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  • 1.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Life through the 'Varanger ice ages': microfossil record of late Neoproterozoic glacial-interglacial units from arctic Norway2018In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Geological Society of America, 2018, Vol. 50Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic strata in Finnmark (Arctic Norway) provide a good sedimentary record of Neoproterozoic glaciations on the Baltica paleocontinent. The lower Vestertana Group exposed on the Digermulen Peninsula contains two glaciogenic units, the Smalfjord and Mortensnes formations. Chemostratigraphic correlation dated the Smalfjord diamictite to the Marinoan glaciation (650-635 Ma), yet its age was also proposed to be older, per correlation to glacial units in central and southern Scandinavia. The diamictites are bracketing shales and siltstones of the interglacial Nyborg Formation. Stratigraphic, paleontological, and sedimentological data are presented from the interglacial-glacial succession, investigated by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group. Palynological analysis yielded well-preserved organic-walled microfossils (OWM) from the Nyborg Fm., and from fine-grained diamictite matrix in the Mortensnes Fm. via a modified extraction method.

    The interglacial Nyborg Fm. hosts a moderate diversity assemblage of prokaryotic and eukaryotic OWM, as well as acanthomorphic acritarchs such as Ceratosphaeridium, ?Cavaspina, and a novel process-bearing form. Organically preserved, enigmatic multicellular eukaryotic fossils occur in the upper Nyborg Fm. The Mortensens glacial assemblage is less diverse and contains bacterial filaments, leiosphaerids, toroidal forms, and Micrhystridium-type minute acanthomorphs.

    The presence of Doushantuo-Pertatataka type acritarchs in the Nyborg Fm., and small acanthomorphs in the Mortensnes diamictite corroborate an early Ediacaran age for the interglacial-glacial succession on Digermulen. In addition to the trace fossil and body-fossil record of Ediacara-biota in the overlying Stáhpogieddi Formation, the microfossil biostratigraphy suggests Marinoan and Gaskiers glaciation equivalent ages of the Varanger glaciations in Finnmark. Protistan diversity in the succession declined through and following the glaciation, until late Ediacaran.

  • 2.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Moczydłowska, Małgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Unusual organic-walled microfossil from the late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation, Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2017In: ISECT 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation is exposed in the Tanafjord area, Finnmark, Arctic Norway, on Digermulen and Varanger Peninsulas. The succession is composed of ~400 m of interbedded shales, siltstone and purple to grey sandstone, deposited between Neoproterozoic low latitude glacial deposits. The Nyborg Fm. lies on top of the Smalfjord diamictite, and is overlain by the Mortensnes diamictite (the latter was attributed to both Marinoan (650-635 Ma) and Gaskiers (579 Ma) glaciations) and the Ediacaran-Cambrian Stáhpogieddi Formation. Thus, the Nyborg Fm. represents late Neoproterozoic, probably the last Cryogenian interglacial interval. Presented material was collected in 2014 by members of Digermulen Early Life Research Group, from organic-rich, grey-green shales and siltstones of the Nyborg Mbr. D, uppermost Nyborg Fm. between Árasulluokta and Guvssájohka valleys. Organic-walled microfossils were extracted from shale via standard palynological acetolysis in hydrofluoric acid, and studied via light and scanning electron microscopy. Microfossils from the Nyborg Fm. include Synsphaeridium-type aggregated cells, unbranched bacterial filaments (Polythrichoides and Siphonophycus), sphaeromorph and envelope-bearing acritarchs (leiosphaerids, Stictosphaeridium, Simia), and previously unrecognized aggregated tubular microfossils. These taxa are long-ranging, but common in glacial-interglacial units worldwide, and thus broadly corroborate the Cryogenian age of the Nyborg sediments. The novel fossil, up to 300 μm in size, is a parenchymatous meshwork of interconnected organic-walled tubes that terminate in cup-shaped apices 4-11 µm in diameter. Irregular tube clusters are truncated both in macerates and in thin sections, suggesting post mortem transport. Elemental EDXS analysis indicates that extracted meshwork microfossils are predominantly composed of carbonaceous material and also associated with small amounts of titanium and vanadium. Considering the branching and adjoined body plan of carbonaceous fossil, it was likely multicellular and of eukaryotic affinity. As such, it may represent an important step in the evolution of complex multicellularity and morphological complexity several million years before the appearance of Ediacaran organisms.

  • 3.
    Agić, Heda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Moczydlowska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Jensen, Sören
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, ZA-7701 Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Höyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Organically-preserved multicellular eukaryote from the early Ediacaran Nyborg Formation, Arctic Norway2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 14659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eukaryotic multicellularity originated in the Mesoproterozoic Era and evolved multiple times since, yet early multicellular fossils are scarce until the terminal Neoproterozoic and often restricted to cases of exceptional preservation. Here we describe unusual organically-preserved fossils from mudrocks, that provide support for the presence of organisms with differentiated cells (potentially an epithelial layer) in the late Neoproterozoic. Cyathinema digermulense gen. et sp. nov. from the Nyborg Formation, Vestertana Group, Digermulen Peninsula in Arctic Norway, is a new carbonaceous organ-taxon which consists of stacked tubes with cup-shaped ends. It represents parts of a larger organism (multicellular eukaryote or a colony), likely with greater preservation potential than its other elements. Arrangement of open-ended tubes invites comparison with cells of an epithelial layer present in a variety of eukaryotic clades. This tissue may have benefitted the organism in: avoiding overgrowth, limiting fouling, reproduction, or water filtration. C. digermulense shares characteristics with extant and fossil groups including red algae and their fossils, demosponge larvae and putative sponge fossils, colonial protists, and nematophytes. Regardless of its precise affinity, C. digermulense was a complex and likely benthic marine eukaryote exhibiting cellular differentiation, and a rare occurrence of early multicellularity outside of Konservat-Lagerstatten.

  • 4.
    Aldén, Björn
    et al.
    Göteborgs botaniska trädgård.
    Ryman, Svengunnar
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Hjertson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Våra kulturväxters namn: ursprung och användning2009Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Alm, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Johansson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Mäkeler, Hendrik
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Harald Nilsson hedersdoktor i historia vid Uppsala universitet2010In: Svensk Numismatisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 1, p. 17-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Alm, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Mäkeler, Hendrik
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Harald Nilsson erhält die Ehrendoktorwürde der Historisch-Philosophischen Fakultät der Universität Uppsala2009In: International Numismatic Newsletter, Vol. 45, p. 14-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Alstrup, Vagn
    et al.
    Grube, Martin
    Motiejunaite, Jurga
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Zhurbenko, Mikhail
    Lichenicolous fungi from the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway2008In: Graphis Scripta, ISSN 0901-7593, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altogether 93 species of lichenicolous fungi are reported, the majority collected during the Nordic Lichen Society excursion in 2003 to the Skibotn area, Troms, Norway. Cornutispora ciliata, Intralichen cf. lichenum, Opegrapha stereocaulicola and Sphaerulina cf. dubiella are new to Scandinavia, 11 species are new to Norway, and further 42 are new to Troms. Stigmidium aggregata is also reported as new to Greenland. Host lichens, localities, collectors and collection numbers are given.

  • 8.
    Amcoff, Örjan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Nysten, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Bonanzamalm i mikroskala1998In: Geologiskt forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 18, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 9. Andriamihajarivo, Tefy H.
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    Kårehed, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala.
    Phyllopentas flava (Rubiaceae), a New Morphologically Heterodistylous and Functionally Dioecious Species from Madagascar2011In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 1024-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of the Afro-Malagasy genus Phyllopentas Karehed & B. Bremer, Phyllopentas flava Razafim., T. Andriam. et Karehed, is described and illustrated. This plant is restricted to the Itremo region in southeastern Madagascar and is distinct morphologically from the other species of the genus by its pubescent, narrowly ovate to narrowly elliptic leaves, grey-whitish and thickly hairy midribs and secondary veins on the lower surfaces of leaves, and functionally dioecious and heterodistylous flowers. Summaries of distribution, phenology, habitat, and ecology are given and a conservation assessment is also provided.

  • 10.
    Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fröberg, Lars
    Lund University.
    Frödén, Patrik
    Lund University.
    Knutsson, Tommy
    Lättman, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lindblom, Louise
    University of Bergen.
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Södertörns högskola.
    Thell, Arne
    Lund University.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Professor Ingvar Kärnefelt - a birthday tribute2009In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 41, p. 453-456Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Arup, Ulf
    et al.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Grube, Martin
    Mattsson, Jan-Eric
    Wedin, Mats
    The sister group relation of Parmeliaceae2007In: Mycologia, Vol. 99, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Atkins, Christian J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Yochelcionella (Mollusca, Helcionelloida) from the lower Cambrian of North America2008In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 23-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five named species of the helcionelloid mollusc genus Yochelcionella Runnegar & Pojeta, 1974 are recognized from the lower Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2) of North America: Yochelcionella erecta (Walcott, 1891), Y. americana Runnegar & Pojeta, 1980, Y. chinensis Pei, 1985, Y. greenlandica Atkins & Peel, 2004 and Y. gracilis Atkins & Peel, 2004, linking lower Cambrian outcrops along the present north-eastern seaboard. Yochelcionella erecta, an Avalonian species, is described for the first time, other species are derived from Laurentia. A revised concept of the Chinese species, Y. chinensis, is based mainly on a large sample from the Forteau Formation of western Newfoundland and the species may have stratigraphic utility between Cambrian palaeocontinents.

  • 13.
    Atkins, Christian J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    New species of Yochelcionella (Mollusca; Helcionelloida) from the Lower Cambrian of Greenland2004In: Bulletin, Geological Society of Denmark, ISSN 0011-6297, Vol. 51, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Babcock, Loren E.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Palaeobiology, taphonomy and stratigraphic significance of the trilobite BUENELLUS from the Sirius Passet Biota, Cambrian of North Greenland2007In: Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, ISSN 0810-8889, Vol. 34, p. 401-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet Biota, collected from the lower Buen Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3), North Greenland, contains one species of trilobite, the nevadiid Buenellus higginsi Blaker, 1988. The species shows considerable morphological variation, especially in exoskeletal width. Many specimens of B. higginsi show some form of exceptionally preserved, non-biomineralised tissue. Structures interpreted as alimentary tracts and probable digestive glands are commonly preserved by silica and limonite. Antennae are rarely preserved, apparently through replication in clay minerals. Tendinous bars in the axial region also seem to be preserved by replication in clay minerals. Mineral-filled gut tracts in B. higginsi suggest they were fluid-filled at the time of burial, and that the species was a non-durophagous predator. Healed injuries, some of which are the result of unsuccessful predaceous attacks, are uncommon in B. higginsi. Other exoskeletons show evidence of post-mortem disruption, perhaps scavenging. Buenellus higginsi, one of the earliest known trilobites from Laurentia, seems to have played an important role in the Sirius Passet ecosystem, serving both as predator on, and prey for, contemporary animals.

  • 15.
    Backman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala.
    Fart, frihet och furstlig fostran: Unga kungligheters ridning under fem sekel2010In: Trofast: Hov och tass i kunglig tjänst / [ed] Sofia Nestor, Stockholm: Livrustkammaren , 2010, p. 39-53Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Backman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala.
    Stångbettet som precisionsverktyg i 1600-talets ridkonst2013In: Till häst: Ridundervisningen vid Uppsala universitet 350 år / [ed] Marianne Andersson, Johan Sjöberg, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2013, p. 137-144Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Einarsson, Elisabeth
    Lund University.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Late Cretaceous (Campanian) actinopterygian fishes from the Kristianstad Basin of southern Sweden2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 277-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a diverse range of aquatic vertebrates are documented from the Upper Cretaceous (mid-Campanian) marine strata of the Kristianstad Basin in southern Sweden, only chondrichthyans and marine amniotes have been described in detail to date. In contrast, coeval actinopterygians are virtually unreported, yet their remains are extremely abundant at most sampled localities. A comprehensive assessment of these fossils has identified the first Late Cretaceous actinopterygian fauna from the Fennoscandian Shield, incorporating indeterminate lepisosteids, the durophagous pycnodontid Anomoeodus subclavatus, the predatory pachycormid Protosphyraena sp., a large ichthyodectid, pachyrhizodontids resembling Pachyrhizodus, the enchodontid Enchodus cf. gladiolus and indeterminate small teleosts. These taxa are diagnosed mainly from isolated teeth and scales, implying substantial taphonomic loss prior to burial. Moreover, the prolific recovery of actinopterygian skeletal remnants in recent excavations suggests that historical collecting biases, rather than ecological paucity, have contributed to their under-representation in the Swedish Cretaceous record. Palaeobiogeographically, the Kristianstad Basin actinopterygians show compositional resemblance to assemblages from the Northern European Platform and the Western Interior Seaway of North America, advocating distributional communication across the Boreal proto-Atlantic Ocean.

  • 18.
    Bazzi, Mohamad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ New England, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
    Static Dental Disparity and Morphological Turnover in Sharks across the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 16, p. 2607-2615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction profoundly altered vertebrate ecosystems and prompted the radiation of many extant clades [1, 2]. Sharks (Selachimorpha) were one of the few larger-bodied marine predators that survived the K-Pg event and are represented by an almost-continuous dental fossil record. However, the precise dynamics of their transition through this interval remain uncertain [3]. Here, we apply 2D geometric morphometrics to reconstruct global and regional dental morphospace variation among Lamniformes (Mackerel sharks) and Carch-arhiniformes (Ground sharks). These clades are prevalent predators in today's oceans, and were geographically widespread during the late Cretaceous-early Palaeogene. Our results reveal a decoupling of morphological disparity and taxonomic richness. Indeed, shark disparity was nearly static across the K-Pg extinction, in contrast to abrupt declines among other higher-trophic-level marine predators [4, 5]. Nevertheless, specific patterns indicate that an asymmetric extinction occurred among lamniforms possessing lowcrowned/triangular teeth and that a subsequent proliferation of carcharhiniforms with similar tooth morphologies took place during the early Paleocene. This compositional shift in post-Mesozoic shark lineages hints at a profound and persistent K-Pg signature evident in the heterogeneity of modern shark communities. Moreover, such wholesale lineage turnover coincided with the loss of many cephalopod [6] and pelagic amniote [5] groups, as well as the explosive radiation of middle trophic-level teleost fishes [1]. We hypothesize that a combination of prey availability and post-extinction trophic cascades favored extant shark antecedents and laid the foundation for their extensive diversification later in the Cenozoic [7-10].

  • 19.
    Berghaus, Peter
    et al.
    Universität Münster.
    Mäkeler, Hendrik
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Nilsson, Harald
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Münzkabinett der Universität Uppsala: Deutsche Münzen der Wikingerzeit sowie des hohen und späten Mittelalters2006Book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lars Roberg och trilobiterna2015In: Geologiskt forum, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 18 juni 1715 försvarades uppsatsen De Fluviatili Astaco ejusque usu medico vid Uppsalauniversitet. Författaren var Lars Roberg ochämnet var kräftdjur av olika slag. Arbetet innehöllen figur och på denna avbildades tre fossil;en krabba och två svanssköldar från trilobiter. Fossil hade aldrig tidigare avbildats i trycktaarbeten i Sverige, och därmed blev Lars Robergför trehundra år sedan den första i Sverige attillustrera fossil, därtill även svenska sådana.

  • 21.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The Bromell fossil collection at Uppsala University, Sweden: its history and the people behind it2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of 17(th) century cabinets of curiosity collections are held at the Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden. Some of the oldest date back to the 1650s, and were included in the collection of Archiater, i.e. physician to the Crown, von Bromell (1679-1731). He is also known for publishing the first series of papers in Sweden to exclusively deal with palaeontology. Throughout his life he acquired specimens by collecting, buying or receiving in exchange to add to those he inherited from his father Olaus Bromelius, a famous botanist and physician. Information on the labels gives a glimpse of his network of friends, colleagues and fellow collectors, such as Kilian Stobaeus, Lars Roberg, Emanuel Swedenborg, Elias Brenner and Johan Dobelius. When Bromell died, his vast collections of books, coins, furniture, conchs, stuffed animals, minerals and fossils were sold off. The minerals and fossils were split up and owned by various persons during the following century. Parts owned by A. Lagerberg between the years 1746 and 1776 were bought in 1796 by Johan Afzelius and donated to Uppsala University at his death. Fossils and minerals earlier described by Bromell were in the care of The Royal Society of Science in Uppsala at least by 1791. Through the Institute of Geology, fossils accumulated over the centuries at Uppsala University eventually came together under the same roof in 1932, under professor Carl Wiman's care at the then newly erected Palaeontology museum building. Today, about 300 fossils from the Bromell collection are preserved at the museum.

  • 22.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Malinky, J.M.
    A revision of Holm's late Mid and Late Cambrian hyoliths of Sweden1999In: Palaeontology, Vol. 42, p. 841-885Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    BERG-MADSEN, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    PEEL, John S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A TERGOMYAN MOLLUSC FROM THE UPPER CAMBRIAN OF WALES1994In: PALAEONTOLOGY, ISSN 0031-0239, Vol. 37, p. 505-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bellerophon cambriensis from the Upper Cambrian of North Wales is redescribed as the type species of the new genus Telamocornu. Unlike most similarly coiled molluscs of this age, apertural sinuses are present which permit both a functional morphological i

  • 24.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Valent, Martin
    Natl Museum, Dept Palaeontol, Cirkusova, Horni Pocernice, Czech Republic.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    An orthothecid hyolith with a digestive tract from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hyolith assemblage from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark, shows a higher diversity than contemporary assemblages in Baltoscandia. The most common species in the Green Shales (Laesa Formation, Norretorp Member, Cambrian Stage 3), is Hyolithes [=Hyolithus] (Orthotheca) johnstrupi Holm, 1893. A specimen of this species shows a well-preserved and almost complete digestive tract, folded into an approximately 22mm long chevron-like structure comprised of at least 20 arcuate loops on the ventral side and a flattened, gently sinuous to straight anal tube on the dorsal side. The thin, phosphatic outer shell layer of the conch is crushed under the digestive tract due to compaction while the digestive tract is preserved in three dimensions and appears undisturbed. The shape of the digestive tract is similar to that of the middle Cambrian Guduguwan hardmani (Etheridge) from Australia and the lower Cambrian specimens from Russia described by Mekova & Sysoev. The Danish specimen is probably an adult, lending support to the idea that the orthothecid digestive tract becomes more complex during ontogeny. Hyolithus (Orthotheca) johnstrupi is revised and here referred to Circotheca Sysoev, 1958.

  • 25. Bergström, Sven
    et al.
    Olsen, Björn
    Burman, Nils
    Gothefors, Leif
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Molecular characterization of Borrelia burgdorferi isolated from Ixodes ricinus in northern Sweden.1992In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ixodes ricinus ticks, harbouring Borrelia burgdorferi, were found in an area in northern Sweden, not thought to be endemic for Lyme borreliosis. This investigation took place at Norrbyskär, an island situated in the Bothnian Gulf, 63 degrees 33'N/19 degrees 52'E. One of 42 nymphal and 8/43 adult I. ricinus ticks collected carried spirochetes as seen by phase contrast microscopy. Pure bacterial cultures were obtained from 2 of the ticks. Western blot analysis using species-specific monoclonal antibodies showed that the isolated spirochetes were B. burgdorferi. The identity of the isolated spirochetes was confirmed by DNA amplification using B. burgdorferi OspA and flagellin gene specific oligonucleotides as well as partial DNA sequencing of the respective OspA and flagellin genes. The 2 isolated spirochaete populations were different as shown by their protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gels. Moreover, the demonstration of Lyme borreliosis in a patient from the island of Norrbyskär indicates the need for clinical consideration of this disease in northern Sweden.

  • 26. Bernadotte, Carl Philip
    et al.
    Martinsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala, Botanical Garden.
    Lidén, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala, Botanical Garden.
    En glimt av paradiset2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Foton i Botaniska trädgården av Carl Philip Bernadotte

    text av Karin Martinsson och Magnus Lidén

  • 27.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Donovan, Stephen K.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Suyarkova, Anna A.
    Yakupov, Rustem
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    New records of brachiopods and crinoids from the Silurian (Wenlock) of the southern Urals, Russia2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crinoids and brachiopods are described from the Silurian Uzyan Formation of the Zilair Zone in the southern Urals. The occurrence of the graptolites Coronograptus praedeubeli suggests a late Homerian (Wenlock) age for the strata. A new disparid crinoid, Cicerocrinus gracilis Donovan sp. nov., is the oldest known member of this genus. It has a long, flexible and homeomorphic column, and a tall bryozoan palaeontology terminology (IBr2) (second primibrachial) axillary. All species of Cicerocrinus described previously have been limited to the Ludlow of the British Isles, Sweden and Estonia, and the Pridoli of Estonia. The poorly preserved brachiopod fauna is represented by small atrypid (Atrypa? sp.) and dalmanellid brachiopods (Levenea? sp.). The reported assemblage generally inhabited deep-water environments.

  • 28.
    Boluda, C. G.
    et al.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain;Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Rico, V. J.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Divakar, P. K.
    Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Nadyeina, O.
    Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Myllys, L.
    Univ Helsinki, Bot Museum, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, POB 7, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    McMullin, R. T.
    Canadian Museum Nat, Res & Collect, Ottawa, ON K1P 6P4, Canada.
    Zamora, Juan Carlos
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Univ Complutense, Dept Farmacol Farmacognosia & Bot UD Bot, Fac Farm, Plaza Ramon & Cajal S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Scheidegger, C.
    Swiss Fed Res Inst WSL, Biodivers & Conservat Biol, Zurcherstr 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Hawksworth, D. L.
    Nat Hist Museum, Dept Life Sci, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England;Royal Bot Gardens, Comparat Plant & Fungal Biol, Richmond TW9 3DS, Surrey, England.
    Evaluating methodologies for species delimitation: the mismatch between phenotypes and genotypes in lichenized fungi (Bryoria sect. Implexae, Parmeliaceae)2019In: Persoonia, ISSN 0031-5850, E-ISSN 1878-9080, Vol. 42, p. 75-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many lichen-forming fungi, molecular phylogenetic analyses lead to the discovery of cryptic species within traditional morphospecies. However, in some cases, molecular sequence data also questions the separation of phenotypically characterised species. Here we apply an integrative taxonomy approach - including morphological, chemical, molecular, and distributional characters - to re-assess species boundaries in a traditionally speciose group of hair lichens, Bryoria sect. Implexae. We sampled multilocus sequence and microsatellite data from 142 specimens from a broad intercontinental distribution. Molecular data included DNA sequences of the standard fungal markers ITS, IGS, GAPDH, two newly tested loci (FRBi15 and FRBi16), and SSR frequencies from 18 microsatellite markers. Datasets were analysed with Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic reconstruction, phenogram reconstruction, STRUCTURE Bayesian clustering, principal coordinate analysis, haplotype network, and several different species delimitation analyses (ABGD, PTP, GMYC, and DISSECT). Additionally, past population demography and divergence times are estimated. The different approaches to species recognition do not support the monophyly of the 11 currently accepted morphospecies, and rather suggest the reduction of these to four phylogenetic species. Moreover, three of these are relatively recent in origin and cryptic, including phenotypically and chemically variable specimens. Issues regarding the integration of an evolutionary perspective into taxonomic conclusions in species complexes, which have undergone recent diversification, are discussed. The four accepted species, all epitypified by sequenced material, are Bryoria fuscescens, B. glabra, B. kockiana, and B. pseudofuscescens. Ten species rank names are reduced to synonymy. In the absence of molecular data, they can be recorded as the B. fuscescens complex. Intraspecific phenotype plasticity and factors affecting the speciation of different morphospecies in this group of Bryoria are outlined.

  • 29.
    Borgerud, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Et tu Brute?: Myntens användning som propagandamedel under den romerska senrepubliken2011Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Borgerud, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum, Uppsala University Coin Cabinet.
    Slå mynt av barn?: En jämförelse av målningar och mynt föreställande drottning Kristina som barn2013Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Borinder, Niclas H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Poropat, Stephen F.
    Australian Age Dinosaurs Nat Hist Museum, Winton, Qld 4735, Australia.;Monash Univ, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Reassessment of the earliest documented stegosaurian fossils from Asia2016In: Cretaceous research (Print), ISSN 0195-6671, E-ISSN 1095-998X, Vol. 68, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1929, the famous Swedish palaeontologist Carl Wiman documented the first unequivocal stegosaurian dinosaur fossils from Asia. His material comprised an isolated dermal spine, together with a dorsal vertebra that was briefly described but never figured. Since then these remains have languished in obscurity, being noted in some stegosaur review articles but often ignored altogether. However, recent auditing of the Museum of Evolution palaeontological collection at Uppsala University in Sweden has led to the rediscovery of Wiman's original specimens, as well as two additional previously unrecognised stegosaurian dorsal vertebrae. All of these bones derive from the Lower Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian) Mengyin Formation of Shandong Province in eastern China, and are morphologically compatible with the stratigraphically proximal stegosaurian taxon Wuerhosaurus from the Valanginian-Albian Tugulu Group in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of Western China. Wirnan's seminal stegosaurian fossils thus expand current palaeobiogeographical distributions, and contribute to the otherwise enigmatic record of Early Cretaceous stegosaurian occurrences.

  • 32. Bungartz, Frank
    et al.
    Nordin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Grube, Ulrike
    Buellia2008In: Lichen Flora of the Greater Sonoran Desert Region, vol. 3., Arizona State University, Tempe: Lichens Unlimited , 2008, p. 113-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bäckström, Ylva
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Archaeol & Ancient Hist, LUX, Box 192, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Swedish Natl Arch, Box 12541, S-10229 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvarsson-Sundström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Uppsala University Museum.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Britton, Kate
    Univ Aberdeen, Dept Archaeol, St Marys Bldg,Elphinstone Rd, Aberdeen AB24 3UF, Scotland;Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Anthropol, Dept Human Evolut, Deutsch Pl 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Integrating isotopes and documentary evidence: dietary patterns in a late medieval and early modern mining community, Sweden2018In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 2075-2094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationship between dietary patterns and social structure in a pre-industrial mining community in Salberget, Sweden c. 1470 to 1600A.D. using a combination of different research approaches and tools, including archaeology, osteology, bone chemistry and history. The correlation between demographic criteria (sex and age) and archaeological variables (burial type and burial location) shows that Salberget was a highly stratified community. Group diets were investigated through analyses of stable isotopes (carbon, C-13, and nitrogen, N-15) of bone collagen from a sub-sample of individuals buried at the site (n=67), interpreted alongside data from human dental lesions and deficiencies, animal bone waste and information on eating habits extracted from the extensive historical documents regarding mining activities at Salberget. These integrated analyses provide a clear association between social status and diet and confirm that social status, and to a lesser extent sex, gender and age, likely governed food choice and opportunity in this diverse community.

  • 34.
    Cederström, Peter
    et al.
    Axelvoldsvägen 27, SE-241 35 Eslöv, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Helcionelloid molluscs from Cambrian Series 2 strata in Sweden: Composition and stratigraphic implications2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35. Comstedt, Pär
    et al.
    Bergström, Sven
    Olsen, Björn
    Garpmo, Ulf
    Marjavaara, Lisette
    Mejlon, Hans
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Barbour, Alan G.
    Bunikis, Jonas
    Migratory passerine birds as reservoirs of Lyme borreliosis in Europe2006In: Emerging Infect. Dis., Vol. 12, p. 1087-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Paraperonospora apiculata sp. nov.1996In: Sydowia, Vol. 48, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paraperonospora apiculata sp. nov., parasitic on Galatella (Asteraceae) collected from Kazakhstan, is described and illustrated. A key for the identification of Paraperonospora species is provided.

  • 37.
    Constantinescu, O
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Peronospora on Acaena (Rosaceae)1996In: MYCOTAXON, ISSN 0093-4666, Vol. 58, p. 313-318Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the examination of additional specimens, the rare Peronospora parasitic on Acaena is described, illustrated, and ascribed to Peronospora sparsa.

  • 38.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Plasmopara orientalis sp. nov. (Chromista, Peronosporales)2002In: Sydowia, Vol. 54, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmopara orientalis n. sp. parasitic on Schizopepon spp., and occasionally on Echinocystis lobata, is described and illustrated from specimens originating from Far East Russia, China and Japan. This fungus was previously confused with Plasmopara austral

  • 39.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Proposal to conserve the name Peronospora lunariae against Peronospora senecionis (Chromista, Peronosporales)2002In: Taxon, Vol. 51, p. 803-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The fine structure of the sporangium in Pseudoperonospora humuli (Chromista, Oomycota, Peronosporales)2000In: Cryptogamie, Mycologie, ISSN S0181158400001147/FLA, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultrastructure of the sporangium, particularly the dehiscence apparatus in Pseudoperonospora humuli is similar to the one described in P. cubensis. This similarity is considered an indication of the homogeneity of the genus Pseudoperonospora. The dehiscence apparatus in P humuli is also similar to those occurring in other closely related, and even more

    distant genera of Oomycota. The importance of the poroid condition in distinguishing Pseudoperonospora

    from Peronospora is emphasised. The dehiscence apparatus is considered as the most appropriate term for the structures present in genera of Oomycota having poroid dissemination

    organs.

  • 41.
    Constantinescu, O.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The genus Chlorospora Spegazzini, an anamorphic fungus2002In: Sydowia, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The type specimen of the unispecific genus Chlorospora was examined. This fungus, considered either a member of the Chromista, Peronosporaceae, or of a doubtful systematic position, is shown to be based on the anamorphic fungus Harzia acremonioides.

  • 42.
    Constantinescu, O. & Fatehi, J.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. BOTANY SECTION, MUSEUM OF EVOLUTION.
    Peronospora-like fungi (Chromista, Peronosporales) parasitic on Brassicaceae and related hosts2002In: Nova Hedwigia, Vol. 74, no 3-4, p. 291-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Peronospora is emended and its type species, P. rumicis, is redescribed and illustrated. A new genus, Hyaloperonospora Constant., with 6 new combinations (H. floerkeae, H. lepidii-perfoliati, H. lunariae, H. niessleana, H. parasitica, and H. tri

  • 43.
    Constantinescu, O. & Negrean, G.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Peronospora on Fragaria1997In: Mycotaxon, Vol. 63, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of Peronospora on Fragaria, a previously disputed fungus-host association, is confirmed from collections in Romania. The fungus is described, illustrated, and ascribed to Peronospora sparsa

  • 44.
    Constantinescu, O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Mel'nik, V.A.
    Verkley, G.J.M.
    Two parasitic fungi on a new host, Syringa (Oleaceae)2006In: Mycotaxon, Vol. 94, p. 175-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thedgonia ligustrina, the agent of Ligustrum leaf-spot, and Gloeosporidiella turgida, known as a parasite of Fraxinus, are reported for the first time on Syringa spp. Both fungi were found in Sweden, the first in a tree nursery in the south, and the second on plants cultivated in Uppsala. Brief descriptions and illustration are provided and the distribution of T. ligustrina is reviewed.

  • 45.
    Constantinescu, O.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Voglmayr, H.
    Fatehi, J.
    Thines, M.
    Plasmoverna gen nov., and the taxonomy and nomenclature of Plasmopara (Chromista, Peronosporales)2005In: Taxon, Vol. 54, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a review of the taxonomy and nomenclature of Plasmopara, it is concluded that this genus contains at least two groups of fungi that can be differentiated on both morphological and molecular grounds. In order to avoid numerous nomenclatural changes, the genus Plasmoverna with seven new combinations (Pv. pygmaea, Pv. alpina, Pv. anemones-dichotomae, Pv. anemones-ranunculoides, Pv. fusca, Pv. hellebori, and Pv. isopyrithalictroides) is introduced to accommodate the species parasitic on Ranunculaceae, which have so far often been referred to as Plasmopara pygmaea s.l. The lectotypification of Plasmopara with Pl. pygmaea, which has been accepted by most authors in recent times, is shown to have been superseded by typification with Pl. nivea. To ensure nomenclatural stability, the ambiguous Pl. nivea is neotypified, and Plasmopara is retained in its current use for the bulk of the species.

  • 46.
    Constantinescu, Ovidiu
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    A revision of Basidiophora (Chromista, Peronosporales)1998In: Nova Hedwigia, ISSN 0029-5035, Vol. 66, no 1-2, p. 251-265Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Basidiophora (Chromista, Oomycota, Peronosporales) is revised and restricted to one species, B. entospora, with the recently described B. montana as a synonym. Basidiophora kellermanii is transferred to a new genus, Benua. The two species are de

  • 47.
    Constantinescu, Ovidiu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Thines, Marco
    Dimorphism of sporangia in Albuginaceae (Chromista, Peronosporomycetes)2006In: Sydowia, ISSN 0082-0598, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 178-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By using light- and scanning electron microscopy, the dimorphism of sporangia in Albuginales is demonstrated in 220 specimens of Albugo, Pustula and Wilsoniana, parasitic on plants belonging to 13 families. The presence of two kinds of sporangia is due to the sporangiogenesis and considered to be present in all representatives of the Albuginales. Primary and secondary sporangia are the term recommended to be used for these dissemination organs.

  • 48.
    Constantinescu, Ovidiu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Thines, Marco
    Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (BiK-F), Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.
    Plasmopara halstedii is absent from Australia and New Zealand2010In: Polish Botanical Journal, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 293-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.) Berl. & de Toni is among the most important species hampering commercial sunfl owerproduction in many countries. Downy mildew on Arctotheca and Arctotis collected in Australia and New Zealand has been attributedto Plasmopara halstedii, although it has never been reported on sunfl ower in those two countries. Potentially this makesit diffi cult for Australia and New Zealand to claim to be free of sunfl ower downy mildew; this has implications for quarantineand trade. Here we present morphological and molecular analyses of specimens of Plasmopara on Arctotis and Arctotheca collectedin Australia and New Zealand. Our results demonstrate that these plants are not attacked by Plasmopara halstedii but bya new species which we formally describe as Plasmopara majewskii sp. nov. in this study. Consequently, quarantine regulationsfor P. halstedii need to be enforced in order to protect the commercial sunfl ower industry in Australia and New Zealand.

  • 49.
    Conway Morris, Simon
    et al.
    Cambridge, Earth Sciences.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The earliest annelids: Lower Cambrian polychaetes from the Sirius Passet Lagerstätte, Peary Land, North Greenland2008In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apart from the Phyllopod Bed of the Burgess Shale (Middle Cambrian) polychaete annelids are practically unknown from any of the Cambrian Lagerstdtten. This is surprising both because their diversity in the Burgess Shale is considerable, while to date the Chengjiang Lagerstatte which is equally impressive in terms of faunal diversity has no reliable records of any annelids. Here we describe, on the basis of about 40 specimens, Phragmochaeta canicularis gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstatte of Peary Land, North Greenland. This makes it by far the oldest known polychaete, with a likely age of lower to middle Atdabanian, The body consists of approximately 20 segments, each bearing notochaetae and neurochaetae. The former appeared to have formed a felt-like covering on the dorsum, whilst the neurochaetae projected obliquely to the longitudinal axis. Apart from minor differences in chaetal size at either end there is no other tagmosis. Details of the head are obscure, and presence of palps, tentacles and eyes are conjectural. Jaws appear to have been absent. The gut was straight, and flanked by massive longitudinal musculature. P. canicularis was evidently benthic, propelling itself on the neurochaetae, with the dorsal neurochaetae conferring protection. Its stratigraphic position and generalized appearance are consistent with P. canicularis being primitive, but the phylogenetic relationships within the polychaetes remain problematic, principally because of paucity of relevant morphological information.

  • 50. Cunnington, James,H.
    et al.
    Constantinescu, Ovidiu
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Basidiophora entospora in Australia2006In: Australasian Mycologist, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 58-60Article in journal (Refereed)
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