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  • 1. Kautsky, Nils
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Troell, Max
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Gotland University, School of Culture, Energy and Environment. Gotland University, SWEDESD, Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development.
    Odlad fisk är mindre miljövänlig än många tror2003In: Torskar torsken?: forskare och fiskare om fisk och fiske / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Forskningsrådet Formas, 2003, 93-102 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Lenglet, Frans
    et al.
    Gotland University, SWEDESD, Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development.
    Fadeeva, Zinaida
    United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS).
    Mochizuki, Yoko
    United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS).
    ESD Promises and Challenges: Increasing its Relevance2010In: Global Environment Research, ISSN 1343-8808, Vol. 14, no 2, 93-100 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Læssøe, Jeppe
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Lenglet, FransGotland University, SWEDESD, Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development.
    Unfolding the Power of ESD: Lessons Learned and Ways Forward : report of the conference2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The report aims to inspire and inform international, national and local efforts to elaborate and accel­erate ESD around the world.

    It makes four main recommendations:

    Involve ESD: ESD can facilitate dialogue and learning on critical sustainable development issues.  ESD should be conducted in more open and inclusive ways.  Transboundary partnerships and governance structures are necessary to give ESD more traction.

    Expand ESD: Link ESD to the Convention on Biological Diversity.  ESD should address the global health risks.  Efforts to promote green skills through Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) should be acknowledged and integrated into ESD.  Early Childhood ESD should be part of the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals.

    Use ESD to reorient education: ESD addresses the quality dimension of the Education for All (EFA) agenda.  UNESCO should enhance the dialogue and concrete connections between the Education for All (EFA) initiative and ESD.  Ministries of Education and other authorities should use ESD to strengthen the quality of edu­cational programs and strategies.  There is a strong need for following up official national SD and ESD policies, in order to help scaling up and spreading innovative practices.

    Make ESD policy context-sensitive: A process of mediation is needed to translate and adapt general aims and principles to meaningful and supportive policy at the local level.

  • 4.
    Warren-Rhodes, Kimberly
    et al.
    The WorldFish Center-Solomon Islands.
    Schwarz, Anne-Maree
    The WorldFish Center-Solomon Islands.
    NG Boyle, Linda
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
    Alberta, Joelle
    The WorldFish Center-Solomon Islands.
    Suti Agaloa, Stephen
    National Resource Development Conservation, Solomon Islands.
    Warren, Regon
    The WorldFish Center-Solomon Islands.
    Bana, Andrew
    Western Province Government, Solomon Islands.
    Paul, Chris
    The WorldFish Center-Solomon Islands.
    Kodosiku, Ringo
    National Resource Development Conservation, Solomon Islands.
    Bosma, Wilko
    National Resource Development Conservation, Solomon Islands.
    Yee, Douglas
    Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology, Honiara, Solomon Islands.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Gotland University, School of Culture, Energy and Environment. Gotland University, SWEDESD, Swedish International Centre of Education for Sustainable Development.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Duke, Norm
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Mangrove ecosystem services and the potential for carbon revenue programmes in the Solomon Island2011In: Environmental Conservation, ISSN 0376-8929, E-ISSN 1469-4387, Vol. 38, 485-496 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mangroves are an imperilled biome whose protection and restoration through payments for ecosystem services (PES) can contribute to improved livelihoods, climate mitigation and adaptation. Interviews with resource users in three Solomon Islands villages suggest a strong reliance upon mangrove goods for subsistence and cash, particularly for firewood, food and building materials. Village-derived economic data indicates a minimum annual subsistence value from mangroves of US$ 345–1501 per household. Fish and nursery habitat and storm protection were widely recognized and highly valued mangrove ecosystem services. All villagers agreed that mangroves were under threat, with firewood overharvesting considered the primary cause. Multivariate analyses revealed village affiliation and religious denomination as the most important factors determining the use and importance of mangrove goods. These factors, together with gender, affected users’ awareness of ecosystem services. The importance placed on mangrove services did not differ significantly by village, religious denomination, gender, age, income, education or occupation. Mangrove ecosystem surveys are useful as tools for raising community awareness and input prior to design of PES systems. Land tenure and marine property rights, and how this complexity may both complicate and facilitate potential carbon credit programmes in the Pacific, are discussed.

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