uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 6239
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. A Molarius, A
    et al.
    Granström, F
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kalander Blomqvist, M
    Pettersson, H
    Ello, S
    Can financial insecurity and condescending treatment explain the higher prevalence of poor self-rated health in women than in men? A population-based cross-sectional study in Sweden2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Aalto, Heidi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Föräldrars upplevelser av omvårdnaden av sitt sent underburna barn på BB: En intervjustudie2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Sent underburna barn vårdas ofta på BB-avdelning för fullgångna barn. De har högre frekvens av återinläggningar på sjukhus än fullgångna barn. De flesta studier kring underburna barns vistelse på sjukhus är inte gjorda specifikt på sent underburna barn. Syfte: Syftet är att utforska föräldrars upplevelser av omvårdnaden av sent underburna barn på en BB-avdelning i Sverige. I analysen användes det teoretiska begreppet empowerment. Metod: Studien är deskriptiv med en kvalitativ ansats. Telefonintervjuer användes som datainsamlingsmetod. Fem mammor och två pappor deltog i studien. Intervjuerna analyserades med innehållsanalys. Resultat/Slutsats: Föräldrarna upplevde att personalen antingen förmedlade empowerment eller inte. Omvårdnadsåtgärder kring barnet som gjorde föräldrarna mer delaktiga upplevdes mer positivt och omvårdnadsåtgärder som orsakade en separation mellan föräldrar och barn upplevdes mer negativt. Föräldrarna hade svårt att ifrågasätta personal, även om de upplevde att något kring omvårdnadsåtgärden kändes fel. Omvårdnadsåtgärder, utfördes inte alltid i enlighet med vetenskap och beprövad erfarenhet. Personalen kan utbildas mer i att främja empowerment i föräldrarollen och därmed även öka föräldradelaktigheten i barnets omvårdnad och möjligheten att se varje familjs unika behov. Mer forskning behövs om hur detta ska ske.

  • 3. Aaltonen, Pertti
    et al.
    Amory, John K
    Anderson, Richard A
    Behre, Hermann M
    Bialy, Gabriel
    Blithe, Diana
    Bone, Wilhelm
    Bremner, William J
    Colvard, Doug
    Cooper, Trevor G
    Elliesen, Jörg
    Gabelnick, Henry L
    Gu, Yi-Qun
    Handelsman, David J
    Johansson, Elof A B
    Kersemaekers, Wendy
    Liu, Peter
    MacKay, Trent
    Matlin, Stephen
    Mbizvo, Michael
    McLachlan, Robert I
    Meriggiola, Maria Cristina
    Mletzko, Stephan
    Mommers, Ellen
    Muermans, Hilde
    Nieschlag, Eberhard
    Odlind, Viveca
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Page, Stephanie T
    Radlmaier, Albert
    Sitruk-Ware, Regine
    Swerdloff, Ronald
    Wang, Christina
    Wu, Frederick
    Zitzmann, Michael
    10th Summit Meeting consensus: recommendations for regulatory approval for hormonal male contraception.2007In: J of Andrology, vol. 28, No 3 May/June, 2007, p. 362-363Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 4.
    Aarnio, Pauliina
    et al.
    Univ Tampere, Fac Social Sci Global Hlth & Dev, Kalevantie 4, FI-33014 Tampere, Finland;Univ Tampere, Med Sch, Dept Int Hlth, Tampere, Finland.
    Kulmala, Teija
    Univ Tampere, Med Sch, Child Hlth Res Unit, Tampere, Finland;Univ Tampere, Med Sch, Dept Int Hlth, Tampere, Finland.
    Olsson, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Husband's role in handling pregnancy complications in Mangochi District, Malawi: A call for increased focus on community level male involvement2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the current study is to provide information about husbands' role in decision-making and healthcare seeking in cases of pregnancy complications in Mangochi district, Malawi with an analysis of qualitative interviews using the concepts of "capital" and "field" from Bourdieu's social field theory. Study design: Twelve husbands and wives who had experienced pregnancy complications and six key informants from a semi-rural area of Mangochi district were interviewed individually. Thematic analysis was conducted based on the concepts of capital and field in Bourdieu's social field theory. Results: Husbands have significant economic and symbolic capital in decisions about healthcare seeking during instances of pregnancy complications as a result of their roles as father, head of the household and main income earner. Lack of money is the only acceptable reason for husbands to deny their wives healthcare. Husbands have limited access to knowledge of maternal health, which can compromise their decisions about seeking healthcare. Joint decision-making within families can be bypassed to allow for prompt healthcare seeking in emergencies. Conclusions: Husbands are important decision makers regarding seeking healthcare for pregnancy complications because of their economic and symbolic power and despite their limited access to knowledge of maternal health. Maternal healthcare seeking practices would benefit from wives gaining an empowered role as well as improved knowledge of maternal health among husbands.

  • 5.
    Aarnio, Pauliina
    et al.
    Dept for International Health, Medical School, University of Tampere, Finland.
    Olsson, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Chimbiri, Agnes
    Kulmala, Teija
    Male involvement in antenatal HIV counseling and testing: exploring men's perceptions in rural Malawi2009In: AIDS Care, ISSN 0954-0121, E-ISSN 1360-0451, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 1537-1546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antenatal care can act as an excellent tool to improve access to HIV counseling and testing services. This paper investigates an issue that may weaken its potential, namely lack of male involvement. We explored married men's perceptions of HIV in pregnancy and male involvement in antenatal HIV testing and counseling in Southern Malawi through 11 focus group discussions and a cross-sectional survey (n=388). The main findings were that men were largely unaware of available antenatal HIV testing and counseling services, and perceived it overall problematic to attend female-oriented health care. Most men supported provision of antenatal HIV testing. They perceived husbands to participate in the process indirectly through spousal communication, being faithful during pregnancy, and supporting the wife if found HIV-positive. Involvement of husbands was compromised by men's reluctance to learn their HIV status and the threat that HIV poses on marriage. Men stressed the importance of prior spousal agreement of antenatal HIV testing and considered HIV testing without their consent a valid reason for divorce. We suggest that male involvement in antenatal HIV testing requires refocusing of information and health services to include men. To avoid negative social outcomes for women, comprehensive and early involvement of men is essential.

  • 6.
    Aarnio, Riina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: Including clinical and health economic aspects2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for the development of cervical cancer. HPV testing has higher sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) than cytology, resulting in more effective screening. As HPV testing also offers an opportunity for self-sampling, it could serve as an even more effective and cost-effective method of cervical screening.

    First, we compared repeated self-sampling for HPV testing with Pap smear cytology in detection of CIN2+ in primary cervical screening for women aged 30–49 years (n=36 390). We found a more than twofold higher detection rate of CIN2+ and a fourfold higher detection rate of CIN2 with self-sampling compared with cytology. However, no difference was seen between the arms in the detection rate of CIN3+. It thus seems that CIN is detected at an earlier stage with self-sampling than with cytology, but the impact of this needs to be further explored.

    Second, as management of HPV-positive women with normal cytology results is a challenge, we wanted to evaluate the proportion of cases of histological CIN2+ in these women. In this prospective study we performed LEEP and found that 15% (6/40) of the women had undetected CIN2+. These findings can be used in counseling women about the risk of cervical cancer and helping clinicians in decisions on management.

    Third, we performed a cost-effectiveness analysis on the same study population as in Study I. Self-sampling for HPV testing resulted in a higher participation rate and more detected cases of CIN2+ at a lower cost and was regarded as more cost-effective than Pap smear cytology in cervical screening. These results can guide policy-makers when planning future screening programs.

    Fourth, we compared self-sampling with sampling by medical professionals for HPV testing in detection of CIN2+, using a combination of an FTA card as storage medium and a PCR-based HPV test (hpVIR) in women aged 30–60 years (n=11 951). No difference in the detection rates of histological CIN2+ was found between the arms.

    Taken together, self-sampling resulted in a higher participation rate than sampling by medical professionals in cervical screening and that triage with repeated self-sampling resulted in high compliance and detection rate of CIN2+. As repeated self-sampling for HPV testing was also cost-effective, it could serve as an attractive alternative in the development of future cervical screening programs. More research is needed on how to refine the management of HPV-positive women by self-sampling only.

    List of papers
    1. Randomised study shows that repeated self-sampling and HPV test has more than two-fold higher detection rate of women with CIN2+ histology than Pap smear cytology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomised study shows that repeated self-sampling and HPV test has more than two-fold higher detection rate of women with CIN2+ histology than Pap smear cytology
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 896-904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This randomised study compared the detection rate of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-positive (CIN2+) based on histology in women performing repeated self-sampling of vaginal fluid (VF) for human papillomavirus (HPV) test with a control group following the ordinary screening by Pap smear cytology.

    Methods:

    36390 women aged 30–49 years scheduled for invitation to organised screening were randomised in two groups, one to perform self-sampling of VF for HPV test (n=17 997, HPV arm) and the other group to perform screening by PAP smear cytology (n=18 393, control arm). HPV positive women in the HPV arm repeated the self-sampling and the HPV test on average 4.4 months later and those with two consecutive positive HPV tests were referred to colposcopy. Outcome was CIN2+ based on histology during 18-month follow-up.

    Results:

    Participation rate was 47% in the HPV arm and 39% in the control arm. The HPV prevalence in the first self-sampling was 6.9%, and 71% of these women were HPV positive in their second test. For the per-protocol approach, cumulative prevalence of histological CIN2+ in the HPV arm was 20.2 per 1000 women screened as compared to 10.8 in the control arm. The cumulative prevalence of CIN2+ diagnosed per 1000 years screened was 160.8 in the HPV arm as compared with 25.4 in the control arm.

    Conclusions:

    Repeated self-sampling of VF and HPV test had more than a two-fold higher discovery rate of CIN2+ per 1000 women screened as compared with PAP smear cytology.

    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367087 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.485 (DOI)000427945800030 ()29438367 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
    Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Diagnostic excision of the cervix in women over 40 years with human papilloma virus persistency and normal cytology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic excision of the cervix in women over 40 years with human papilloma virus persistency and normal cytology
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: European journal of obstetrics & gynecology and reproductive biology: X, ISSN 2590-1613, Vol. 3, article id 100042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as the main risk factor of cervical cancer. Investigation via cytology and colposcopy have lower sensitivity than HPV testing in the diagnosis of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+). Despite normal cytology and colposcopy findings women with persistent HPV infection have an increased risk of CIN2+. The aim of the study was to evaluate the proportion of histologically confirmed CIN2+ in women with persistent HPV infection and normal Pap smears.

    Study design: From April 2013 until March 2016 we prospectively recruited 91 women over 40 years with persistent HPV infection without any abnormalities in cytology. Of these, 40 women attended a gynecological examination including an HPV test, Pap smear, endocervical cytology, colposcopy with biopsies and diagnostic loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Biopsy and LEEP samples were subjected to histological examination.

    Results: CIN2+ was verified by histological examination of the LEEP sample in 6/40 (15%) of the women. All the cytological samples were normal and none of the biopsies confirmed CIN2+. Only 19/40 women still had a persistent HPV infection at the study visit. None of the 21/40 women who had cleared their HPV infection at the study visit had CIN2+ in histology of the LEEP sample.

    Conclusions: A persistent HPV infection needs to be monitored despite normal Pap smears, since 6/40 (15%) women older than 40 years, was revealed to have an undiagnosed CIN2+ when LEEP was performed. Counseling women regarding the risk of cervical cancer and the expected effect of an eventual LEEP can help them to make an optimal informed choice.

    Keywords
    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Colposcopy, Human papillomavirus, Loop electrical excision procedure, Transformation zone
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400770 (URN)10.1016/j.eurox.2019.100042 (DOI)31404426 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeated self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: a randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeated self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: a randomized study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is recommended in primary cervical screening to improve cancer prevention. An advantage of HPV testing is that it can be performed on self-samples, which could increase population coverage and result in a more efficient strategy to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer. Our objective was to assess whether repeated self-sampling for HPV testing is cost-effective in comparison with Pap smear cytology for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more (CIN2+) in increasing participation rate in primary cervical screening.

    Methods

    A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was performed on data from a previously published randomized clinical study including 36 390 women aged 30–49 years. Participants were randomized either to perform repeated self-sampling of vaginal fluid for HPV testing (n = 17 997, HPV self-sampling arm) or to midwife-collected Pap smears for cytological analysis (n = 18 393, Pap smear arm).

    Results

    Self-sampling for HPV testing led to 1633 more screened women and 107 more histologically diagnosed CIN2+ at a lower cost vs. midwife-collected Pap smears (€ 228 642 vs. € 781 139). 

    Conclusions

    This study projected that repeated self-sampling for HPV testing increased participation and detection of CIN2+ at a lower cost than midwife-collected Pap smears in primary cervical screening. Offering women a home-based self-sampling may therefore be a more cost-effective alternative than clinic-based screening.

     

    Keywords
    Self-sampling, HPV testing, primary cervical screening, cost-effectiveness, CIN2+, precancerous lesion, cervical cancer
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405549 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Comparison of vaginal self-sampling and cervical sampling by medical professionals for the detection of HPV and CIN2+: a randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of vaginal self-sampling and cervical sampling by medical professionals for the detection of HPV and CIN2+: a randomized study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) test is more effective in reducing cervical cancer incidence than cytology and it also offers the opportunity to self-sample. We conducted a randomized study to compare vaginal self-sampling with cervical sampling by medical professionals for HPV testing concerning prevalence of HPV and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+)  or grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) in primary screening. In total, 11 951 women aged 30–60 years were randomized into two groups, 5961 for self-sampling (SS arm) and 5990 for sampling by medical professionals (SMP arm). Sampling was performed with a Rovers®Viba-brush in the SS arm and a cytobrush in the SMP arm. All samples were applied to an indicating FTA elute card and analyzed for HPV using a clinically validated real-time PCR test (hpVIR). All HPV-positive women performed repeated sampling about six months later using the same procedure as used initially. All HPV-positive women in the second sampling were referred to colposcopy. HPV prevalence in the first test did not differ between the SS arm (6.8%, 167/2466) and the SMP arm (7.8%, 118/1519) (p=0.255). The prevalence of CIN2+ per 1000 screened women was 17 (43/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 13–24) in the SS arm and 21 (32/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 15–30) in the SMP arm. For CIN3+, the prevalence per 1000 screened women was 14 (35/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 10–20) in the SS arm and 15 (23/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 10–23) in the SMP arm.  In conclusion, self-sampling and sampling by medical professionals showed the same prevalence of HPV and detection rate of CIN2+ and CIN3+ in histology.

    Novelty and Impact

    Offering self-sampling in primary cervical screening results in similar rates of HPV prevalence and detection of CIN2+ and CIN3+ compared with sampling by medical professionals when using an FTA card as storage medium and PCR-based HPV test (hpVIR). Considering health-economic aspects, resources should be directed towards self-sampling as a first choice for primary cervical screening, with careful follow-up of this strategy.

    Keywords
    Self-sampling, HPV test, Primary cervical screening
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405547 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Aarnio, Riina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Isacson, Isabella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sanner, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Gustavsson, Inger M.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Gyllensten, Ulf B.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Comparison of vaginal self-sampling and cervical sampling by medical professionals for the detection of HPV and CIN2+: a randomized studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) test is more effective in reducing cervical cancer incidence than cytology and it also offers the opportunity to self-sample. We conducted a randomized study to compare vaginal self-sampling with cervical sampling by medical professionals for HPV testing concerning prevalence of HPV and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+)  or grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) in primary screening. In total, 11 951 women aged 30–60 years were randomized into two groups, 5961 for self-sampling (SS arm) and 5990 for sampling by medical professionals (SMP arm). Sampling was performed with a Rovers®Viba-brush in the SS arm and a cytobrush in the SMP arm. All samples were applied to an indicating FTA elute card and analyzed for HPV using a clinically validated real-time PCR test (hpVIR). All HPV-positive women performed repeated sampling about six months later using the same procedure as used initially. All HPV-positive women in the second sampling were referred to colposcopy. HPV prevalence in the first test did not differ between the SS arm (6.8%, 167/2466) and the SMP arm (7.8%, 118/1519) (p=0.255). The prevalence of CIN2+ per 1000 screened women was 17 (43/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 13–24) in the SS arm and 21 (32/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 15–30) in the SMP arm. For CIN3+, the prevalence per 1000 screened women was 14 (35/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 10–20) in the SS arm and 15 (23/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 10–23) in the SMP arm.  In conclusion, self-sampling and sampling by medical professionals showed the same prevalence of HPV and detection rate of CIN2+ and CIN3+ in histology.

    Novelty and Impact

    Offering self-sampling in primary cervical screening results in similar rates of HPV prevalence and detection of CIN2+ and CIN3+ compared with sampling by medical professionals when using an FTA card as storage medium and PCR-based HPV test (hpVIR). Considering health-economic aspects, resources should be directed towards self-sampling as a first choice for primary cervical screening, with careful follow-up of this strategy.

  • 8.
    Aarnio, Riina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Wikström, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Gustavsson, Inger M.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Gyllensten, Ulf B.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Diagnostic excision of the cervix in women over 40 years with human papilloma virus persistency and normal cytology2019In: European journal of obstetrics & gynecology and reproductive biology: X, ISSN 2590-1613, Vol. 3, article id 100042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as the main risk factor of cervical cancer. Investigation via cytology and colposcopy have lower sensitivity than HPV testing in the diagnosis of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+). Despite normal cytology and colposcopy findings women with persistent HPV infection have an increased risk of CIN2+. The aim of the study was to evaluate the proportion of histologically confirmed CIN2+ in women with persistent HPV infection and normal Pap smears.

    Study design: From April 2013 until March 2016 we prospectively recruited 91 women over 40 years with persistent HPV infection without any abnormalities in cytology. Of these, 40 women attended a gynecological examination including an HPV test, Pap smear, endocervical cytology, colposcopy with biopsies and diagnostic loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Biopsy and LEEP samples were subjected to histological examination.

    Results: CIN2+ was verified by histological examination of the LEEP sample in 6/40 (15%) of the women. All the cytological samples were normal and none of the biopsies confirmed CIN2+. Only 19/40 women still had a persistent HPV infection at the study visit. None of the 21/40 women who had cleared their HPV infection at the study visit had CIN2+ in histology of the LEEP sample.

    Conclusions: A persistent HPV infection needs to be monitored despite normal Pap smears, since 6/40 (15%) women older than 40 years, was revealed to have an undiagnosed CIN2+ when LEEP was performed. Counseling women regarding the risk of cervical cancer and the expected effect of an eventual LEEP can help them to make an optimal informed choice.

  • 9.
    Aarnio, Riina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Östensson, Ellinor
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Gustavsson, Inger M.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Gyllensten, Ulf B.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeated self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: a randomized studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is recommended in primary cervical screening to improve cancer prevention. An advantage of HPV testing is that it can be performed on self-samples, which could increase population coverage and result in a more efficient strategy to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer. Our objective was to assess whether repeated self-sampling for HPV testing is cost-effective in comparison with Pap smear cytology for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more (CIN2+) in increasing participation rate in primary cervical screening.

    Methods

    A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was performed on data from a previously published randomized clinical study including 36 390 women aged 30–49 years. Participants were randomized either to perform repeated self-sampling of vaginal fluid for HPV testing (n = 17 997, HPV self-sampling arm) or to midwife-collected Pap smears for cytological analysis (n = 18 393, Pap smear arm).

    Results

    Self-sampling for HPV testing led to 1633 more screened women and 107 more histologically diagnosed CIN2+ at a lower cost vs. midwife-collected Pap smears (€ 228 642 vs. € 781 139). 

    Conclusions

    This study projected that repeated self-sampling for HPV testing increased participation and detection of CIN2+ at a lower cost than midwife-collected Pap smears in primary cervical screening. Offering women a home-based self-sampling may therefore be a more cost-effective alternative than clinic-based screening.

     

  • 10.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Exclusive breastfeeding-Does it make a difference?: A longitudinal, prospective study of daily feeding practices, health and growth in a sample of Swedish infants2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of exclusive breastfeeding in relation to daily feeding practices and to health and growth of infants in an affluent society was examined. In a descriptive longitudinal prospective study 506 mother-infant pairs were followed from birth through the greater part of the first year. Feeding was recorded daily, and health and growth were recorded fortnightly.

    Large individual variations were seen in breastfeeding patterns. A wide discrepancy between the exclusive breastfeeding rates obtained from "current status" data and data "since birth" was found.

    Using a strict definition of exclusive breastfeeding from birth and taking into account the reasons for giving complementary feeding, the study showed that many exclusively breastfed infants had infections early in life, the incidence of which increased with age, despite continuation of exclusive breastfeeding. However, truly exclusively breastfed infants seem less likely to suffer infections than infants who receive formula in addition to breast milk. Increasing formula use was associated with an increasing likelihood of suffering respiratory illnesses. The growth of exclusively breastfed infants was similar to that of infants who were not exclusively breastfed.

    The health of newborn infants during the first year of life was associated with factors other than feeding practices alone. Some of these factors may be prenatal, since increasing birth weight was associated with an increasing likelihood of having respiratory symptoms, even in exclusively breastfed infants. However, exclusive breastfeeding was shown to be beneficial for the health of the infant even in an affluent society.

  • 11.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hornell, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hofvander, Yngve
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gebre-Medhin, Mehari
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Breastfeeding patterns in relation to thumb sucking and pacifier use1999In: Pediatrics, Vol. 104, p. 50-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hofvander, Yngve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gebre-Medhin, Meharigm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Growth under privileged conditions of healthy Swedish infants exclusively breastfed from birth to 4-6 months:  a longitudinal prospective study based on daily records of feeding2003In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    In most studies the methodology used to study growth in relation to breastfeeding patterns cannot ensure that exclusive breastfeeding has in fact occurred since birth. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth of healthy infants in Sweden in whom exclusive breastfeeding for the first 4–6 mo was ascertained through daily feeding records and to compare the results with the World Health Organization (WHO) “12-month breastfed pooled data set” and the Euro-Growth references for exclusively breastfed infants, as well as with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO reference.

    Methods:

    147 exclusively breastfed infants and 325 non-exclusively breastfed Swedish infants, with a birthweight of ≥3 kg, were included. The mothers had previous breastfed at least one infant for at least 4 mo. Weight was recorded fortnightly and length monthly.

    Results:

    Infants exclusively breastfed since birth showed similar growth in weight and height to that of the non-exclusively breastfed infants. During the first 6 mo of life the growth of exclusively breastfed infants was also similar to that of the infants regularly receiving formula at 12–16 wk of age, mostly in addition to breast milk. The monthly growth increments were fairly similar to those of the “WHO pooled breastfed data set” and the Euro-Growth references for exclusively breastfed infants.

    Conclusion:

    In an affluent society truly exclusively breastfed infants seem to have the same growth during the first half year of life as non-exclusively breastfed infants with a high breastfeeding rate.

  • 13.
    Aarts, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hornell, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hofvander, Yngve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gebre-Medhin, Mehari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Greiner, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    How exclusive is exclusive breastfeeding? A comparison of data since birth with current status data:  2000In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1041-1046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    There is no accepted and widely used indicator for exclusive breastfeeding since birth. Indeed, the difference between 'current status' data on exclusive breastfeeding and data on 'exclusive breastfeeding since birth' is rarely recognized. We used data from a longitudinal study to examine this issue.

    METHODS:

    A descriptive longitudinal, prospective study design was used in which 506 mother-infant pairs were included. The mothers completed daily recordings on infant feeding during the first nine months after birth. A research assistant conducted fortnightly home visits with structured interviews. The resulting data on breastfeeding patterns are presented in two different ways: analysis of 'current status' data based on a single 24-hour recording of infant feeding at 2, 4 and 6 months of age, and analysis of data 'since birth', i.e. data on infant feeding for every day, starting from birth until the ages of 2, 4 and 6 months.

    RESULTS:

    A wide discrepancy between the results obtained from the two analyses was found. The difference in the exclusive breastfeeding rate was over 40 percentage points at both 2 and 4 months of age (92% versus 51% at 2 months and 73% versus 30% at 4 months) and 9 percentage points at 6 months (11% versus 1.8%).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Current status indicators based on a 24-hour period may be inadequate and even misleading for many purposes. We propose that in many studies an indicator called 'exclusive breastfeeding since birth' could be added.

  • 14.
    Abacan, MaryAnn
    et al.
    Univ Philippines Manila, Inst Human Genet, NIH, Manila, Philippines.
    Alsubaie, Lamia
    KASCH, King Abdulaziz Med City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Barlow-Stewart, Kristine
    Univ Sydney, Fac Med & Hlth, Northern Clin Sch, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Caanen, Beppy
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Clin Genet, Med Ctr, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Cordier, Christophe
    SYNLAB Genet, Dept Genet, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Courtney, Eliza
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Med Oncol, Canc Genet Serv, Singapore, Singapore.
    Davoine, Emeline
    Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Edwards, Janice
    Univ South Carolina, Genet Counseling Program, Transnat Alliance Genet Counseling, Columbia, SC USA.
    Elackatt, Niby J.
    Cloudnine Hosp, Org Rare Dis India, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
    Gardiner, Kate
    LifeLabs Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Guan, Yue
    Emory Univ, Rollins Sch Publ Hlth, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Huang, Lian-Hua
    China Med Univ, Sch Nursing, Taichung, Taiwan;Natl Taiwan Univ, Coll Med, Sch Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Ingvoldstad, Charlotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Fetal Med & Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kejriwal, Sahil
    Univ Washington, Inst Publ Hlth Genet, Seattle, WA USA.
    Kim, Hyon J.
    Ajou Univ, Med Sch, Suwon, South Korea;Konyang Univ, Grad Sch, Suwon, South Korea.
    Lambert, Deborah
    Natl Rare Dis Off, Dublin, Ireland.
    Lantigua-Cruz, Paulina Araceli
    Univ Med Sci Havana, Havana, Cuba.
    Lee, Juliana M. H.
    Natl Univ Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Lodahl, Marianne
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Clin Genet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lunde, Ashild
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway.
    Macaulay, Shelley
    Univ Witwatersrand, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Human Genet, Johannesburg, South Africa;Natl Hlth Lab Serv, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Macciocca, Ivan
    Victorian Clin Genet Serv, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Margarit, Sonia
    Clin Alemana Univ Desarrollo, Fac Med, Ctr Genet & Genom, Santiago, Chile.
    Middleton, Anna
    Soc & Eth Res Connecting Sci, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Fac Educ, Cambridge, England.
    Moldovan, Ramona
    Babes Bolyai Univ, Dept Psychol, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Med Oncol, Canc Genet Serv, Singapore, Singapore.
    Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J.
    Univ Arkansas Med Sci, Little Rock, AR 72205 USA.
    Ormond, Kelly E.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Ctr Biomed Eth, Stanford, CA USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, 300 Pasteur Dr,MC 5208, Stanford, CA USA.
    Paneque, Milena
    Univ Porto, CGPP Ctr Predict & Prevent Genet, I3S, Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, IBMC Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Porto, Portugal.
    Powell, Karen
    Cone Hlth Canc Ctr, Greensboro, NC USA.
    Sanghavi, Kunal
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT USA.
    Scotcher, Diana
    Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Scott, Jenna
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Juhe, Clara Serra
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, Dept Ciencies Expt & Salut, Inst Hosp Mar Invest Med, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Enfermedades Raras, Barcelona, Spain.
    Shkedi-Rafid, Shiri
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ, Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Wessels, Tina-Marie
    Univ Cape Town, Div Human Genet, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Yoon, Sook-Yee
    Natl Univ Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;Canc Res, Subang Jaya, Malaysia;Univ Malaya, Med Ctr, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Wicklund, Catherine
    Northwestern Univ, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.
    The Global State of the Genetic Counseling Profession2019In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 183-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The profession of genetic counseling (also called genetic counselling in many countries) began nearly 50 years ago in the United States, and has grown internationally in the past 30 years. While there have been many papers describing the profession of genetic counseling in individual countries or regions, data remains incomplete and has been published in diverse journals with limited access. As a result of the 2016 Transnational Alliance of Genetic Counseling (TAGC) conference in Barcelona, Spain, and the 2017 World Congress of Genetic Counselling in the UK, we endeavor to describe as fully as possible the global state of genetic counseling as a profession. We estimate that in 2018 there are nearly 7000 genetic counselors with the profession established or developing in no less than 28 countries.

  • 15.
    Abdelmenan, Semira
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Berhane, Hanna Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Jirström, Magnus
    Worku, Alemayehu
    Trenholm, Jill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Berhane, Yemane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Availability, affordability and consumption of family food:-the social stratification in Addis Ababa, the EAT Addis Study in EthiopiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Abdul Fatah, Naderah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Oskarsson, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Preventivmedelsanvändning bland kvinnor med utvecklingsstörning – en litteraturöversikt2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Individer med utvecklingsstörning har under en stor del av historien betraktats som mindervärdiga eller som icke-mänskliga varelser och har under lång tid förvägrats grundläggande mänskliga rättigheter. Exempelvis hade man i Sverige fram till 1976 ett juridiskt stöd för att tvångssterilisera personer med utvecklingsstörning. Under senare tid har dock inställningen att personer med utvecklingsstörning ska ha samma möjligheter och levnadsomständigheter som andra personer vuxit fram i stora delar av västvärlden. Detta har bland annat lett till en mer personcentrerad vård där personer med utvecklingsstörning fått mer makt att bestämma över sina egna liv. Mot denna bakgrund är syftet med denna litteraturöversikt att ta fram ett kunskapsunderlag för att designa en lättläst broschyr om preventivmedel anpassad för kvinnor med utvecklingsstörning. Metoden som används är en litteraturöversikt där databaserna PubMed, Google Scholar och PsycINFO har genomsökts. Efter granskning och analys valdes 18 artiklar ut att inkluderas i resultatet. Resultatet visade att kvinnor med utvecklingsstörning har begränsad kunskap om preventivmedel och reproduktion. Valet av preventivmedel påverkades av olika faktorer som begränsad kunskap om preventivmedelsanvändning, brist på lättläst informationsmaterial samt läkarens begränsade kunskap och erfarenhet av att ge preventivmedelsrådgivning till kvinnor med utvecklingsstörning. För att ytterligare förbättra situationen för dessa kvinnor behöver ett flertal förändringar ske. Framförallt behöver kvinnor med utvecklingsstörning få en ökad kunskap om sex, samlevnad och preventivmedel. Dessutom behöver kunskapen om dessa kvinnors särskilda behov stärkas bland förskrivande barnmorskor och läkare.

  • 17.
    Abdulcadir, Jasmine
    et al.
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Abdulcadir, Omar
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Caillet, Martin
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Catania, Lucrezia
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Cuzin, Béatrice
    Division of Urology and Transplantation, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Foldès, Pierre
    Institute of Reproductive Health, Saint Germain en Laye, Paris, France.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista
    Refugee Women's Health Clinic, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maricopa Integrated Health System.
    Nour, Nawal
    Global Ob/Gyn and African Women's Health Center, Ambulatory Obstetrics, Office for Multicultural Careers, Division of Global Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
    Ouedraogo, Charlemagne
    University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Warren, Nicole
    Department of Community Public Health Nursing, John Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wylomanski, Sophie
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France.
    Clitoral Surgery After Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting2017In: Aesthetic surgery journal, ISSN 1090-820X, E-ISSN 1527-330X, Vol. 37, no 9, p. NP113-NP115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Abdulcadir, Jasmine
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ahmadu, Fuambai Sia
    Catania, Lucrezia
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Gruenbaum, Ellen
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Johnson, Michelle C.
    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista
    Kratz, Corinne
    Sulkin, Carlos Londoño
    McKinley, Michelle
    Njambi, Wairimu
    Rogers, Juliet
    Shell-Duncan, Bettina
    Shweder, Richard A.
    Human Development, University of Chicago, Illinois.
    Seven things to know about female genital surgeries in Africa2012In: The Hastings center report, ISSN 0093-0334, E-ISSN 1552-146X, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Improving Health-seeking Behavior and Care among Sexual Violence Survivors in Rural Tanzania2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to assess the effects of providing community education and training to healthcare workers to improve community response, healthcare and support for rape survivors in the Kilombero district of Tanzania. The overall design of the project was to begin with an exploratory study (Paper I) to establish the community’s perceptions towards sexual violence and their perceived recommendations to address this issue. Using a structured questionnaire, the community’s knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence were determined along with their associations with demographic factors (Paper II). Papers III and IV assessed the effect of healthcare workers’ training and a community information package, respectively, using a controlled quasi-experimental design. The findings highlighted the social norms and variety of barriers that impacted negatively on the survivors’ care-seeking from support services and health outcomes. Increasing age and higher education were associated with better knowledge and less accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. Training on the management of sexual violence was effective in improving healthcare workers’ knowledge and practice but not attitude. Knowledge on sexual violence among the communities in the intervention and comparison areas increased significantly over the study period; from 57.3% to 80.6% in the intervention area and from 55.5% to 71.9% in the comparison area. In the intervention area, women had significantly less knowledge than men at baseline (53% Vs 64%, p<.001).There was a reduction, though not significantly, in acceptance attitudes from 28.1% to 21.8% in favor of women. In conclusion, the current intervention provides evidence that healthcare workers’ training and community education is effective in improving knowledge but not attitudes towards sexual violence. The findings have potential implications for interventions aimed at preventing and responding to violence. The broader societal norms that hinder rape disclosure need to be re-addressed.

    List of papers
    1. Community perceptions of rape and child sexual abuse: a qualitative study in rural Tanzania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community perceptions of rape and child sexual abuse: a qualitative study in rural Tanzania
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 14, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rape of women and children is recognized as a health and human rights issue in Tanzania and internationally. Exploration of the prevailing perceptions in rural areas is needed in order to expand the understanding of sexual violence in the diversity of Tanzania's contexts. The aim of this study therefore was to explore and understand perceptions of rape of women and children at the community level in a rural district in Tanzania with the added objective of exploring those perceptions that may contribute to perpetuating and/or hindering the disclosure of rape incidences. Methods: A qualitative design was employed using focus group discussions with male and female community members including religious leaders, professionals, and other community members. The discussions centered on causes of rape, survivors of rape, help-seeking and reporting, and gathered suggestions on measures for improvement. Six focus group discussions (four of single gender and two of mixed gender) were conducted. The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants perceived rape of women and children to be a frequent and hidden phenomenon. A number of factors were singled out as contributing to rape, such as erosion of social norms, globalization, poverty, vulnerability of children, alcohol/drug abuse and poor parental care. Participants perceived the need for educating the community to raise their knowledge of sexual violence and its consequences, and their roles as preventive agents. Conclusions: In this rural context, social norms reinforce sexual violence against women and children, and hinder them from seeking help from support services. Addressing the identified challenges may promote help-seeking behavior and improve care of survivors of sexual violence, while changes in social and cultural norms are needed for the prevention of sexual violence.

    Keywords
    Child sexual abuse, Community perceptions, Focus group discussions, Rape, Rural, Sexual violence, Tanzania
    National Category
    Occupational Health and Environmental Health
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232600 (URN)10.1186/1472-698X-14-23 (DOI)000340801600001 ()
    Available from: 2014-09-23 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Knowledge and attitude towards rape and child sexual abuse - a community-based cross-sectional study in Rural Tanzania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge and attitude towards rape and child sexual abuse - a community-based cross-sectional study in Rural Tanzania
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Violence against women and children is globally recognized as a social and human rights concern. In Tanzania, sexual violence towards women and children is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to determine community knowledge of and attitudes towards rape and child sexual abuse, and assess associations between knowledge and attitudes and socio-demographic characteristics.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken between May and June 2012. The study was conducted in the Kilombero and Ulanga rural districts in the Morogoro Region of Tanzania. Men and women aged 18-49 years were eligible for the study. Through a three-stage cluster sampling strategy, a household survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, attitudes about gender roles and violence, and knowledge on health consequences of rape. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 21. Main outcome measures were knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual violence. Multivariate analyses were used to assess associations between socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    RESULTS: A total of 1,568 participants were interviewed. The majority (58.4%) of participants were women. Most (58.3%) of the women respondents had poor knowledge on sexual violence and 63.8% had accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. Those who were married were significantly more likely to have good knowledge on sexual violence compared to the divorced/separated group (AOR = 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.2)) but less likely to have non-accepting attitudes towards sexual violence compared to the single group (AOR = 1.8 (95%CI: 1.4-2.3)). Sex of respondents, age, marital status and level of education were associated with knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that these rural communities have poor knowledge on sexual violence and have accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. Increasing age and higher education were associated with better knowledge and less accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. The findings have potentially important implications for interventions aimed at preventing violence. The results highlight the challenges associated with changing attitudes towards sexual violence, particularly as the highest levels of support for such violence were found among women.

    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-253212 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-1757-7 (DOI)000353941200001 ()25927715 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-05-25 Created: 2015-05-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31735Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level.

    DESIGN:

    A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers' knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method.

    RESULTS:

    Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers' knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are made available.

    Keywords
    healthcare worker, training, quasi-experimental, rape, sexual violence, Tanzania
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261889 (URN)10.3402/gha.v9.31735 (DOI)000381095700001 ()27435570 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
    Available from: 2015-09-05 Created: 2015-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. A community-based intervention for improving health-seeking behavior among sexual violence survivors: A controlled before and after design study in rural Tanzania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A community-based intervention for improving health-seeking behavior among sexual violence survivors: A controlled before and after design study in rural Tanzania
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, article id 28608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite global recognition that sexual violence is a violation of human rights, evidence still shows it is a pervasive problem across all societies. Promising community intervention studies in the low- and middle-income countries are limited.

    Objective: This study assessed the impact of a community-based intervention, focusing on improving the community’s knowledge and reducing social acceptability of violence against women norms with the goal to prevent and respond to sexual violence.

    Design: The strategies used to create awareness included radio programs, information, education communication materials and advocacy meetings with local leaders. The intervention took place in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design including cross-sectional surveys at baseline (2012) and endline (2014) with men and women aged 18-49. Main outcome measures were number of reported rape cases at health facilities and the community’s knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    Results: The number of reported rape events increased by more than 50% at health facilities during the intervention. Knowledge on sexual violence increased significantly in both areas over the study period (from 57.3% to 80.6% in the intervention area and from 55.5% to 71.9% in the comparison area; p<.001), and the net effect of the intervention between the two areas was statistically significant (6.9, 95% CI 0.2–13.5, p= 0.03). There was significant improvement in most of attitude indicators in the intervention area, but not in the comparison area. However, the intervention had no significant effect in the overall scores of acceptance attitudes in the final assessment when comparing the two areas (-2.4, 95%CI: -8.4 – 3.6, p= 0.42).

    Conclusions: The intervention had an effect on some indicators on knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence even after a short period of intervention. This finding informs the public health practitioners of the importance of combined strategies in achieving changes.

    Keywords
    sexual violence, evaluation, community intervention, Tanzania
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261900 (URN)10.3402/gha.v8.28608 (DOI)000361749600001 ()
    Funder
    Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
    Available from: 2015-09-05 Created: 2015-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
  • 20.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania .
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania .
    Massawe, Siriel
    Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Mpembeni, Rose
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway .
    Knowledge and attitude towards rape and child sexual abuse - a community-based cross-sectional study in Rural Tanzania2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Violence against women and children is globally recognized as a social and human rights concern. In Tanzania, sexual violence towards women and children is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to determine community knowledge of and attitudes towards rape and child sexual abuse, and assess associations between knowledge and attitudes and socio-demographic characteristics.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken between May and June 2012. The study was conducted in the Kilombero and Ulanga rural districts in the Morogoro Region of Tanzania. Men and women aged 18-49 years were eligible for the study. Through a three-stage cluster sampling strategy, a household survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, attitudes about gender roles and violence, and knowledge on health consequences of rape. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 21. Main outcome measures were knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual violence. Multivariate analyses were used to assess associations between socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    RESULTS: A total of 1,568 participants were interviewed. The majority (58.4%) of participants were women. Most (58.3%) of the women respondents had poor knowledge on sexual violence and 63.8% had accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. Those who were married were significantly more likely to have good knowledge on sexual violence compared to the divorced/separated group (AOR = 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.2)) but less likely to have non-accepting attitudes towards sexual violence compared to the single group (AOR = 1.8 (95%CI: 1.4-2.3)). Sex of respondents, age, marital status and level of education were associated with knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that these rural communities have poor knowledge on sexual violence and have accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. Increasing age and higher education were associated with better knowledge and less accepting attitudes towards sexual violence. The findings have potentially important implications for interventions aimed at preventing violence. The results highlight the challenges associated with changing attitudes towards sexual violence, particularly as the highest levels of support for such violence were found among women.

  • 21.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Mpembeni, Rose
    Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    A community-based intervention for improving health-seeking behavior among sexual violence survivors: A controlled before and after design study in rural Tanzania2015In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, article id 28608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite global recognition that sexual violence is a violation of human rights, evidence still shows it is a pervasive problem across all societies. Promising community intervention studies in the low- and middle-income countries are limited.

    Objective: This study assessed the impact of a community-based intervention, focusing on improving the community’s knowledge and reducing social acceptability of violence against women norms with the goal to prevent and respond to sexual violence.

    Design: The strategies used to create awareness included radio programs, information, education communication materials and advocacy meetings with local leaders. The intervention took place in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design including cross-sectional surveys at baseline (2012) and endline (2014) with men and women aged 18-49. Main outcome measures were number of reported rape cases at health facilities and the community’s knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence.

    Results: The number of reported rape events increased by more than 50% at health facilities during the intervention. Knowledge on sexual violence increased significantly in both areas over the study period (from 57.3% to 80.6% in the intervention area and from 55.5% to 71.9% in the comparison area; p<.001), and the net effect of the intervention between the two areas was statistically significant (6.9, 95% CI 0.2–13.5, p= 0.03). There was significant improvement in most of attitude indicators in the intervention area, but not in the comparison area. However, the intervention had no significant effect in the overall scores of acceptance attitudes in the final assessment when comparing the two areas (-2.4, 95%CI: -8.4 – 3.6, p= 0.42).

    Conclusions: The intervention had an effect on some indicators on knowledge and attitudes towards sexual violence even after a short period of intervention. This finding informs the public health practitioners of the importance of combined strategies in achieving changes.

  • 22.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). MUHAS, Dept Obstet Gynecol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). MUHAS, Dept Obstet Gynecol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Mpembeni, Rose
    MUHAS, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Gen Practice, Trondheim, Norway.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31735Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level.

    DESIGN:

    A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers' knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method.

    RESULTS:

    Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers' knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are made available.

  • 23.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olsson, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Community perceptions of rape and child sexual abuse: a qualitative study in rural Tanzania2014In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 14, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rape of women and children is recognized as a health and human rights issue in Tanzania and internationally. Exploration of the prevailing perceptions in rural areas is needed in order to expand the understanding of sexual violence in the diversity of Tanzania's contexts. The aim of this study therefore was to explore and understand perceptions of rape of women and children at the community level in a rural district in Tanzania with the added objective of exploring those perceptions that may contribute to perpetuating and/or hindering the disclosure of rape incidences. Methods: A qualitative design was employed using focus group discussions with male and female community members including religious leaders, professionals, and other community members. The discussions centered on causes of rape, survivors of rape, help-seeking and reporting, and gathered suggestions on measures for improvement. Six focus group discussions (four of single gender and two of mixed gender) were conducted. The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants perceived rape of women and children to be a frequent and hidden phenomenon. A number of factors were singled out as contributing to rape, such as erosion of social norms, globalization, poverty, vulnerability of children, alcohol/drug abuse and poor parental care. Participants perceived the need for educating the community to raise their knowledge of sexual violence and its consequences, and their roles as preventive agents. Conclusions: In this rural context, social norms reinforce sexual violence against women and children, and hinder them from seeking help from support services. Addressing the identified challenges may promote help-seeking behavior and improve care of survivors of sexual violence, while changes in social and cultural norms are needed for the prevention of sexual violence.

  • 24.
    Abrahamsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Forestier, Erik
    Heldrup, Jesper
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Jónsson, Olafur G.
    Lausen, Birgitte
    Palle, Josefine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Zeller, Bernward
    Hasle, Henrik
    Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus.
    Response-Guided Induction Therapy in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Excellent Remission Rate2011In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 310-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.

    Patients and Methods

    All Nordic children with AML younger than 15 years (n = 151) were treated on the Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO) AML 2004 protocol. After the first course of idarubicin, cytarabine, etoposide, and 6-thioguanin, patients with good response were allowed hematologic recovery before the second course, whereas patients with a poor (>= 15% blasts) or intermediate (5% to 14.9% blasts) were recommended to proceed immediately with therapy. Patients not in remission after the second course received fludarabine, cytarabine, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Poor responders received allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) as consolidation.

    Results

    Seventy-four percent of patients had good response, 17% had intermediate response, and 7% had poor response after the first course. The overall remission frequency was 97.4%, with 92% in remission after the second course. The rate of induction death was 1.3%. Patients with an intermediate response had a lower event-free survival of 35% compared with good (61%) and poor responders (82%).

    Conclusion

    The NOPHO-AML 2004 induction strategy gives an excellent remission rate with low toxic mortality in an unselected population. Outcome is worse in patients with intermediate response but may be improved by intensifying consolidation in this group using SCT.

  • 25.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlund, Lovisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ahrin, Elsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alfonsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Video-based CBT-E improves eating patterns in obese patients with eating disorder: A single case multiple baseline study2018In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 61, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is effective for treating eating disorders but it may be difficult to reach patients living far from urban centers. Mobile video-based psychotherapy may potentially improve service reach but has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mobile video-based CBT for eating disorder and to explore the feasibility to use this technology in clinical care.

    METHODS:

    A controlled single case multiple baseline design was used which allowed for statistical analyses with randomization tests and non-overlap of all pairs (NAP). Five patients in the first stage of eating disorder treatment were included and the main outcome variable was daily meal frequency. Secondary outcome variables included eating disorder symptoms, psychological distress and treatment satisfaction.

    RESULTS:

    The treatment resulted in a significant (p < .01) increase in daily meal frequency with medium to large effect sizes (combined NAP = .89). Four participants reported reliable improvements in eating disorder symptoms and three reported improvements in mood. The participants reported high satisfaction with the treatment and with the mobile video-application despite some technical problems.

    LIMITATIONS:

    Self-reported data on eating behavior is prone to be biased and the results of single case studies may have limited generalizability.

    CONCLUSION:

    CBT can be delivered effectively via a mobile video application and, despite some technological issues, can be well received by patients. All participants in this study had previous low access to mental health services and reported high satisfaction with the treatment format.

  • 26. Abrams, P
    et al.
    Cardozo, L
    Fall, M
    Griffiths, D
    Rosier, P
    Ulmsten, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Van Kerrebroeck, P
    Victor, A
    Wein, A
    The standardisation of terminology in lower urinary tract function: reportfrom the standardisation sub-committee of the International ContinenceSociety.2003In: Urology, Vol. 61, p. 37-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Abrams, P
    et al.
    Cardozo, L
    Fall, M
    Griffiths, D
    Rosier, P
    Ulmsten, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    van Kerrebroeck, P
    Victor, A
    Wein, A
    The standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: Report from the standardistation sub-committee of the International Continence Society.2002In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, Vol. 21, p. 167-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Abuelgasim, Khalda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
     “Who do I turn to?” The experiences of Sudanese women and Eritrean refugee women when trying to access healthcare services in Sudan after being subject to gender-based violence2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the experiences of Sudanese women and Eritrean refugee women in Sudan when seeking healthcare after being subject to gender-based violence.

    Background: In Sudan there is a general assumption that anyone who is subject violence, including gender-based violence, must first go to the police department to file a report and be given “Form Eight”, a legal document, which they must present to the healthcare provider before they receive any care. Without this form healthcare providers are, supposedly, by law not allowed to treat the person. This complicates an already vague system of services for women subject to gender-based violence.

    Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of eight Sudanese women and seven Eritrean refugee women. Data was analyzed through a framework analysis (a form of thematic analysis).

    Results: Women had to bring Form Eight before they received any help, this led to a delay in the time to receive care. There was a general lack of cooperation by police officers. Some women feared the consequences of help seeking, apparent amongst those subject to domestic violence and the Eritrean refugee women. Generally, the healthcare provided to these women was inadequate.

    Conclusion: This study concludes the experiences of all the women in this study when seeking healthcare after being subject to gender-based violence were far from international standards. A lot needs to be done in order for women to know the clear answer to the question posed in the title of this study; “Who do I turn to?”.

  • 29.
    Abujrais, Sandy