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  • 1.
    Bani-Shoraka, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Bilingual practices in the process of initiating and resolving lexical problems in students' collaborative writing sessions2007In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 11, no 2, 157-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the sequential organization of language choice and codeswitching between Persian as a first language and Swedish as a second language in the process of initiating and resolving a problem of understanding and producing the correct version of a lexical item. The data consist of detailed transcripts of audio tapings of two bilingual students' collaborative writing sessions within the frame of a one-year master's program in computer science in a multilingual setting at a Swedish university. The students, both Persian- speaking, are advanced speakers of Swedish as a second language. For this article, four lexical language-related episodes, where codeswitching between Persian and Swedish occurs, are analyzed. The analyzed excerpts in this article are drawn from a corpus of data consisting of language-related episodes identified and transcribed in the audio tapings. We employ a conversation analysis (CA) approach for the analysis of bilingual interaction. This means that the meaning of the codeswitching in the interaction is described in terms of both global (the conversational activity at large) and local interactional factors. In the analysis, a close step-by-step analysis of the turn-taking procedures demonstrates how the communicative meaning of the students' bilingual behavior in a lexical episode is determined in its local production in the emerging conversational context and how it can be explicated as part of the following social actions: drawing attention to a problem, seeking alliance when a problem is made explicit and confirming intersubjective understanding when the problem is resolved.

  • 2.
    Barjasteh Delforooz, Behrooz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    On the translatability of Persian ghazals into Balochi and vice versa2006In: Indo-Iranian Linguistics and the Typology of linguistic situations.: Prof. Alexander L. Gruenberg (1930-1995) Memorial Volume / [ed] Mikhail N. Bogolyubov, Saint Petersburg: Nauka , 2006, 1, 247-263 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is usually difficult to translate poems from one language into another keeping both the original form and meaning. However, between languages which are very close to each other structurally and genetically, especially when one of these languages is under the influence of the other one, there is often a higher degree of translatability than between unrelated languages. Also, when the speakers of the two languages share a common cultural framework of reference because of shared literary traditions including common poetic techniques, the form and meaning of the poems can be preserved to a considerable degree when they are translated. Geographically, spreading from Asia Minor in the north-west to Central Asia and the Indian Subcontinent in the north-east and south-east, respectively, Persian literature has had a strong influence on the local and national literatures of these areas. The great Iranian classical poets developed philosophical, mystical, moral and love themes which also influenced poets for generations. In addition, allusions and poetic imagery which they used spread along with their relatively concrete vocabulary to poetry in the the above mentioned areas in general, and to Balochi poetry in particular. In this brief survey, the translatability of Persian and Balochi ghazals from one language to the other has been examined according to form, poetic imagery and lexicon.

  • 3.
    Barjasteh Delforooz, Behrooz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    A sociolinguistic survey among the Jadgal in Iranian Balochistan2008In: The Baloch and Others: Linguistic, Historical and Socio-Political Perspectives in Pluralism in Balochistan / [ed] Carina Jahani, Agnes Korn & Paul Titus, Wiesbaden: Reichert , 2008, 23-43 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of a sociolinguistic research project among the Jadgal with special focus on language use, language attitudes, bilingual proficiency and multilingualism.

  • 4.
    Fallahzadeh, Mehrdad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    A Treatise from the Post-scholastic Era of Persian Writings on Music Theory: Resālah-e Musiqi by Neẓām-al-din Aḥmad Gilāni2007In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, Vol. LVI, 65-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persian writings on theory of music has passed through phases of change during its evolution. One of these phases began at the beginning of the 16th century with the abandonment of scientific Greek-Arabic influenced writing on music theory and the emergence of a new approach to the subject. This phase, which can be labelled the post-scholastic period, was one of the most productive phases of the genre and many tracts and treatises were written during that period. One of the works from this era which come down to us is a concise tract by Neẓām-al-din Aḥmad Gilāni. In this article, the author and the opus are first introduced, then a critical edition of the text and an English translation of the text are provided.

  • 5.
    Fallahzadeh, Mehrdad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Two Treatises – Two Streams: treatises from the Post-Scholastic Era of Persian Writings on Music Theory2009 (ed. 750)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book presents two important Persian-language works on music theory from the post-scholastic era (16th–18th centuries). They are Resalah-e Karramiyyah by Davrah Karami (Sofrachi) and Resalah-e Musiqi in Mohit al-tavarix by Mohammad Amin (b. Mirza Zaman Boxari; Sufiyyani).

    The author introduces and discusses the works, the writers, the various manuscripts, and the editorial method and technique applied in editing. He has critically edited and translated the texts into English. Both the Persian text and the English translation are accompanied by copious footnotes explaining specific terms and variations. A concise analysis of the theoretical discussions and musical terms used in each work is also presented.

    In editing the manuscripts, both the traditional and the stemmatic method and the procedure of eliminatio lectionum singularium have been applied. Two Treatises—Two Streams will hopefully contribute to the better understanding of the evolution of music, music theory, and literature in Iran and Central Asia from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century

  • 6.
    Fallahzadeh, Mehrdad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Ras Baras, Šams al-aṣwāt2013Other (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Department of Oriental Studies, University Mainz, Germany.
    Utas, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Editorial note2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, Vol. 58, 5-7 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Utas, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.Isaksson, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.Johanson, LarsUniversität Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Orientalia Suecana: An International Journal of Indological, Iranian, Semitic and Turkic Studies2008Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Hassanabadi, Mahmoud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    The Situation of Women in Sasanian Iran: Reflections on the Story of Bahrām Gōr and his Mistress2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, Vol. 58, 60-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Restrictive relative clauses in Balochi and the marking of the antecedent: linguistic influence from Persian?2008In: The Baloch and others: linguistic, historical and socio-political perspectives on pluralism in Balochistan, Wiesbaden: Reichert , 2008, 139-166 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An interesting morphosyntactic feature that has been observed in e.g. New Persian and Balochi is that the same suffix that marks indefinite restrictive selection out of a generic unit or a plurality (the so-called yā-ye vaḥdat) is also attached to head nouns of restrictive relative clauses. The purpose of the article is to investigate whether an extension of the use of the suffix denoting indefinite selection to mark antecedents of restrictive relative clauses similar to the one observed in Persian has also taken place in Balochi. If there is such a marking, in what variants of Balochi does it occur? In these cases, should it be seen as an internal development in Balochi parallel to that of Persian or can it be attributed to linguistic influence from Persian? Data from different Balochi dialects are investigated and the conclusion is that the dialects divide neatly into three groups when it comes to the marking of the antecedent, those heavily influenced by Modern Persian, those where there has been a close contact with, but not massive influence from Persian and those dialects where there has been a limited influence from Persian, mainly in its classical form.

  • 11.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Expressions of future in classical and modern new Persian2008In: Aspects of Iranian Linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2008, 153-175 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As in several other Indo-European languages, there are two main strategies for marking future time reference in Persian:1. lexical or contextual means of expressing the future with the verb in the non-past tense2. periphrastic verbal constructions with an ‘upgraded,’ i.e. ‘pragmaticallystrengthened’ and ‘semantically bleached’ verb of volition as the auxiliary.The purpose of the paper is to make a detailed investigation of strategies employed formarking future time reference in written New Persian, both in its classical and modern variety. In Modern New Persian factual prose and fiction are described as two different varieties, since they show a considerable amount of divergence. This study does not include spoken Persian.The results show that the primary strategy for Persian when it comes to expressing future time reference is lexical/contextual marking with the non-past form of the verb. In written language, it is the one encountered the most commonly in Classical Persian (with a Ø-marked verb form) and in the fiction genre of Modern Persian (with a mi-marked verb form). The periphrastic constructions used in Persian are based on the verb ‘towant’, thus volitional constructions.

  • 12.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Kargar, DariushUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Manuscript, Text and Literature. Author: Bo Utas: Collected Essays on Middle and New Persian Texts.2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present volume comprises part of Bo Utas' extensive scholarship on Persian literature. The articles included in the book are: * On the composition of the Ayyātkār-ī Zarērān * Non-religious Book Pahlavi literature as a source to the history of Central Asia * Jang u āštī: War and peace in Iran * The manuscript tradition of Miṣbāḥ ul-arvāḥ and the application of the stemmatic method to New Persian texts * The Munjājāt or Ilāhī-nāmah of ‘Abdu'llāh Anṣārī * Towards a computerized method for the construction of stemmas of Persian manuscripts * Some trends in modern Persian literature * Did ‘Adhra remain a virgin? * A journey to the other world according to the Lantern of Spirits * Four entries from a French literary dictionary (in French) * Arabic and Iranian elements in New Persian prosody * ‘Ambiguity’ in the Savāniḥ of Aḥmad Ghazālī * The ardent lover and the virgin - a Greek romance in Muslim lands * The invention of the barbat according to ‘Unsuri's Vamiq-u-‘Adhra * The aesthetic use of New Persian * ‘Genres’ in Persian literature 900-1900

  • 13.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Korn, Agnes
    University of Frankfurt-am-Main.
    Balochi2009In: The Iranian languages / [ed] Gernot Windfuhr, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, 634-692 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Balochi (Bal.) is spoken in south-western Pakistan, in the province of Balochistan as well as by smaller populations in Punjab and Sindh and by a large number of people in Karachi. It is also spoken in south-eastern Iran, in the province of Sistan and Baluchistan and by Baloch who have settled in the north-eastern provinces of Khorasan and Golestan. It is furthermore spoken by smaller communities in Afghanistan (particularly in the province of Nimruz), in the Gulf States (especially in Oman and the United Arab Emirates), in the Marw / Mari region in Turkmenistan, in India, East Africa, and nowadays also by a considerable number of Baloch in North America, Europe and Australia.

    It is difficult to estimate the total number of Balochi speakers. Central authorities readily underestimate ethnic minorities, while members of ethnicities sometimes do the opposite. Censuses generally ignore the bi‑ or multilingual situation of most speakers. Moreover, large numbers of those who identify as Baloch do not speak the language any more, particularly in the areas bordering Indian languages in Punjab and Sindh, on the one hand, and in Khorasan and Golestan, on the other hand, as well as in East Africa and in the Gulf States. In contrast, Balochi has been retained quite well in Turkmenistan due to the adherence to a traditional rural lifestyle and the generally low level of education. The total number of speakers of Balochi has been estimated as being between 5-8 million (Jahani 2001: 59), but might also be somewhat higher than that. 

    The chapter is a description of the various dialects of Balochi, their phonology, morphology and syntax. It also provides two short glossed samples of Balochi.

  • 14.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Korn, AgnesUniversität Frankfurt.Titus, Paul
    The Baloch and Others: Linguistic, historical and socio-political perspectives on Pluralism in Balochistan2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Balochistan has been at the crossroads of civilisations for millennia. Now divided among three nation states (Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan), the Baloch people face the challenges posed by the modern world. As state administration and education find their way even into remote rural areas, modernisation creates significant gaps between different groups of people in Balochistan, e.g. between the elderly and the young, and between rural and urban sections of the population. It is not known when the Baloch arrived in the region that bears their name, and we have only sparse information about who inhabited the land before them. Today, apart form the Baloch themselves, a number of other ethnic groups are present in Balochistan, some who have lived there for centruies, and some are rather recent immigrants. Together with this ethnic pluralism we see a rich linguistic pluralism in the region. The predominant religion in Balochistan is the Sunni Islam of the Hanafi school. However, some Baloch profess other faiths. The social organisaion of the Baloch is also somewhat heterogeneous. Although the Baloch in pre-modern times always had a considerable degree of autonomy, they were at times tributary to poweful rulers in their vicinity, e.g. the Persians, Afghans and Moghuls. In the 19th century Balochistan was divided between British India and Iran, and in the 20th century there have been several militant upsurges demanding self-rule in both Iranian and Pakistani Balochistan.This book, which is divided into one section on Language, one on Sociology and Anthropology, and one on Religion, History and Political Sciences, contains a number of articles which study the relation between Baloch and neighbouring peoples.

  • 15.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Paul, Daniel
    University of Manchester.
    Fronting of the voiceless velar plosive in Persian2008In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, Vol. 57, 81-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fronting of the voiceless velar plosive /k/1 in Persian2 has been described in several grammars. However, no complete study has been made of this phenomenon in different phonological environments. This article is an attempt to make a complete survey of the /k/ phoneme in Persian in different environments in order to establish allophonic rules for its pronunciation.Several linguistic consultants were recorded and their pronunciation of /k/ was analysed by means of the software Praat in order to determine the burst frequencies of /k/ in different phonetic environments. Palatographic analysis was conducted with one consultant. This investigation shows that the fronting of /k/ in Persian occurs word-finally, and when preceding a front vowel or a consonant. When followed by a back vowel /k/ is not fronted.

  • 16.
    Kargar, Dariush
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma: Iranian Conceptions of the Other World2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis consists of an edition of an Iranian literary work whose theme is a journey to the Other World, namely the Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma. The version of this work which is here edited and commented on is a prose version in the Zoroastrian Persian language. A discussion about Iranian conceptions of the Other World is also an integrated part of the thesis.

    The text of the Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma is edited employing a text critical method by using six manuscripts. The oldest manuscript, which has been used as the base manuscript for editing the text, was written in 896 A.Y. (Yazdgirdī)/1527 A.D. The edited text is also translated into English, and followed by a Commentary on names, unusual words and Zoroastrian terms used in the text.

    Other Iranian documents about journeys to the Other World are studied in this thesis as well, and all are compared to the Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma. The Zoroastrian Persian version of this work is also compared to its Parsig version.

    The differences between the Zoroastrian Persian and the Parsig versions indicate that they have their background in two different world views. To prove this theory, some significant elements in the Zoroastrian Persian version, which demonstrate that this is a pre-Zoroastrian epic narrative, have been compared to some elements in the Parsig version that show that this is a religious Zoroastrian account. Possible reasons for the change in Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma from a pre-Zoroastrian epic narrative into a Zoroastrian-religious one are also suggested.

    A king named Davānūs is one of the Ardāy-Vīrāf Nāma personages. In an appendix, the historical personality of Davānūs is discussed with reference to Arabic, Persian and Greek historiography.

  • 17.
    Okati, Farideh
    et al.
    Dept. of English Language and Linguistics, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran.
    Ahangar, Abbas Ali
    Dept. of English Language and Linguistics, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Fronting of /u/ in Iranian Sistani2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, Vol. 58, 120-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Okati, Farideh
    et al.
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran .
    Ahangar, Abbas Ali
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    The Status of [h] and [ʔ] in the Sistani Dialect of Miyankangi2009In: Iranian Journal of Applied Language Studies, ISSN 2008-5494, Vol. 1, no 1, 80-999 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to determine the phonemic status of [h] and [ʔ] in the Sistani dialect of Miyankangi. Auditory tests applied to the relevant data show that [ʔ] occurs mainly in word-initial position, where it stands in free variation with Ø. The only place where [h] is heard is in Arabic and Persian loanwords, and only by some speakers who are educated and/or have lived in urban centres, where inhabitants are in closer touch with Persian than in rural areas. The sound [h] also occurs in the pronunuciation of some Arabic loanwords where it replaces the glottal plosive, particularly in word medial, intervocalic position. The investigation shows that neither [ʔ] nor [h] have phonemic status in the Sistani dialect of Miyankangi at present, but that more intense contact with Persian may change this state in the future, particularly for [h].

  • 19. Roberts, John R.
    et al.
    Barjasteh Delforooz, Behrooz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    A study of Persian discourse structure2009 (ed. 1st)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a first study of Persian discourse structure(s). It also integrates syn­tac­tic analysis with discourse analysis. In order to achieve this, Role and Refer­ence Grammar (RRG) (see Van Valin (1993, 2004) and Van Valin and LaPolla (1997)) is used as the preferred model of syntax, since amongst current formal and functional syntactic theories only this approach has components which link directly to dis­course structures. Since there is no general theory of discourse structure avail­able, the main linguistic features that contribute to the formation of a coherent text are studied and analyzed with respect to Persian narrative discourse. An analytical method­ology to discourse analysis, as set out in Dooley and Levinsohn (2001), is follow­ed for this purpose. Chapter 2 introduces the basic axioms and principles of RRG and chapter 3 presents the approach to text analysis that is followed. In chapters 4-7 this approach is applied to Persian narrative text and covers coherence and cohesion, thematic groupings, the activation status of refer­ents in a discourse, the discourse-pragmatic structuring of sentences, fore­ground and background inform­ation, semantic relations between pro­posi­tions, the status of conversations in a narrative discourse, and the coding of participant reference. Appendix 1 contains details of the Persian text-corpus used, appendix 2 contains interlinearized versions of two of the main texts used in the study plus one additional text, and appendix 3 contains the participant reference analysis charts for these two texts.

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