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  • 1.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Lei, Fumin
    Wang, Hai-tao
    Gao, Wei
    Sundberg, Per
    Phylogeny and classification of the Old World Emberizini (Aves, Passeriformes)2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 960-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of the avian genus Emberiza and the monotypic genera Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria (collectively the Old World Emberizini), as well as representatives for the New World Emberizini, the circumpolar genera Calcarius and Plectrophertax and the four other generally recognized tribes in the subfamily Emberizinae was estimated based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and introns 6-7 of the nuclear ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene. Our results support monophyly of the Old World Emberizini, but do not corroborate a sister relationship to the New World Emberizini. Calcarius and Plectrophenax form a clade separated from the other Emberizini. This agrees with previous studies, and we recommend the use of the name Calcariini. Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria are nested within Emberiza, and we therefore propose they be synonymized with Emberiza. Emberiza is divided into four main clades, whose relative positions are uncertain, although a sister relation between a clade with six African species and one comprising the rest of the species (30, all Palearctic) is most likely. Most clades agree with traditional, morphology-based, classifications. However, four sister relationships within Emberiza, three of which involve the previously recognized Latoucheornis, Melophus and Miliaria, are unpredicted, and reveal cases of strong morphological divergence. In contrast, the plumage similarity between adult male Emberiza (formerly Latoucheornis) siemsseni and the nominate subspecies of the New World Junco hyemalis is shown to be the result of parallel evolution. A further case of parallel plumage evolution, between African and Eurasian taxa, is pointed out. Two cases of discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear data with respect to branch lengths and genetic divergences are considered to be the result of introgressive hybridization.

  • 2.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Sundberg, Per
    Morphological, vocal and genetic divergence in the Cettia acanthizoides complex (Aves : Cettiidae)2007In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 149, no 3, p. 437-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used morphological, vocal and molecular (one mitochondrial and two nuclear loci) data to re-evaluate the taxonomic status of the taxa acanthizoides, concolor, and brunnescens in the Cettia acanthizoides (J. Verreaux, 1871) complex. We conclude that all three are valid taxa, and that acanthizoides of China and concolor of Taiwan are best treated as conspecific, whereas brunnescens of the Himalayas is better considered as a separate species. The degree of morphological, vocal, and genetic differentiation is variably congruent among all taxa; the recently separated acanthizoides and concolor differ slightly in plumage and structure but are indistinguishable in vocalizations, whereas the earlier diverged brunnescens and acanthizoides/concolor differ only slightly more in morphology but to a much greater degree in vocalizations. We stress the essential nature of taxonomic revisions as a prerequisite for the biodiversity estimates required for conservation planning.

  • 3.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Olsson, Urban
    Sundberg, Per
    Species delimitation based on multiple criteria: the Spotted Bush Warbler Bradypterus thoracicus complex (Aves : Megaluridae)2008In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 154, no 2, p. 291-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate the importance of using multiple criteria in species delimitations, whatever the conceptual base for species delimitation. We do this by studying plumage, biometrics, egg coloration, song, mitochondrial DNA and habitat/altitudinal distribution in the Spotted Bush Warbler Bradypterus thoracicus (Blyth) complex, and by conducting playback experiments. Taxa that we suggest are best treated as separate species [B. thoracicus (Blyth), B. davidi (La Touche) and B. kashmirensis (Sushkin)] differ in most or all of these aspects, particularly in song and mitochondrial DNA, while those that we treat as subspecies (suschkini) or synonyms (przevalskii) differ slightly and only in morphology.

  • 4. Altekar, G
    et al.
    Dwarkadas, S
    Huelsenbeck, John
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. systematisk zoologi.
    Parallel Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo for Bayesian phylogenetic inference2004In: Bioinformatics, Vol. 20, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Arez, Anna
    et al.
    Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Snounou, G
    UK.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    doRosario, Virgilio
    Lisbon, Portugal.
    Transmission of mixed Plasmodium species and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes2003In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 68, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ashitani, Tatsuya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Garboui, Samira
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Vongsombath, Chanda
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Hyptis suaveolens a source for arthropod repellent compounds.: Repellency of sesquiterpene oxides and sulfides to Ixodes ricinusManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Beier, Björn Axel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk botanik.
    Nylander, Johan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Chase, Mark W
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk botanik.
    Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the desert plant genus Fagonia (Zygophyllaceae), inferred by parsimony and Bayesian model averaging2004In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 91-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Garboui, Samira
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Repellency of methyl jasmonate to Ixodes ricinus nymphs (Acari: Ixodidae)2007In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our search for tick repellents of plant origin, to be used as alternatives to commercial arthropod repellents, we investigated the effect of the well known plant signaling compound methyl jasmonate (MJ) using nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus. In laboratory tests, pieces of cloth with MJ at 0.075, 0.15, 0.30 and 0.75 mg/cm2 yielded increasing repellencies against the nymphs: 57%, 71%, 92% and 99%, respectively, of the nymphs did not cling to the cloth. Repellency of MJ was also investigated in a tick-infested woodland area in central Sweden. Cotton flannel cloths sprayed with 0.05, 0.1 or 0.2 mg/cm2 MJ dissolved in acetone were dragged over the ground vegetation. The numbers of nymphs on the treated cloths were significantly lower than those on the untreated cloth. Thus, MJ has, at the concentrations tested, significant repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs.

  • 9.
    Garboui, Samira
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Repellency of MyggA® Natural spray (para-menthane 3, 8-diol) and RB86 (neem oil) against the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the field in east-central Sweden2006In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 40, no 3-4, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field in south-central Sweden, we tested by randomised, standardised methodology the potential anti-tick repellent activity of two concentrations of MyggA® Natural spray (containing PMD) (4.2 and 3.2 g/m2) and one of RB86 (with 70% neem oil containing azadirachtin)(3 g/m2) to host seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus. Each substance was applied separately to 1 m2 cotton flannel cloths. Nymphal ticks on the cloths, pulled over the vegetation, were recorded at 10-m stops. Nymphal numbers recorded differed significantly between treated cloths [4.2 or 3.2 g MyggA® Natural spray/m2 and 3 g RB86/m2] and the untreated control (df = 3, χ2 = 112.74, P < 0.0001). Nymphal numbers also differed significantly among collectors (df = 3, χ2 = 15.80, P < 0.001). Repellency of treated cloths, i.e., 4.2 or 3.2 g MyggA® Natural spray/m2 and 3 g RB 86/m2 declined from day 0 (i.e. the day of impregnation) to day 3 after impregnation from 77 to 24%, 58 to 16% and 47 to 0.5%, respectively. This study suggests that all three treatments have significant repellent activities against I. ricinus nymphs.

  • 10. Hooge, Matthew
    et al.
    Wallberg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Todt, Christiane
    Maloy, Aaron
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Tyler, Seth
    A revision of the systematics of panther worms (Hofstenia spp., Acoela), with notes on color variation and genetic variation within the genus2007In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 592, p. 439-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species of the genus Hofstenia are voracious predators and among the largest and most colorful of the Acoela. They are known from Japan, the Red Sea, the North Atlantic islands of Bermuda and the Bahamas, and the Caribbean and in a variety of habitats including the rocky intertidal, among Thalassia sea grass, on filamentous algae and decaying mangrove leaves. Certain color morphs associated with each of these habitats seem to have confused the taxonomy of the group. While brown-and-white banding and spotting patterns of Hofstenia miamia and Hofstenia giselae are distinctive for species associated with mangrove leaves and Thallasia sp. and are likely to be cryptic for these specific environments, we find some evidence to suggest that the coloration is mimicry of a nudibranch with aposematic coloration. The common plan in these patterns is one with three variously solid or spotted lighter cross bands on a dark background. Our examination of museum type material and live specimens of Hofstenia collected from Bahamas, Belize, Bermuda, and Panama revealed no internal morphological differences between the Hofstenia species occurring in the Caribbean. Similarly, our analyses of 18S and 28S molecular sequence data revealed no significant differences among specimens. Accordingly, we declare that Hofstenia giselae is a junior synonym of Hofstenia miamia, the three- banded panther worm.

  • 11.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Medically important parasitic arthropods (insects, ticks, and mites) of the northern Holarctic region2002In: Parasites of the Colder Climates, CRC Press, London , 2002, p. 215-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    The reservoir hosts of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Europe1999In: Acarology IX. Vol. 2. Symposia, 1999, p. 409-414Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Garboui, Samira
    Systematisk zoologi.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Systematisk zoologi.
    Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus (Corymbia citriodora), geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolium), and the mosquito repellent MyggA Natural to the common tick Ixodes ricinus in the laboratory and field2006In: Journal of Medical Entomology, Vol. 43, p. 731-736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Garboui, Samira
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA Natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.2006In: Journal of Medical Entomology, ISSN 4, Vol. 43, p. 731-736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Lindström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Repellency of the mosquito repellent MyggA (N,N-diethyl-3-methyl-benzamide) to the common tick Ixodes ricinus (L.)(Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field2003In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, Vol. 124, p. 245-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Thorsell, Walborg
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Tunón, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Människan och faunan; Etnobiologi i Sverige 3: Fästingen Ixodes ricinus2007In: Människan och faunan Etnobiologi i Sverige, Wahlström & Widstrand, Stockholm , 2007Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 17. Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Ericson, Per G. R.
    Sundberg, Per
    Price, Trevor D.
    Build-up of the Himalayan avifauna through immigration: A biogeographical analysis of the Phylloscopus and Seicercus warblers2007In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 324-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Himalayan mountain range is one of the most species-rich areas in the world, harboring about 8% of the world's bird species. In this study, we compare the relative importance of immigration versus in situ speciation to the build-up of the Himalayan avifauna, by evaluating the biogeographic history of the Phylloscopus/Seicercus warblers, a speciose clade that is well represented in Himalayan forests. We use a comprehensive, multigene phylogeny in conjunction with dispersal-vicariance analysis to discern patterns of speciation and dispersal within this clade. The results indicate that virtually no speciation has occurred within the Himalayas. Instead, several speciation events are attributed to dispersal into the Himalayas followed by vicariance between the Himalayas and China/Southeast Asia. Most, perhaps all, of these events appear to be pre-Pleistocene. The apparent lack of speciation within the Himalayas stands in contrast to the mountain-driven Pleistocene speciation suggested for the Andes and the East African mountains.

  • 18.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematic Zoology.
    Larsson, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematic Zoology.
    Raikova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematic Zoology.
    Cleavage in Nemertoderma westbladi (Nemertodermatida) and its phylogenetic significance2004In: Zoomorphology, Vol. 123, p. 221-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Larsson, Karolina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Phylogeny of Catenulida and support for Platyhelminthes2008In: Organisms Diversity & Evolution, ISSN 1439-6092, E-ISSN 1618-1077, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 378-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular studies have shown that Platyhelminthes is polyphyletic, placing Rhabditophora within Lophotrochozoa, whereas Acoela and Nemertodermatida are separate early bilaterian branches. However, there has been little evidence to support the position of Catenulida, a group that was traditionally classified within Platyhelminthes. In Ehlers' pioneering cladistic system of the Platyhelminthes they were placed as the earliest clade. Other morphologists have considered the Catenulida as an early bilaterian clade separate from Rhabditophora, a position that was supported in an early molecular study. Subsequent molecular phylogenetic studies, which placed Catenulida as the sister group of Rhabditophora with no or low branch support, included 18S rDNA data from only one or two catenulid species. The aims of the present study were (1) to test the putative sister-group relationship of Catenulida and Rhabditophora by improving the taxon sampling of molecular data spanning a larger part of catenulid taxonomic diversity and (2) to provide a phylogenetic framework for the systematization of Catenulida. Twelve catenulid species were sampled around Sweden. Both the 18S rDNA gene and the 28S rDNA gene were sequenced and analysed in a Metazoa-wide data set within parsimony and Bayesian frameworks. The results unambiguously support Catenulida as the sister group of Rhabditophora within Lophotrochozoa. Parsimony-based inferences about the common ancestor of Catenulida and Rhabditophora are presented. A definition of the name Platyhelminthes is suggested.

  • 20. Lindgren, Elisabet
    et al.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Lyme borreliosis in Europe: influence of climate and climate change2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lindgren, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Tick-, mosquito- and sandfly-borne infectious diseases in a future, warmer climate in Sweden: Fästing- och myggöverförda infektionssjukdomar i ett kommande, varmare klimat i Sverige2006In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, Vol. 127, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lindström, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Distribution of the common tick Ixodes ricinus in different vegetation types in southern Sweden2003In: Journal of Medical Entomology, Vol. 40, p. 375-378Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lindström, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Lindquist, Olle
    Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Rättsmedicin.
    Forensic entomology - first Swedish case studies2003In: Canadian Society for Forensic Science Journal, Vol. 36, p. 207-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Liu, Zhiwei
    et al.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Nordlander, Göran
    The cynipoid genus Paramblynotus: Revision, phylogeny, and historical biogeography (Hymenoptera : Liopteridae)2007In: Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, ISSN 0003-0090, E-ISSN 1937-3546, no 304, p. 3-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Paramblynotus is the most species-rich genus of the so-called macrocynipoids, the large cynipoid parasitoids of wood-boring and cone-boring insect larvae. The species range in size from some of the largest to the smallest macrocynipoids, comparable in size to microcynipoids. Paramblynotus members occur on all continents except Europe and Australia, with most species being tropical or subtropical. The biology is poorly known but a few observations indicate that the species are parasitoids of beetle larvae. In this monographic revision of the genus, we present a species-level cladistic analysis based on qualitative and quantitative features of the external morphology. For analysis of quantitative features, we present for the first time a novel coding method, the method of Finite Mixture Coding (FMC) based on k-means clustering, or FMCK. The new method is similar to the FMC method proposed by previous authors in that they both generate codes (character states) for phylogenetic analysis as the direct output of a statistical procedure, thus avoiding the subdivision of quantitative data into discrete states on the basis of arbitrary criteria as with other coding methods. Through incorporating finite mixture analysis and likelihood estimation as used in FMC and k-mean cluster analysis for a priori statistical modeling of component distributions, FMCK is advantageous over FMC in that it can be implemented using readily available statistic programs with k-mean cluster analysis, such as STATISTICA, MINITAB or SYSTAT, available on both PC and Macintosh platforms. We were able to identify 8 quantitative characters among 23 as useful for cladistic analysis by using the new coding method. In total, our character matrix has 132 coded characters. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that species of the previously recognized genus Decelleu form a monophyletic group deeply nested within Paramblynotus. Decellea is therefore synonymized with Paramblynotus, which is separated into seven monophyletic species groups: the virginianus, scaber, ynngambicolars, nigricornis, apeosus, ruficollis, and punclulalus groups. Based on the phylogeny, we reconstruct the historical biogeography of the liopterid subfamily Mayrellinae, consisting of the genera Paramblynotus and Kiefferiellu, using dispersal-vicariance analysis in combination with palaeoenvironmental data. The results suggest that the subfamily originated in the Northern Hemisphere and then expanded its distribution early by way of the Bering area. The divergence between Puramblynotus and Kiefferiellu was apparently associated with the formation of the Rocky Mountains about 50 million years ago. An early Paramblynotus lineage dispersed to Africa from the eastern Palearctic by way of Arabia, and it subsequently diversified along with montane forests in Africa. The relatively high diversity of Paramblynotus in Southeast Asia is considered to be partly caused by the frequent sea level changes since late Oligocene (29 Ma), which drastically changed the land configuration of this area. We end this paper with a taxonomic revision of the genus Paramblynotus, with a total of 92 species treated, including 72 described as new and 20 previously known, of which 18 are redescribed. Keys to the species groups as defined in this paper and to all known species of each species group are provided. For all species, the available information on their biology and distribution are summarized.

  • 25. Lo, Nathan
    et al.
    Authors, Sixteen
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Widespread distribution and high prevalence of an alpha-proteobacterial symbiont in the tick Ixodes ricinus2006In: Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 8, no 1280-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Marroquin, Ricardo
    et al.
    Monroy, Calota
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Triatoma ryckmani (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the epiphyte Tillandsia xerographica (Bromeliaceae) in the semiarid region of Guatemala2004In: Journal of Medical Entomology, ISSN US ISSN 0022-2585, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 321-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time, the reduviid bug Triatoma ryckmani Zeledón and Ponce (Hemiptera; Reduviidae) was recorded to inhabit the epiphyte Tillandsia xerographica Rohweder (Bromeliaceae) in the semiarid region of Guatemala. These bromeliads grow mainly in drought-resistant trees with rough bark such as Pereskia lychnidiflora (Cactaceae). In our study site, we investigated 30 T. xerographica, and 53 specimens of T. ryckmani were found. Most T. ryckmani (68.5%) were unfed. Ants (Formicidae) were the predominant (92.2%) insect taxon in T. xerographica. Other insects such as Blattidae (3.0%), Reduviidae (T. ryckmani: 2.5%), Blaberidae (2.2%), Gryllidae (0.1%), and Acrididae (0.1%) were recorded in the bromeliads. T. xerographica is illegally commercialized without previous inspection. This may cause accidental introduction of T. ryckmani to houses and to other countries.

  • 27.
    Monroy, Carlota
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Marroquin, Ricardo
    Rodas, Antonieta
    Rosales, Regina
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Dispersion and colonization of Triatoma ryckmani (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in artificial environments in a semiarid region of Chagas disease endemic area in Guatemala2004In: Acta Tropica, Vol. 91, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The colonization capacity and dispersal of sylvatic populations of Triatoma ryckmani Zeledón and Ponce were investigated by means of experimental chicken coops installed within the semiarid region in the Department of El Progreso, Guatemala. In the four artificial habitats a total of 672 T. ryckmani was found as well as two males of T. dimidiata (Latreille). Triatomine densities were not the same in the four chicken coops. From one chicken coop 53.4% (359) of the triatomines were collected. Full colonization, i.e. all stages from egg to adult found at the same time, took place in the fourth month after the first female’s arrival. High dispersal and colonization capacity of T. ryckmani was evident; adult dispersal occurs mainly during the dry and coolest season (November–February). The overall female/male sex ratio was 2:1; more females than males were found throughout the year. Most of the triatomines in the shelter inside the chicken coops were found on the northern (43%; with less heat and sunlight) and eastern side (35%; more windy). This is the first report on the colonization capacity and population dynamics of T. ryckmani in artificial habitats in a Chagas disease endemic area of Central America.

  • 28. Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis
    et al.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Comparative morphology of terminal-instar larvae of Cynipoidea: phylogenetic implicationsIn: Zoologica ScriptaArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Nieves-Aldrey, NL
    et al.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. systematisk zoologi.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. systematisk zoologi.
    Comparative morphology of terminal-instar larvae of Cynipoidea: phylogenetic implications2005In: Zoologica Scripta, Vol. 34, p. 15-36Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 30.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Bayesian Phylogenetics and the Evolution of Gall Wasps2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns the phylogenetic relationships and the evolution of the gall-inducing wasps belonging to the family Cynipidae. Several previous studies have used morphological data to reconstruct the evolution of the family. DNA sequences from several mitochondrial and nuclear genes where obtained and the first molecular, and combined molecular and morphological, analyses of higher-level relationships in the Cynipidae is presented. A Bayesian approach to data analysis is adopted, and models allowing combined analysis of heterogeneous data, such as multiple DNA data sets and morphology, are developed. The performance of these models is evaluated using methods that allow the estimation of posterior model probabilities, thus allowing selection of most probable models for the use in phylogenetics. The use of Bayesian model averaging in phylogenetics, as opposed to model selection, is also discussed.

    It is shown that Bayesian MCMC analysis deals efficiently with complex models and that morphology can influence combined-data analyses, despite being outnumbered by DNA data. This emphasizes the utility and potential importance of using morphological data in statistical analyses of phylogeny.

    The DNA-based and combined-data analyses of cynipid relationships differ from previous studies in two important respects. First, it was previously believed that there was a monophyletic clade of woody rosid gallers but the new results place the non-oak gallers in this assemblage (tribes Pediaspidini, Diplolepidini, and Eschatocerini) outside the rest of the Cynipidae. Second, earlier studies have lent strong support to the monophyly of the inquilines (tribe Synergini), gall wasps that develop inside the galls of other species. The new analyses suggest that the inquilines either originated several times independently, or that some inquilines secondarily regained the ability to induce galls. Possible reasons for the incongruence between morphological and DNA data is discussed in terms of heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among lineages, and convergent evolution of morphological characters.

    List of papers
    1. A maximum-likelihood anaysis of eight phylogenetic markers in gallwasps (Hymenoptera:Cynipidae): implications for insect phylogenetic studies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A maximum-likelihood anaysis of eight phylogenetic markers in gallwasps (Hymenoptera:Cynipidae): implications for insect phylogenetic studies
    2002 (English)In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 206-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91350 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-11 Created: 2004-02-11 Last updated: 2009-04-02Bibliographically approved
    2. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of combined data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of combined data
    2004 (English)In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 47-67Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development of Bayesian phylogenetic inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques has facilitated the exploration of parameter-rich evolutionary models. At the same time, stochastic models have become more realistic (and complex) and have been extended to new types of data, such as morphology. Based on this foundation, we developed a Bayesian MCMC approach to the analysis of combined data sets and explored its utility in inferring relationships among gall wasps based on data from morphology and four genes (nuclear and mitochondrial, ribosomal and protein coding). Examined models range in complexity from those recognizing only a morphological and a molecular partition to those having complex substitution models with independent parameters for each gene. Bayesian MCMC analysis deals efficiently with complex models: convergence occurs faster and more predictably for complex models, mixing is adequate for all parameters even under very complex models, and the parameter update cycle is virtually unaffected by model partitioning across sites. Morphology contributed only 5% of the characters in the data set but nevertheless influenced the combined-data tree, supporting the utility of morphological data in multigene analyses. We used Bayesian criteria (Bayes factors) to show that process heterogeneity across data partitions is a significant model component, although not as important as among-site rate variation. More complex evolutionary models are associated with more topological uncertainty and less conflict between morphology and molecules. Bayes factors sometimes favor simpler models over considerably more parameter-rich models, but the best model overall is also the most complex and Bayes factors do not support exclusion of apparently weak parameters from this model. Thus, Bayes factors appear to be useful for selecting among complex models, but it is still unclear whether their use strikes a reasonable balance between model complexity and error in parameter estimates.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91351 (URN)10.1080/10635150490264699 (DOI)14965900 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2004-02-11 Created: 2004-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Phylogenetic inference using Bayesian model averaging: approximate methods
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogenetic inference using Bayesian model averaging: approximate methods
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91352 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-11 Created: 2004-02-11 Last updated: 2009-04-02Bibliographically approved
    4. Molecular phylogeny and the evolution of gall wasps
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular phylogeny and the evolution of gall wasps
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91353 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-11 Created: 2004-02-11 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
  • 31.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Phylogenetic inference using Bayesian model averaging: approximate methodsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Buffington, Matthew L.
    Liu, Zhiwei
    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis
    Liljeblad, Johan
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Molecular phylogeny and the evolution of gall waspsManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Sanmartin, Isabel
    Accounting for phylogenetic uncertainty in biogeography: A Bayesian approach to dispersal-vicariance analysis of the thrushes (Aves2008In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 257-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of the thrushes (Aves: Turdus) has been difficult to reconstruct due to short internal branches and lack of node support for certain parts of the tree. Reconstructing the biogeographic history of this group is further complicated by the fact that current implementations of biogeographic methods, such as dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA; Ronquist, 1997), require a fully resolved tree. Here, we apply a Bayesian approach to dispersal-vicariance analysis that accounts for phylogenetic uncertainty and allows a more accurate analysis of the biogeographic history of lineages. Specifically, ancestral area reconstructions can be presented as marginal distributions, thus displaying the underlying topological uncertainty. Moreover, if there are multiple optimal solutions for a single node on a certain tree, integrating over the posterior distribution of trees often reveals a preference for a narrower set of solutions. We find that despite the uncertainty in tree topology, ancestral area reconstructions indicate that the Turdus clade originated in the eastern Palearctic during the Late Miocene. This was followed by an early dispersal to Africa from where a worldwide radiation took place. The uncertainty in tree topology and short branch lengths seems to indicate that this radiation took place within a limited time span during the Late Pliocene. The results support the role of Africa as a probable source area for intercontinental dispersals as suggested for other passerine groups, including basal diversification within the songbird tree.

  • 34.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Huelsenbeck, John P.
    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis
    Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of combined data2004In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 47-67Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development of Bayesian phylogenetic inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques has facilitated the exploration of parameter-rich evolutionary models. At the same time, stochastic models have become more realistic (and complex) and have been extended to new types of data, such as morphology. Based on this foundation, we developed a Bayesian MCMC approach to the analysis of combined data sets and explored its utility in inferring relationships among gall wasps based on data from morphology and four genes (nuclear and mitochondrial, ribosomal and protein coding). Examined models range in complexity from those recognizing only a morphological and a molecular partition to those having complex substitution models with independent parameters for each gene. Bayesian MCMC analysis deals efficiently with complex models: convergence occurs faster and more predictably for complex models, mixing is adequate for all parameters even under very complex models, and the parameter update cycle is virtually unaffected by model partitioning across sites. Morphology contributed only 5% of the characters in the data set but nevertheless influenced the combined-data tree, supporting the utility of morphological data in multigene analyses. We used Bayesian criteria (Bayes factors) to show that process heterogeneity across data partitions is a significant model component, although not as important as among-site rate variation. More complex evolutionary models are associated with more topological uncertainty and less conflict between morphology and molecules. Bayes factors sometimes favor simpler models over considerably more parameter-rich models, but the best model overall is also the most complex and Bayes factors do not support exclusion of apparently weak parameters from this model. Thus, Bayes factors appear to be useful for selecting among complex models, but it is still unclear whether their use strikes a reasonable balance between model complexity and error in parameter estimates.

  • 35. Oliveira, E.
    et al.
    Salgueiro, P.
    Pålsson, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Vicente, J. L.
    Arez, A. P.
    Jaenson, T. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Caccone, A.
    Pinto, J.
    High Levels of Hybridization between Molecular Forms of Anopheles gambiae from Guinea Bissau2008In: Journal of medical entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, E-ISSN 1938-2928, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1057-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto, two molecular forms denoted M and S are considered units of incipient speciation within this species. Very low hybrid frequencies and significant genetic differentiation have been found in sympatric M- and S-form populations, We studied the molecular form composition and the degree of genetic differentiation at 15 microsatellites in two samples of An. gambiae collected ill two consecutive years from Bissau, Guinea Bissau. High frequencies of M/S hybrids (19-24%) were found in this area. Coincidently, very low levels of genetic differentiation were detected between forms when analysis involved microsatellites mapped at chromosome-3 (mean F-st 0.000-0.002). The single exception was the X-linked AGXH678, for which high differentiation was measured (F-st 0.158-0.301). This locus maps near the centromere of chromosome X, a low recombination region in which selection is likely to promote divergence between M and S forms. These results strongly suggest that the degree of isolation between M and S forms, considered the units of incipient speciation within An. gambiae, is not homogenous throughout the species distribution range.

  • 36. Olsson, Urban
    et al.
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. systematisk zoologi.
    Ericson, Per
    Sundberg, Per
    Non-monophyletic taxa and cryptic species – evidence from a molecular phylogeny of leaf-warblers (Phylloscopus, Aves)2005In: Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, Vol. 36, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Olsson, Urban
    et al.
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Sundberg, Per
    Phylogeography of Indonesian and Sino-Himalayan region bush warblers (Cettia, Aves)2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 556-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a hypothesis for the phylogeny and phylogeography of a group of bush warblers in the genus Cettia, based on parts of the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene and the nuclear myoglobin intron II (in all similar to 1.7 kb). Ancestral areas were reconstructed by dispersal-vicariance analysis and constrained Bayesian inference. The results suggest that the insular taxa in the Cettia vulcania group are most closely related to Cettia flavolivacea, and originated from a dispersal by an ancestral population in the Himalayas towards the south, to the Sunda region. From this population, a second dispersal along a different route colonized China and northern Vietnam. Hence, the Chinese taxon intricata and Vietnamese oblita, currently allocated to C. flavoliuacea, are more closely related to the vulcania group than to the other taxa in the flavolivacea group, and we propose that they be treated as conspecific with C vulcania, restricting C. flavolivacea to Myanmar and the Himalayas.

  • 38.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Comparison of natural products and pyrethroid-treated bed nets for protection against mosquitoes in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa1999In: Journal of Medical Entomology, Vol. 36, p. 144-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Jaenson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Plant products used as mosquito repellents in Guinea Bissau, West Africa1999In: Acta Tropica, Vol. 72, p. 39-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk zoologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population Biology.
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk zoologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population Biology.
    Dias, Francisco
    Laugen, Ane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Populationsbiologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Population Biology.
    Björkman, Anders
    Endophilic Anopheles mosquitoes in Guinea Bissau, West Africa in relation to human housing conditions2004In: Journal of Medical Entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 746-752Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Raikova, Olga I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Reuter, Maria
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Gustafsson, Margaretha K. S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Maule, Aaron G.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Halton, David W.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematic Zoology.
    Basiepidermal nervous system in Nemertoderma westbladi (Nemertodermatida): GYIRFamide immunoreactivity2004In: Zoology, Vol. 107, p. 75-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Raikova, Olga I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Reuter, Maria
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Gustafsson, Margaretha K. S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Maule, Aaron G.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Halton, David W.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematic Zoology.
    Evolution of the nervous system in Paraphanostoma (Acoela)2004In: Zoologica Scripta, Vol. 33, p. 71-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Raikova, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Tekle, Yonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Reuter, Maria
    Gustafsson, Margaretha
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Copulatory organ musculature in Childia (Acoela) as revealed by phalloidin fluorescence and confocal microscopy2006In: Tissue & Cell, ISSN 0040-8166, E-ISSN 1532-3072, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 219-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Copulatory organs of eight species of the monophyletic taxon Childia were investigated in detail, using phalloidin fluorescence method and confocal microscopy. Childia species were shown to have one, two or several tubular stylets, conical to cylindrical in shape, composed of few to numerous needles. The musculature varied greatly, from the absence of seminal vesicle to extensively developed seminal vesicles with several additional types of specialized muscles. Ten copulatory organ characters were coded and mapped on the total evidence tree. The data obtained permitted to follow the evolution of the Childia stylet and to demonstrate that the structure of the stylet apparatus is. largely consistent with the phylogeny of the group (CI = 0.75). Possible function of different muscle specializations was discussed.

  • 44. Rokas, Antonis
    et al.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Stone, Graham N.
    A maximum-likelihood anaysis of eight phylogenetic markers in gallwasps (Hymenoptera:Cynipidae): implications for insect phylogenetic studies2002In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 206-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. systematisk zoologi.
    Bayesian inference of character evolution2004In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 19, p. 475-481Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Sadek Garboui, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Plant-Derived Chemicals as Tick Repellents2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ixodes ricinus is the main vector of Lyme borreliosis and Tick-borne encephalitis in Europe. Repellents provide a practical means of protection against tick bites and can therefore reduce transmission of tick-borne diseases.

    In laboratory tests, pieces of cloth treated with MyggA Natural® (a commercial insect repellent) or with the essential oils of Corymbia citriodora (30%), Lavandula angustifolia (1 and 30%), Pelargonium graveolens (1 and 30%), Hyptis suaveolens (10%), Salvadora persica, Pistacia atlantica, Juniperus phoenicea (20%) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) (0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 5.0%) showed strong repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs.

    In a tick-infested woodland in east-central Sweden, we tested by randomized, standardised methodology the potential anti-tick repellent activity of MyggA Natural® (roll-on), two concentrations of MyggA Natural® spray, RB86 (a commercially available insect repellent for horses), the essential oil of C. citriodora and three concentrations of MJ. Each substance was dissolved in acetone and applied separately to 1 m2 cloths which were then pulled over vegetation. Nymphal tick numbers on the cloths were recorded at 10-m intervals and differed significantly between treated cloths and the untreated control and also between collectors.

    Volatile compounds from fresh and dried leaves of H. suaveolens and the essential oils of H. suaveolens (from Laos and Guinea Bissau) and S. persica, P. atlantica and J. phoenicea (from Libya) were collected by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and the constituents were identified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two main sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in the H. suaveolens oil were β-caryophyllene and humulene. These were modified by oxidation and sulphidation to obtain effective tick repellent compounds with lower volatility. In all three oils from Libyan plants the main monoterpene hydrocarbons were α-pinene, sabinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-phellandrene, 4-carene, β-phellandrene and γ-terpinene.

    The selected plant species contained numerous volatiles known to have insecticidal, acaricidal, and/or insect repellent properties.

    List of papers
    1. Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA Natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA Natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Medical Entomology, ISSN 4, Vol. 43, p. 731-736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97764 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2009-04-02Bibliographically approved
    2. Repellency of MyggA® Natural spray (para-menthane 3, 8-diol) and RB86 (neem oil) against the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the field in east-central Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repellency of MyggA® Natural spray (para-menthane 3, 8-diol) and RB86 (neem oil) against the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the field in east-central Sweden
    2006 (English)In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 40, no 3-4, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the field in south-central Sweden, we tested by randomised, standardised methodology the potential anti-tick repellent activity of two concentrations of MyggA® Natural spray (containing PMD) (4.2 and 3.2 g/m2) and one of RB86 (with 70% neem oil containing azadirachtin)(3 g/m2) to host seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus. Each substance was applied separately to 1 m2 cotton flannel cloths. Nymphal ticks on the cloths, pulled over the vegetation, were recorded at 10-m stops. Nymphal numbers recorded differed significantly between treated cloths [4.2 or 3.2 g MyggA® Natural spray/m2 and 3 g RB86/m2] and the untreated control (df = 3, χ2 = 112.74, P < 0.0001). Nymphal numbers also differed significantly among collectors (df = 3, χ2 = 15.80, P < 0.001). Repellency of treated cloths, i.e., 4.2 or 3.2 g MyggA® Natural spray/m2 and 3 g RB 86/m2 declined from day 0 (i.e. the day of impregnation) to day 3 after impregnation from 77 to 24%, 58 to 16% and 47 to 0.5%, respectively. This study suggests that all three treatments have significant repellent activities against I. ricinus nymphs.

    Keywords
    Azadirachtin, Ixodes ricinus ticks, Lemon eucalyptus, Para-menthane-3, 8-diol, Tick repellents
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97765 (URN)10.1007/s10493-006-9031-4 (DOI)000243963600010 ()17103083 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Repellency of methyl jasmonate to Ixodes ricinus nymphs (Acari: Ixodidae)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repellency of methyl jasmonate to Ixodes ricinus nymphs (Acari: Ixodidae)
    2007 (English)In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In our search for tick repellents of plant origin, to be used as alternatives to commercial arthropod repellents, we investigated the effect of the well known plant signaling compound methyl jasmonate (MJ) using nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus. In laboratory tests, pieces of cloth with MJ at 0.075, 0.15, 0.30 and 0.75 mg/cm2 yielded increasing repellencies against the nymphs: 57%, 71%, 92% and 99%, respectively, of the nymphs did not cling to the cloth. Repellency of MJ was also investigated in a tick-infested woodland area in central Sweden. Cotton flannel cloths sprayed with 0.05, 0.1 or 0.2 mg/cm2 MJ dissolved in acetone were dragged over the ground vegetation. The numbers of nymphs on the treated cloths were significantly lower than those on the untreated cloth. Thus, MJ has, at the concentrations tested, significant repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs.

    Keywords
    Ixodes ricinus ticks, Methyl jasmonate, Higher plants, Repellents, Sweden
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97766 (URN)10.1007/s10493-007-9066-1 (DOI)000248170500006 ()17611808 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Hyptis suaveolens a source for arthropod repellent compounds.: Repellency of sesquiterpene oxides and sulfides to Ixodes ricinus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyptis suaveolens a source for arthropod repellent compounds.: Repellency of sesquiterpene oxides and sulfides to Ixodes ricinus
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97767 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Tick repellent properties of three Libyan plants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tick repellent properties of three Libyan plants
    2009 (English)In: Journal of medical entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, E-ISSN 1938-2928, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1415-1419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Specimens of Salvadora persica Wallich (Salvadoraceae), Pistacia   atlantica Desfontaines (Anacardiaceae), and Juniperus phoenicea L.   (Cupressaceae) were collected at The Green Mountain in northeastern   Libya. The tick-repellent effects of the essential oils from the plants   were evaluated using host-seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus L. (Acari:   Ixodidae) in the laboratory. Significant tick repellent effects were   observed for the oils of all three species, but the duration of action   was short. The oils were obtained by steam distillation. Volatile   compounds of the essential oils were collected by solid phase   microextraction and the constituents were identified by gas   chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Keywords
    medicinal plants, ethnobotany, essential oil, Ixodes ricinus, tick repellents
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97768 (URN)000271591800023 ()
    Available from: 2008-11-12 Created: 2008-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 47.
    Sanmartin, Isabel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology.
    Biology and larval morphology of the genus Ceramida Baraud (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Pachydeminae)2007In: Entomologica Fennica, ISSN 0785-8760, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-125