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  • 1.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors:: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison.2018In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision.

    Purpose: To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    Material and Methods: The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes.

    Results: Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%).

    Conclusion: Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

  • 2.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 3.
    Adam, Meike
    et al.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Tubingen, Dept Urol, Tubingen, Germany..
    Tennstedt, Pierre
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Lanwehr, Dominik
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Tilki, Derya
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Urol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Steuber, Thomas
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Beyer, Burkhard
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Thederan, Imke
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Heinzer, Hans
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Haese, Alexander
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Salomon, Georg
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Budäus, Lars
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Michl, Uwe
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Pehrke, Dirk
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umea Univ Hosp, Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Bernard, Jürgen
    Fraunhofer Inst Graf Datenverarbeitung, Darmstadt, Germany..
    Klaus, Bernd
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Radiooncol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Pompe, Raisa S.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Petersen, Cordula
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Radiooncol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Huland, Hartwig
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Graefen, Markus
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany..
    Schwarz, Rudolf
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Radiooncol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Huber, Wolfgang
    European Mol Biol Lab, Genome Biol Unit, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Loeb, Stacy
    NYU, Dept Urol, Populat Hlth, New York, NY 10003 USA.;NYU, Laura & Isaac Perlmutter Canc Ctr, New York, NY 10003 USA..
    Schlomm, Thorsten
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Prostate Canc Ctr, Martini Klin, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Urol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Functional Outcomes and Quality of Life After Radical Prostatectomy Only Versus a Combination of Prostatectomy with Radiation and Hormonal Therapy2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 330-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While the optimal use and timing of secondary therapy after radical prostatectomy (RP) remain controversial, there are limited data on patient-reported outcomes following multimodal therapy.

    Objective: To assess the impact of additional radiation therapy (RT) and/or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on urinary continence, potency, and quality of life (QoL) after RP.

    Design, setting, and participants: Among 13 150 men who underwent RP from 1992 to 2013, 905 received RP + RT, 407 RP + ADT and 688 RP + RT + ADT.

    Outcome measurements and statistical analyses: Urinary function, sexual function, and overall QoL were evaluated annually using self-administered validated questionnaires. Propensity score-matched and bootstrap analyses were performed, and the distributions for all functional outcomes were analyzed as a function of time after RP.

    Results and limitations: Patients who received RP + RT had a 4% higher overall incontinence rate 3 yr after surgery, and 1% higher rate for severe incontinence (> 3 pads/24 h) compared to matched RP-only patients. ADT further increased the overall and severe incontinence rates by 4% and 3%, respectively, compared to matched RP + RT patients. RP + RT was associated with an 18% lower rate of potency compared to RP alone, while RP + RT + ADT was associated with a further 17% reduction compared to RP + RT. Additional RT reduced QoL by 10% and additional ADT by a further 12% compared to RP only and RP + RT, respectively. The timing of RT after RP had no influence on continence, but adjuvant compared to salvage RT was associated with significantly lower potency (37% vs 45%), but higher QoL (60% vs 56%). Limitations of our study include the observational study design and potential for selection bias in the treatments received.

    Conclusions: Secondary RT and ADT after RP have an additive negative influence on urinary function, potency, and QoL. Patients with high-risk disease should be counseled before RP on the potential net impairment of functional outcomes due to multimodal treatment.

    Patient summary: Men with high-risk disease choosing surgery upfront should be counseled on the potential need for additional radiation and or androgen deprivation, and the potential net impairment of functional outcomes arising from multimodal treatment.

  • 4. Adami, Hans-Olov
    et al.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Radikal prostatektomi utvärderad: 18 års uppföljning i svensk randomiserad multicenterstudie2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 11, no 15, p. 682-683Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Adami, Hans-Olov
    et al.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Management of Early Prostate Cancer REPLY2014In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 370, no 22, p. 2151-2151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Scherdin, Tove Dahl
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bergström, Sofia Halin
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBP expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 435-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein- (C/EBP).

    Methods: To explore this further, we examined C/EBP expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors?and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    Results: In rats, C/EBP mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBP was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBP expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, distance to the tumor, and metastatic capacity. In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBP in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBP in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, metastases, and poor outcome.

    Conclusions: This study suggest that the expression of C/EBP-beta, a transcription factor mediating multiple biological effects, is differentially expressed both in the benign parts of the tumor-bearing prostate and in prostate tumors, and that alterations in this may be related to patient outcome.

  • 7.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Letocha, H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Andersson, J
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi; Plattformen för preklinisk PET, Uppsala university, Uppsala.
    Långström, Bengt
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi; Plattformen för preklinisk PET, Uppsala university, Uppsala.
    Nilsson, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of urinary bladder cancer1996In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 180-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Evaluation of positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)fl 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) and L-methyl-11C-methionine in the diagnosis and staging of urinary bladder carcinoma.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    Twenty-three patients with biopsy-proven urinary bladder carcinoma were examined with PET after intravenous injection of 11C-methionine; 2 were also examined with 18FDG. The results from the PET investigations were compared with CT or MR findings and TNM classification before and after treatment.

    RESULTS:

    The urinary excretion of 18FDG prevented distinction of the primary tumour from the surrounding tracer. With 11C-methionine it was possible to detect 18/23 primary tumours. A trend was seen, suggesting that the higher the uptake values of 11C-methionine in the tumour, the greater the tumour stage.

    CONCLUSION:

    It is possible to visualize urinary bladder tumours larger than 1 cm in diameter with PET using (11)C-methionine, but the value of the method in the staging of the lesions is not superior to conventional methods.

  • 8. Allen, Naomi E
    et al.
    Travis, Ruth C
    Appleby, Paul N
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Barnett, Matt J
    Black, Amanda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Deschasaux, Mélanie
    Galan, Pilar
    Goodman, Gary E
    Goodman, Phyllis J
    Gunter, Marc J
    Heliövaara, Markku
    Helzlsouer, Kathy J
    Henderson, Brian E
    Hercberg, Serge
    Knekt, Paul
    Kolonel, Laurence N
    Lasheras, Christina
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Metter, E Jeffrey
    Neuhouser, Marian L
    Olsen, Anja
    Pala, Valeria
    Platz, Elizabeth A
    Rissanen, Harri
    Reid, Mary E
    Schenk, Jeannette M
    Stampfer, Meir J
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Tangen, Catherine M
    Touvier, Mathilde
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    van den Brandt, Piet A
    Key, Timothy J
    Selenium and Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Individual Participant Data From Fifteen Prospective Studies.2016In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 108, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Some observational studies suggest that a higher selenium status is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer but have been generally too small to provide precise estimates of associations, particularly by disease stage and grade.

    METHODS: Collaborating investigators from 15 prospective studies provided individual-participant records (from predominantly men of white European ancestry) on blood or toenail selenium concentrations and prostate cancer risk. Odds ratios of prostate cancer by selenium concentration were estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided.

    RESULTS: Blood selenium was not associated with the risk of total prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio [OR] per 80 percentile increase = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83 to 1.23, based on 4527 case patients and 6021 control subjects). However, there was heterogeneity by disease aggressiveness (ie, advanced stage and/or prostate cancer death, Pheterogeneity = .01), with high blood selenium associated with a lower risk of aggressive disease (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.21 to 0.87) but not with nonaggressive disease. Nail selenium was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.40, Ptrend < .001, based on 1970 case patients and 2086 control subjects), including both nonaggressive (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.50) and aggressive disease (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.11 to 0.31, Pheterogeneity = .08).

    CONCLUSIONS: Nail, but not blood, selenium concentration is inversely associated with risk of total prostate cancer, possibly because nails are a more reliable marker of long-term selenium exposure. Both blood and nail selenium concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of aggressive disease, which warrants further investigation.

  • 9.
    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Läckgren, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Nevéus, Tryggve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Stenberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery.
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlstrom, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Changes of arterial pressure following relief of obstruction in adults with hydronephrosis2018In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 123, no 4, p. 216-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As much as 20% of all cases of hypertension are associated with kidney malfunctions. We have previously demonstrated in animals and in pediatric patients that hydronephrosis causes hypertension, which was attenuated by surgical relief of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. This retrospective cohort study aimed to investigate: (1) the proposed link between hydronephrosis, due to UPJ obstruction, and elevated arterial pressure in adults; and (2) if elevated blood pressure in patients with hydronephrosis might be another indication for surgery.

    Materials and methods: Medical records of 212 patients undergoing surgical management of hydronephrosis, due to UPJ obstruction, between 2000 and 2016 were assessed. After excluding patients with confounding conditions and treatments, paired arterial pressures (i.e. before/after surgery) were compared in 49 patients (35 years old; 95% CI 29–39). Split renal function was evaluated by using mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) renography before surgical management of the hydronephrotic kidney.

    Results: Systolic (−11 mmHg; 95% CI 6–15 mmHg), diastolic (−8 mmHg; 95% CI 4–11 mmHg), and mean arterial (-9 mmHg; 95% CI 6–12) pressures were significantly reduced after relief of the obstruction (p < 0.001). Split renal function of the hydronephrotic kidney was 39% (95% CI 37–41). No correlations were found between MAG3 and blood pressure level before surgery or between MAG3 and the reduction of blood pressure after surgical management of the UPJ obstruction.

    Conclusions: In adults with hydronephrosis, blood pressure was reduced following relief of the obstruction. Our findings suggest that elevated arterial pressure should be taken into account as an indication to surgically correct hydronephrosis.

  • 10. Andersson, Gustav
    et al.
    Wennersten, Christoffer
    Gaber, Alexander
    Boman, Karolina
    Nodin, Bjorn
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Reduced expression of ezrin in urothelial bladder cancer signifies more advanced tumours and an impaired survival: validatory study of two independent patient cohorts2014In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 14, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced membranous expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein ezrin has previously been demonstrated to correlate with tumour progression and poor prognosis in patients with T1G3 urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with non-maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (n = 92), and the associations with adverse clinicopathological factors have been validated in another, unselected, cohort (n = 104). In the present study, we examined the prognostic significance of ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer in a total number of 442 tumours from two independent patient cohorts. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was evaluated in tissue microarrays with tumours from one retrospective cohort of bladder cancer (n = 110; cohort I) and one population-based cohort (n = 342; cohort II). Classification regression tree analysis was applied for selection of prognostic cutoff. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test and Cox regression proportional hazards' modeling were used to evaluate the impact of ezrin on 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Ezrin expression could be evaluated in tumours from 100 and 342 cases, respectively. In both cohorts, reduced membranous ezrin expression was significantly associated with more advanced T-stage (p < 0.001), high grade tumours (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.040 and p = 0.013), and membranous expression of podocalyxin-like protein (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009). Moreover, reduced ezrin expression was associated with a significantly reduced 5-year OS in both cohorts (HR = 3.09 95% CI 1.71-5.58 and HR = 2.15(1.51-3.06), and with DSS in cohort II (HR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.78-4.31). This association also remained significant in adjusted analysis in Cohort I (HR1.99, 95% CI 1.05-3.77) but not in Cohort II. In pTa and pT1 tumours in cohort II, there was no significant association between ezrin expression and time to progression. Conclusions: The results from this study validate previous findings of reduced membranous ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer being associated with unfavourable clinicopathological characteristics and an impaired survival. The utility of ezrin as a prognostic biomarker in transurethral resection specimens merits further investigation.

  • 11. Andersson, Lennart
    et al.
    Droller, Michael J.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Månsson, Wiking
    Kirkali, Ziya
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Montironi, Rodolfo
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Tribukait, Bernhard
    Grossman, H. Barton
    Chairmen's summary2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Supplementum, ISSN 0300-8886, E-ISSN 1651-2537, no 218, p. 7-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Armstrong, A J
    et al.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Stadler, W M
    Gingrich, J R
    Assikis, V
    Polikoff, J
    Damber, J E
    Belkoff, L
    Nordle, O
    Forsberg, G
    Carducci, M A
    Pili, R
    Long-term Survival and Biomarker Correlates of Tasquinimod Efficacy in a Multicenter Randomized Study of Men with Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.2013In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 19, no 24, p. 6891-6901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Tasquinimod (Active Biotech) is an oral immunomodulatory, anti-angiogenic, and anti-metastatic agent that delayed metastatic disease progression in a randomized placebo-controlled phase II trial in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Here, we report long-term survival with biomarker correlates from this trial.

    EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Two hundred and one (134 tasquinimod and 67 placebo) men with mCRPC were evaluated. Forty-one men randomized to placebo crossed over to tasquinimod. Survival data were collected with a median follow-up time of 37 months. Exploratory biomarker studies at baseline and over time were collected to evaluate potential mechanism-based correlates with tasquinimod efficacy including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

    RESULTS: With 111 mortality events, median OS was 33.4 months for tasquinimod versus 30.4 months for placebo overall, and 34.2 versus 27.1 months in men with bone metastases (n = 136), respectively. Multivariable analysis demonstrated an adjusted HR of 0.52 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35-0.78; P = 0.001] for PFS and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.42-0.97; P = 0.034) for OS, favoring tasquinimod. Time-to-symptomatic progression was improved with tasquinimod (P = 0.039, HR = 0.42). Toxicities tended to be mild in nature and improved over time. Biomarker analyses suggested a favorable impact on bone alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) over time and a transient induction of inflammatory biomarkers, VEGF-A, and thrombospondin-1 levels with tasquinimod. Baseline levels of thrombospondin-1 less than the median were predictive of treatment benefit.

    CONCLUSIONS: The survival observed in this trial of men with minimally symptomatic mCRPC suggests that the prolongation in PFS with tasquinimod may lead to a survival advantage in this setting, particularly among men with skeletal metastases, and has a favorable risk:benefit ratio. 

  • 13.
    Arthur, R.
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA.
    Williams, R.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammar, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;AstraZeneca, Global Med Dev Med Evidence & Observat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walldius, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robinsson, D.
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jungner, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Hemelrijck, M.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Div Canc Studies, TOUR, London, England;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serum inflammatory markers in relation to prostate cancer severity and death in the Swedish AMORIS study2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 11, p. 2254-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is a well-documented driver of cancer development and progression. However, little is known about its role in prostate carcinogenesis. Thus, we examined the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin and white blood cells (WBC) with prostate cancer (PCa) severity (defined by PCa risk category and clinicopathological characteristics) and progression (defined by PCa death). We selected 8,471 Swedish men with newly diagnosed PCa who had exposure measurements taken approximately 14 years prior to diagnosis. We calculated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the associations between the inflammatory markers and PCa severity using logistic regression, while Cox proportional hazard regression was used for the associations with overall and PCa death. Serum CRP levels were associated with increased odds of high risk and metastatic PCa, and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06-1.56, 1.32; 1.05-1.65 and 1.51; 1.26-1.81, respectively). Similarly, higher haptoglobin levels were associated with increased odds of metastatic PCa, high PSA level and possibly high grade PCa (1.38; 1.10-1.74, 1.50; 1.17-1.93 and 1.25; 1.00-1.56, respectively). Albumin was positively associated with Gleason 4+3 tumour (1.38; 1.02-1.86) and overall death (HRunit increase in log: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.11-2.30), but inversely associated with high risk PCa and high PSA levels (20 mu g/L) (0.71; 0.56-0.89 and 0.72; 0.5 9-0.90). WBC was associated with increased odds of T3-T4 PCa. Except for albumin, none of these markers were associated with PCa death or overall death. Systemic inflammation as early as 14 years prior to diagnosis may influence prostate cancer severity. What's new? High levels of C-reactive protein can presage a particularly malignant prostate cancer, new results show. Cancers certainly arise in the wake of chronic inflammation, but it's not known exactly how markers of inflammation initiate prostate cancer. Here, the authors show that systemic inflammation can worsen the severity of the cancer, even if it occurred long before the cancer's onset. High levels of CRP and haptoglobin, they found, were associated with prostate cancer with high PSA and metastasis. The question remains whether inflammation pushes cancer cells into a more malignant mode, or selects for the more dangerous cells early on.

  • 14.
    Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England..
    Møller, Henrik
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England..
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Departments of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University.
    Malmstrom, Hakan
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lambe, Mats
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hammar, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;AstraZeneca Sverige, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Walldius, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Dept Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robinson, David
    Departments of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Div Canc Studies, London, England.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories2016In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1307-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 mu g/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 mu g/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 mu g/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 mu g/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate-and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

  • 15.
    Arthur, Rhonda
    et al.
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, New York, NY 10461 USA;Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, 1300 Morris Pk, Bronx, NY 10461 USA.
    Møller, Henrik
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Häggström, Christel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Umea Univ, Dept Biobank Res, Umea, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Malmström, Håkan
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum Sobi, Biostat Data Management & Med Writing, Res & Dev, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hammar, Niklas
    AstraZeneca, Med Evidence & Observat Res, Global Med Dev, Molndal, Sweden.
    Walldius, Göran
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Robinson, David
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Jungner, Ingmar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;CALAB Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, Translat Oncol & Urol Res, London, England.
    Serum glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol in relation to prostate cancer death in the Swedish AMORIS study2019In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Lifestyle-related conditions such as obesity are associated with prostate cancer progression, but the associations with hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are unclear. This study, therefore, aims to examine the association of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol with prostate cancer death

    Methods: From the Swedish AMORIS cohort, we selected 14,150 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1996 and 2011 who had prediagnostic measurements of serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regressionmodels were used to determine the hazard ratios for death in relation to the aforementioned metabolic markers.

    Results: Using clinical cut-off points, a non-significant positive association was observed between glucose and prostate cancer death. When compared to those with glucose in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile had greater risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02-1.39). However, neither total cholesterol nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer death. Glucose and triglycerides were positively associated with overall, cardiovascular, and other deaths. Hypercholesterolemia was only associated with risk of CVD death.

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that glucose levels may influence prostate cancer survival, but further studies using repeated measurements are needed to further elucidate how glucose levels may influence prostate cancer progression.

  • 16.
    Assel, Melissa
    et al.
    Molecular Pharmacology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
    Dahlin, Anders
    Lund University.
    Ulmert, David
    Lund Univerity; Molecular Pharmacology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umeå University.
    Lilja, Hans
    Lund University; University of Oxford; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
    Vickers, Andrew J
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
    Association Between Lead Time and Prostate Cancer Grade: Evidence of Grade Progression from Long-term Follow-up of Large Population-based Cohorts Not Subject to Prostate-specific Antigen Screening.2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 961-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Lead time (LT) is of key importance in early detection of cancer, but cannot be directly measured. We have previously provided LT estimates for prostate cancer (PCa) using archived blood samples from cohorts followed for many years without screening.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between LT and PCa grade at diagnosis to provide an insight into whether grade progresses or is stable over time.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The setting was three long-term epidemiologic studies in Sweden including men not subject to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. The cohort included 1041 men with PSA of 3-10 ng/ml at blood draw and subsequently diagnosed with PCa with grade data available.

    OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict high-grade (Gleason grade group ≥2 or World Health Organization grade 3) versus low-grade PCa at diagnosis in terms of LT, defined as the time between the date of elevated PSA and the date of PCa diagnosis with adjustment for cohort and age.

    RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: The probability that PCa would be high grade at diagnosis increased with LT. Among all men combined, the risk of high-grade disease increased with LT (odds ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.16; p<0.0001), with no evidence of differences in effect by age group or cohort. Higher PSA predicted shorter LT by 0.46 yr (95% CI 0.28-0.64; p<0.0001) per 1 ng/ml increase in PSA. However, there was no interaction between PSA and grade, suggesting that the longer LT for high-grade tumors is not simply related to age. Limitations include the assumption that men with elevated PSA and subsequently diagnosed with PCa would have had biopsy-detectable PCa at the time of PSA elevation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data support grade progression, whereby following a prostate over time would reveal transitions from benign to low-grade and then high-grade PCa.

    PATIENT SUMMARY: Men with a longer lead time between elevated prostate-specific antigen and subsequent prostate cancer diagnosis were more likely to have high-grade cancers at diagnosis.

  • 17.
    Ax, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Garmo, Hans
    Regional Cancer Center , Uppsala University Hospital , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Grundmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Becker, Wulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary Patterns and Prostate Cancer Risk: Report from the Population Based ULSAM Cohort Study of Swedish Men2014In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary pattern analyses have increased the possibilities to detect associations between diet and disease. However, studies on dietary pattern and prostate cancer are scarce. Food intake data in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort was determined by 7-day food records. Adherence to a modified Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) and a low carbohydrate-high protein (LCHP) score were grouped as low, medium, or high in the whole study population (n = 1,044) and in those identified as adequate reporters of energy intake (n = 566), respectively. Prostate cancer risk was analyzed with Cox proportional hazard regression (median follow-up 13years) and competing risk of death was considered. There were no associations between dietary patterns and prostate cancer (n = 133) in the whole study population. Among adequate reporters the mMDS was not associated with prostate cancer (n = 72). The LCHP score was inversely related to prostate cancer in adequate reporters, adjusted hazard ratios; 0.55 (0.32-0.96) for medium and 0.47 (0.21-1.04) for high compared to low adherent participants (P-for-trend 0.04). Risk relations were not attributable to competing risk of death. In this study, a LCHP diet was associated with lower prostate cancer incidence. Relations emerged in adequate reporters, underscoring the importance of high-quality dietary data.

  • 18.
    Ax, Erika Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Grundmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Becker, Wulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary Patterns and prostate cancer risk: a population based cohort study in elderly Swedish men2013In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 27, no S1, p. 847.8-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Axelson, Hans W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Intraoperative Cavernous Nerve Stimulation and Laser-Doppler Flowmetry during Radical Prostatectomy2013In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 2842-2848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. 

    Erectile dysfunction is a common side effect following radical prostatectomy mainly due to damage of the pelvic autonomic nerve fibers (cavernous nerves). Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerves while measuring changes in penile girth has previously been shown to provide the surgeon with feedback of nerve integrity.

    Aim. 

    To test the feasibility of recording changes in glans penis blood flow by Laser Doppler flowmetry from cavernous nerve stimulation.

    Methods. 

    Fifteen patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy had electrical stimulation of the proximal and distal parts of the neurovascular bundles after prostate removal. The stimulation consisted of 30-40 seconds biphasic constant current (10-30 mA) with 0.5 millisecond pulse duration.

    Main Outcome Measures. 

    Stimulus induced changes in penile blood flow was recorded from a Laser Doppler probe attached to the glans penis. Changes in penile girth were simultaneously recorded from a mercury-in rubber strain gauge. Erectile function was evaluated three months after surgery.

    Results. 

    Ten patients had stimulus induced increase in Laser Doppler flow unilaterally (N = 7) or bilaterally (N = 3). Out of 10 patients, 6 reported some preserved erectile function postoperatively at 3 months follow-up (indicating 6 true and 4 false positives). Three patients had no Doppler response from stimulation and had no postoperative erectile function postoperatively (indicating three true negatives). Two patients were excluded from the study due to bad signal quality in the Laser Doppler signal. In the majority of patients, stimulation produced increase in penile girth sensed by the strain gauge.

    Conclusion. 

    This preliminary report provides evidence that Laser Doppler Flowmetry is able to detect increased penile blood flow from intraoperative electrical stimulation of the neurovascular bundles. However, further improvement in the recording technique is required. Laser Doppler Flowmetry may also be feasible to confirm autonomic nerve sparing in women undergoing pelvic surgery.

  • 20.
    Beckmann, Kerri
    et al.
    Univ South Australia, Australian Ctr Precis Hlth, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, TOUR, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, TOUR, London, England;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bosco, Cecilia
    Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, TOUR, London, England.
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Robinson, David
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, TOUR, London, England.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, TOUR, London, England;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Androgen Deprivation Therapies and Changes in Comorbidity: A Comparison of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonists and Antiandrogen Monotherapy as Primary Therapy in Men with High-risk Prostate Cancer2019In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 676-683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Some studies suggest that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are associated with higher risk of adverse events than antiandrogens (AAs) monotherapy. However, it has been unclear whether this is due to indication bias.

    Objective: To investigate rates of change in comorbidity for men on GnRH agonists versus AA monotherapy in a population-based register study.

    Design, setting, and participants: Men with advanced nonmetastatic prostate cancer (PCa) who received primary AA (n = 2078) or GnRH agonists (n = 4878) and age- and area-matched PCa-free men were selected from Prostate Cancer Database Sweden 3.0. Increases in comorbidity were measured using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), from 5 yr before through to 5 yr after starting androgen deprivation therapy (ADT).

    Outcome measures and statistical methods: Multivariable linear regression was used to determine differences in excess rate of CCI change before and after ADT initiation. Risk of any incremental change in CCI following ADT was assessed using multivariable Cox regression analyses.

    Results and limitations: Men on GnRH agonists experienced a greater difference in excess rate of CCI change after starting ADT than men on AA monotherapy (5.6% per yr, p < 0.001). Risk of any new CCI change after ADT was greater for GnRH agonists than for AA (hazard ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-144).

    Conclusions: Impact on comorbidity was lower for men on AA monotherapy than for men on GnRH agonists. Our results should be confirmed through randomised trials of effectiveness and adverse effects, comparing AA monotherapy and GnRH agonists in men with advanced nonmetastatic PCa who are unsuitable for curative treatment.

    Patient summary: Hormone therapies for advanced prostate cancer can increase the risk of other diseases (eg, heart disease, diabetes). This study compared two common forms of hormone therapy and found that the risk of another serious disease was higher for those on gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists than for those on antiandrogen monotherapy.

  • 21.
    Bergengren, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Bratt, Ola
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Satisfaction with Care Among Men with Localised Prostate Cancer: A Nationwide Population-based Study2018In: European Urology Oncology, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background

    Information about how men with prostate cancer (PC) experience their medical care and factors associated with their overall satisfaction with care (OSC) is limited.

    Objective

    To investigate OSC and factors associated with OSC among men with low-risk PC.

    Design, setting, and participants

    Men registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden as diagnosed in 2008 with low-risk PC at the age of ≤70 yr who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy (RT), or started on active surveillance (AS) were invited in 2015 to participate in this nationwide population-based survey (n = 1720).

    Outcome measurements and statistical analysis

    OSC data were analysed using ordinal logistic regression. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for comparisons between the highest and lowest possible response categories.

    Results and limitations

    A total of 1288 men (74.9%) responded. High OSC was reported by 958 (74.4%). Factors associated with high OSC were high participation in decision-making (OR 4.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.61–6.69), receiving more information (OR 11.1, 95% CI 7.97–15.6), high-quality information (OR 7.85, 95% CI 5.46–11.3), access to a nurse navigator (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.44–2.26), and better functional outcomes (defined as 25 points higher on the EPIC-26 questionnaire; OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21–1.48). OSC was not affected by whether a doctor or specialist nurse conducted follow-up (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.66–1.07). These findings were similar across treatment groups. Men who had undergone RP or RT reported high OSC more often than men on AS (78.2% vs 84.0% vs 72.6%), high participation in decision-making (70.5% vs 64.5% vs 49.2%), and having received more information (40.5% vs 45.8% vs 28.6%), and were less likely to believe they would die from PC (3.8% vs 3.9% vs 8.0%). Limitations include the nonrandomised retrospective design and potential recall bias.

    Conclusions

    Information and participation in decision-making, as well as access to a nurse navigator, are key factors for OSC, regardless of treatment. Men on AS need more information about their treatment and need to participate more in decision-making. OSC was as high among men who had nurse-led follow-up as among men who had doctor-led follow-up.

    Patient summary

    Information about how men with low-risk prostate cancer experience their medical care is limited. In this nationwide population-based study we found that information and participation in decision-making as well as access to a nurse navigator are key factors for satisfaction regardless of treatment. Men who are being closely watched for prostate cancer without immediate curative treatment need more information than they now receive and need to participate more in decision-making than they currently do.

  • 22.
    Berglund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Lena-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Eriksson, Karin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Wallenius, Imke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Roshanai, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nordin, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Sjödén, Per-Olow
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    "Between Men": A psychosocial rehabilitation programme for men with prostate cancer2007In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychosocial rehabilitation on newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. The “Between Men” programme consisted of seven weekly sessions of physical training (Phys) alone, information (Info) alone or physical training plus information (PhysInfo). After diagnoses, patients (n =211) were consecutively included, stratified and randomised to one of four groups: Phys, Info, PhysInfo or standard care control (C). A nurse specialised in urology, an urologist and a physiotherapist performed the interventions. Patients were followed up during one year with mailed standardised questionnaires. It could not be assumed that the “Between Men” programme had any effect on patients’ anxiety and depression (HADS). Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was associated with stage of disease but not with psychosocial intervention. Thus, Physical Function (PF), Role Function (RF) and Fatigue (FA) were inferior among patients with, than without, metastases of prostate cancer both at baseline and at the 12-month follow-up. This randomized study did not demonstrate any significant effect of psychosocial rehabilitation among prostate cancer patients. Considering the low rate (1/2), of included/eligible patients a less complicated design (intervention versus control) would have been preferred in order to increase power.

  • 23.
    Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Markus
    Sundsvall Hosp, Dept Urol, Sundsvall, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Linton, Ludvig B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Sofia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hyllienmark, Martin
    TLA Targeted Immunotherapies AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundgren, Christian
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holmström, Benny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Palmqvist, Karin
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden.;Ostersund Cty Hosp, Urol Sect, Dept Surg, Ostersund, Sweden..
    Hansson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Alamdari, Farhood
    Vastmanland Hosp, Dept Urol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Huge, Ylva
    Linkoping Univ, Div Urol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linkoping Univ, Div Urol, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Diagnost Radiol, Umea, Sweden..
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Krantz, David
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zirakzadeh, A. Ali
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Marits, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjöholm, Louise K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Diagnost Radiol, Umea, Sweden..
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Increased CD4(+) T cell lineage commitment determined by CpG methylation correlates with better prognosis in urinary bladder cancer patients2018In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 10, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. Environmental factors and chronic inflammation are correlated with the disease risk. Diagnosis is performed by transurethral resection of the bladder, and patients with muscle invasive disease preferably proceed to radical cystectomy, with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The anti-tumour immune responses, known to be initiated in the tumour and draining lymph nodes, may play a major role in future treatment strategies. Thus, increasing the knowledge of tumour-associated immunological processes is important. Activated CD4(+) T cells differentiate into four main separate lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg, and they are recognized by their effector molecules IFN-gamma, IL-13, IL-17A, and the transcription factor Foxp3, respectively. We have previously demonstrated signature CpG sites predictive for lineage commitment of these four major CD4(+ )T cell lineages. Here, we investigate the lineage commitment specifically in tumour, lymph nodes and blood and relate them to the disease stage and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Results: Blood, tumour and regional lymph nodes were obtained from patients at time of transurethral resection of the bladder and at radical cystectomy. Tumour-infiltrating CD4(+ )lymphocytes were significantly hypomethylated in all four investigated lineage loci compared to CD4(+) lymphocytes in lymph nodes and blood (lymph nodes vs rumour-infiltrating lymphocytes: IFNG -4229 bp p < 0.0001, IL13 -11 bp p < 0.05, IL17A -122 bp p < 0.01 and FOXP3 -77 bp p> 0.05). Examination of individual lymph nodes displayed different methylation signatures, suggesting possible correlation with future survival. More advanced post-cystectomy tumour stages correlated significantly with increased methylation at the IFNG -4229 bp locus. Patients with complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy displayed significant hypomethylation in CD4(+ )T cells for all four investigated loci, most prominently in IFNG p < 0.0001. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy seemed to result in a relocation of Th1-committed CD4(+) T cells from blood, presumably to the tumour, indicated by shifts in the methylation patterns, whereas no such shifts were seen for lineages corresponding to IL13, IL17A and FOXP3.

    Conclusion: Increased lineage commitment in CD4(+) T cells, as determined by demethylation in predictive CpG sites, is associated with lower post-cystectomy tumour stage, complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and overall better outcome, suggesting epigenetic profiling of CD4(+) T cell lineages as a useful readout for clinical staging.

  • 24.
    Beukers, Willemien
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Keur, Kirstin A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kandimalla, Raju
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vergouwe, Yvonne
    Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Steyerberg, Ewout W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Boormans, Joost L.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Urol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Jensen, Jorgen B.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Lorente, Jose A.
    Hosp del Mar, Serv Urol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Real, Francisco X.
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, Dept Ciencies Expt & Salut, Barcelona, Spain.;Spanish Natl Canc Res Centre CNIO, Canc Cell Biol Programme, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Segersten, Ulrike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Orntoft, Torben F.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Malats, Nuria
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Centre CNIO, Canc Cell Biol Programme, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dyrskjot, Lars
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Zwarthoff, Ellen C.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Pathol, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    FGFR3, TERT and OTX1 as a Urinary Biomarker Combination for Surveillance of Patients with Bladder Cancer in a Large Prospective Multicenter Study2017In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 197, no 6, p. 1410-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer are followed with frequent cystoscopies. In this study FGFR3, TERT and OTX1 were investigated as a diagnostic urinary marker combination during followup of patients with primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Materials and Methods: In this international, multicenter, prospective study 977 patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer were included. A total of 2,496 urine samples were collected prior to cystoscopy during regular visits. Sensitivity was estimated to detect concomitant recurrences. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the development of future recurrences after urinalysis and a negative cystoscopy.

    Results: Sensitivity of the assay combination for recurrence detection was 57% in patients with primary low grade, nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. However, sensitivity was 83% for recurrences that were pT1 or muscle invasive bladder cancer. Of the cases 2% progressed to muscle invasive bladder cancer. Sensitivity for recurrence detection in patients with primary high grade disease was 72% and 7% of them had progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer. When no concomitant tumor was found by cystoscopy, positive urine samples were more frequently followed by a recurrence over time compared to a negative urine sample (58% vs 36%, p < 0.001). High stage recurrences were identified within 1 year after a positive urine test and a negative cystoscopy.

    Conclusions: Recurrences in patients with primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer can be detected by a combination of urine assays. This study supports the value of urinalysis as an alternative diagnostic tool in patients presenting with low grade tumors and as a means to identify high stage tumors earlier.

  • 25.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bratt, Ola
    Re: Screening and Prostate Cancer Mortality: Results of the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) at 13 Years of Follow-up2015In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 175-175Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Christensson, Anna
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Norlén, Bo Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Experiences of randomization: Interviews with patients and clinicians in the SPCG-IV trial2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 358-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Recruitment of both patients and clinicians to randomized trials is difficult. Low participation carries the risk of terminating studies early and making them invalid owing to insufficient statistical power. This study investigated patients' and clinicians' experiences of randomization with the aim of facilitating trial participation in the future. Material and methods. This was a qualitative study using content analysis. Patients offered to participate in a randomized trial and randomizing clinicians were interviewed. Five participants, four non-participants and five randomizing clinicians were interviewed, 2-8 years from randomization. Results. Clinicians used strategies in interaction with the patients to facilitate decision making. Patients' attitudes differed and experiences of relatives or friends were often stated as reasons for treatment preferences. Patients described that letting chance decide treatment was a difficult barrier to overcome for randomization. The clinicians used a number of different strategies perceived to make randomization more acceptable to their patients. The clinicians' own motivation for randomizing patients for trials depended on the medical relevance of the study question and the clinicians' major obstacle was to maintain equipoise over time. Regular meetings with the study group helped to maintain equipoise and motivation. Conclusions. To establish a good platform for randomization the clinician needs to know about the patient's treatment preferences and the patient's attitude concerning the role of the clinician to facilitate decision making. The strategies used by the clinicians were perceived as helpful and could be tested in an intervention study.

  • 27.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Stattin, Pär
    Suicide Risk in Men with Prostate-Specific Antigen-Detected Early Prostate Cancer: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study from PCBaSe Sweden2010In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 390-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of suicide is increased among cancer patients including men with prostate cancer (PCa). However, whether this increased risk applies to men diagnosed subsequent to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is not known. Objective: To assess the risk of suicide among men diagnosed with PCa subsequent to PSA testing. Design, setting, and participants: The Prostate Cancer Base Sweden (PCBaSe Sweden) database, the Swedish Cause of Death Register, and the Swedish census database were used. The PCBaSe Sweden is a merged database that includes data from the Swedish National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) for cases diagnosed between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006. The number of suicides registered for cases in the PCBaSe cohort was compared with the expected number of suicides in an age-matched general male Swedish population. Measurements: Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for different categories of cases. Results and limitations: There were 128 suicides among the 77 439 PCa cases in the NPCR compared with an expected number of 85 (SMR: 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). The risk of suicide was not increased for the 22 405 men with PSA-detected T1c tumours (SMR: 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5), whereas the 22 929 men with locally advanced nonmetastatic tumours (SMR: 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-2.9) and the 8350 men with distant metastases (SMR: 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6) had statistically significant increased SMRs for suicide. Potential effects of comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions could not be investigated. Conclusions: No increased risk of committing suicide was observed among men with PCa diagnosed subsequent to PSA testing, whereas the risk was twice as high among men with locally advanced or metastatic disease, compared with an age-matched male population. (C) 2009 European Association of Urology.

  • 28.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Lambe, Mats
    Bratt, Ola
    Stattin, Par
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Psychiatric treatment in men with prostate cancer: Results from a Nation-wide, population-based cohort study from PCBaSe Sweden2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 2195-2201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore whether the self-reported psychological distress among men with prostate cancer was to the extent that it required psychiatric treatment. Methods: PCBaSe Sweden, a merged database based on the National Prostate Cancer Register including 97% of all prostate cancers registered as well as age-matched controls. We calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals to compare risks of psychiatric treatment due to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder controlling for age and socio-economic factors. We used odds ratios to compare use or no use of antidepressants. Findings: In total 72,613 men with prostate cancer and 217,839 men without prostate cancer were included for analyses. Psychiatric hospitalisation due to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly increased (RR 1.29, (95% CI 1.14-1.45), RR 1.42 (95% CI 1.12-1.80) and RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.16-2.24), respectively). However, hospitalisations due to anxiety were only increased in men with more advanced tumours RR 2.28 (95% CI 1.45-3.57). The use of antidepressants was increased for all men with prostate cancer RR 1.65 (95% CI 1.54-1.77) and treatment strategies RR 1.93 (95% CI 1.75-2.13). Interpretation: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer had increased risk of psychiatric treatment for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and use of antidepressants regardless of risk group and treatment strategy compared to age-matched controls, whilst more advanced prostate cancer was associated with severe anxiety disorders. 

  • 29.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Filén, Frej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Ruutu, Mirja
    Garmo, Hans
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Bratell, Stefan
    Spångberg, Anders
    Palmgren, Juni
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Lindeborg, T.
    Einarsson, G.
    Ekman, P.
    Wijkström, H.
    Karlberg, L.
    Hagberg, G.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    de la Torre, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hamberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lindgren, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Mavadati, E.
    Gobén, B.
    Pettersson, I.
    Damber, J.E.
    Lindgren, A.
    Varenhorst, E.
    Norlén, B.J.
    Radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in localized prostate cancer: the Scandinavian prostate cancer group-4 randomized trial2008In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 100, no 16, p. 1144-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of radical prostatectomy in patients with early prostate cancer has been assessed in only one randomized trial. In 2005, we reported that radical prostatectomy improved prostate cancer survival compared with watchful waiting after a median of 8.2 years of follow-up. We now report results after 3 more years of follow-up. METHODS: From October 1, 1989, through February 28, 1999, 695 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to radical prostatectomy (n = 347) or watchful waiting (n = 348). Follow-up was complete through December 31, 2006, with histopathologic review and blinded evaluation of causes of death. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During a median of 10.8 years of follow-up (range = 3 weeks to 17.2 years), 137 men in the surgery group and 156 in the watchful waiting group died (P = .09). For 47 of the 347 men (13.5%) who were randomly assigned to surgery and 68 of the 348 men (19.5%) who were not, death was due to prostate cancer. The difference in cumulative incidence of death due to prostate cancer remained stable after about 10 years of follow-up. At 12 years, 12.5% of the surgery group and 17.9% of the watchful waiting group had died of prostate cancer (difference = 5.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 11.1%), for a relative risk of 0.65 (95% CI = 0.45 to 0.94; P = .03). The difference in cumulative incidence of distant metastases did not increase beyond 10 years of follow-up. At 12 years, 19.3% of men in the surgery group and 26% of men in the watchful waiting group had been diagnosed with distant metastases (difference = 6.7%, 95% CI = 0.2 to 13.2%), for a relative risk of 0.65 (95% CI = 0.47 to 0.88; P = .006). Among men who underwent radical prostatectomy, those with extracapsular tumor growth had 14 times the risk of prostate cancer death as those without it (RR = 14.2, 95% CI = 3.3 to 61.8; P < .001). CONCLUSION: Radical prostatectomy reduces prostate cancer mortality and risk of metastases with little or no further increase in benefit 10 or more years after surgery.

  • 30.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Regional Cancer Center Uppsala Örebro.
    Garmo, Hans
    Regional Cancer Center Uppsala Örebro.
    Rider, Jennifer R.
    Taari, Kimmo
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Spangberg, Anders
    Andren, Ove
    Palmgren, Juni
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Early Prostate Cancer2014In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 370, no 10, p. 932-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundRadical prostatectomy reduces mortality among men with localized prostate cancer; however, important questions regarding long-term benefit remain. MethodsBetween 1989 and 1999, we randomly assigned 695 men with early prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy and followed them through the end of 2012. The primary end points in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group Study Number 4 (SPCG-4) were death from any cause, death from prostate cancer, and the risk of metastases. Secondary end points included the initiation of androgen-deprivation therapy. ResultsDuring 23.2 years of follow-up, 200 of 347 men in the surgery group and 247 of the 348 men in the watchful-waiting group died. Of the deaths, 63 in the surgery group and 99 in the watchful-waiting group were due to prostate cancer; the relative risk was 0.56 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.77; P=0.001), and the absolute difference was 11.0 percentage points (95% CI, 4.5 to 17.5). The number needed to treat to prevent one death was 8. One man died after surgery in the radical-prostatectomy group. Androgen-deprivation therapy was used in fewer patients who underwent prostatectomy (a difference of 25.0 percentage points; 95% CI, 17.7 to 32.3). The benefit of surgery with respect to death from prostate cancer was largest in men younger than 65 years of age (relative risk, 0.45) and in those with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (relative risk, 0.38). However, radical prostatectomy was associated with a reduced risk of metastases among older men (relative risk, 0.68; P=0.04). ConclusionsExtended follow-up confirmed a substantial reduction in mortality after radical prostatectomy; the number needed to treat to prevent one death continued to decrease when the treatment was modified according to age at diagnosis and tumor risk. A large proportion of long-term survivors in the watchful-waiting group have not required any palliative treatment. (Funded by the Swedish Cancer Society and others.) The randomized Swedish trial of prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in disease detected mainly clinically (not by PSA screening) continues to show a benefit for early prostatectomy. The number of men younger than 65 needed to treat to prevent one death is now four. The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group Study Number 4 (SPCG-4), a randomized trial of radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in men with localized prostate cancer diagnosed before the era of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, showed a survival benefit of radical prostatectomy as compared with observation at 15 years of follow-up.(1) By contrast, the Prostate Cancer Intervention versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in the early era of PSA testing, showed that radical prostatectomy did not significantly reduce prostate cancer-specific or overall mortality after 12 years.(2) PSA screening profoundly changes the clinical domain of study. Among other considerations, the substantial additional lead time ...

  • 31.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Sch Med, Div Canc Studies, London, England;Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Kings Coll London, Sch Med, Div Canc Studies, London, England.
    Taari, Kimmo
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Andren, Ove
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Sahlgrens Acad, Div Clin Canc Epidemiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Harvard TC Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Univ Oslo, Inst Hlth & Soc, Clin Effectiveness Res Grp, Oslo, Norway.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer: 29-Year Follow-up2018In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 379, no 24, p. 2319-2329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Radical prostatectomy reduces mortality among men with clinically detected localized prostate cancer, but evidence from randomized trials with long-term followup is sparse.

    METHODS We randomly assigned 695 men with localized prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy from October 1989 through February 1999 and collected follow-up data through 2017. Cumulative incidence and relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for death from any cause, death from prostate cancer, and metastasis were estimated in intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses, and numbers of years of life gained were estimated. We evaluated the prognostic value of histopathological measures with a Cox proportional-hazards model.

    RESULTS By December 31, 2017, a total of 261 of the 347 men in the radical-prostatectomy group and 292 of the 348 men in the watchful-waiting group had died; 71 deaths in the radical-prostatectomy group and 110 in the watchful-waiting group were due to prostate cancer (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.74; P<0.001; absolute difference in risk, 11.7 percentage points; 95% CI, 5.2 to 18.2). The number needed to treat to avert one death from any cause was 8.4. At 23 years, a mean of 2.9 extra years of life were gained with radical prostatectomy. Among the men who underwent radical prostatectomy, extracapsular extension was associated with a risk of death from prostate cancer that was 5 times as high as that among men without extracapsular extension, and a Gleason score higher than 7 was associated with a risk that was 10 times as high as that with a score of 6 or lower (scores range from 2 to 10, with higher scores indicating more aggressive cancer).

    CONCLUSIONS Men with clinically detected, localized prostate cancer and a long life expectancy benefited from radical prostatectomy, with a mean of 2.9 years of life gained. A high Gleason score and the presence of extracapsular extension in the radical prostatectomy specimens were highly predictive of death from prostate cancer.

  • 32.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Norlén, BJ
    Busch, C
    Norberg, M
    No increased prostate cancer incidence after negative transrectal guided multiple biopsies in men with increased prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination.2003In: J Urol, Vol. 170, p. 1180-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Bo Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Norberg, Mona
    No increased prostate cancer incidence after negative transrectal ultrasound guided multiple biopsies in men with increased prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination.2003In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 170, no 4 Pt 1, p. 1180-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: We investigated the incidence of prostate cancer after negative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided multiple biopsies. Our secondary aim was to calculate the sensitivity of the extended protocol used.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort of 547 men with elevated prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination but with results negative for prostate cancer on a mean of 9 TRUS guided biopsies was followed through record linkage to the national cancer Registry. The observed number of prostate cancers was compared with the expected number during the same calendar period in an age matched male population to determine the standardized incidence ratio. The sensitivity of TRUS with multiple biopsies after 5 years of followup was calculated. Relative survival was estimated if there was an excess death rate due to undiagnosed prostate cancer.

    RESULTS: We found 11 men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The expected number in the age standardized male population was 15, resulting in a standardized incidence ratio of 0.8 (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2). Five-year sensitivity of the extended protocol of TRUS guided biopsies was 95.2% (95% CI 93.5 to 96.4) and relative survival was more than 100%, indicating a selection of men deemed candidates for curative treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer who are examined by an extended protocol of TRUS guided biopsies negative for cancer do not have an increased incidence of prostate cancer within 6 years compared with an age matched male population. Five-year sensitivity of this protocol was high.

  • 34.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ruutu, Mirja
    Garmo, Hans
    Stark, Jennifer R.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Bratell, Stefan
    Spångberg, Anders
    Linköpings universitet.
    Palmgren, Juni
    Karolinska Inst. Institutionen för Medicinsk Epidemiologi och Biostatistik.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst. institutionen för onkologi-patologi..
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Harvard, Department of Epidemiology.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro Universitet.
    Radical Prostatectomy versus Watchful Waiting in Early Prostate Cancer2011In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 364, no 18, p. 1708-1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    In 2008, we reported that radical prostatectomy, as compared with watchful waiting, reduces the rate of death from prostate cancer. After an additional 3 years of follow-up, we now report estimated 15-year results.

    METHODS

    From October 1989 through February 1999, we randomly assigned 695 men with early prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy. Follow-up was complete through December 2009, with histopathological review of biopsy and radical-prostatectomy specimens and blinded evaluation of causes of death. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were estimated with the use of a Cox proportional-hazards model.

    RESULTS

    During a median of 12.8 years, 166 of the 347 men in the radical-prostatectomy group and 201 of the 348 in the watchful-waiting group died (P=0.007). In the case of 55 men assigned to surgery and 81 men assigned to watchful waiting, death was due to prostate cancer. This yielded a cumulative incidence of death from prostate cancer at 15 years of 14.6% and 20.7%, respectively (a difference of 6.1 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2 to 12.0), and a relative risk with surgery of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.87; P=0.01). The survival benefit was similar before and after 9 years of follow-up, was observed also among men with low-risk prostate cancer, and was confined to men younger than 65 years of age. The number needed to treat to avert one death was 15 overall and 7 for men younger than 65 years of age. Among men who underwent radical prostatectomy, those with extracapsular tumor growth had a risk of death from prostate cancer that was 7 times that of men without extracapsular tumor growth (relative risk, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.6 to 18.4).

    CONCLUSIONS

    Radical prostatectomy was associated with a reduction in the rate of death from prostate cancer. Men with extracapsular tumor growth may benefit from adjuvant local or systemic treatment.

  • 35.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ruutu, Mirja
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Sven-Olof
    Bratell, Stefan
    Spångberg, Anders
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Garmo, Hans
    Palmgren, J
    Adami, HO
    Norlén, Bo Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Johansson, JE
    Radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in early prostate cancer2005In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 352, no 19, p. 1977-1944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In 2002, we reported the initial results of a trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting in the management of early prostate cancer. After three more years of follow-up, we report estimated 10-year results.

    METHODS:

    From October 1989 through February 1999, 695 men with early prostate cancer (mean age, 64.7 years) were randomly assigned to radical prostatectomy (347 men) or watchful waiting (348 men). The follow-up was complete through 2003, with blinded evaluation of the causes of death. The primary end point was death due to prostate cancer; the secondary end points were death from any cause, metastasis, and local progression.

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 8.2 years of follow-up, 83 men in the surgery group and 106 men in the watchful-waiting group died (P=0.04). In 30 of the 347 men assigned to surgery (8.6 percent) and 50 of the 348 men assigned to watchful waiting (14.4 percent), death was due to prostate cancer. The difference in the cumulative incidence of death due to prostate cancer increased from 2.0 percentage points after 5 years to 5.3 percentage points after 10 years, for a relative risk of 0.56 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.88; P=0.01 by Gray's test). For distant metastasis, the corresponding increase was from 1.7 to 10.2 percentage points, for a relative risk in the surgery group of 0.60 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.86; P=0.004 by Gray's test), and for local progression, the increase was from 19.1 to 25.1 percentage points, for a relative risk of 0.33 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.25 to 0.44; P<0.001 by Gray's test).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Radical prostatectomy reduces disease-specific mortality, overall mortality, and the risks of metastasis and local progression. The absolute reduction in the risk of death after 10 years is small, but the reductions in the risks of metastasis and local tumor progression are substantial.

  • 36.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala-Örebro, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    King's College London, Medical School, Division of Cancer Studies, London, UK.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Rider, Jennifer R
    Long-term Distress After Radical Prostatectomy Versus Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer: A Longitudinal Study from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-4 Randomized Clinical Trial2013In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 920-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Studies enumerating the dynamics of physical and emotional symptoms following prostate cancer (PCa) treatment are needed to guide therapeutic strategy. Yet, overcoming patient selection forces is a formidable challenge for observational studies comparing treatment groups.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare patterns of symptom burden and distress in men with localized PCa randomized to radical prostatectomy (RP) or watchful waiting (WW) and followed up longitudinally.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

    The three largest, Swedish, randomization centers for the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-4 trial conducted a longitudinal study to assess symptoms and distress from several psychological and physical domains by mailed questionnaire every 6 mo for 2 yr and then yearly through 8 yr of follow-up.

    INTERVENTION:

    RP compared with WW.

    OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

    A questionnaire was mailed at baseline and then repeatedly during follow-up with questions concerning physical and mental symptoms. Each analysis of quality of life was based on a dichotomization of the outcome (yes vs no) studied in a binomial response, generalized linear mixed model.

    RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

    Of 347 randomized men, 272 completed at least five questionnaires during an 8-yr follow-up period. Almost all men reported that PCa negatively influenced daily activities and relationships. Health-related distress, worry, feeling low, and insomnia were consistently reported by approximately 30-40% in both groups. Men in the RP group consistently reported more leakage, impaired erection and libido, and fewer obstructive voiding symptoms. For men in the WW group, distress related to erectile symptoms increased gradually over time. Symptom burden and distress at baseline was predictive of long-term outlook.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Cancer negatively influenced daily activities among almost all men in both treatment groups; health-related distress was common. Trade-offs exist between physiologic symptoms, highlighting the importance of tailored treatment decision-making. Men who are likely to experience profound long-term distress can be identified early in disease management.

  • 37.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Garmo, Hans
    Reg Canc Ctr Uppsala Örebro, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Radical Surgery or Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer Reply2019In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 380, no 11, p. 1084-1084Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Bjartell, Anders
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Div Urol Canc, Dept Translat Med, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Persson, Josefin
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bratt, Ola
    Lund Univ, Div Urol Canc, Dept Translat Med, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Cambridge Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Cambridge, England..
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Akre, Olof
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prediction of clinical progression after radical prostatectomy in a nationwide population-based cohort2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to create a model for predicting progression-free survival after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: The risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) was modelled in a cohort of 3452 men aged 70 years or younger who were primarily treated with radical prostatectomy after being diagnosed between 2003 and 2006 with localized prostate cancer [clinical stage T1c-T2, Gleason score 5-10, N0/NX, M0/MX, prostate-specific antigen (PSA)<20 ng/ml]. The cohort was split into two: one cohort for model development (n = 3452) and one for validation (n = 1762). BCR was defined as two increasing PSA values of at least 0.2 ng/ml, initiation of secondary therapy, distant metastases or death from prostate cancer. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was applied, predictive performance was assessed using the bootstrap resampling technique to calculate the c index, and calibration of the model was evaluated by comparing predicted and observed Kaplan-Meier 1 year BCR. Results: The overall 5 year progression-free survival was 83% after a median follow-up time of 6.8 years in the development cohort and 7.3 years in the validation cohort. The final model included T stage, PSA level, primary and secondary Gleason grade, and number of positive and negative biopsies. The c index for discrimination between high and low risk of recurrence was 0.68. The probability of progression-free survival ranged from 22% to 97% over the range of risk scores in the study population. Conclusions: This model is based on nationwide population-based data and can be used with a fair predictive accuracy to guide decisions on clinical follow-up after prostatectomy. An online calculator for convenient clinical use of the model is available at www.npcr.se/nomogram

  • 39.
    Björklund, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Solna, Sweden..
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cole, Alexander
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Urol Surg, Boston, MA USA..
    Carlsson, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Urol Sect, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robinson, David
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Loeb, Stacy
    NYU, Dept Urol Populat Hlth, Laura & Isaac Perlmutter Canc Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Akre, Olof
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Postoperative mortality 90 days after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and retropubic radical prostatectomy: a nationwide population-based study2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess 90-day postoperative mortality after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) and retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) using nationwide population-based registry data. Patients and Methods We conducted a cohort study using the National Prostate Cancer R