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  • 1. Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Professionals' views of children's everyday life situations and the relation to participation2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 581-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to determine professionals' views of everyday life situations (ELS) of importance for children and to explore how ELS correlate with the construct "Participation". This study was part of a larger work to develop a structured tool with code sets to identify child participation and support children with disabilities to describe what matters most for them in intervention planning.

    Method: The study had a concurrent mixed methods design. Information from one open-ended question and questionnaires were linked to the ICF-CY component Activities and Participation. Two concurrent data sets were compared.

    Results: Proposed ELS were distributed across ICF-CY categories from low to high level of complexity and context specificity. The correlation with participation became stronger for the later chapters of the component (d7-d9). Differences between respondents due to working field, country, and children's ages were explored. Acts and tasks seemed most important for the youngest children, whereas ELS shifted towards societal involvement for adolescents.

    Conclusion: Eleven categories related to ICF-CY chapters d3-d9 emerged as ELS. Two age groups (infants/preschoolers and adolescents) are required to develop code sets for the new tool. The results need triangulation with other concurrent studies to provide corroborating evidence and add a family perspective.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Granuld, Mats
    Identifying child functioning from an ICF-CY perspective: everyday life situations explored in measures of participation2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 13-14, p. 1230-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. This study was part of a larger work to develop an authentic measure consisting of code sets for self- or proxy-report of child participation. The aim was to identify common everyday life situations of children and youth based on measures of participation.

    Method. The study was descriptive in nature and involved several stages: systematic search of literature to find articles presenting measures for children and youth with disabilities, identifying measures in selected articles, linking items in included measures to the ICF-CY, analysing content in measures presented as performance and participation and identifying aggregations of ICF-CY codes across these measures.

    Results. A large number of measures for children and youth with disabilities were identified but only 12 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A slight distinction in content and age appropriateness appeared. Measures presented as performance covered all the ICF-CY Activities and Participation chapters, whereas measures presented as participation covered five of nine chapters. Three common everyday life situations emerged from the measures: Moving around, Engagement in play and Recreation and leisure.

    Conclusion. Only a small number of life situations for children and youth emerged from items in selected measures, thus, other sources are needed to identify more everyday life situations.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Ekman, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Umb-Carlsson, Öie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Challenges for registered dietitians working with food related health promotion for adults with IDD in supported housing2018In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 621-621Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Centrum för forskning om funktionshinder.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    How people with cognitive disabilities experience electronic planning devices2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 379-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: People with cognitive disabilities have difficulties in accomplishing everyday tasks. Electronic planning devices (EPDs) may compensate for the gap between a person’s capacity and everyday challenges. However, the devices are not always used as intended. Despite that, cognitive assistive technology has been investigated in several studies, knowledge regarding when and what makes adults decide to use EPDs is incomplete. People with cognitive disabilities have difficulties in accomplishing everyday tasks. Electronic planning devices (EPDs) may compensate for the gap between a person’s capacity and everyday challenges. However, the devices are not always used as intended. Despite that, cognitive assistive technology has been investigated in several studies, knowledge regarding when and what makes adults decide to use EPDs is incomplete. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to explore the subjective experiences of people with cognitive disabilities in relation to the use of EPDs. The aim was to explore the subjective experiences of people with cognitive disabilities in relation to the use of EPDs. METHODS: A qualitative approach was applied with a qualitative content analysis. Twelve respondents were interviewed with support from a study specific guide. A qualitative approach was applied with a qualitative content analysis. Twelve respondents were interviewed with support from a study specific guide. RESULTS: A model representing the respondents’ experiences in the use of EPDs, comprising one theme, Possibility to master my daily life , four categories, Degree of fit to my needs, I am aware of my cognitive disability, I get help to structure my everyday life and The EPD improves my volition and ten subcategories, was developed. A model representing the respondents’ experiences in the use of EPDs, comprising one theme, Possibility to master my daily life , four categories, Degree of fit to my needs, I am aware of my cognitive disability, I get help to structure my everyday life and The EPD improves my volition and ten subcategories, was developed. CONCLUSIONS: EPDs allow people with cognitive disabilities the possibility to deal with daily challenges; those who find EPDs beneficial tend to use them. EPDs can help people with cognitive disabilities in organisation, managing time and improve volition. EPDs allow people with cognitive disabilities the possibility to deal with daily challenges; those who find EPDs beneficial tend to use them. EPDs can help people with cognitive disabilities in organisation, managing time and improve volition.

  • 5.
    Ahlström, S. Wallin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Evaluation of a new method to remediate time processing ability in children with intellectual disability (ID) in special schools2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Anmyr, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Cochlear Implant Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Parents' Stress and Coping Related to Children's Use of a Cochlear Implant: A Qualitative Study2016In: Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1536-710X, E-ISSN 1536-7118, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 150-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to increase understanding of parents' experiences of having a child with cochlear implant (CI) and to explore how these related to children's use of CI. Twelve parents of children, full-time users or limited users of CI, participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis showed that the parents of children who used their CI differed from the parents with limited users in how they handled stressors. Support from health care professionals was seen as insufficient. Parents need to get involved in dynamic processes, where health care resources promote parental coping.

  • 7. Anmyr, Lena
    et al.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Freijd, Anders
    Strengths and difficulties in children with cochlear implants: Comparing self-reports with reports from parents and teachers2012In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 76, no 8, p. 1107-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to explore and compare how children with cochlear implants, their parents, and their teachers perceive the children's mental health in terms of emotional and behavioral strengths and difficulties.

    Methods: The self-report, parents', and teachers' versions of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were used to assess the mental health of 22 children with cochlear implants. The children's assessments were then compared to the parents' and 17 teachers' assessments. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software package.

    Results: Total difficulties (p = .000), emotional symptoms (p = .000), and conduct problems (p = .007) were greater according to the children than according to parents and teachers. Younger children (9 years, n = 12) reported more emotional symptoms than older children (12 and 15 years, n = 10). Almost a quarter of the children rated themselves in a way indicating mental ill-health. Parents and teachers each indicated mental ill-health for one child.

    Conclusions: Children with cochlear implants express greater concerns about their mental health than their parents and teachers do. This is important knowledge for adults in families, schools, and health care in order to support these children and offer treatment when needed.

  • 8. Anmyr, Lena
    et al.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Freijd, Anders
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Sense of coherence, social networks, and mental health among children with a cochlear implant2015In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 610-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the personal and social resources of children with a cochlear implant from a child's perspective. Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 19 children with cochlear implants, aged 9-12 years. Data was collected, using the children's sense of coherence (CSOC) scale, the Network map, and the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ). The data was analyzed using descriptive and correlation statistics. Results: Most children had a strong sense of coherence. School life was an important arena for their social network. The mental health was comparable to normal hearing children. Still, some of the children with implants had low SOC and poor mental health. High SOC and closeness of the social network, especially in school, were associated with good mental health. Conclusion: This study shows that Swedish school-aged children with cochlear implants as a group have access to personal and social resources as strong sense of coherence and social networks. Still, there are individual children with psychosocial problems who need support and treatment.

  • 9.
    Anmyr, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Freijd, Anders
    Children with hearing impairment: living with cochlear implants or with hearing aids2011In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 844-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to enhance knowledge about the life circumstances of children with cochlear implants or hearing aids, regarding daily functioning and attitude to the impairment.

    Methods

    Data were obtained from 36 children with cochlear implants and 38 children with hearing aids via study-specific questionnaires with fixed answer alternatives. The questions covered (1) usage of aids and related factors, (2) hearing in different everyday situations, (3) thoughts about the children's own hearing and others’ attitudes to it, and (4) choice of language. The data were analyzed using SPSS, and presented via the theoretical frame of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth version (ICF-CY).

    Results

    Children with CI and HA functioned equally well in daily life, but there were also certain differences. Symptoms from neck and shoulders were more common among children with hearing aids than among children with cochlear implants (p < .001). Children with hearing aids used their aids significantly less often than those with cochlear implants (p < .001). The participation variables showed that children with hearing aids had significantly more hearing problems in team sports (p = .033) and outdoor activities (p = .019), in comparison to children with cochlear implants. The two groups had similar thoughts regarding their own hearing, mostly considering it not to be a problem. They also did not generally think that other people found their hearing to be a problem.

    Conclusions

    Children with cochlear implants and children with hearing aids have, in some aspects, equally good functioning in everyday life situations. However, certain differences were found in dimensions of functioning, regarding neck and shoulder pain, usage of aids and sign language, and hearing problems in some activities.

  • 10.
    Beijer, Ulla
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.; Res & Dev Sormland Forskning, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Vingare, Emme-Li
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Social Work, S-35195 Vaxjo, Sweden.; Res & Dev Sormland Forskning, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Hans G.
    Res & Dev Sormland Forskning, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Umb-Carlsson, Õie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Res & Dev Sormland Forskning, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Are clear boundaries a prerequisite for well-functioning collaboration in home health care?: A mixed methods study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 128-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine whether professional collaboration in home health care is associated with clear boundaries between principals' areas of responsibility and the professions areas of responsibility, respectively.

    Methods: Data were derived from a web-based survey that was carried out in one county in the middle of Sweden during spring 2013. Participants were health professionals and managers from the county council and from all the municipalities in the county. Both structured and open-ended questions were utilised. A total of 421 individuals (90% women) answered the structured questions, and 91 individuals (22% of the 421) answered the open-ended questions. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive statistics methods, tests of independence and of correlation strength. Qualitative data were analysed with content analysis.

    Results: The results from the structured questions showed that well-functioning collaboration was associated with clear boundaries between principals in the county overall, and for respondents in two of three parts of the county. Association between clear boundaries between professions and well-functioning collaboration was found in the county overall among the municipality population. However, in one part of the county, we did not find any correlations between well-functioning collaboration and clear boundaries between professions or principals, with the exception of home help services. The analysis of the open questions gave similar results as the quantitative analysis, illustrated within three themes: The significance of concepts, trust and interdependence, and collaboration as a means for well-being.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that, recently after an organisational change, clear boundaries between the principals' areas of responsibility and professions' area of responsibility respectively are necessary for effective cooperation between professionals. If the organisation and professionals have previous positive experience of colocated activities, clear boundaries do not share the same importance.

  • 11.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 12.
    Bergström, Aileen L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Asaba, Eric
    Erikson, Anette
    Tham, Kerstin
    Complex negotiations: The lived experience of enacting agency after a stroke2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This qualitative, longitudinal, descriptive study aimed to understand the lived experience of enacting agency, and to describe the phenomenon of agency and the meaning structure of the phenomenon during the year after a stroke. Agency is defined as making things happen in everyday life through one's actions. Methods: This study followed six persons (three men and three women, ages 63 to 89), interviewed on four separate occasions. Interview data were analysed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Results: The main findings showed that the participants experienced enacting agency in their everyday lives after stroke as negotiating different characteristics over a span of time, a range of difficulty, and in a number of activities, making these negotiations complex. The four characteristics described how the participants made things happen in their everyday lives through managing their disrupted bodies, taking into account their past and envisioning their futures, dealing with the world outside themselves, and negotiating through internal dialogues. Conclusions: This empirical evidence regarding negotiations challenges traditional definitions of agency and a new definition of agency is proposed. Understanding clients' complex negotiations and offering innovative solutions to train in real-life situations may help in the process of enabling occupations after a stroke.

  • 13. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 14. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 15. Bertilsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Ranner, Maria
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tham, Kerstin
    A client-centred ADL intervention: three-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 377-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to study a client-centred activities of daily living (ADL) intervention (CADL) compared with the usual ADL intervention (UADL) in people with stroke regarding: independence in ADL, perceived participation, life satisfaction, use of home-help service, and satisfaction with training and, in their significant others, regarding: caregiver burden, life satisfaction, and informal care. Methods: In this multicentre study, 16 rehabilitation units were randomly assigned to deliver CADL or UADL. The occupational therapists who provided the CADL were specifically trained. Eligible for inclusion were people with stroke treated in a stroke unit 3 months after stroke, dependent in two ADL, not diagnosed with dementia, and able to understand instructions. Data were collected at inclusion and three months thereafter. To detect a significant difference between the groups in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) domain "participation", 280 participants were required. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Results: At three months, there was no difference in the outcomes between the CADL group (n = 129) and the UADL group (n = 151), or their significant others (n = 87/n = 93) except in the SIS domain "emotion" in favour of CADL (p = 0.04). Conclusion: The CADL does not appear to bring about short-term differences in outcomes and longer follow-ups are required.

  • 16.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Aphasia and Communication in Everyday Life: Experiences of persons with aphasia, significant others, and speech-language pathologists2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this thesis were to describe the experiences of persons with aphasia and their significant others of their conversations and use of communication strategies, examine current practice of family-oriented speech-language pathology (SLP) services, and test a family-oriented intervention in the early phase of rehabilitation.

    The persons with aphasia valued having conversations despite perceiving their aphasia as a serious social disability. They acknowledged the importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies. Their own use of communication strategies varied considerably. The persons with aphasia longed to regain language ability and to be active participants in society.

    A majority of the significant others perceived their conversations with the person with aphasia as being less stimulating and enjoyable than conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a serious problem. The significant others took on increased communicative responsibility, where two thirds had changed their communicative behaviour to facilitate conversations. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the significant others and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Thirty percent of the speech-language pathologists worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. They considered the involvement of significant others in SLP services as very important, especially in providing information about aphasia and communication partner training (CPT). However, involvement of significant others was restricted because of a time shortage and perceived limited skills and knowledge. In addition, there were national differences regarding aphasia rehabilitation services.

    The intervention consisted of three sessions directed to significant others (primarily emotional support and information) and three directed to the dyads (a person with aphasia and a significant other) (primarily CPT). All six participants (three dyads) felt that their knowledge and understanding of aphasia had increased and that their conversations had improved. These improvements were also evident to some extent with formal assessments.

    These results suggest the following: CPT should be an integral part of SLP services, national clinical guidelines are needed, and further education of speech-language pathologists and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice requires consideration.

    List of papers
    1. Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia
    2012 (English)In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    Aims:

    To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners’ use of communication strategies.

    Methods & Procedures:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Outcomes & Results:

    Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants’ views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants’ narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    Conclusions & Implications:

    The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159493 (URN)10.1111/j.1460-6984.2011.00089.x (DOI)000300772000003 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-03 Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia
    2012 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others’ experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others’ experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

    Keywords
    Aphasia, Significant others, Interpersonal communication, Communication strategies, Speech-language pathology services
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-170408 (URN)10.1080/02687038.2012.671927 (DOI)000306607000003 ()
    Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists
    2011 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:The overall aim was to investigate how speech and language pathologists (SLPs), in Sweden are working with people with aphasia and their families and what their professional experiences are.

    Method:A cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design. An 84-item study-specific questionnaire was sent to all Swedish SLPs, affiliated to SLOF (the Swedish professional association and trade union).

    Results:The response rate was 72.5% (n = 758). Thirty per cent worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. The participants considered the involvement of families as very important, especially concerning providing information of aphasia and training of communication strategies. However, involvement of families was limited due to a shortage of time, but also to perceived limited skill and knowledge.

    Conclusions:There was an evident discrepancy between what the participants claimed to be an important part of their work, and their actual practice. It is suggested that to facilitate family intervention, this should be explicitly expressed in both local and national guidelines. The content of the SLP education, and the need of further education and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice also requires consideration.

    Keywords
    Aphasia services, speech-language pathology, family
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-134771 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2010.486465 (DOI)000284695100006 ()20455706 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-12-01 Created: 2010-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia
    2013 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims:

    To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures:

    An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results:

    The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions:

    The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

    Keywords
    aphasia, significant others, interpersonal communication, communication strategies, communication partner training, speech-language pathology services
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-173128 (URN)10.1080/02687038.2012.744808 (DOI)000316048700005 ()
    Available from: 2012-04-19 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 17.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Kommunikation vid afasi – finns det några hinder och var finns de i så fall?2010In: FORSKNING PÅGÅR...om funktionshinder: Miljö, människa eller mitt emellan?, Uppsala, 20 april,  2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Beskrivning av den svenska logopedkårens sammansättning samt av "afasilogopeders" arbetsmässiga förutsättningar - resultat från en enkätstudie2011In: Logopednytt, ISSN 1102-500X, no 2, p. 14-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Communication aid devices in Swedish aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of speech-language pathologists2011In: 3rd Nordic Aphasia Conference, 2011, Helsinki, Finland: Aphasia rehabilitation today and in the future, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia2012In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    Aims:

    To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners’ use of communication strategies.

    Methods & Procedures:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Outcomes & Results:

    Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants’ views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants’ narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    Conclusions & Implications:

    The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

  • 21.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    How do we work with persons with aphasia and their relatives?: Preliminary results from a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Svenska logopeders insatser till personer med afasi2011In: Logopednytt, ISSN 1102-500X, no 3, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:The overall aim was to investigate how speech and language pathologists (SLPs), in Sweden are working with people with aphasia and their families and what their professional experiences are.

    Method:A cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design. An 84-item study-specific questionnaire was sent to all Swedish SLPs, affiliated to SLOF (the Swedish professional association and trade union).

    Results:The response rate was 72.5% (n = 758). Thirty per cent worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. The participants considered the involvement of families as very important, especially concerning providing information of aphasia and training of communication strategies. However, involvement of families was limited due to a shortage of time, but also to perceived limited skill and knowledge.

    Conclusions:There was an evident discrepancy between what the participants claimed to be an important part of their work, and their actual practice. It is suggested that to facilitate family intervention, this should be explicitly expressed in both local and national guidelines. The content of the SLP education, and the need of further education and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice also requires consideration.

  • 24.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia2013In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims:

    To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures:

    An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results:

    The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions:

    The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

  • 25.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia2012In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others’ experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others’ experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

  • 26. Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Lidström, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Thelin, Nils
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group. Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 27. Coren, Esther
    et al.
    Hutchfield, Jemeela
    Thomae, Manuela
    Gustafsson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Parent training support for intellectually disabled parents2010In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 6, p. CD007987-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Intellectual disability may impact on an individual's capacity to parent a child effectively. Research suggests that the number of intellectually disabled people with children is increasing. Children of parents with intellectual disabilities may be at increased risk of neglectful care which could lead to health, developmental and behavioural problems, or increased risk of intellectual disability.However, there is some indication that some parents with intellectual disabilities are able to provide adequate child care if they are given appropriate training and support to do so. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of parent training interventions to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts International, MetaRegister of Controlled Trials, and ZETOC. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disabilities with usual care or with a control group. Outcomes of interest were: the attainment of parenting skills specific to the intervention, safe home practices and the understanding of child health. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and undertook data extraction. MAIN RESULTS: Three trials met the inclusion criteria for this review but no meta-analysis was possible. One study reported improved maternal-child interaction following group parent training compared with the control group. The second study reported some improvements in parents knowledge of life threatening emergencies, ability to recognise dangers and identify precautions and smaller improvements in their ability to implement precautions, use medicines safely and recognise child illness and symptoms. The third study reported improvement in child care and safety skills following the intervention. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is some risk of bias in the included studies, with limited information available to assess possible bias and to fully assess the findings of one included study. Whilst the evidence presented here does seem promising with regard to the ability of such interventions to improve parenting knowledge and skill in this population, there is a need for larger RCTs of interventions before conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of parent training for this group of parents.

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Aasnes, Monica
    Tistad, Malin
    Guidetti, Susanne
    von Koch, Lena
    Occupational Gaps in Everyday Life One Year After Stroke and the Association With Life Satisfaction and Impact of Stroke2012In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 244-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine the presence, frequency, and distribution of occupational gaps and to explore whether there are associations between occupational gaps and life satisfaction, self-rated recovery, and functioning and participation in activities of daily living (ADLs) 1 year after stroke.

    Method: Data were collected at onset and at 12 months after stroke from 161 patients admitted to a stroke unit in central Sweden by using Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, LiSat-11, Stroke Impact Scale, Katz ADL Index, and Barthel Index. Spearman rank correlation and Mann Whitney U test were used in the analyses.

    Results: Occupational gaps were reported by 87% of the participants. The number of occupational gaps was moderately associated with participation and self-rated recovery. There was a significant difference in the number of occupational gaps between the participants who were independent in ADLs and those who were not, both at baseline and at 12 months after stroke. There was, however, no significant association between occupational gaps and life satisfaction.

    Conclusions: Occupational gaps 1 year after stroke are very common, particularly among individuals experiencing difficulties in ADLs. Increased efforts are vital to enable individuals to do the activities that are important to them, irrespective of whether these are instrumental ADLs or leisure or social activities. Occupational gaps could be reduced by developing rehabilitation interventions that enable desired activities in different contexts that are crucial for individual patients.

  • 29.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Kottorp, Anders
    A cross-diagnostic validation of an instrument measuring participation in everyday occupations: The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to validate the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ) when used in samples of people with acquired brain injuries (ABI), stroke, stress-related disorders, concussion, and persons receiving rehabilitation after ABI to investigate whether the OGQ could be used as a generic scale. A total of 601 individuals answered the OGQ at various time points after illness/injury. A Rasch analysis was performed on the data to evaluate evidence of internal scale validity and person response validity, and the capability of the OGQ to separate people into different levels of participation in everyday occupations. The results provided evidence that the OGQ is a valid measure across different diagnostic groups. A generic version of the OGQ can separate at least two levels of perceived occupational gaps and is therefore recommended as a screening tool to be used by occupational therapists working with different diagnostic groups.

  • 30.
    Glad, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Assessment in Evidence-Based Practice: Psychometric Properties, Clinical Utility and Professional Co-operation from Different Perspectives of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment in Sweden2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the present thesis was to explore and compare professional co-operation in child welfare investigations, explore the psychometric properties, and describe the clinical utility from different perspectives of a translated Swedish version of the standardized assessment instrument the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (the HOME Inventory). Social workers in Sweden, Denmark, Britain, Germany, and Texas (USA) co-operated with different professionals around a fictitious child welfare case. Differences were found between and within country-based samples, indicating an unsystematic work procedure in the social work agencies studied. The psychometric properties of the translated Early Childhood version (EC-HOME) and Middle Childhood version (MC-HOME) of the HOME Inventory were explored in terms of inter-observer reliability and by Rasch analysis. The samples were authentic Swedish child welfare cases recruited from a field setting. Inter-observer reliability was satisfactory. Results were ambiguous regarding measurement construction of the two versions studied. Because of the differentiating ability of the EC-HOME and MC-HOME, total scores could provide an indication of inadequate home environments. Experiences of social work practitioners of the clinical utility of the HOME Inventory suggested that they considered the instrument to be comprehensive and have explicit potential benefits, i.e. to be clinically useful. Correspondingly, caregivers’ overall perceptions of the HOME Inventory were positive, determining the content relevant and the format acceptable. However, certain flaws have to be rectified before the HOME Inventory is to be implemented and used successfully. Further, education and the possibility to practice administering the instrument seemed to be essential conditions for future use according to social workers. When social workers and teachers’ apprehensions about support and stimulation provided by caregivers to children in their home environments were compared, preschool teachers’ apprehensions correlated poorly with the social workers’ assessment. These results suggest that the HOME Inventory is promising but cultural adaptation and further studies of psychometric properties are necessary. Different forms of support to practitioners and agencies for successful implementation are required. Awareness of the type of information provided by different sources is important when co-operating in child welfare.

    List of papers
    1. Co-operation in a child welfare case: a comparative cross-national vignette study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-operation in a child welfare case: a comparative cross-national vignette study.
    2006 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 223-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore how social workers co-operate around a case where a four-year-old child is exposed to hardship or abuse in the family. The empirical data were collected using a vignette technique in Denmark, Germany, Sweden, the state of Texas (USA) and Britain. The data show that it is common to discuss, as well as work jointly, with others in an obviously serious child welfare case, and that different professional expertise is involved. Discussions of a case are generally held within the agency rather than with external specialists. Moreover, there is a positive relationship between the severity of the case and the degree of collaborative working. The data show that there are differences in the answers between the countries under study. One cause contributing to differences might be variation in organisation of the social services in the countries. Another explanation could be the extent to which legislation affects co-operation at the single case level. To be able to establish regular co-operation between different agencies, it seems to be important that co-operation is integrated in the process of the practice in social work.

    Keywords
    Child protection, social work practice, vignette method, collaboration, co-operation
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109640 (URN)10.1080/13691450600723187 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-21 Created: 2009-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    2. Psychometric Properties of the HOME Inventory Using Rasch Analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Properties of the HOME Inventory Using Rasch Analysis
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore psychometric properties of two versions of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory in a Swedish social service sample.

    Method

    Social workers employed at 22 Swedish child protections agencies participated in the data collection. Both classic test theory approaches and Rasch analysis were used. Seventy-five (46 double) protocols of the Early Childhood version and 65 (43 double) protocols of the Middle Childhood version were obtained.

    Results

    The interobserver reliability and Rasch reliability displayed acceptable results. Targeting was satisfying for the middle and more adequate home environments. However, there were mixed results concerning model fit.

    Conclusion

    The scores may be used to identify families with inadequate home environments where children may be at risk.                 

    Keywords
    HOME Inventory, social work assessment, Rasch analysis, psychometric evaluation
    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198270 (URN)10.1177/1049731513493518 (DOI)000331464900007 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-11 Created: 2013-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Social work practitioners' experience of the clinical utility of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social work practitioners' experience of the clinical utility of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory
    2012 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical utility of an assessment instrument can provide importantinformation about the potential value of that instrument when used inpractice. The aim of this study was to describe social work practitioners’experiences of the clinical utility of a Swedish version of theHome Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME)Inventory. Because knowledge of clinical utility in this area is scarce,a qualitative method based on semi-structured interviews was used togain a deeper understanding of the phenomenon. Data were collectedthrough 16 interviews and then analysed by qualitative manifestcontent analysis.The analysis yielded five categories: improves qualityof child protection investigations, supports practitioners, HOME hasdrawbacks and difficulties, certain issues are important for futureapplications and basic conditions are crucial. The findings supportedthe clinical utility of the HOME Inventory though some critical issueshave to be addressed, especially concerning the category basic conditionsare crucial. A thorough education, the possibility to practiceactivities related to the administration of the method and supportfrom management were found to be essential. Replication and furtherstudies are needed in the Swedish context to confirm the applicabilityof the HOME Inventory.

    Keywords
    clinical utility, HOME Inventory, interview study, qualitative content analysis, social work assessment, social work practice
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-151937 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2206.2011.00769.x (DOI)000298918400003 ()
    Available from: 2011-04-19 Created: 2011-04-19 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Social worker and teacher apprehension of children’s stimulation and support in the home environment and caregiver perception of the HOME Inventory in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social worker and teacher apprehension of children’s stimulation and support in the home environment and caregiver perception of the HOME Inventory in Sweden
    2014 (English)In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 2218-2236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment tools are needed for the operationalisation of child protection guidelines and frameworks. The HOME Inventory taps into three domains that are often highlighted in guidelines: parenting capacity; the child’s developmental needs; and, family and environmental factors. Social workers are obliged to collaborate in child protection investigations, for example with teachers. This collaboration can be an important source of information since whether or not social workers always perform home visits is unclear. The primary aim of this study was to compare social workers’ and teachers’ apprehensions of the support and stimuli provided in children’s home environments. Social workers’ apprehensions were assessed using the subscales of the Home Observation and Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory. Teachers’ apprehensions were assessed using a different, but comparable, questionnaire. The preschool teachers’ apprehension showed a weak association with the social workers’ assessments.  Hence, it is important for social workers to reflect upon the type of information different professions may provide. This study also describes caregivers’ perception of the HOME Inventory. Such information, although rarely published, is central to the successful implementation of assessment tools. Caregivers were highly satisfied with the HOME Inventory: they considered the content relevant and the format acceptable.

    Keywords
    Assessment, client perception, HOME Inventory, social work practice, teacher rating
    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198268 (URN)10.1093/bjsw/bct075 (DOI)000346050900010 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-11 Created: 2013-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 31.
    Glad, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Jergeby, Ulla
    Socialstyrelsen.
    Gustafsson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Social work practitioners' experience of the clinical utility of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory2012In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical utility of an assessment instrument can provide importantinformation about the potential value of that instrument when used inpractice. The aim of this study was to describe social work practitioners’experiences of the clinical utility of a Swedish version of theHome Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME)Inventory. Because knowledge of clinical utility in this area is scarce,a qualitative method based on semi-structured interviews was used togain a deeper understanding of the phenomenon. Data were collectedthrough 16 interviews and then analysed by qualitative manifestcontent analysis.The analysis yielded five categories: improves qualityof child protection investigations, supports practitioners, HOME hasdrawbacks and difficulties, certain issues are important for futureapplications and basic conditions are crucial. The findings supportedthe clinical utility of the HOME Inventory though some critical issueshave to be addressed, especially concerning the category basic conditionsare crucial. A thorough education, the possibility to practiceactivities related to the administration of the method and supportfrom management were found to be essential. Replication and furtherstudies are needed in the Swedish context to confirm the applicabilityof the HOME Inventory.

  • 32.
    Glad, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Jergeby, Ulla
    Gustafsson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Social worker and teacher apprehension of children’s stimulation and support in the home environment and caregiver perception of the HOME Inventory in Sweden2014In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 2218-2236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment tools are needed for the operationalisation of child protection guidelines and frameworks. The HOME Inventory taps into three domains that are often highlighted in guidelines: parenting capacity; the child’s developmental needs; and, family and environmental factors. Social workers are obliged to collaborate in child protection investigations, for example with teachers. This collaboration can be an important source of information since whether or not social workers always perform home visits is unclear. The primary aim of this study was to compare social workers’ and teachers’ apprehensions of the support and stimuli provided in children’s home environments. Social workers’ apprehensions were assessed using the subscales of the Home Observation and Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory. Teachers’ apprehensions were assessed using a different, but comparable, questionnaire. The preschool teachers’ apprehension showed a weak association with the social workers’ assessments.  Hence, it is important for social workers to reflect upon the type of information different professions may provide. This study also describes caregivers’ perception of the HOME Inventory. Such information, although rarely published, is central to the successful implementation of assessment tools. Caregivers were highly satisfied with the HOME Inventory: they considered the content relevant and the format acceptable.

  • 33.
    Glad, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Jergeby, Ulla
    Gustafsson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Psychometric Properties of the HOME Inventory Using Rasch Analysis2014In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore psychometric properties of two versions of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory in a Swedish social service sample.

    Method

    Social workers employed at 22 Swedish child protections agencies participated in the data collection. Both classic test theory approaches and Rasch analysis were used. Seventy-five (46 double) protocols of the Early Childhood version and 65 (43 double) protocols of the Middle Childhood version were obtained.

    Results

    The interobserver reliability and Rasch reliability displayed acceptable results. Targeting was satisfying for the middle and more adequate home environments. However, there were mixed results concerning model fit.

    Conclusion

    The scores may be used to identify families with inadequate home environments where children may be at risk.                 

  • 34.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Bendrik, Regina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Prevalence of subjective swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD: Results from the TIE-study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Bröms, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Swallowing dysfunction in COPD: Is it more related to burden of disease than lung function: Results from the TIE-study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Granat, Tina
    et al.
    Landstinget i Uppsala län, Habilitering och Hjälpmedel.
    Nordgren, Ingrid
    Landstinget i Uppsala län, Habilitering och Hjälpmedel.
    Rein, George
    Landstinget i Uppsala län, Habilitering och Hjälpmedel.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Group intervention for siblings with disabilities: a pilot study in a clinical setting2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness of a group intervention in a clinical setting designed to increase knowledge of disability and improve sibling relationship among siblings of children with disabilities. Method: A self-selected sample of 54 younger and older siblings with typical development (ages 8-12 years) of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (9), Asperger syndrome (7), autistic disorder (13), physical disability (8) and intellectual disability (17) participated in collateral sibling groups. The Sibling Knowledge Interview (SKI) and Sibling Relationship Questionnaire (SRQ) were administered pre- and post-intervention. Results: SKI scores increased (p < 0.001) from pre- to post-intervention when merged diagnostic groups were compared. Comparisons of SRQ pre- and post-intervention scores across diagnostic sibling groups showed significantly different (p < 0.05) score patterns. Conclusions: The results were encouraging and contribute to further development of interventions meeting the needs of siblings of children with disabilities. In view of the limited empirical research on group interventions for siblings of children with disabilities future work is needed to investigate the effectiveness of such interventions. Particular attention should be given to siblings of children with autism and siblings of children with intellectual disability.

  • 37.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Niia, Anna
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    Maxwell, Gregory
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Eriksson-Augustine, Lilly
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Differentiating activity and participation of children and youth with disability in Sweden: a third qualifier in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health for Children and Youth?2012