uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aggarwal, Tanya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Ivert, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Boundary Cap Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Survival of Mutant SOD1 Motor Neurons2017In: Neurotherapeutics : the journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, ISSN 1878-7479, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 773-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ALS is a devastating disease resulting in degeneration of motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord. The survival of MNs strongly depends on surrounding glial cells and neurotrophic support from muscles. We previously demonstrated that boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) can give rise to neurons and glial cells in vitro and in vivo and have multiple beneficial effects on co-cultured and co-implanted cells, including neural cells. In this paper, we investigate if bNCSCs may improve survival of MNs harboring a mutant form of human SOD1 (SOD1(G93A)) in vitro under normal conditions and oxidative stress and in vivo after implantation to the spinal cord. We found that survival of SOD1(G93A) MNs in vitro was increased in the presence of bNCSCs under normal conditions as well as under oxidative stress. In addition, when SOD1(G93A) MN precursors were implanted to the spinal cord of adult mice, their survival was increased when they were co-implanted with bNCSCs. These findings show that bNCSCs support survival of SOD1(G93A) MNs in normal conditions and under oxidative stress in vitro and improve their survival in vivo, suggesting that bNCSCs have a potential for the development of novel stem cell-based therapeutic approaches in ALS models.

  • 2.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Animal models of spinal cord repair2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Abrahamsson, Ninnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Kozhevnikova, Mariya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Zhou, Chunfang
    Trolle, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Pankratova, Stanislava
    Copenhagen University.
    Berezin, Vladimir
    Copenhagen University.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    In vitro generation of motor neuron precursors from mouse embryonic stem cells using mesoporous nanoparticles2014In: Nanomedicine, ISSN 1743-5889, E-ISSN 1748-6963, Vol. 9, no 16, p. 2457-2466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Stem cell-derived motor neurons (MNs) are utilized to develop replacement strategies for spinal cord disorders. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into MN precursors involves factors and their repeated administration. We investigated if delivery of factors loaded into mesoporous nanoparticles could be effective for stem cell differentiation in vitro.

    Materials & methods: We used a mouse embryonic stem cell line expressing green fluorescent protein under the promoter for the MN-specific gene Hb9 to visualize the level of MN differentiation. The differentiation of stem cells was evaluated by expression of MN-specific transcription factors monitored by quantitative real-time PCR reactions and immunocytochemistry.

    Results: Mesoporous nanoparticles have strong affiliation to the embryoid bodies, penetrate inside the embryoid bodies and come in contact with differentiating cells.

    Conclusion: Repeated administration of soluble factors into a culture medium can be avoided due to a sustained release effect using mesoporous silica.

  • 4.
    Grapensparr, Liza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Li, Zhanchun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Co-transplantation of Human Pancreatic Islets With Post-migratory Neural Crest Stem Cells Increases beta-Cell Proliferation and Vascular And Neural Regrowth2015In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 100, no 4, p. E583-E590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are capable of substantially improving murine islet function by promoting beta-cell proliferation. Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the potential of NCSCs to stimulate human beta-cell proliferation, and improve neural and vascular engraftment of human islets. Design, Setting, and Subjects: Human pancreatic islets from 18 brain-dead cadaveric donors (age range, 19-78 y) were obtained through the Nordic Network for Clinical Islet Transplantation. beta-cell proliferation and graft function was investigated at our experimental laboratory. Intervention and Main Outcome Measures: Human islets were transplanted, either alone or together with spheres of NCSCs. beta-cell proliferation, as well as islet neuralandvascular densities, were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Graft blood perfusion and oxygen tension were measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry and Clark microelectrodes, respectively. Results: Two days posttransplantation, the number of Ki67-positive beta-cells was doubled in human islets that had been exposed to NCSCs. Similar findings were obtained in vitro, as well as with EdU as proliferation marker. Four weeks posttransplantation, NCSC-exposed human islet grafts had much higher neural and vascular densities. The newly formed blood vessels were also functional, given that these human islets had a substantially higher blood perfusion and oxygen tension when compared with control transplants. Conclusion: We conclude that exposure to NCSCs stimulates human beta-cell proliferation, andthat these cells improve both the neural and vascular engraftment of transplanted human islets. NCSCs are a promising cellular therapy for translation into clinical use.

  • 5.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Neural progenitors for sensory and motor repair2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Injury and neurodegenerative conditions of the spinal cord can lead to paralysis and loss of sensation. Cell therapeutic approaches can restore sensory innervation of the spinal cord following injury and protect spinal cord cells from degeneration. This thesis primarily focuses on the restoration of deaffarented sensory fibres following injury to the dorsal root and spinal cord. These injuries lead to the formation of a non-permissive glial scar that prevents sensory axons from reinnervating spinal cord targets. It takes advantage of a dorsal root injury model that closely mimics spinal root avulsion injuries occurring in humans. In the first part of the thesis, three different neural progenitor types from human or murine sources are tested for their regenerative properties following their transplantation to the site of dorsal root avulsion injury. In the second part, the ability of murine neural progenitors to protect spinal motor neurons from a neurodegenerative process is tested.

    In the first original research article, I show that human embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitors are able to restore sensorimotor functions, mediated by the formation of a tissue bridge that allows ingrowth of sensory axons into the spinal cord. In the second research article, I present that murine boundary cap neural crest stem cells, a special type of neural progenitor that governs the entry of sensory axons into the spinal cord during development, are unable to form a permissive tissue bridge. This is possibly caused by the contribution of transplant derived ingrowth non-permissive glial cells. In the third research article, I show that human neural progenitors derived from foetal sources are capable of stimulating sensory ingrowth and that they ameliorate the glial scar. When this approach is combined with the delivery of sensory outgrowth stimulating neurotrophic factors, these cells fail to form a permissive tissue bridge and fail to modify the glial scar. In the final research article, murine boundary cap neural crest stem cells are shown to protect motor neurons, which harbor an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis causing mutation, from oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a pathological component of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in human patients.

    Taken together, this thesis provides first evidence that sensory regeneration following a spinal root avulsion injury can be achieved by transplantation of human neural progenitors. In addition, it introduces murine boundary cap neural crest stem cells as interesting candidates for the cell therapeutic treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    List of papers
    1. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 10666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system.

    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251488 (URN)10.1038/srep10666 (DOI)000356063500001 ()26053681 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 5420, 20716
    Available from: 2015-04-20 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Sensory regeneration in dorsal root avulsion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory regeneration in dorsal root avulsion
    2015 (English)In: Neural Regeneration Research, ISSN 1673-5374, E-ISSN 1876-7958, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1739-1740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275487 (URN)10.4103/1673-5374.170296 (DOI)000367332800011 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 5420Swedish Research Council, 20716Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Boundary cap neural crest stem cell transplants contribute Mts1/S100A4-expressing cells in the glial scar
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundary cap neural crest stem cell transplants contribute Mts1/S100A4-expressing cells in the glial scar
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1746-0751, E-ISSN 1746-076X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 339-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: During development, boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) assist sensory axon growth into the spinal cord. Here we repositioned them to test if they assist regeneration of sensory axons in adult mice after dorsal root avulsion injury.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: Avulsed mice received bNCSC or human neural progenitor (hNP) cell transplants and their contributions to glial scar formation and sensory axon regeneration were analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transganglionic tracing.

    RESULTS: hNPs and bNCSCs form similar gaps in the glial scar, but unlike hNPs, bNCSCs contribute Mts1/S100A4 (calcium-binding protein) expression to the scar and do not assist sensory axon regeneration.

    CONCLUSION: bNCSC transplants contribute nonpermissive Mts1/S100A4-expressing cells to the glial scar after dorsal root avulsion.

    Keywords
    calcium-binding protein, glia, nerve degeneration, neural stem cell, sensory neuron, spinal cord
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328589 (URN)10.2217/rme-2016-0163 (DOI)000406147100006 ()28621171 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 20716
    Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 26, no 14, p. 1065-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Spinal root injuries result in newly formed glial scar formation, which prevents regeneration of sensory axons causing permanent sensory loss. Previous studies showed that delivery of trophic factors or implantation of human neural progenitor cells supports sensory axon regeneration and partly restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (MesoMIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along "bridges" formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of MesoMIM prevented stem cell migration, "bridges" were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting their level of differentiation. Our data show that (1) the ability of stem cells to migrate into the spinal cord and organize cellular "bridges" in the newly formed interface is crucial for successful sensory axon regeneration, (2) trophic factor mimetics delivered by mesoporous silica may be a convenient alternative way to induce sensory axon regeneration, and (3) a combinatorial approach of individually beneficial components is not necessarily additive, but can be counterproductive for axonal growth.

    Keywords
    biomimetics, neural stem cells, spinal cord regeneration, stem cell transplantation
    National Category
    Neurosciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Hematology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328587 (URN)10.1089/scd.2017.0019 (DOI)000405071200005 ()28562227 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist ByggmästareSwedish Research Council, 20716
    Note

    De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Boundary Cap Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Survival of Mutant SOD1 Motor Neurons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundary Cap Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Survival of Mutant SOD1 Motor Neurons
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Neurotherapeutics : the journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, ISSN 1878-7479, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 773-783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    ALS is a devastating disease resulting in degeneration of motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord. The survival of MNs strongly depends on surrounding glial cells and neurotrophic support from muscles. We previously demonstrated that boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) can give rise to neurons and glial cells in vitro and in vivo and have multiple beneficial effects on co-cultured and co-implanted cells, including neural cells. In this paper, we investigate if bNCSCs may improve survival of MNs harboring a mutant form of human SOD1 (SOD1(G93A)) in vitro under normal conditions and oxidative stress and in vivo after implantation to the spinal cord. We found that survival of SOD1(G93A) MNs in vitro was increased in the presence of bNCSCs under normal conditions as well as under oxidative stress. In addition, when SOD1(G93A) MN precursors were implanted to the spinal cord of adult mice, their survival was increased when they were co-implanted with bNCSCs. These findings show that bNCSCs support survival of SOD1(G93A) MNs in normal conditions and under oxidative stress in vitro and improve their survival in vivo, suggesting that bNCSCs have a potential for the development of novel stem cell-based therapeutic approaches in ALS models.

    Keywords
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Neurodegeneration, Neuroglia, Oxidative stress, Transplantation
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328588 (URN)10.1007/s13311-016-0505-8 (DOI)000405725300022 ()28070746 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 20716Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare
    Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Sensory regeneration in dorsal root avulsion2015In: Neural Regeneration Research, ISSN 1673-5374, E-ISSN 1876-7958, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1739-1740Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hoeber, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Trolle, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Lekholm, Emilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Zhou, Chunfang
    Nanologica AB , Södertälje, Sweden.
    Pankratova, Stanislava
    Univ Copenhagen, Inst Neurosci & Pharmacol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Åkesson, Elisabet
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord2017In: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 26, no 14, p. 1065-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spinal root injuries result in newly formed glial scar formation, which prevents regeneration of sensory axons causing permanent sensory loss. Previous studies showed that delivery of trophic factors or implantation of human neural progenitor cells supports sensory axon regeneration and partly restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (MesoMIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along "bridges" formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of MesoMIM prevented stem cell migration, "bridges" were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting their level of differentiation. Our data show that (1) the ability of stem cells to migrate into the spinal cord and organize cellular "bridges" in the newly formed interface is crucial for successful sensory axon regeneration, (2) trophic factor mimetics delivered by mesoporous silica may be a convenient alternative way to induce sensory axon regeneration, and (3) a combinatorial approach of individually beneficial components is not necessarily additive, but can be counterproductive for axonal growth.

  • 8.
    Hoeber, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Trolle, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Du, Zhongwei
    Gallo, Alessandro
    Hermans, Emmanuel
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Shortland, Peter
    Zhang, Su-Chun
    Deumens, Ronald
    Kozlova, Elena N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 10666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system.

  • 9.
    Kosykh, Anastasiia
    et al.
    Laboratory of Cell Proliferation, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Ngamjariyawat, Anongnad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Trolle, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Mikaelyan, Arsen
    Laboratory of Cell Proliferation, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Panchenko, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vorotelyak, Ekaterina
    Laboratory of Cell Proliferation, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    N. Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Neural crest stem cells from hair follicles and boundary cap have different  effects on pancreatic islets in vitro2015In: International Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0020-7454, E-ISSN 1563-5279, Vol. 125, no 7, p. 547-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    Neural crest stem cells derived from the boundary cap (bNCSCs), markedly promote survival, proliferation and function of insulin producing β-cells in vitro and in vivo after coculture/transplantation with pancreatic islets [ 1, 2 ]. Recently, we have shown that beneficial effects on β-cells require cadherin contacts between bNCSCs and β-cells [ 3, 4 ]. Here we investigated whether hair follicle (HF) NCSCs, a potential source for human allogeneic transplantation, exert similar positive effects on β-cells.

    Materials and Methods:

    We established cocultures of HF-NCSCs or bNCSCs from mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein together with pancreatic islets from DxRed expressing mice or NMRI mice and compared their migration towards islet cells and effect on proliferation of β-cells as well as intracellular relations between NCSCs and islets using qRT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry.

    Results:

    Whereas both types of NCSCs migrated extensively in the presence of islets, only bNCSCs demonstrated directed migration toward islets, induced β-cell proliferation and increased the presence of cadherin at the junctions between bNCSCs and β-cells. Even in direct contact between β-cells and HF-NCSCs, no cadherin expression was detected.

    Conclusions:

    These observations indicate that HF-NCSCs do not confer the same positive effect on β-cells as demonstrated for bNCSCs. Furthermore, these data suggest that induction of cadherin expression by HF-NCSCs may be useful for their ability to support β-cells in coculture and after transplantation.

  • 10.
    Latini, Francesco
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hjortberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Ryttlefors, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection2015In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, article id 872645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity.

  • 11.
    Latini, Francesco
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hjortberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Ryttlefors, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The use of a cerebral perfusion and immersion-fixation process for subsequent white matter dissection2015In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, ISSN 0165-0270, E-ISSN 1872-678X, Vol. 253, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Klingler's method for white matter dissection revolutionized the study of deep cerebral anatomy. Although this technique made white matter dissection more feasible and widely used, it still presents some intrinsic limitations. New method: We evaluated the quality of different methods for specimen preparation based on an intra-carotidal formalin perfusion fixation process. Ten post-mortem human hemispheres were prepared with this method and dissected in a stepwise manner. Results: The homogeneous and rapid fixation of the brain allowed documentation of several fine additional anatomical details. Intra-cortical white matter terminations were described during the first stage of dissection on each specimen. No limitations were encountered during dissection of the major associative bundles. On the contrary, the quality of the fixation of the specimens made it possible to isolate them en bloc. One of the most complex and deep bundles (accumbo-frontal fasciculus) was dissected without technical limitations. Deep vascular structures were very well preserved and dissected within the white matter until their sub-millimetric terminations. Comparison with existing method: Short time for preparation, a more homogeneous fixation, no technical limitation for a detailed description of superficial and deep white matter anatomy, the possibility to dissect with a single technique the fibre organization and the white matter vascular architecture are the advantages reported with the perfusion fixation. Conclusion: These results provide encouraging data about the possibility to use a perfusion fixation process, which may help in improving the quality of white matter dissection for research, didactic purposes and surgical training.

  • 12.
    Latini, Francesco
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Mårtensson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjortberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Ryttlefors, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Segmentation of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in the human brain: A white matter dissection and diffusion tensor tractography study.2017In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, no 1675, p. 102-115, article id S0006-8993(17)30386-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inferior longitudinal fascicle (ILF) is one of the major occipital-temporal association pathways. Several studies have mapped its hierarchical segmentation to specific functions. There is, however, no consensus regarding a detailed description of ILF fibre organisation. The aim of this study was to establish whether the ILF has a constant number of subcomponents. A secondary aim was to determine the quantitative diffusion proprieties of each subcomponent and assess their anatomical trajectories and connectivity patterns. A white matter dissection of 14 post-mortem normal human hemispheres was conducted to define the course of the ILF and its subcomponents. These anatomical results were then investigated in 24 right-handed, healthy volunteers using in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and streamline tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA), volume, fibre length and the symmetry coefficient of each fibre group were analysed. In order to show the connectivity pattern of the ILF, we also conducted an analysis of the cortical terminations of each segment. We confirmed that the main structure of the ILF is composed of three constant components reflecting the occipital terminations: the fusiform, the lingual and the dorsolateral-occipital. ILF volume was significantly lateralised to the right. The examined indices of ILF subcomponents did not show any significant difference in lateralisation. The connectivity pattern and the quantitative distribution of ILF subcomponents suggest a pivotal role for this bundle in integrating information from highly specialised modular visual areas with activity in anterior temporal territory, which has been previously shown to be important for memory and emotions.

  • 13.
    Mazzini, Letizia
    et al.
    Maggiore Carita Univ Hosp Novara, Dept Neurol, ALS Ctr, Novara, Italy.
    Ferrari, Daniela
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Biotechnol & Biosci, Milan, Italy.
    Andjus, Pavle R.
    Univ Belgrade, Fac Biol, Ctr Laser Microscopy, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Buzanska, Leonora
    Polish Acad Sci, Mossakowski Med Res Ctr, Stem Cell Bioengn Unit, Warsaw, Poland.
    Cantello, Roberto
    Maggiore Carita Univ Hosp Novara, Dept Neurol, ALS Ctr, Novara, Italy.
    De Marchi, Fabiola
    Maggiore Carita Univ Hosp Novara, Dept Neurol, ALS Ctr, Novara, Italy.
    Gelati, Maurizio
    IRCCS Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, Sci Direct, Foggia, Italy;Fdn Cellule Staminali, Cell Factory & Biobanca, Terni, Italy.
    Giniatullin, Rashid
    Univ Eastern Finland, AI Virtanen Inst Mol Sci, Neulaniementie 2, Kuopio, Finland.
    Glover, Joel C.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Basic Med Sci, Dept Mol Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Norwegian Ctr Stem Cell Res, Oslo, Norway.
    Grilli, Mariagrazia
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Lab Neuroplast, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Novara, Italy.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Maioli, Margherita
    Univ Sassari, CNR, Ist Ric Genet & Biomed, Dept Biomed Sci, Sassari, Italy;Univ Sassari, CNR, Ist Ric Genet & Biomed, Ctr Dev Biol & Reprogramming CEDEBIOR, Sassari, Italy.
    Mitrecic, Dinko
    Univ Zagreb, Sch Med, Croatian Inst Brain Res, Lab Stem Cells, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Pivoriunas, Augustas
    Ctr Innovat Med, State Res Inst, Dept Stem Cell Biol, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario
    Andalusian Hlth Minist, Andalusian Initiat Adv Therapies, Preclin Res, Seville, Spain.
    Sarnowska, Anna
    Polish Acad Sci, Mossakowski Med Res Ctr, Stem Cell Bioengn Unit, Warsaw, Poland.
    Vescovi, Angelo L.
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Biotechnol & Biosci, Milan, Italy;Fdn Cellule Staminali, Cell Factory & Biobanca, Terni, Italy.
    Advances in stem cell therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2018In: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, ISSN 1471-2598, E-ISSN 1744-7682, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 865-881Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, incurable neurodegenerative disease that targets motoneurons. Cell-based therapies have generated widespread interest as a potential therapeutic approach but no conclusive results have yet been reported either from pre-clinical or clinical studies. Areas covered: This is an integrated review of pre-clinical and clinical studies focused on the development of cell-based therapies for ALS. We analyze the biology of stem cell treatments and results obtained from pre-clinical models of ALS and examine the methods and the results obtained to date from clinical trials. We discuss scientific, clinical, and ethical issues and propose some directions for future studies. Expert opinion: While data from individual studies are encouraging, stem-cell-based therapies do not yet represent a satisfactory, reliable clinical option. The field will critically benefit from the introduction of well-designed, randomized and reproducible, powered clinical trials. Comparative studies addressing key issues such as the nature, properties, and number of donor cells, the delivery mode and the selection of proper patient populations that may benefit the most from cell-based therapies are now of the essence. Multidisciplinary networks of experts should be established to empower effective translation of research into the clinic.

  • 14.
    Schizas, Nikos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Andersson, Brittmarie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Hailer, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Neural crest stem cells protect spinal cord neurons from excitotoxic damage and inhibit glial activation by secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor2018In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 372, no 3, p. 493-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acute phase of spinal cord injury is characterized by excitotoxic and inflammatory events that mediate extensive neuronal loss in the gray matter. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can exert neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that may be mediated by soluble factors. We therefore hypothesize that transplantation of NCSCs to acutely injured spinal cord slice cultures (SCSCs) can prevent neuronal loss after excitotoxic injury. NCSCs were applied onto SCSCs previously subjected to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced injury. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining were used to quantitatively study cell populations and apoptosis. Concentrations of neurotrophic factors were measured by ELISA. Migration and differentiation properties of NCSCs on SCSCs, laminin, or hyaluronic acid hydrogel were separately studied. NCSCs counteracted the loss of NeuN-positive neurons that was otherwise observed after NMDA-induced excitotoxicity, partly by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis. They also reduced activation of both microglial cells and astrocytes. The concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was increased in supernatants from SCSCs cultured with NCSCs compared to SCSCs alone and BDNF alone mimicked the effects of NCSC application on SCSCs. NCSCs migrated superficially across the surface of SCSCs and showed no signs of neuronal or glial differentiation but preserved their expression of SOX2 and Krox20. In conclusion, NCSCs exert neuroprotective, anti-apoptotic and glia-inhibitory effects on excitotoxically injured spinal cord tissue, some of these effects mediated by secretion of BDNF. However, the investigated NCSCs seem not to undergo neuronal or glial differentiation in the short term since markers indicative of an undifferentiated state were expressed during the entire observation period.

  • 15.
    Trolle, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Abrahamsson, Ninnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    König, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Boundary cap neural crest stem cells homotopically implanted to the injured dorsal root transitional zone give rise to different types of neurons and glia in adult rodents2014In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 15, p. 60-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boundary cap is a transient group of neural crest-derived cells located at the presumptive dorsal root transitional zone (DRTZ) when sensory axons enter the spinal cord during development. Later, these cells migrate to dorsal root ganglia and differentiate into subtypes of sensory neurons and glia. After birth when the DRTZ is established, sensory axons are no longer able to enter the spinal cord. Here we explored the fate of mouse bNCSCs implanted to the uninjured DRTZ after dorsal root avulsion for their potential to assist sensory axon regeneration. Grafted cells showed extensive survival and differentiation after transplantation to the avulsed DRTZ. Transplanted cells located outside the spinal cord organized elongated tubes of Sox2/GFAP expressing cells closely associated with regenerating sensory axons or appeared as small clusters on the surface of the spinal cord. Others, migrating into the host spinal cordas single cells, differentiated to spinal cord neurons with different neurotransmitter characteristics, extensive fiber organization, and in some cases surrounded by glutamatergic terminal-like profiles. These findings demonstrate that bNCSCs implanted at the site of dorsal root avulsion injury display remarkable differentiation plasticity inside the spinal cord and in the peripheral compartment where they organize tubes associated with regenerating sensory fibers. These properties offer a basis for exploring the ability of bNCSCs to assist regeneration of sensory axons into the spinal cord and replace lost neurons in the injured spinal cord.

  • 16.
    Trolle, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Ivert, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Hoeber, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Rocamonde-Lago, Iris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Lukanidin, Eugen
    Department of Molecular Cancer Biology, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Denmark.
    Kozlova, Elena N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Boundary cap neural crest stem cell transplants contribute Mts1/S100A4-expressing cells in the glial scar2017In: Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1746-0751, E-ISSN 1746-076X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 339-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: During development, boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) assist sensory axon growth into the spinal cord. Here we repositioned them to test if they assist regeneration of sensory axons in adult mice after dorsal root avulsion injury.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: Avulsed mice received bNCSC or human neural progenitor (hNP) cell transplants and their contributions to glial scar formation and sensory axon regeneration were analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transganglionic tracing.

    RESULTS: hNPs and bNCSCs form similar gaps in the glial scar, but unlike hNPs, bNCSCs contribute Mts1/S100A4 (calcium-binding protein) expression to the scar and do not assist sensory axon regeneration.

    CONCLUSION: bNCSC transplants contribute nonpermissive Mts1/S100A4-expressing cells to the glial scar after dorsal root avulsion.

  • 17.
    Wang, Xuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xie, Beichen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qi, Yu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vasylovska, Svitlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kozlova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Regenerative neurobiology.
    Welsh, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Knock-down of ZBED6 in insulin-producing cells promotes N-cadherin junctions between beta-cells and neural crest stem cells in vitro2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 19006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the novel transcription factor ZBED6 for the adhesion/clustering of insulin-producing mouse MIN6 and βTC6 cells was investigated. Zbed6-silencing in the insulin producing cells resulted in increased three-dimensional cell-cell clustering and decreased adhesion to mouse laminin and human laminin 511. This was paralleled by a weaker focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at laminin binding sites. Zbed6-silenced cells expressed less E-cadherin and more N-cadherin at cell-to-cell junctions. A strong ZBED6-binding site close to the N-cadherin gene transcription start site was observed. Three-dimensional clustering in Zbed6-silenced cells was prevented by an N-cadherin neutralizing antibody and by N-cadherin knockdown. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) with Zbed6-silenced cells, but not with control cells, stimulated the outgrowth of NCSC processes. The cell-to-cell junctions between NCSCs and βTC6 cells stained more intensely for N-cadherin when Zbed6-silenced cells were co-cultured with NCSCs. We conclude that ZBED6 decreases the ratio between N- and E-cadherin. A lower N- to E-cadherin ratio may hamper the formation of three-dimensional beta-cell clusters and cell-to-cell junctions with NCSC, and instead promote efficient attachment to a laminin support and monolayer growth. Thus, by controlling beta-cell adhesion and cell-to-cell junctions, ZBED6 might play an important role in beta-cell differentiation, proliferation and survival.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf