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  • 1.
    Aabel, Peder
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Biochem, Oslo, Norway;Akershus Univ Hosp, Ear Nose & Throat Dept, Div Surg, Lorenskog, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Div Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Biochem, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Oral Biol, Fac Dent, Oslo, Norway.
    Olstad, Ole Kristoffer
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Biochem, Oslo, Norway.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Dilley, Rodney James
    Ear Sci Inst Australia, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Western Australia, Ear Sci Ctr, Nedlands, WA, Australia;Univ Western Australia, Ctr Cell Therapy & Regenerat Med, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    von Unge, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Akershus Univ Hosp, Ear Nose & Throat Dept, Div Surg, Lorenskog, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Div Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Transcription and microRNA Profiling of Cultured Human Tympanic Membrane Epidermal Keratinocytes2018In: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, ISSN 1525-3961, E-ISSN 1438-7573, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 243-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human tympanic membrane (TM) has a thin outer epidermal layer which plays an important role in TM homeostasis and ear health. The specialised cells of the TM epidermis have a different physiology compared to normal skin epidermal keratinocytes, displaying a dynamic and constitutive migration that maintains a clear TM surface and assists in regeneration. Here, we characterise and compare molecular phenotypes in keratinocyte cultures from TM and normal skin. TM keratinocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion and cultured in vitro. We compared global mRNA and microRNA expression of the cultured cells with that of human epidermal keratinocyte cultures. Genes with either relatively higher or lower expression were analysed further using the biostatistical tools g:Profiler and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Approximately 500 genes were found differentially expressed. Gene ontology enrichment and Ingenuity analyses identified cellular migration and closely related biological processes to be the most significant functions of the genes highly expressed in the TM keratinocytes. The genes of low expression showed a marked difference in homeobox (HOX) genes of clusters A and C, giving the TM keratinocytes a strikingly low HOX gene expression profile. An in vitro scratch wound assay showed a more individualised cell movement in cells from the tympanic membrane than normal epidermal keratinocytes. We identified 10 microRNAs with differential expression, several of which can also be linked to regulation of cell migration and expression of HOX genes. Our data provides clues to understanding the specific physiological properties of TM keratinocytes, including candidate genes for constitutive migration, and may thus help focus further research.

  • 2.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CTManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of etiological mechanisms of whiplash associated disorder is still inadequate. Objective visualization and quantification of peripheral musculoskeletal injury and possible painful inflammation in whiplash associated disorder would facilitate diagnosis, strengthen patients’ subjective pain reports and aid clinical decisions eventually leading to better treatments. In the current study, we further evaluated the potential to use [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT to visualize inflammation after whiplash injury. Sixteen patients with whiplash injury grade II were recruited at the emergency department and underwent [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase and at 6 months after injury. Subjective pain levels, self rated neck disability and active cervical range of motion were recorded at each imaging session. Results showed that the molecular aspects of inflammation and possible tissue injuries after acute whiplash injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. An altered [11C]D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self rated disability during both imaging occasions. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of affected peripheral structures in whiplash injury and strengthens the idea that PET/CT detectable organic lesions in peripheral tissue may be relevant for the development of persistent pain and disability in whiplash injury.

    Perspective: This article presents a novel way of objectively visualizing possible structural damage and inflammation that cause pain and disability in whiplash injury. This PET method can bring an advance in pain research and eventually would facilitate the clinical management of patients in pain.

  • 3.
    Aase, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernkvist, Mira
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ebarasi, Lwaki
    Division of Matrix Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Majumdar, Arindam
    Division of Matrix Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yi, Chunling
    Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
    Birot, Olivier
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ming, Yue
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Ophthalmology and Vision, Karolinska Institutet, St Erik’s Hospital, SE-11284 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Ophthalmology and Vision, Karolinska Institutet, St Erik’s Hospital, SE-11284 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Aspenström, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Kissil, Joseph
    Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Shimono, Akihiko
    Vertebrate Body Plan, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN Kobe, Chuou-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.
    Holmgren, Lars
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Angiomotin regulates endothelial cell migration during embryonic angiogenesis2007In: Genes & Development, ISSN 0890-9369, E-ISSN 1549-5477, Vol. 21, no 16, p. 2055-2068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of the embryonic vascular system into a highly ordered network requires precise control over the migration and branching of endothelial cells (ECs). We have previously identified angiomotin (Amot) as a receptor for the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin. Furthermore, DNA vaccination targeting Amot inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, little is known regarding the role of Amot in physiological angiogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of Amot in embryonic neovascularization during zebrafish and mouse embryogenesis. Here we report that knockdown of Amot in zebrafish reduced the number of filopodia of endothelial tip cells and severely impaired the migration of intersegmental vessels. We further show that 75% of Amot knockout mice die between embryonic day 11 (E11) and E11.5 and exhibit severe vascular insufficiency in the intersomitic region as well as dilated vessels in the brain. Furthermore, using ECs differentiated from embryonic stem (ES) cells, we demonstrate that Amot-deficient cells have intact response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in regard to differentiation and proliferation. However, the chemotactic response to VEGF was abolished in Amot-deficient cells. We provide evidence that Amot is important for endothelial polarization during migration and that Amot controls Rac1 activity in endothelial and epithelial cells. Our data demonstrate a critical role for Amot during vascular patterning and endothelial polarization.

  • 4. Aavik, Einari
    et al.
    Lumivuori, Henri
    Leppänen, Olli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Wirth, Thomas
    Hakkinen, Sanna-Kaisa
    Braesen, Jan-Hinrich
    Beschorner, Ulrich
    Zeller, Thomas
    Braspenning, Maarten
    van Criekinge, Wim
    Makinen, Kimmo
    Yla-Herttuala, Seppo
    Global DNA methylation analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques reveals extensive genomic hypomethylation and reactivation at imprinted locus 14q32 involving induction of a miRNA cluster2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 16, p. 993-U23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Genetics can explain just above 10% of the observed heritability in cardiovascular diseases. Epigenetics is about to provide some further explanations, but the information needed for that is in the accumulation phase. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis has revealed thousands of genes, which are epigenetically differentially regulated in atherosclerotic plaques. Our results point to an additional level of complexity that needs to be integrated into the aetiology of atherogenesis.We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated genes in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods DNA methylation at promoters, exons and introns was identified by massive parallel sequencing. Gene expression was analysed by microarrays, qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blots. Results Globally, hypomethylation of chromosomal DNA predominates in atherosclerotic plaques and two-thirds of genes showing over 2.5-fold differential in DNA methylation are up-regulated in comparison to healthy mammary arteries. The imprinted chromatin locus 14q32 was identified for the first time as an extensively hypomethylated area in atherosclerosis with highly induced expression of miR127, -136, -410, -431, -432, -433 and capillary formation-associated gene RTL1. The top 100 list of hypomethylated promoters exhibited over 1000-fold enrichment for miRNAs, many of which mapped to locus 14q32. Unexpectedly, also gene body hypermethylation was found to correlate with stimulated mRNA expression. Conclusion Significant changes in genomic methylation were identified in atherosclerotic lesions. The most prominent gene cluster activated via hypomethylation was detected at imprinted chromosomal locus 14q32 with several clustered miRNAs that were up-regulated. These results suggest that epigenetic changes are involved in atherogenesis and may offer new potential therapeutic targets for vascular diseases.

  • 5.
    Abdelgadir, Moawia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Low serum adiponectin concentrations are associated with insulin sensitivity independent of obesity in Sudanese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus2013In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 5, p. 15-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus among Sudanese population was found to be 3.4% and associated with high rates of complications and obesity. Different adipocytokines are secreted from adipose tissues, among them adiponectin, which was shown to have insulins ensitizing properties and anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic effect. The aim of this study was to characterize type 2 diabetes in Sudanese diabetic subjects and controls in respect to hormones influencing or influenced by glucose metabolism. Methods: 104 type 2 diabetic patients (45 men and 59 women), and 75 matched control subjects (34 men and 41 women) were studied. Fasting serum samples were used to measure adiponectin, leptin, insulin, proinsulin, ghrelin and glucose. Body mass index, insulin/proinsulin ratio and (HOMA) insulin resistance and beta cell function were also calculated. Results: Adiponectin serum concentrations were significantly lower in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with controls subjects (P = 0.002), comparison between males and females did not reach significant levels in both diabetic (P = 0.06) or controls (P = 0.16) groups. In the diabetic group adiponectin correlated positively with serum glucose, negatively with serum proinsulin and HOMA beta cell function (P = 0.03) respectively and serum ghrelin (P = 0.003), but not with BMI, HOMA insulin resistance, insulin or leptin. In controls serum adiponectin correlated negatively with BMI (P = 0.002) but not with other variables. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that, adiponectin concentrations independent on BMI as a measure of adiposity, were mostly linked to insulin sensitivity and not to insulin resistance in Sudanese type 2 diabetic subjects, where race specific regulation mechanisms or different type 2 diabetes phenotype suggested being a major contributory factor in clarification the findings of this study.

  • 6.
    Abdulla, Salim
    et al.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Adam, Ishag
    Univ Khartoum, Fac Med, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Adjei, George O.
    Univ Ghana, Sch Med, Ctr Trop Clin Pharmacol & Therapeut, Accra, Ghana..
    Adjuik, Martin A.
    INDEPTH Network Secretariat, Accra, Ghana..
    Alemayehu, Bereket
    Int Ctr AIDS Care & Treatment Programs, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Allan, Richard
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Arinaitwe, Emmanuel
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda..
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Ba, Mamadou S.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Barennes, Hubert
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;French Foreign Affairs, Biarritz, France..
    Barnes, Karen I.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, Div Clin Pharmacol, ZA-7925 Cape Town, South Africa..
    Bassat, Quique
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Baudin, Elisabeth
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England..
    Berens-Riha, Nicole
    Univ Munich LMU, Med Ctr, Div Infect Dis & Trop Med, Munich, Germany.;LMU, German Ctr Infect Res DZIF, Munich, Germany..
    Bjoerkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bompart, Francois
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Bonnet, Maryline
    Epictr, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Bousema, Teun
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Med Microbiol, Njimegen, Netherlands..
    Brasseur, Philippe
    IRD, Dakar, Senegal..
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Checchi, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Dahal, Prabin
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Inst Trop Med, Unit Malariol, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium.;MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Desai, Meghna
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Dicko, Alassane
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali.;Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Dept Publ Hlth, Bamako, Mali..
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Dorsey, Grant
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Drakeley, Chris J.
    German Ctr Infect Res, Tubingen, Germany..
    Duparc, Stephan
    Med Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Eshetu, Teferi
    Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.;Jimma Univ, Dept Med Lab Sci & Pathol, Jimma, Ethiopia..
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Etard, Jean-Francois
    Epictr, Paris, France.;IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Faiz, Abul M.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Falade, Catherine O.
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Dept Pharmacol & Therapeut, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Fanello, Caterina I.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Mahidol Oxford Res Unit, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    IRD, Mother & Child Hlth Trop Res Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 05, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.;Univ Besancon, Med Ctr, Dept Infect Dis, F-25030 Besancon, France..
    Faye, Babacar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Faye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Filler, Scott
    Global Fund Fight AIDS TB & Malaria, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Monash Univ, Sch Math Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.;Monash Univ, Monash Acad Cross & Interdisciplinary Math Applic, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Fofana, Bakary
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Fogg, Carole
    Univ Portsmouth, Portsmouth Hosp NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hants, England..
    Gadalla, Nahla B.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England.;Natl Res Ctr, Res Inst Trop Med, Dept Epidemiol, Khartoum, Sudan.;NIAID, Rockville, MD USA..
    Gaye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Genton, Blaise
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne Hosp, Dept Ambulatory Care & Community Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Gething, Peter W.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Zool, Spatial Ecol & Epidemiol Grp, Oxford OX1 3PS, England..
    Gil, Jose P.
    Karolinska Inst, Pharmacogenet Sect, Drug Resistance Unit, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, Biosyst & Integrat Sci Inst BioISI, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal.;SUNY Binghamton, Harpur Coll Arts & Sci, Binghamton, NY USA..
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Grandesso, Francesco
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Greenhouse, Bryan
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Dis Control, London WC1, England..
    Grivoyannis, Anastasia
    Univ Washington, Div Emergency Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Inst Veille Sanit, Dept Malad Infect, St Maurice, France..
    Hamed, Kamal
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hamour, Sally
    Royal Free Hosp, UCL Ctr Nephrol, London NW3 2QG, England..
    Hay, Simon I.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Inst Hlth Metr & Evaluat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;NIH, Fogarty Int Ctr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hodel, Eva Maria
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Humphreys, Georgina S.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Hwang, Jimee
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA.;Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Ibrahim, Maman L.
    Ctr Rech Med & Sanit, Niamey, Niger..
    Jima, Daddi
    Fed Minist Hlth, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia..
    Jones, Joel J.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Jullien, Vincent
    Univ Paris 05, AP HP, Paris, France..
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kachur, Patrick S.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Kager, Piet A.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kamugisha, Erasmus
    Catholic Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Mwanza, Tanzania..
    Kamya, Moses R.
    Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda..
    Karema, Corine
    Minist Hlth, Malaria & Other Parasit Dis Div RBC, Kigali, Rwanda..
    Kayentao, Kassoum
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Kiechel, Jean-Rene
    Drugs Neglected Dis initiat, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kironde, Fred
    Makerere Univ, Dept Biochem, Kampala, Uganda..
    Kofoed, Poul-Erik
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Kolding Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Kolding, Denmark..
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Krishna, Sanjeev
    Univ London, Inst Infect & Immun, London, England. Operat Ctr Barcelona Athens, Med Sans Frontieres, Barcelona, Spain..
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Sanofi Aventis, Direct Acces Med Access Med, Gentilly, France..
    Lell, Bertrand
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Lima, Angeles
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Makanga, Michael
    European & Dev Countries Clin Trials Partnership, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Malik, ElFatih M.
    Fed Minist Hlth, Khartoum, Sudan..
    Marsh, Kevin
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Massougbodji, Achille
    Univ Abomey Calavi, FSS, CERPAGE, Cotonou, Benin..
    Menan, Herve
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharm, Dept Parasitol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Menard, Didier
    Inst Pasteur Cambodia, Malaria Mol Epidemiol Unit, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Menendez, Clara
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica, Manhica, Mozambique.;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, ISGlobal, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Mens, Petra F.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Infect & Immun Amsterdam CINIMA, Div Infect Dis Trop Med & AIDS, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Meremikwu, Martin
    Univ Calabar, Dept Paediat, Calabar, Nigeria.;Inst Trop Dis Res & Prevent, Calabar, Nigeria..
    Moreira, Clarissa
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Nabasumba, Carolyn
    Epictr, Paris, France.;Mbarara Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Med, Mbarara, Uganda..
    Nambozi, Michael
    Trop Dis Res Ctr, Ndola, Zambia..
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Ngasala, Billy E.
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nikiema, Frederic
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Nsanzabana, Christian
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Ntoumi, Francine
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany.;Univ Marien Ngouabi, FCRM, Fac Sci Sante, Brazzaville, Congo..
    Oguike, Mary
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    United States Army Med Res Unit, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kisumu, Kenya..
    Olliaro, Piero
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Omar, Sabah A.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Ctr Biotechnol Res & Dev, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Owusu-Agyei, Seth
    Kintampo Hlth Res Ctr, Kintampo, Ghana..
    Penali, Louis K.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Pene, Mbaye
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Peshu, Judy
    Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kenya Med Res Inst, Kilifi, Kenya..
    Piola, Patrice
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Epidemiol Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Plowe, Christopher V.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Ctr Vaccine Dev, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Premji, Zul
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Price, Ric N.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Darwin, NT, Australia.;Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia..
    Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona
    Inst Pasteur Madagascar, Malaria Res Unit, Antananarivo, Madagascar..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res Lab,Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malarsjukhuset, Dept Infect Dis, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Roper, Cally
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Pathogen Mol Biol, London WC1, England..
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Sagara, Issaka
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Dent, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Same-Ekobo, Albert
    Ctr Hosp Univ Yaounde, Fac Med & Sci Biomed, Yaounde, Cameroon..
    Sawa, Patrick
    Int Ctr Insect Physiol & Ecol, Human Hlth Div, Mbita, Kenya..
    Schallig, Henk D. F. H.
    KIT Biomed Res, Royal Trop Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schramm, Birgit
    Epictr, Paris, France..
    Seck, Amadou
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN W, Dakar, Senegal..
    Shekalaghe, Seif A.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.;Kilimanjaro Christian Med Ctr, Kilimanjaro Clin Med Res Inst, Moshi, Tanzania..
    Sibley, Carol H.
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sinou, Vronique
    Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Pharm, UMR MD3, Marseille, France..
    Sirima, Sodiomon B.
    CNRFP, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso..
    Som, Fabrice A.
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Sow, Doudou
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda.;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Clin Res, London WC1, England..
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England..
    Sutherland, Colin J.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, Dept Infect & Immun, London WC1, England..
    Swarthout, Todd D.
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England..
    Sylla, Khadime
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Talisuna, Ambrose O.
    East Africa Reg Ctr, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Nairobi, Kenya.;Univ Oxford, KEMRI, Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    UNICEF UNDP World Bank WHO Special Programme Res, Geneva, Switzerland.;Hop Cantonal Univ Geneva, Serv Med Int & Humanitaire, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Temu, Emmanuel A.
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England.;Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Thwing, Julie I.
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Tine, Roger C. K.
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal..
    Tinto, Halidou
    Ctr Muraz, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.;Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Tommasini, Silva
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Toure, Offianan A.
    Inst Pasteur Cote Ivoire, Malariol Dept, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Ursing, Johan
    Projecto Saude Bandim, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vaillant, Michel T.
    CRP Sante, Ctr Hlth Studies, Methodol & Stat Unit, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.;Univ Bordeaux 2, Unite Bases Therapeut Inflammat & Infect 3677, F-33076 Bordeaux, France..
    Valentini, Giovanni
    Sigma Tau Ind Farmaceut Riunite SpA, Rome, Italy..
    Van den Broek, Ingrid
    Med Sans Frontieres, London, England.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm, Ctr Infect Dis Control, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands..
    Van Vugt, Michele
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Ctr Trop Med & Travel Med, Div Infect Dis, NL-1012 WX Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ward, Stephen A.
    Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    Winstanley, Peter A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Yavo, William
    Univ Cocody, Fac Pharmaceut & Biol Sci, Dept Parasitol & Mycol, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Malaria Res & Control Ctr, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire..
    Yeka, Adoke
    Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project, Kampala, Uganda..
    Zolia, Yah M.
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Programme, Monrovia, Liberia..
    Zongo, Issaka
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso..
    Clinical determinants of early parasitological response to ACTs in African patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a literature review and meta-analysis of individual patient data2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, article id 212Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has emerged in the Greater Mekong sub-region and poses a major global public health threat. Slow parasite clearance is a key clinical manifestation of reduced susceptibility to artemisinin. This study was designed to establish the baseline values for clearance in patients from Sub-Saharan African countries with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). Methods: A literature review in PubMed was conducted in March 2013 to identify all prospective clinical trials (uncontrolled trials, controlled trials and randomized controlled trials), including ACTs conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa, between 1960 and 2012. Individual patient data from these studies were shared with the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) and pooled using an a priori statistical analytical plan. Factors affecting early parasitological response were investigated using logistic regression with study sites fitted as a random effect. The risk of bias in included studies was evaluated based on study design, methodology and missing data. Results: In total, 29,493 patients from 84 clinical trials were included in the analysis, treated with artemether-lumefantrine (n = 13,664), artesunate-amodiaquine (n = 11,337) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (n = 4,492). The overall parasite clearance rate was rapid. The parasite positivity rate (PPR) decreased from 59.7 % (95 % CI: 54.5-64.9) on day 1 to 6.7 % (95 % CI: 4.8-8.7) on day 2 and 0.9 % (95 % CI: 0.5-1.2) on day 3. The 95th percentile of observed day 3 PPR was 5.3 %. Independent risk factors predictive of day 3 positivity were: high baseline parasitaemia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.16 (95 % CI: 1.08-1.25); per 2-fold increase in parasite density, P <0.001); fever (>37.5 degrees C) (AOR = 1.50 (95 % CI: 1.06-2.13), P = 0.022); severe anaemia (AOR = 2.04 (95 % CI: 1.21-3.44), P = 0.008); areas of low/moderate transmission setting (AOR = 2.71 (95 % CI: 1.38-5.36), P = 0.004); and treatment with the loose formulation of artesunate-amodiaquine (AOR = 2.27 (95 % CI: 1.14-4.51), P = 0.020, compared to dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine). Conclusions: The three ACTs assessed in this analysis continue to achieve rapid early parasitological clearance across the sites assessed in Sub-Saharan Africa. A threshold of 5 % day 3 parasite positivity from a minimum sample size of 50 patients provides a more sensitive benchmark in Sub-Saharan Africa compared to the current recommended threshold of 10 % to trigger further investigation of artemisinin susceptibility.

  • 7.
    Abdulla, Salim
    et al.
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Bassat, Quique
    Univ Barcelona, Ctr Invest Saude Manhica Manhica Mozamb & ISGloba, Barcelona Ctr Int Hlth Res CRESIB, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Bethell, Delia
    AFRIMS, Dept Immunol & Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya.;Univ Magdeburg, Sch Med, D-39106 Magdeburg, Germany..
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Inst Trop Med, Unit Malariol, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium.;MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia..
    Dahal, Prabin
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Day, Nicholas P.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Diakite, Mahamadou
    Univ Bamako, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Dondorp, Arjen M.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Duong, Socheat
    Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Edstein, Michael D.
    Fairhurst, Rick M.
    NIAID, Lab Malaria & Vector Res, NIH, Rockville, MD USA..
    Faiz, M. Abul
    Malaria Res Grp MRG & Dev Care Fdn, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Falade, Catherine
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    Monash Univ, Sch Math Sci, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Fogg, Carole
    Univ Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hants, England..
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Ctr Invest Saude Manhica Manhica Mozamb, Barcelona, Spain.;CRESIB, Barcelona, Spain..
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, London WC1, England..
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Epicentre, Paris, France..
    Hamed, Kamal
    Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA..
    Hien, Tran Tinh
    Htut, Ye
    Dept Med Res, Lower Myanmar, Yangon, Myanmar..
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Lim, Pharath
    NIAID, Lab Malaria & Vector Res, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.;US & Natl Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Cell & Tumour Biol, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mayxay, Mayfong
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahosot Hosp, Lao Oxford Mahosot Hosp, Wellcome Trust Res Unit LOMWRU, Viangchan, Laos.;Univ Hlth Sci, Fac Postgrad Studies, Viangchan, Laos..
    Mokuolu, Olugbenga A.
    Univ Ilorin, Dept Paediat & Child Hlth, Ilorin, Nigeria..
    Moreira, Clarissa
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Newton, Paul
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahosot Hosp, Lao Oxford Mahosot Hosp, Wellcome Trust Res Unit LOMWRU, Viangchan, Laos..
    Noedl, Harald
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Specif Prophylaxis & Trop Med, Vienna, Austria..
    Nosten, Francois
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, US Army Med Res Unit, Kisumu, Kenya..
    Onyamboko, Marie A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Kinshasa Sch Publ Hlth, Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO..
    Owusu-Agyei, Seth
    Kintampo Hlth Res Ctr, Kintampo, Ghana..
    Phyo, Aung Pyae
    Mahidol Univ, Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Premji, Zul
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Price, Ric N.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.;Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Global & Trop Hlth Div, Darwin, NT, Australia.;Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia..
    Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Ramharter, Michael
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Infect Dis & Trop Med, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Tubingen, Inst Tropenmed, Tubingen, Germany.;Ctr Rech Med Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon..
    Sagara, Issaka
    Univ Bamako, Fac Med Pharm & Odontostomatol, Dept Epidemiol Parasit Dis, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Bamako, Mali..
    Se, Youry
    AFRIMS, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Suon, Seila
    Natl Ctr Parasitol Entomol & Malaria Control, Phnom Penh, Cambodia..
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England..
    Ward, Stephen A.
    Univ Liverpool, Liverpool Sch Trop Med, Dept Parasitol, Liverpool L3 5QA, Merseyside, England..
    White, Nicholas J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.;Mahidol Univ, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit MORU, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok 10700, Thailand..
    Winstanley, Peter A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Baseline data of parasite clearance in patients with falciparum malaria treated with an artemisinin derivative: an individual patient data meta-analysis2015In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, article id 359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum manifests as slow parasite clearance but this measure is also influenced by host immunity, initial parasite biomass and partner drug efficacy. This study collated data from clinical trials of artemisinin derivatives in falciparum malaria with frequent parasite counts to provide reference parasite clearance estimates stratified by location, treatment and time, to examine host factors affecting parasite clearance, and to assess the relationships between parasite clearance and risk of recrudescence during follow-up. Methods: Data from 24 studies, conducted from 1996 to 2013, with frequent parasite counts were pooled. Parasite clearance half-life (PC1/2) was estimated using the WWARN Parasite Clearance Estimator. Random effects regression models accounting for study and site heterogeneity were used to explore factors affecting PC1/2 and risk of recrudescence within areas with reported delayed parasite clearance (western Cambodia, western Thailand after 2000, southern Vietnam, southern Myanmar) and in all other areas where parasite populations are artemisinin sensitive. Results: PC1/2 was estimated in 6975 patients, 3288 of whom also had treatment outcomes evaluate d during 28-63 days follow-up, with 93 (2.8 %) PCR-confirmed recrudescences. In areas with artemisinin-sensitive parasites, the median PC1/2 following three-day artesunate treatment (4 mg/kg/day) ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 h and the proportion of patients with PC1/2 > 5 h from 0 to 10 %. Artesunate doses of 4 mg/kg/day decreased PC1/2 by 8.1 % (95 % CI 3.2-12.6) compared to 2 mg/kg/day, except in populations with delayed parasite clearance. PC1/2 was longer in children and in patients with fever or anaemia at enrolment. Long PC1/2 (HR = 2.91, 95 % CI 1.95-4.34 for twofold increase, p < 0.001) and high initial parasitaemia (HR = 2.23, 95 % CI 1.44-3.45 for tenfold increase, p < 0.001) were associated independently with an increased risk of recrudescence. In western Cambodia, the region with the highest prevalence of artemisinin resistance, there was no evidence for increasing PC1/2 since 2007. Conclusions: Several factors affect PC1/2. As substantial heterogeneity in parasite clearance exists between locations, early detection of artemisinin resistance requires reference PC1/2 data. Studies with frequent parasite count measurements to characterize PC1/2 should be encouraged. In western Cambodia, where PC1/2 values are longest, there is no evidence for recent emergence of higher levels of artemisinin resistance.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Disability Research.
    Ihop eller isär?: samarbete mellan personal i skola och boende för barn med autism: en förundersökning1993Report (Other academic)
  • 9. Abramczyk, Olga
    et al.
    Zien, Piotr
    Zielinski, Rafał
    Pilecki, Marek
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Szyszka, Ryszard
    The protein kinase 60S is a free catalytic CK2alpha' subunit and forms an inactive complex with superoxide dismutase SOD12003In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 307, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 60S ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain a set of acidic P-proteins playing an important role in the ribosome function. Reversible phosphorylation of those proteins is a mechanism regulating translational activity of ribosomes. The key role in regulation of this process is played by specific, second messenger-independent protein kinases. The PK60S kinase was one of the enzymes phosphorylating P-proteins. The enzyme has been purified from yeast and characterised. Pure enzyme has properties similar to those reported for casein kinase type 2. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) has identified the PK60S as a catalytic alpha(') subunit of casein kinase type 2 (CK2alpha(')). Protein kinase activity is inhibited by SOD1 and by highly specific CK2 inhibitor-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-benzotriazole (TBBt). The possible mechanism of regulation of CK2alpha(') activity in stress conditions, by superoxide dismutase in regulation of 80S-ribosome activity, is discussed.

  • 10.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 11.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 12.
    Addo, Rebecka N.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wiens, Stefan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nord, Marie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Maria
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Gosta Ekman Lab, Frescati Hagvag 9A, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olfactory Functions in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders2017In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often characterized by atypical sensory behavior (hyperor hyporeactivity) although evidence is scarce regarding olfactory abilities in ASD; 16 adults with high-functioning ASD (mean age: 38.2, SD: 9.7) and 14 healthy control subjects (mean age: 42.0 years, SD: 12.5) were assessed in odor threshold, free and cued odor identification, and perceived pleasantness, intensity, and edibility of everyday odors. Although results showed no differences between groups, the Bayes Factors (close to 1) suggested that the evidence for no group differences on the threshold and identification tests was inconclusive. In contrast, there was some evidence for no group differences on perceived edibility (BF01 = 2.69) and perceived intensity (BF01 = 2.80). These results do not provide conclusive evidence for or against differences between ASD and healthy controls on olfactory abilities. However, they suggest that there are no apparent group differences in subjective ratings of odors.

  • 13.
    Adern, Bengt
    et al.
    Mälar Hosp, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Dent Care Ctr, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Minston, Ava
    Inst Odontol, Dept Stomatognath Physiol, Jönköping, Sweden;Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Klostergatan 26,Box 1126, S-70111 Örebro, Sweden.
    Nohlert, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Orofacial Pain & Jaw Funct, Klostergatan 26,Box 1126, S-70111 Örebro, Sweden; Malmö Univ, Fac Odontol, Malmö, Sweden.
    Self-reportance of temporomandibular disorders in adult patients attending general dental practice in Sweden from 2011 to 20132018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 7, p. 530-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The study aim was to evaluate the prevalence of self-reported temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and acceptance or nonacceptance of such disorders in adult patients attending all public dental health services in the County of Sormland, Sweden, during a 3-year period, 2011-2013.

    Methods: Two questions were asked about TMD and the voluntary mouth-opening capacity was measured. The results were registered in a score 0-3. The registration was completed with a question about each patient's acceptance or nonacceptance of their condition.

    Results: More than 73,000 registrations of the TMD condition were performed in general dental clinics from 2011 to 2013. The mean prevalence of a TMD score of 1-3 was 5% and was consistent over these years. Seventy percent of these patients were women. The peak prevalence of TMD was registered in patients aged 30-45years (38%), and the frequency declined in older age groups. Reduced voluntary mouth-opening capacity (<= 35 mm) was found in less than 2% of the participants. About one-fifth of the patients with a TMD-score of 1-3 did not accept their condition and wanted professional care. The frequency of nonacceptance of the condition increased with the severity of symptom score: 15%, 27%, and 49% for scores 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

    Conclusions: This study shows that the prevalence of self-reported TMD in adult patients was consistent from 2011 to 2013 and should be considered as a public health issue in Sweden. Patients with more severe TMD pain symptoms wanted care more frequent. The annual clinical calibrations should be continued to achieve an acceptable level of registration.

  • 14. Adern, Bengt
    et al.
    Stenvinkel, Christer
    Sahlqvist, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tegelberg, Ake
    Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction and pain in adult general practice patients2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 585-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders and related pain (TMD-pain) among adult recall patients in general dental practice. Materials and methods. From November 2006 to September 2008, all adults attending a Swedish Public Dental Service (PDS) clinic for recall examination were asked two standardized questions about temporomandibular pain and dysfunction. Mouth-opening capacity was measured. The responses to the questions and mouth-opening capacity were combined to give a TMD-pain score, on a scale of 0-3. The patients' acceptance of their TMD condition was also noted. Results. The subjects comprised 2837 adults (53% females, 47% men). Of the total sample, 4.9% reported a TMD-pain score of 1-3. The gender difference was significant: women predominated (p < 0.003). Forty-three per cent of those with TMD-pain scores of 1-3 (36% men, 47% women) considered that the condition warranted treatment, especially those registering a pain score (significant difference between pain and dysfunction groups, p < 0.000). Conclusions. The TMD-pain score shows promise as a useful instrument for detecting and recording TMD-pain. The prevalence of TMD disclosed in the study is high enough to be considered a public health concern. Most of the subjects with lower scores on the TMD-pain scale accepted their condition as not severe enough to require treatment.

  • 15. Adjuik, Martin A.
    et al.
    Allan, Richard
    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Ba, Mamadou S.
    Barennes, Hubert
    Barnes, Karen I.
    Bassat, Quique
    Baudin, Elisabeth
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Bompart, Francois
    Bonnet, Maryline
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Brasseur, Philippe
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    Checchi, Francesco
    Cot, Michel
    Dahal, Prabin
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    Deloron, Philippe
    Desai, Meghna
    Diap, Graciela
    Djimde, Abdoulaye A.
    Dorsey, Grant
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    Etard, Jean-Francois
    Fanello, Caterina I.
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    Faye, Babacar
    Flegg, Jennifer A.
    Gaye, Oumar
    Gething, Peter W.
    Gonzalez, Raquel
    Grandesso, Francesco
    Guerin, Philippe J.
    Guthmann, Jean-Paul
    Hamour, Sally
    Hasugian, Armedy Ronny
    Hay, Simon I.
    Humphreys, Georgina S.
    Jullien, Vincent
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kamya, Moses R.
    Karema, Corine
    Kiechel, Jean R.
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Krishna, Sanjeev
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Ibrahim, Laminou M.
    Lee, Sue J.
    Lell, Bertrand
    Martensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Massougbodji, Achille
    Menan, Herve
    Menard, Didier
    Menendez, Clara
    Meremikwu, Martin
    Moreira, Clarissa
    Nabasumba, Carolyn
    Nambozi, Michael
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Nikiema, Frederic
    Nsanzabana, Christian
    Ntoumi, Francine
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    Olliaro, Piero
    Osorio, Lyda
    Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco
    Penali, Louis K.
    Pene, Mbaye
    Pinoges, Loretxu
    Piola, Patrice
    Price, Ric N.
    Roper, Cally
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Rwagacondo, Claude Emile
    Same-Ekobo, Albert
    Schramm, Birgit
    Seck, Amadou
    Sharma, Bhawna
    Sibley, Carol Hopkins
    Sinou, Veronique
    Sirima, Sodiomon B.
    Smith, Jeffery J.
    Smithuis, Frank
    Some, Fabrice A.
    Sow, Doudou
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    Swarthout, Todd D.
    Sylla, Khadime
    Talisuna, Ambrose O.
    Tarning, Joel
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    Temu, Emmanuel A.
    Thwing, Julie I.
    Tjitra, Emiliana
    Tine, Roger C. K.
    Tinto, Halidou
    Vaillant, Michel T.
    Valecha, Neena
    Van den Broek, Ingrid
    White, Nicholas J.
    Yeka, Adoke
    Zongo, Issaka
    The effect of dosing strategies on the therapeutic efficacy of artesunate-amodiaquine for uncomplicated malaria: a meta-analysis of individual patient data2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) is one of the most widely used artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) to treat uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa. We investigated the impact of different dosing strategies on the efficacy of this combination for the treatment of falciparum malaria. Methods: Individual patient data from AS-AQ clinical trials were pooled using the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) standardised methodology. Risk factors for treatment failure were identified using a Cox regression model with shared frailty across study sites. Results: Forty-three studies representing 9,106 treatments from 1999-2012 were included in the analysis; 4,138 (45.4%) treatments were with a fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (FDC), 1,293 (14.2%) with a non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 25 mg/kg (loose NFDC-25), 2,418 (26.6%) with a non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (loose NFDC-30), and the remaining 1,257 (13.8%) with a co-blistered non-fixed dose combination with an AQ target dose of 30 mg/kg (co-blistered NFDC). The median dose of AQ administered was 32.1 mg/kg [IQR: 25.9-38.2], the highest dose being administered to patients treated with co-blistered NFDC (median = 35.3 mg/kg [IQR: 30.6-43.7]) and the lowest to those treated with loose NFDC-25 (median = 25.0 mg/kg [IQR: 22.7-25.0]). Patients treated with FDC received a median dose of 32.4 mg/kg [IQR: 27-39.0]. After adjusting for reinfections, the corrected antimalarial efficacy on day 28 after treatment was similar for co-blistered NFDC (97.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 97.0-98.8%]) and FDC (98.1% [95% CI: 97.6%-98.5%]; P = 0.799), but significantly lower for the loose NFDC-25 (93.4% [95% CI: 91.9%-94.9%]), and loose NFDC-30 (95.0% [95% CI: 94.1%-95.9%]) (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). After controlling for age, AQ dose, baseline parasitemia and region; treatment with loose NFDC-25 was associated with a 3.5-fold greater risk of recrudescence by day 28 (adjusted hazard ratio, AHR = 3.51 [95% CI: 2.02-6.12], P < 0.001) compared to FDC, and treatment with loose NFDC-30 was associated with a higher risk of recrudescence at only three sites. Conclusions: There was substantial variation in the total dose of amodiaquine administered in different AS-AQ combination regimens. Fixed dose AS-AQ combinations ensure optimal dosing and provide higher antimalarial treatment efficacy than the loose individual tablets in all age categories.

  • 16.
    Adolfsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gregeby, Ebba
    Fernström, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes2004In: Patient Education & counseling, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Reporting systems, reporting rates and completeness of data reported from primary healthcare to a Swedish quality register: The National Diabetes Register2011In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 80, no 9, p. 663-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aims of this paper were to study the reporting rate and completeness of data reported from primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden to the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR), with a special attention on the relation between these measures and the reporting system used by the PHCCs.

    Method:

    A national survey conducted in Swedish primary healthcare covering the year 2006. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 523 PHCCs. Data on 87,099 adult diabetic patients attending these PHCCs and reported to the NDR were obtained from the register. In Sweden, participation in the NDR is voluntary. The data were reported through the Internet, either online using a web-based system or by direct transmission. The main outcome measures were reporting rate and completeness of reported data.

    Results:

    Of the 523 PHCCs, almost two-thirds had reported <75% of their diabetic patients to the NDR. The lowest reporting rate was found among the largest PHCCs, while the highest was found among small PHCCs (p < 0.001). Reasons given for not reporting data to the NDR were lack of time and lack of personnel resources. Altogether, 73.1% of the PHCCs reported data to the NDR online using a web-based system, 20.5% used direct transmission and 6.3% used both systems. The PHCCs that reported data through direct transmission systems reported almost 70% of their diabetic patients to the NDR, while PHCCs using web-based systems reported 54% of their diabetic patients to the NDR. Adjusted for other factors, using direct transmission increased the reporting rate by 13.0 percentage points. However, the web-based system contributed to a higher completeness of data than the direct transmission system.

    Conclusions:

    A direct transmission system facilitates a high reporting rate to the register at the expense of lower completeness of the reported data.

  • 18.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    The Swedish National Survey of the Quality and Organization of Diabetes Care in Primary Healthcare—Swed-QOP2010In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe the quality and organization of diabetes care in primary healthcare in Sweden regarding resources and ways of working.

    METHOD:

    A questionnaire was used to collect data from all 921 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden. Of these, 74.3% (n=684) responded to the questionnaire covering list size of the PHCCs, number of diabetic patients, personnel resources and ways of working.

    RESULTS:

    The median list size reported from the PHCCs was 9,000 patients, 294 of whom were diabetic patients. The majority (72%) of PHCCs had diabetes-responsible general practitioners (GPs) and almost all (97%) had diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) with some degree of postgraduate education in diabetes. The PHCCs reported that they used regional/local diabetes guidelines (93%), were engaged in call-recall diabetic reviews by GP(s) (66%) and DSN(s) (89%), checked that patients had participated in the reviews by GP(s) (69%) and DSN(s) (78%), arranged group education programmes (23%) and reported data to a National Diabetes Register (82%).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The presence of diabetes-responsible GP(s) and DSN(s) who use guidelines may contribute to good and equal quality of care. It is, however, necessary to improve the call-recall system and there is an urgent need for all diabetic patients to receive patient education.

  • 19.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Type 2 diabetic patients' experiences of two different educational approaches: A qualitative study2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 7, no 45, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to explore patients' experiences of participating in an empowerment group education programme or receiving individual counselling. Method: In total, 28 patients from seven primary care centres were interviewed. Of these, 14 had received individual counselling and the remaining 14 had also participated in 4-5 empowerment group sessions. The semi-structured interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: Three main categories crystallized from the interviews: (I) relationships, (II) learning and (III) controlling the disease. The relationships in the individual counselling seemed vertical, characterized by one-way communication with care providers acting as superiors and patients as subordinates. The relationships in the empowerment group appeared to be horizontal, characterized by trust and mutual communication. Those who had received individual counselling talked about learning by compliance-care providers acted as superiors, giving advice they expected the patients to follow. In the empowerment groups the patients talked more about participatory learning, whereby the facilitators and patients shared their knowledge and experiences. Controlling the disease could be labelled external in individual counselling, which made it difficult for patients to take responsibility for and control of their diabetes self-care. On the contrary, the patients in the empowerment group achieved the insight that diabetes is a serious disease but can be influenced, which contributed to their experience of self-control. Conclusions: The current study indicates that vertical relationships, learning by compliance and external control seem to limit patients' ability to take responsibility for their disease, while horizontal relationships, participatory learning and self-control may contribute to strengthening patients' ability to influence and be actively involved in their own care.

  • 20.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Disability Research.
    Food security and people with intellectual disabilities living in community residences in Sweden2012In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 56; 7/8, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Centrum för forskning om funktionshinder.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    How people with cognitive disabilities experience electronic planning devices2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 379-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with cognitive disabilities have difficulties in accomplishing everyday tasks. Electronic planning devices (EPDs) may compensate for the gap between a person’s capacity and everyday challenges. However, the devices are not always used as intended. Despite that, cognitive assistive technology has been investigated in several studies, knowledge regarding when and what makes adults decide to use EPDs is incomplete. People with cognitive disabilities have difficulties in accomplishing everyday tasks. Electronic planning devices (EPDs) may compensate for the gap between a person’s capacity and everyday challenges. However, the devices are not always used as intended. Despite that, cognitive assistive technology has been investigated in several studies, knowledge regarding when and what makes adults decide to use EPDs is incomplete. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to explore the subjective experiences of people with cognitive disabilities in relation to the use of EPDs. The aim was to explore the subjective experiences of people with cognitive disabilities in relation to the use of EPDs. METHODS: A qualitative approach was applied with a qualitative content analysis. Twelve respondents were interviewed with support from a study specific guide. A qualitative approach was applied with a qualitative content analysis. Twelve respondents were interviewed with support from a study specific guide. RESULTS: A model representing the respondents’ experiences in the use of EPDs, comprising one theme, Possibility to master my daily life , four categories, Degree of fit to my needs, I am aware of my cognitive disability, I get help to structure my everyday life and The EPD improves my volition and ten subcategories, was developed. A model representing the respondents’ experiences in the use of EPDs, comprising one theme, Possibility to master my daily life , four categories, Degree of fit to my needs, I am aware of my cognitive disability, I get help to structure my everyday life and The EPD improves my volition and ten subcategories, was developed. CONCLUSIONS: EPDs allow people with cognitive disabilities the possibility to deal with daily challenges; those who find EPDs beneficial tend to use them. EPDs can help people with cognitive disabilities in organisation, managing time and improve volition. EPDs allow people with cognitive disabilities the possibility to deal with daily challenges; those who find EPDs beneficial tend to use them. EPDs can help people with cognitive disabilities in organisation, managing time and improve volition.

  • 22.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Norling Hermansson, Liselotte
    Univ Örebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.; Örebro Cty Council, Dept Prosthet & Orthot, Örebro, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, CHILD, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Perception of the influence of environmental factors in the use of electronic planning devices in adults with cognitive disabilities2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adults with cognitive disabilities often have difficulties in dealing with the complexity of everyday life. With cognitive assistive technology (e.g. electronic planning devices [EPDs] and individual support), they can bring order to their often chaotic life. Assumptions are that environmental factors influence with non-use of EPDs.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how adults with cognitive disabilities perceive the influence of environmental factors in the use of EPDs.

    METHODS: A reference group with experience of use of EPDs assisted the researchers. Twelve adults with cognitive disabilities and experience of using EPDs participated. An interview guide was implemented covering environmental factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analyses.

    RESULTS: Five categories and two themes emerged, which were integrated into a model of facilitating factors influencing the use of EPDs. Measures to prevent or eliminate negative influences of the device use are important to be taken. CONCLUSIONS: Professionals need more knowledge about EPDs, while users need individual adaption of the EPDs. EPDs need to be user-friendly, manageable and work in any seasons. Implications for Rehabilitation The users should have access to specially trained prescribers. There is a need for development of user-friendly and manageable products to function in any climate. Knowledge is lacking on how to implement the users in all stages of the prescribing process. Prescribers should increase knowledge in the use of EPDs to influence the attitudes of the social environment.

  • 23. Adérn, B
    et al.
    List, T
    Nebeska, M
    Öster, A
    Tegelberg, Å
    Uppsala University, Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Orsaker till remisser till bettfysiolog, en jämförelse mellan fyra specialistkliniker2003In: Tandläkartidningen, Vol. 10, p. 50-55Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 24.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies, Sveav 160, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Sven -Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Family & Community Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Levander, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alm, Per Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Smoking habits - Associations with personality/behavior, platelet monoamine oxidase activity and plasma thyroid hormone levels2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 118, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to outline results from our scientific studies on the associations among childhood behavior, adult personality, and biochemical factors in smoking habits. The studies consisted of: (1) follow-up of young criminals and controls, subdivided into risk for antisocial behavior groups, based on childhood rating levels of a projective test; and adult smoking habit groups; and (2) a large group of young adults examined on the same inventories. Personality in terms of KSP and EPQ-I scale scores, controlled for intelligence, indicated that the high and very high risk groups displayed significantly higher self-rated impulsiveness, anxiety, and nonconformity, as compared to the low risk group. Further, the very high risk group subjects, found to be overrepresented among subjects with heavy smoking habits, displayed lower mean platelet MAO-B activity and higher thyroid hormone levels than the low risk group. Thus, the higher the childhood risk for antisocial behavior, the clearer the adult personality pattern making subjects more disposed for smoking appeared; and the higher smoking habits, the stronger the relationships with biochemical measures. Results are discussed in terms of possible underlying mechanisms influencing personality and smoking habits. 

  • 25. af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Johansson, Sven-Erik
    Gacono, Carl
    Alm, Per-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Projective risk variables in early adolescence and subsequent disinhibitory psychopathology2008In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, E-ISSN 1873-6386, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to examine early adolescent projective risk indicators for the development of antisocial behaviour as related to adult personality traits, psychopathy, and violent behaviour over the life span. Assessment data included Rorschach (Rr) ratings (at age 11-14 years), personality inventories (EPQ-I and KSP scales), and a shortened Psychopathy Check List (PCL) (administered at age 32-40 years), obtained from a group of 199 male subjects; and smoking habits (at age 36-44 years) obtained from 125 of those subjects. Results, controlled for intelligence, indicated that the high and very high risk groups, as determined by level of total Rr risk scores, were (1) significantly higher on self-rated IVE Impulsiveness, the anxiety-related KSP Muscular Tension, and nonconformity traits, as compared to the low Rr risk group - the very high risk group also scoring significantly higher on the EPQ Psychoticism scale, related to aggressiveness and cruelty; (2) higher on clinically rated PCL total sum and factor scores; and (3) they were overrepresented among Ss with subsequent violent offence, and Ss with heavy smoking habits. The results are discussed in terms of the possible usefulness of psychodynamic oriented cognitive-emotional indicators in the search for underlying mechanisms in the development of disinhibitory psychopathology.

  • 26.
    Afrakhte, Mozhgan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Morén, Anita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Jossan, Surinder
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Itoh, Susumu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Sampath, Kuber
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Heldin, Nils-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    ten Dijke, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Induction of inhibitory Smad6 and Smad7 mRNA by TGF-beta family members1998In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 249, no 2, p. 505-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smad6 and Smad7 function as intracellular antagonists in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling. Here we report the isolation of human Smad6, which is closely related to Smad7. Smad6 and Smad7 mRNAs were differentially expressed in lung cancer cell lines and were rapidly and directly induced by TGF-beta1, activin and bone morphogenetic protein-7. Cross-talk between TGF-beta and other signaling pathways was demonstrated by the finding that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced the expression of inhibitory SMAD mRNA. Moreover, whereas the phorbol ester PMA alone had no effect, it potentiated the TGF-beta1-induced expression of Smad7 mRNA. Ectopic expression of anti-sense Smad7 RNA was found to increase the effect of TGF-beta1, supporting its role as a negative regulator in TGF-beta signaling. Thus, expression of inhibitory Smads is induced by multiple stimuli, including the various TGF-beta family members, whose action they antagonize.

  • 27.
    Agnarsdóttir, Margrét
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sooman, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Bolander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gallagher, William
    UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Ekman, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Department of Proteomics, School of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedstrand, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    SOX10 expression in superficial spreading and nodular malignant melanomas2010In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX10 is a transcription factor expressed in nerve cells and melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression pattern of SOX10 in malignant melanoma tumors and to analyze whether the results correlated with clinical parameters and the proliferation marker Ki-67. Furthermore, proliferation and migration were analyzed in three different cell lines employing SOX10 small interfering RNA-mediated silencing. Expression patterns were determined in 106 primary tumors and 39 metastases in addition to 16 normal skin samples and six benign nevi employing immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. The immunohistochemical staining was evaluated manually and with an automated algorithm. SOX10 was strongly expressed in the benign tissues, but for the malignant tumors superficial spreading melanomas stained stronger than nodular malignant melanomas (P=0.008). The staining intensity was also inversely correlated with T-stage (Spearman's ρ=-0.261, P=0.008). Overall survival and time to recurrence were significantly correlated with SOX10 intensity, but not in multivariate analysis including T-stage. With the automated algorithm there was an inverse correlation between the SOX10 staining intensity and the proliferation marker, Ki-67 (ρ=-0.173, P=0.02) and a significant difference in the intensity signal between the benign tissues, the primary tumors and the metastases where the metastases stained the weakest (P≤0.001). SOX10 downregulation resulted in variable effects on proliferation and migration rates in the melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, the SOX10 intensity level differed depending on the tissue studied and SOX10 might have a role in survival. No conclusion regarding the role of SOX10 for in-vitro proliferation and migration could be drawn.

  • 28. Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Johansson, Gun
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: A cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 29.
    Agustsson, Atli
    et al.
    Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Res Ctr Movement Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Sveinsson, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Res Ctr Movement Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Rodby-Bousquet, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Lund Univ, Orthopaed, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden..
    The effect of asymmetrical limited hip flexion on seating posture, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion2017In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 71, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postural asymmetries with seating problems are common in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Aims: To analyse the prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion (< 90) in adults with CP, and to evaluate the association between asymmetrical limited hip flexion and postural asymmetries in the sitting position.

    Methods and procedures: Cross-sectional data of 714 adults with CP, 16-73 years, GMFCS level I -V, reported to CPUP, the Swedish cerebral palsy national surveillance program and quality registry, from 2013 to 2015. Hip range of motion was analysed in relation to pelvic obliquity, trunk asymmetry, weight distribution, scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

    Outcomes and results: The prevalence of asymmetrical limited hip flexion increased as GMFCS level decreased. Of adults at GMFCS level V, 22% had asymmetrical limited hip flexion (< 90). The odds of having an oblique pelvis (OR 2.6, 95% CI:1.6-2.1), an asymmetrical trunk (OR 2.1, 95% CI:1.1-4.2), scoliosis (OR 3.7, 95% CI:1.3-9.7), and windswept hip distortion (OR 2.6, 95% CI:1.2-5.4) were higher for adults with asymmetrical limited hip flexion compared with those with bilateral hip flexion > 90 degrees.

    Conclusions and implications: Asymmetrical limited hip flexion affects the seating posture and is associated with scoliosis and windswept hip distortion.

  • 30. Agüero, Fernán
    et al.
    Noé, Griselda
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Repetto, Yolanda
    Zaha, Arnaldo
    Cazzulo, Juan José
    Purification, cloning, and expression of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) from protoscolices of Echinococcus granulosus2004In: Molecular and biochemical parasitology (Print), ISSN 0166-6851, E-ISSN 1872-9428, Vol. 137, no 2, p. 207-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protoscolices of the parasitic helminth Echinococcus granulosus contain two malate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.37), one cytosolic and one mitochondrial. The latter has been separated from the other isoform and purified to protein homogeneity. Sequencing of tryptic peptides by Edman degradation allowed the design of oligonucleotide primers for PCR, leading to the cloning and sequencing of a full length cDNA. The encoding gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and codes for a protein with high sequence identity (56-58%) with the similar enzymes from mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and yeast. Active recombinant mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase was expressed in Escherichia coli, as protein fusions with glutathione S-transferase or a poly-His tail. The purified recombinant enzymes had a kinetic behaviour similar to that of the native enzyme, being inhibited by excess of the substrate oxaloacetate and unaffected by excess L-malate. The results indicate that E. granulosus contains two typical eukaryotic malate dehydrogenases, with relative levels quite different from those present in mammalian tissues like heart, in good agreement with the predominantly fermentative metabolism of the protoscolices.

  • 31.
    Ahlin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Zhou, Wenjing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Holmqvist, Marit
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Nilsson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Jirström, Karin
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Fjällskog, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Cyclin A is a proliferative marker with good prognostic value in node-negative breast cancer2009In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 2501-2506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Proliferative markers are not recommended as prognostic   factors for clinical use in breast cancer due to lack of   standardization in methodology. However, proliferation is driving   several gene expression signatures emphasizing the need for a reliable   proliferative marker IF or clinical use. Studies suggest that cyclin A   is a prognostic marker with satisfying reproducibility. We investigated   cyclin A as a prognostic marker in node-negative breast cancer using   previously defined cutoff values.   Patients and Methods: In a case-control study, we defined 190 women who   died from breast cancer as cases and 190 women alive at the time for   the corresponding case's death as controls. Inclusion criteria were   tumor size <= 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no adjuvant   chemotherapy. Tumor tissues were immunostained for cyclin A using   commercially available antibodies.   Results: We found a statistically significant association between   expression of cyclin A and breast cancer death in a univariate model:   odds ratio for cyclin A(ave) 2.7 [95% confidence interval (CI),   1.7-4.3] and cyclin A(max) 3.4 (CI, 2.1-5.5). Corresponding odds ratio   for Ki67 were Ki67(ave) 1.9 (CI, 1.2-3.1) and Ki67(max) 1.7 (CI,   1.1-2.7) and for grade 3.1 (CI, 1.8-5.1). Cyclin A was strongly   correlated to Ki67 and grade why a model including all was not   appropriate.   Conclusions: Cyclin A is a prognostic factor for breast cancer death in   node-negative patients using standardized methodology regarding scoring   and cutoff values. Adding cyclin A as a proliferative marker to established clinicopathologic factors will improve the separation of  low and high risk breast cancer.

  • 32. Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Albåge, Anders
    Källner, Göran
    Holmgren, Anders
    Boano, Gabriella
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Kimblad, Per-Ola
    Scherstén, Henrik
    Sjögren, Johan
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Åberg, Bengt
    Berglin, Eva
    A Swedish consensus on the surgical treatment of concomitant atrial fibrillation2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 212-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia among patients scheduled for open heart surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to international guidelines, symptomatic and selected asymptomatic patients should be offered concomitant surgical AF ablation in conjunction with valvular or coronary surgery. The gold standard in AF surgery is the Cox Maze III ("cut-and-sew") procedure, with surgical incisions in both atria according to a specified pattern, in order to prevent AF reentry circuits from developing. Over 90% of patients treated with the Cox Maze III procedure are free of AF after 1 year. Recent developments in ablation technology have introduced several energy sources capable of creating nonconducting atrial wall lesions. In addition, simplified lesion patterns have been suggested, but results with these techniques have been unsatisfactory. There is a clear need for standardization in AF surgery. The Swedish Arrhythmia Surgery Group, represented by surgeons from all Swedish units for cardiothoracic surgery, has therefore reached a consensus on surgical treatment of concomitant AF. This consensus emphasizes adherence to the lesion pattern in the Cox Maze III procedure and the use of biatrial lesions in nonparoxysmal AF.

  • 33.
    Ahlström, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Rudberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Correlation between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a community-based cohort of men and women2009In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 673-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: In recent years, an association has been noted between several abnormalities that characterize the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). These abnormalities include dyslipidaemia, obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. The correlations between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the variables in the MetS in a normal population are still unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe correlations between plasma calcium and PTH and the various abnormalities present in the MetS in a healthy population.

    DESIGN: We studied 1016 healthy individuals from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) population of 70 years old, by means of plasma analyses of calcium, PTH, creatinine, lipids, insulin and glucose, as well as by standardized blood pressure measurements. Further, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were determined.

    RESULTS: The more National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria for the MetS that were met, the higher the s-PTH and albumin-corrected s-calcium. Further, positive correlations between plasma calcium and BMI (P = 0.0003), waist circumference (P = 0.0009) and insulin resistance (P = 0.079) were found. PTH and BMI (P < 0.0001), waist circumference (P < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.0034), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0008), serum triglycerides (P = 0.0003) and insulin resistance (P = 0.0003) were positively correlated, whereas serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) (P = 0.036) and PTH were negatively correlated.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that PTH correlates with several of the metabolic factors included in the MetS within a normocalcaemic population. In addition, individuals with mild pHPT present significantly more NCEP criteria for MetS. We postulate that increased levels of PTH in pHPT may be associated with the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in pHPT.

  • 34.
    Ahmadi, Z.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Sundh, J.
    Univ Orebro, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bornefalk Hermansson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ekström, M.
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Does Long-Term Oxygen Therapy 24 H/day Improve Survival Compared To 15 H/day In Hypoxemic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?2016In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Bornefalk-Hermansson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Midgren, Bengt
    Ekstrom, Magnus P.
    Hypo- and hypercapnia predict mortality in oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based prospective study2014In: Respiratory research (Online), ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 15, p. 30-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prognostic role of the arterial blood gas tension of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) in severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between PaCO2 and mortality in oxygen-dependent COPD. Methods: National prospective study of patients starting long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) for COPD in Sweden between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2009, with all-cause mortality as endpoint. The association between PaCO2 while breathing air, PaCO2 (air), and mortality was estimated using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, arterial blood gas tension of oxygen (PaO2), World Health Organization performance status, body mass index, comorbidity, and medications. Results: Of 2,249 patients included, 1,129 (50%) died during a median 1.1 years (IQR 0.6-2.0 years) of observation. No patient was lost to follow-up. PaCO2 (air) independently predicted adjusted mortality (p < 0.001). The association with mortality was U-shaped, with the lowest mortality at approximately PaCO2 (air) 6.5 kPa and increased mortality at PaCO2 (air) below 5.0 kPa and above 7.0 kPa. Conclusion: In oxygen-dependent COPD, PaCO2 (air) is an independent prognostic factor with a U-shaped association with mortality.

  • 36. Ahmed, Niaz
    et al.
    Davalos, Antoni
    Eriksson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Ford, Gary A.
    Glahn, Joerg
    Hennerici, Michael
    Mikulik, Robert
    Kaste, Markku
    Lees, Kennedy R.
    Lindsberg, Perttu J.
    Toni, Danilo
    Association of Admission Blood Glucose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Intravenous Thrombolysis2010In: Archives of Neurology, ISSN 0003-9942, E-ISSN 1538-3687, Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1123-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the association between admission blood glucose and outcome in ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombolysis. Design: A prospective, open, multinational, observational study. Setting: An ongoing Internet-based, academic-driven, interactive thrombolysis register. Patients: Between 2002 and 2007, 16 049 patients were recorded in the SITS-ISTR. Main Outcome Measure: Blood glucose was recorded at admission. Blood glucose was divided into the following categories: less than 80,80-120 (reference range), 121-140, 141-160, 161-180, 181-200, and greater than 200 mg/dL. Outcomes were mortality and independence (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2) at 3 months and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale deterioration >= points within 24 hours and type 2 parenchymal hemorrhage). Results: In multivariable analysis, blood glucose as a continuous variable was independently associated with a higher mortality (P < .001), lower independence (P < .001), and an increased risk of SICH (P = .005). Blood glucose greater than 120 mg/dL as a categorical variable was associated with a significantly higher odds for mortality (odds ratio [OR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.07-1.44; P = .004) and a lower odds for independence (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.48-0.70; P < .001), and blood glucose from 181 to 200 mg/dL was associated with an increased risk of SICH (OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.69-4.83; P < .001) compared with the reference level. The trends of associations between blood glucose and outcomes were similar in patients with diabetes (17%) or without such history, except for mortality (P = .23) and SICH (P = .06) in which the association was not statistically significant in patients with diabetes. Conclusions: Admission hyperglycemia was an independent predictor for poor outcome after stroke/thrombolysis, though SICH rates did not increase significantly until reaching 180 mg/dL. These results suggest that tight control of blood glucose may be indicated in the hyperacute phase following thrombolysis. Randomized trial data are needed.

  • 37.
    Ahrne, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adan, A.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Shytt, Erica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Andersson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Small, R.
    La Trobe Univ, Judith Lumley Ctr, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Flacking, R.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Byrskog, U.
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Antenatal care for Somali born women in Sweden - perspectives from mothers, fathers and midwives2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 104-104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Alabas, O. A.
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..