; and conceptualizations of responses to changing socioenvironmental conditions. Due to these disparities, PE and SES analyses have radically divergent sociopolitical implications for what ought to be done to redress the current RDH situation

  • 23.
    Gebrehiwot, Solomon Gebreyohannis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. SLU Aquatic Sciences and Assessment.
    Bewket, Woldeamlak
    Addis Ababa University.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Community perceptions of forest–water relationships in the Blue Nile Basin of Ethiopia2014In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 605-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community perception of forest–water relationship was gathered using participatory rural appraisal tools in four watersheds of the Blue Nile River Basin in Ethiopia. These were compared and contrasted with the observational records of forest cover and water flow. Upstream and downstream communities were assessed separately to check for differences in perception based on location within a watershed. The key result of the study was that people in the study watersheds had a range of perceptions about the forest–water relationship which were watershed specific. The perceptions were generally consistent with observational evidence from the same watersheds. This study highlighted the need for locale-specific approaches to land and water management in the Basin, as well as the potential value of using community perceptions to complement the observational records which can have spatial and temporal limitations.

  • 24.
    Gebrehiwot, Solomon Gebreyohannis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Bewket, Woldeamlak
    Gardenas, Annemieke I.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Forest cover change over four decades in the Blue Nile Basin, Ethiopia: comparison of three watersheds2014In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to quantify forest cover changes in three watersheds (Gilgel Abbay (1,646 km(2)), Birr (980 km(2)), and Upper-Didesa (1,980 km(2)) of the Blue Nile Basin between 1957 and 2001. Four land cover maps were produced for each watershed for 1957/1958, 1975, 1986, and 2000/2001. Nine different types of land cover were identified, five of which were forest cover classes. Between 1957 and 2001, the total forest cover increased in Gilgel Abbay (from 10 to 22 % cover) and decreased in Birr (from 29 to 22 % cover) as well as in Upper-Didesa (from 89 to 45 % cover). The increase in Gilgel Abbay was primarily due to the expansion of eucalyptus plantations. Natural forest cover decreased in all three watersheds. Wooded grassland decreased by two-thirds, dry/moist mixed forests decreased by half, and riverine forests had disappeared by 1975 in Gilgel Abbay and Birr. Major deforestation had already taken place in the northern watersheds, Gilgel Abbay and Birr, before the 1960s and 1970s, while in the southern watershed, Upper-Didesa, much of the deforestation occurred after 1975. The southern watershed still remained by far the most forested watershed in 2001 despite the strong ongoing deforestation. The changes in forest cover could affect natural resource management, greenhouse gas emissions, water resources, and agricultural production including coffee production. The patterns of change are different in the three watersheds. We therefore recommend further studies of the local conditions and drivers of change as the basis for designing effective policy to halt further loss of natural forest, which offers a wealth of ecosystem services.

  • 25.
    Gebrehiwot, Solomon Gebreyohannis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Gardenas, Annemieke I.
    Bewket, Woldeamlak
    Seibert, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Ilstedt, Ulrik
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    The long-term hydrology of East Africa's water tower: statistical change detection in the watersheds of the Abbay Basin2014In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 321-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forty-five years (1960-2004) of hydrological data from 12 watersheds in the Abbay Basin, Ethiopia, were tested for possible trends over the entire time series and differences in medians (step-wise changes) between three sub-periods. The classification of the sub-periods was based on the major political changes in 1975 and 1991. Variables investigated were rainfall (P), total flow (Q(t)), high flow (Q(h)), low flow (Q(1)), low flow index (LFI) and run-off coefficient (C). Data were checked for outliers, errors and homogeneity. Trend was tested after serial and cross-correlation tests. The data for each variable were serially uncorrelated from 1 to 10 lag years. There were five globally significant trends out of 50 test cases and 36 significant step-wise changes out of 180 tests. The majority of the significant changes were watershed specific. Run-off coefficient was the single variable showing a consistently increasing trend and stood for ca. 25 % of the total significant trends and step-wise changes. Half of these changes occurred after 1991. We concluded that despite the land use policy changes in 1975 and 1991, as well as the long-term soil degradation, the hydrological regime was quite stable over the 45-year period, with the exception of an increase in the run-off coefficient in the latter part of the run-off record in some watersheds.

  • 26. Gebrehiwot, Solomon Gebreyohannis
    et al.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Gardenas, Annemieke I.
    Mellander, Per-Erik
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Hydrological change detection using modeling: Half a century of runoff from four rivers in the Blue Nile Basin2013In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 3842-3851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Land cover changes can have significant impacts on hydrological regime. The objective of this study was to detect possible hydrological changes of four watersheds in the Blue Nile Basin using a model-based method for hydrological change detection. The four watersheds, Birr, Upper-Didesa, Gilgel Abbay, and Koga range in size from 260 to 1800 km(2). The changes were assessed based on model parameters, model residuals, and in the overall function of the watersheds in transferring rainfall into runoff. The entire time series (1960-2004) was divided into three periods based on political and land management policy changes. A conceptual rainfall-runoff model, the HBV (Hydrologiska Byrans Vattenbalansavdelning) model, was used for the analysis, and suitable parameter sets for each period were found based on a Monte Carlo approach. The values of six out of nine parameters changed significantly between the periods. Model residuals also showed significant changes between the three periods in three of the four watersheds. On the other hand, the overall functioning of the watersheds in processing rainfall to runoff changed little. So even though the individual parameters and model residuals were changing, the integrated functioning of the watersheds showed minimal changes. This study demonstrated the value of using different approaches for detecting hydrological change and highlighted the sensitivity of the outcome to the applied modeling and statistical methods.

  • 27.
    Grandin, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Cemus miljöhistoria: drivkrafter för en läranderevolution2012In: Miljöhistorier: personliga, lokala, globala berättelser om dåtid, nutid och framtid / [ed] Anneli Ekblom, Michel Notelid, Uppsala: Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia and CSD Uppsala , 2012, p. 15-Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Grandin, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Andersson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Cemus miljöhistoria: drivkrafter för en läranderevolution2012In: Miljöhistorierpersonliga, lokala, globala berättelser om dåtid, nutid och framtid / [ed] Anneli Ekblom, Michel Notelid, Uppsala: CSD Uppsala och Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Granvik, Madeleine
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Wlodarczyk, Dorota
    Gdansk Technical University.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    3. Building a sustainable neighbourhood: Kronsberg2003In: Building and Re-building Sustainable Communities: Reports from the Superbs project / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 26-34Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Eleven recently built neighbourhoods applying principles of sustainability in all its aspects – environmental, economic and social – are described with a more detailed description of Kronsberg outside Hannover, Germany. Kronsberg with 15,000 inhabitants and working places for 2,000, consists of 10% single-family homes and 90% multi-storey buildings. Considerable obligations were made in all phases of the project to secure a high quality of life and to use natural resources sparingly.

  • 30.
    Guinea Barrientos, Héctor Estuardo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Facultad de Agronom í a, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala.
    Swain, Ashok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Stakeholders' views towards flood risk management in the Paz River catchment area of Guatemala and El Salvador2015In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 892-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The river Paz is a transboundary river that flows through Guatemala and El Salvador. Its frequent floods endanger the lives and livelihoods of downstream communities. Attempts have previously been made to develop flood management programmes for this watershed. However, these approaches were generally made by high-level governmental institutions with few if any contributions from floodplain communities and other stakeholders. Recognising that public consultation is a key aspect in flood management programmes, we intend in this work to extract different stakeholders' views regarding current and future flooding and flood management programmes in the Paz River basin. This is achieved using Future Scenarios Workshops with a projected time horizon of 30 years. The exercise was expected to identify consensual short- and medium–long-term flood management strategies for the Paz River basin that draws on input from inhabitants of flood-prone areas and other stakeholders.

  • 31.
    Guinea Barrientos, Héctor Estuardo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Swain, Ashok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Wallin, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Disaster Management Cooperation in Central America: The Case of Rainfall-induced Natural Disasters2015In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rainfall-induced natural disasters rank first among all natural disasters in Central America. Due to the geographical conditions of the Central American region, it is common that two or more countries are struck by the same rainfall event, for example Hurricane Mitch in 1998 affected the entire Central American region, killing more than 18 000 people. As a consequence, Central American countries have started to promote regional policies and programs that aim for better preparation and response to these events, including disaster management cooperation. However, cooperation poses several challenges that may hinder its goals. In order to analyse these challenges, we present analysis in this paper of the current policy and legal institutions as well as the main challenges that may hinder international disaster management cooperation in Central America.

  • 32.
    Hauck, Maria
    et al.
    Environmental Evaluation Unit, University of Cape Town, SA.
    Gallardo Fernández, Gloria L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Crises in the South African abalone and Chilean loco fisheries: Shared challenges and prospects2013In: Maritime Studies, ISSN 1872-7859, E-ISSN 2212-9790, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide there is an increasing realisation that there is an inextricable link between the natural and human systems, and there is a need to integrate these into the governance of small-scale fisheries. The critical importance of adopting such an approach is argued in this paper by exploring the challenge of resource over-exploitation in the abalone fishery in South Africa and the loco fishery in Chile, both of which faced unsuccessful fishery closures and the implementation of Territorial Use Rights in Fisheries (TURFs). By exploring similarities and differences in fisheries context and approaches, these case studies highlight that although management strategies have been progressive on paper, they are compromised, to different degrees, by a lack of understanding of the socio-economic and political factors that are influencing the fisheries system. We argue that unless a more integrated approach is adopted to understand the social-ecological system as a whole, few long-term benefits will be secured for both the resources and the livelihoods of fishers.

  • 33.
    Hytteborn, Julia K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Temnerud, Johan
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Alexander, Richard B.
    U.S. Geological Survey, USA.
    Boyer, Elisabeth W.
    Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Pennsylvania State University, USA.
    Futter, Martyn N.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Mats
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Dahné, Joel
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Research Department, Sweden.
    Bishop, Kevin H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala. Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Patterns and predictability in the intra-annual organic carbon variability across the boreal and hemiboreal landscape2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 520, p. 260-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors affecting total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in 215 watercourses across Sweden were investigated using parameter parsimonious regression approaches to explain spatial and temporal variabilities of the TOC water quality responses. We systematically quantified the effects of discharge, seasonality, and long-term trend as factors controlling intra-annual (among year) and inter-annual (within year) variabilities of TOC by evaluating the spatial variability in model coefficients and catchment characteristics (e.g. land cover, retention time, soil type).

    Catchment area (0.18–47,000 km2) and land cover types (forests, agriculture and alpine terrain) are typical for the boreal and hemiboreal zones across Fennoscandia. Watercourses had at least 6 years of monthly water quality observations between 1990 and 2010. Statistically significant models (p < 0.05) describing variation of TOC in streamflow were identified in 209 of 215 watercourses with a mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index of 0.44. Increasing long-term trends were observed in 149 (70%) of the watercourses, and intra-annual variation in TOC far exceeded inter-annual variation. The average influences of the discharge and seasonality terms on intra-annual variations in daily TOC concentration were 1.4 and 1.3 mg l− 1 (13 and 12% of the mean annual TOC), respectively. The average increase in TOC was 0.17 mg l− 1 year− 1 (1.6% year− 1).

    Multivariate regression with over 90 different catchment characteristics explained 21% of the spatial variation in the linear trend coefficient, less than 20% of the variation in the discharge coefficient and 73% of the spatial variation in mean TOC. Specific discharge, water residence time, the variance of daily precipitation, and lake area, explained 45% of the spatial variation in the amplitude of the TOC seasonality.

    Because the main drivers of temporal variability in TOC are seasonality and discharge, first-order estimates of the influences of climatic variability and change on TOC concentration should be predictable if the studied catchments continue to respond similarly.

  • 34.
    Håkanson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    4. The Baltic Sea Basin: Nature, History, and Economy2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 92-119Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Ishihara, Sachiko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Back from the Future We Want: Backcasting as a pedagogical practice towards sustainable futures2017In: Envisioning futures for environmental and sustainability education / [ed] Peter Blaze Corcoran, Joseph P. Weakland and Arjen E.J. Wals, Wageningen Academic Publishers: Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can education train imagination and creativity to think about ‘the future we want?’ How can we create learning experiences to head towards these desirable futures? In this chapter, we explore backcasting as a pedagogical practice in the group project ‘Back from the Future We Want’, as a part of the interdisciplinary student-led course ‘Global Challenges and Sustainable Futures’. In small groups, students were asked to choose a specific city/village in the world and: (1) describe their visions of a ‘sustainable and desirable future’ for the region in year 2100; (2) develop a transition strategy to reach the described future written as a fictional ‘history’ between 2015 and 2100; and (3) form concrete recommendations for today. Overall, this assignment gave students the opportunity to think and discuss what a ‘sustainable and desirable future’ would include, and provided new ways of looking at the present from a future perspective. Their visions suggested new normativity in each region, which expressed critiques towards present society in various forms, and the process allowed students to think of solutions and how to transform society. The assignment holds further potential as material to have critical discussions about societal directions, including technological, cultural, and ideological assumptions. This chapter intends to inspire further development of sustainable futures education.

  • 36.
    Ishihara, Sachiko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    What is your dream course?2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    If you could change education, what would you do?If you could create your dream course, how would it look like? As a Course Coordinator at the unique student-led education centre, Centre for Environment and Development Studies (CEMUS) at Uppsala University and SLU, I reflect on ideas about empowering and creative participatory learning that were behind how we designed and ran our course. After giving a few examples of pedagogical activities briefly, I finish with posing a question that is pressing: What kind of education is needed in times of Trump and Brexit?

  • 37.
    Jakobsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Sustainable Agriculture2012Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Jakobsson, Christine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Levengood, Jeffrey
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Preface2012In: Sustainable Agriculture / [ed] Christine Jakobsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 8-10Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Jasaitis, Jonas
    et al.
    Siauliai University, Siauliai, Lithuania.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    19. A Rural Country in Transition: Alternatives for Lithuania2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 228-233Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40. Jingying, Xu
    et al.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eklöf, Karin
    Osman, Omneya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies.
    Björn, Erik
    Skyllberg, Ulf
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bravo, Andrea Garcia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Present address: Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona, 18-26 - E-08034 Barcelona – Spain.
    Mercury methylating microbial communities of boreal forest soilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of the potent neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) is a microbially mediated process that has raised much concern because MeHg poses threats to wildlife and human health. Since boreal forest soils can be a source of MeHg in aquatic networks, it is crucial to understand the biogeochemical processes involved in the formation of this pollutant. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA and the mercury methyltransferase, hgcA, combined with geochemical characterisation of soils, were used to determine the microbial populations contributing to MeHg formation in forest soils across Sweden. The hgcA sequences obtained were distributed among diverse clades, including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Methanomicrobia, with Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Geobacteraceae, dominating the libraries across all soils examined. Our results also suggest that MeHg formation is linked to the composition of also non-mercury methylating bacterial communities, likely providing growth substrate (e.g. acetate) for the hgcA-carrying microorganisms responsible for the actual methylation process. While previous research focused on mercury methylating microbial communities of wetlands, this study provides some first insights into the diversity of mercury methylating microorganisms in boreal forest soils.

  • 41.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    13. Sustainable Forestry2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 165-169Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    14. Forestry in the European Union Part of the Baltic Sea Region2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 170-175Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Hossain, Motaher
    University of Helsinki, Finland Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    26. Voluntary Instruments and Sustainable Consumption2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 294-300Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Karlsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Sepp, Kalev
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Tartu.
    Introduction2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Kilhström, Jan Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Migula, Pawel
    University of Silesia, Katowice.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    15. The Damaged Environment: Distribution, Interaction, and Longevity of Environmental Impact2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 444-475Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Klemmensen, Børge
    et al.
    Roskilde University.
    Pedersen, Sofie
    Roskilde University.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Kasper R.
    Roskilde University.
    Marklund, Anneli
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Environmental Policy: Legal and Economic Instruments2007 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Korpi, Sture
    et al.
    The Swedish National Board of Institutional Care, Stockholm.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Segraeus, Vera
    The Swedish National Board of Institutional Care, Stockholm.
    45. Use and abuse of tobacco, alcohol and narcotics: a Baltic dilemma2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 568-581Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Kowalik, Piotr
    et al.
    Gdansk Technical University.
    Rydén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, The Baltic University Programme.
    Dahmani, Amine
    University of Connecticut, USA.
    Andersson, Alicja
    Swedish Chemicals Inspectorate, Stockholm.
    18. Soil Protection and Solid Waste Management2003In: Environmental Science: Understanding, protecting and managing the environment in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Lars Rydén, Pawel Migula and Magnus Andersson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2003, 1, p. 534-565Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Krampe, Florian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Swain, Ashok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Human Development and Minority Empowerment: Exploring Regional Perspectives on Peace in South Asia2016In: The Palgrave Handbook of Disciplinary and Regional Approaches to Peace / [ed] Oliver Richmond, Sandra Pagodda, Jasmin Ramovic, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 363-375Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Asia is the sub-Himalayan southern region of the Asian continent, comprising eight countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. South Asia has a population of about 1.6 billion, which is characterized by significant cultural divergences between and within the states. An estimated 2,000 ethnic groups, at least six ethnic-linguistic families and several major faiths make South Asia one of the most diverse regions on earth. The states and societies in this vast region face challenges on several fronts. The major challenge is to achieve the social and political stability that is needed to enable their progress towards increased human development. Several factors, however, make the prospects of progress daunting. The rise in the region’s population is a key challenge. A large part of the population in South Asia lives in abject poverty.

  • 50.
    Kurkiala, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Moksnes, Heidi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala.
    Hornborg, Alf
    Århem, Kaj
    Den obrutna cirkeln1995Book (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 107
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