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  • 1.
    Bensing, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Brandt, Lena
    Tabaroj, Farnoush
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Blomqvist, Paul
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Increased death risk and altered cancer incidence pattern in patients with isolated or combined autoimmune primary adrenocortical insufficiency2008In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Primary adrenocortical insufficiency is mostly caused by an autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex. The disease may appear isolated or as a part of an autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS). APS1 is a rare hereditary disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. In APS2, primary adrenocortical insufficiency is often combined with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes. We analysed mortality and cancer incidence in primary adrenocortical insufficiency patients during 40 years. Data were compared with the general Swedish population. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: A population based cohort study including all patients with autoimmune primary adrenocortical insufficiency (3299) admitted to Swedish hospitals 1964-2004. MEASUREMENTS: Mortality risk was calculated as the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and cancer incidence as the standardized incidence ratio (SIR). RESULTS: A more than 2-fold increased mortality risk was observed in both women (SMR 2.9, 95% CI 2.7-3.0) and men (SMR 2.5, 95% CI 2.3-2.7). Highest risks were observed in patients diagnosed in childhood. SMR was higher in APS1 patients (SMR 4.6, 95% CI 3.5-6.0) compared with patients with APS2 (SMR 2.1, 95% CI 1.9-2.4). Cancer incidence was increased (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.5). When tumours observed during the first year of follow-up were excluded, only the cancer risk among APS1 patients remained increased. Cause-specific cancer incidence analysis revealed significantly higher incidences of oral cancer, nonmelanoma skin cancer, and male genital system cancer among patients. Breast cancer incidence was lower than in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows a reduced life expectancy and altered cancer incidence pattern in patients with autoimmune primary adrenocortical insufficiency.

  • 2.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Schneider, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ulfberg, J.
    High incidence of iron depletion and restless leg syndrome (RLS) in regular blood donors: intravenous iron sucrose substitution more effective than oral iron2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 354-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives Iron depletion is common in regular blood donors. The objective of the study was to investigate the frequency and severity of iron depletion in regular blood donors and whether IV iron is more effective than oral to avoid iron depletion and symptoms thereof, especially restless legs syndrome (RLS). Method One hundred and twenty blood donors with at least five previous whole blood donations were randomized to receive either IV iron sucrose (Venofer (R), RenaPharma/Vifor, Uppsala, Sweden), 200 mg, or to 20 x 100 mg of oral iron sulphate (Duroferon (R), GlaxoSmithKline, Stockholm, Sweden), after each blood donation during 1 year. Iron status and RLS incidence and severity were investigated. Results Iron status was generally poor among regular blood donors, especially in women, with a high incidence of iron depletion (> 20%) and RLS (18%). The IV iron group increased storage iron to a greater extent than the oral iron group after 12 months (P = 0 center dot 0043). Female donors were more responsive to IV iron sucrose compared to oral iron sulphate, particularly female donors below 50 years of age. RLS severity scores were significantly lower in the IV iron group. The two treatments were safe. Conclusion Iron status is poor in regular blood donors, restless legs syndrome is common, and the routine iron supplementation is insufficient. IV iron sucrose substitutes iron loss in blood donors more efficiently compared with oral iron sulphate, especially in women. Iron substitution to blood donors should be individualized and based on P-ferritin monitoring.

  • 3. Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    et al.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Detection of antinuclear antibodies by the Inno-Lia ANA update test in canine systemic rheumatic disease2010In: Veterinary clinical pathology, ISSN 0275-6382, E-ISSN 1939-165X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 215-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Certain systemic autoimmune diseases in dogs are characterized by high titers of circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which can be demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). In an earlier study of IIF-ANA-positive dogs, the Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion (DID) test was used to identify specific autoantibodies. The DID test has largely been replaced with line blot tests in human diagnostic settings. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether the line blot assay Inno-Lia ANA update test is a useful tool in demonstrating ANA specificities in canine patients with previously diagnosed IIF-ANA-positive rheumatic disorders. Methods: Serum samples from 3 clinically healthy control dogs and 20 canine patients with clinical signs of systemic rheumatic disease and documented positive results for IIF-ANA and DID tests were included in the study. The Inno-Lia ANA update assay was performed with an anti-canine detection antibody. Results: Six serum samples that had DID positivity with anti-spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNP) reactivity showed reactivity to multiple snRNP proteins in the Inno-Lia test. Samples from 2 dogs that had other types of DID positivity also had clear SmB reactivity and 1 had weak reactivity to RNP-70K. The other serum samples, including controls, were negative. Conclusions: Using the Inno-Lia ANA update test, multiple snRNP specificities were demonstrated in some canine patients with autoimmune rheumatic disorders. Other canine autoantibodies may exist that are not detected by this test. Further studies are necessary to characterize the target antigen(s) of these remaining autoantibodies in canine sera.

  • 4.
    Hong, Jaan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Klinisk immunologi.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Reynolds, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A new in vitro model to study interaction between whole blood and biomaterials. Studies of platelet and coagulation activation and the effect of aspirin1999In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 603-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a versatile in vitro chamber model with a double purpose: first, to be able to study mechanisms of bio- incompatibility, and, second, to test biomaterials at all levels of interactions, in whole blood. The use of biomaterials in the form of microscope slides as walls in the chamber makes it possible to analyse both the biomaterial surface with regard to protein and cell binding, as well as the molecular events taking place in the fluid. Incubation of blood in the chamber, for 60 min at 37°C resulted in the rapid binding of complement and coagulation proteins and of leukocytes and platelets to polyvinylchloride (PVC) slides. The cells formed a layer which more or less covered the underlying surface. Unlike complement activation, as reflected by soluble C3a and C5b-9, the thrombin—antithrombin formation was completely nullified in cell-depleted plasma. Despite the fact that throm- bin—antithrombin generation was also negligible in platelet-rich plasma, inhibition of platelet aggregation on the material surface with aspirin resulted in suppressed generation of thrombin—antithrombin complexes. Taken together, the coagulation activation in the chamber was dependent on the presence of blood cells which suggests that bound/aggregated platelets initiate a sequence of events involving leukocytes that results in coagulation activation. 

  • 5. Kamper-Jörgensen, Mads
    et al.
    Ahlgren, Martin
    Rostgaard, Klaus
    Melbye, Mads
    Edgren, Gustaf
    Nyrén, Olof
    Reilly, Marie
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Titlestad, Kjell
    Tynell, Elsa
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Survival after blood transfusion2008In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 2577-2584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term survival of transfusion recipients has rarely been studied. This study examines short- and long-term mortality among transfusion recipients and reports these as absolute rates and rates relative to the general population. Population-based cohort study of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first registered transfusion. Three months after the first transfusion, 84.3 percent of recipients were alive. One-, 5-, and 20-year posttransfusion survival was 73.7, 53.4, and 27.0 percent, respectively. Survival was slightly poorer in men than in women, decreased with increasing age, and was worst for recipients transfused at departments of internal medicine. The first 3 months after the first transfusion, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 17.6 times higher in transfusion recipients than in the general population. One to 4 years after first transfusion, the SMR was 2.1 and even after 17 years the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions.

  • 6.
    Norda, Rut
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Tynell, E.
    Use of plasma: Clinical indications and types of plasma components in Sweden2007In: Transfusion Clinique et Biologique, ISSN 1246-7820, E-ISSN 1953-8022, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 560-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of plasma in Sweden is relatively high compared to other countries in the European Union. An analysis of all transfusion recipients in Orebro county during the whole year 2000 was performed. There were 3159 transfusion recipients of whom 96% had a registered diagnosis and 50% had undergone a "true" operation. Seven hundred and eleven patients (23%) had received plasma. Significantly more operated than nonoperated and more men than women received plasma. The typical plasma recipient was a man undergoing cardiovascular surgery. In Sweden there are two main types of plasma components: fresh frozen (FFP) and nonfrozen liquid plasma stored for up to 14 days, both considered to be clinically equal for most indications. The quality of these components as well as stored thawed FFP has been studied. The major storage effect was cold-induced contact activation and thereby consumption of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) by day 14 in 22%. The citrate content in plasma sustained the overall coagulation function over 14 days. Other studies have shown that the levels of FV and ADAMTS 13 after 14 days remain at 70% or more compared to those for FFP. Since it is immediately available, liquid, nonfrozen or thawed, plasma is of great value in emergencies. Quality criteria for plasma components need to be assessed against evidence based indications and published in guidelines.

  • 7. Reesink, H. W.
    et al.
    Engelfriet, C. P.
    Hyland, C. A.
    Coghlan, P.
    Tait, B.
    Wsolak, M.
    Keller, A. J.
    Henn, G.
    Mayr, W. R.
    Thomas, I.
    Osselaer, J. -C
    Lambermont, M.
    Beaten, M.
    Wendel, S.
    Qiu, Y.
    Georgsen, J.
    Krusius, T.
    Maki, T.
    Andreu, G.
    Morel, P.
    Lefrere, J. -J
    Rebulla, P.
    Giovanelli, S.
    Butti, B.
    Lecchi, L.
    Mozzi, F.
    van Hilten, J. A.
    Zwaginga, J. J.
    Flanagan, P.
    Flesland, O.
    Brojer, E.
    Letowska, M.
    Åkerblom, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Norda, R.
    Prowse, C.
    Dow, B.
    Jarvis, L.
    Davidson, F.
    Kleinman, S.
    Bianco, C.
    Stramer, S. L.
    Dodd, R. Y.
    Busch, M. P.
    Biobanks of blood from donors and recipients of blood products2008In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 242-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Stegmayr, B.
    et al.
    Ptak, J.
    Wikström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, G.
    Axelsson, C. G.
    Griskevicius, A.
    Centoni, P.
    Liumbruno, G.
    Molfettini, P.
    Audzijoniene, J.
    Mokvist, K.
    Sojka, B. Nilsson
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Knutson, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ramlow, W.
    Blaha, M.
    Witt, V.
    Evergren, M.
    Tomaz, J.
    World apheresis registry 2003-2007 data2008In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 247-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Seventy-five centers from many countries have applied for a login code to the WAA apheresis registry. Fifteen centers from 7 countries have been actively entering data at the internet site from 2003 until 2007. We report on data from the registry so far. Methods: This is a web-based registry. A link is available from the WAA homepage (www.worldapheresis.org). So far data from 2013 patients (12,448 procedures) have been included. A median of 6 treatments have been performed (range 1140). Mean age 51 years (range 1-94 years; 45% women). Seven percent of the patients were <= 21 years and 4% were <= 16 years. Results: The purpose of the apheresis procedure was therapeutic in 67% and retrieval of blood components in 33% Main indications: neurological and hematological diseases, lipid apheresis and stemcell collection (autologous, and some allogeneic). Blood access: peripheral vessels (71%), central dialysis catheter through jugular (6.5%) or subclavian veins (6.7%), femoral vein (8%) and AV fistula (4%). ACD was used for anticoagulation in 73% of the procedures. Albumin was mainly used as replacement fluid. Adverse events (AE) were registered in 5.7% of the procedures. AE was graded as mild (2.5%), moderate (2.7%) or severe (0.5%). No death occurred due to treatment. The procedures were interrupted in 2.6%. Most frequent AEs were blood access problems (29%), tingling around the mouth (20%), hypotension (18%), and urticaria (9%). There were significant differences between the centers regarding mild and moderate AEs. Data indicate that centers using continuous infusion of calcium had fewer AEs. Conclusion: There was a limited number of severe AEs. Centers use various standard procedures for apheresis. By learning from the experience of others the treatment quality will improve further. In the near future, an update of the registry will enable more extensive evaluation of the data.

  • 9. Turesson, C.
    et al.
    Jacobsson, L. T. H.
    Sturfelt, G.
    Matteson, E. L.
    Mathsson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides are associated with severe extra-articular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo study antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti‐CCP) and rheumatoid factor in patients with active, severe extra‐articular rheumatoid arthritis (ExRA) compared with controls without ExRA.Methods35 consecutive patients with severe ExRA manifestations according to predefined criteria were studied. 70 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but no ExRA manifestations, individually matched for age, sex and disease duration, served as controls. Patients were included when ExRA was diagnosed, before any new treatment was started. Anti‐CCPs were detected with ELISA, rheumatoid factor was quantified using nephelometry and anti‐nuclear antibodies (ANA) were investigated using indirect immune fluorescence.ResultsAnti‐CCPs were detected in 77% of patients with ExRA versus 56% of controls without ExRA (p=0.03). Anti‐CCP levels also tended to be higher in patients with ExRA (p=0.09). Rheumatoid factor was detected in 94% v 71% of patients and controls, respectively (p=0.006), and rheumatoid factor levels were higher in patients with ExRA (median interquartile range (IQR) 245 IU/ml (94–604) v 73 IU/ml (not detected–165); p=0.001). Levels and occurrence of ANA did not differ between patients with ExRA and controls. Patients with ExRA had higher swollen joint counts and C reactive protein levels, but no correlations were found between anti‐CCP or rheumatoid factor levels and these measures within the ExRA group.ConclusionRheumatoid factor is strongly associated with severe ExRA manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and a similar but weaker association exists for anti‐CCPs. This suggests a role for rheumatoid factor and anti‐CCP in the pathogenesis of ExRA.

  • 10.
    Tynell, Elsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, Therese M. L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Edgren, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyren, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Shanwell, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Reilly, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Should plasma from female donors be avoided?: A population-based cohort study of plasma recipients in Sweden from 1990 through 20022010In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1249-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Plasma from female donors has been implicated in the sometimes fatal complication known as transfusion-related acute lung injury. In studies of patients in intensive care units, worsened gas exchange of the lungs has also been attributed to female plasma. Despite a lack of population-based evidence, policies have already been introduced to exclude female donor plasma. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Short-term mortality after plasma transfusion was investigated using data from the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) database. A cohort of 92,565 patients in 30 Swedish hospitals were followed for 14 days after their first plasma transfusion. The relative risk (RR) of death in recipients of female plasma compared to recipients of only male plasma was estimated from Poisson regression. RESULTS: Recipients had median age 70 years, received a mean of 4.4 plasma units, and had an overall 14-day mortality of 8.43%. Sixty-eight percent were exposed to female plasma, with a 14-day mortality of 8.85% compared to 7.53% in the nonexposed group. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the RRs were 1.16 (confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.27) and 1.32 (CI, 1.17-1.49) for those receiving 3 to 4 and 5 or more units of female plasma, respectively. Risk estimates were increased in an analysis of deaths with a concomitant discharge diagnosis involving the respiratory or circulatory system or an adverse reaction. CONCLUSIONS: This large population-based cohort study of unselected patients suggests that transfusion of plasma from female donors confers a short-term survival disadvantage on recipients.

  • 11. Ullum, H.
    et al.
    Kamper-Jorgensen, M.
    Edgren, G.
    Rostgaard, K.
    Melbye, M.
    Nyrén, O.
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hjalgrim, H.
    FREQUENCY OF BLOOD DONATION DOES NOT AFFECT BLOOD DONOR SURVIVAL2010In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 99, p. 184-185Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wei, Qichun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sheng, Liming
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Shui, Yongjie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Hu, Qiongge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nordgren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    EGFR, HER2, and HER3 expression in laryngeal primary tumors and corresponding metastases2008In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1193-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There are several substances available to target members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, both for imaging in nuclear medicine and for various forms of therapy. The level and stability of expression in both primary tumors and corresponding metastases is crucial in the assessment of a receptor as a target in systemic tumor therapy. To date, the expression of EGFR family members has only been determined in primary laryngeal carcinomas, and we have not found published data regarding the receptor status in corresponding metastatic lesions. METHODS: Expression of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 was investigated immunohistochemically in both lymph node metastases and corresponding primary laryngeal squamous carcinomas (n = 40). RESULTS: EGFR overexpression (2+ or 3+) was found in 87.5% (35/40) of the laryngeal primary tumors and 82.5% (33/40) of the corresponding lymph node metastases. There was a good agreement between the primary tumors and the paired metastases regarding EGFR expression. HER2 overexpression was found in only four cases (10.5%) of the studied primary tumors and in all cases the HER2 expression was retained in the paired metastases. Another two metastases gained HER2 status when compared to the corresponding primary tumors. Strong HER3 staining was found in 26.7% of both the primary tumors and the corresponding metastases. CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency and stability in EGFR expression is encouraging for efforts to use EGFR targeting agents (e.g. Iressa, Tarceva, Erbitux or radiolabeled antibodies) for therapy of laryngeal carcinoma. For a few laryngeal carcinoma patients with HER2 overexpression, anti-HER2 agents could possibly be used.

  • 13. Witt, Volker
    et al.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Ptak, Jan
    Wikström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Axelsson, C. G.
    Griskevicius, A.
    Centoni, Paolo Emilio
    Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria
    Molfettini, Pietra
    Audzijoniene, Judita
    Mokvist, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sojka, B. Nilsson
    Norda, Rut
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ramlow, W.
    Blaha, Milan
    Evergren, M.
    Tomaz, J.
    World apheresis registry data from 2003 to 2007, the pediatric and adolescent side of the registry2008In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 255-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Paediatric patients are a special group in apheresis. It is general accepted to use adult indications in paediatric patients, but data in this age group are rare. In order to provide more information of apheresis practise in children and young adults (<21a) we will report of knowledge learnt by data from the registry from 2003 until 2007. Methods: This is a web-based registry. A link is available from the WAA homepage (www.worldapheresis.org). So far data from 12,448 procedures have been included. Six hundred and twelve procedures were performed in 135 children and young adults (308 procedures < 16a, 237 from 17 to 20a, and 67 with 21a) representing 5% of the total population. The median age was 14 years (range 1-21 years), 74 male and 61 female. These data were entered by 15 centres with a frequency of in median 18 aphereses in young patients per centre (range 1-287) from 2003 to 2007. Results: Main indications: haematological diseases and also nephrological, and neurological. The type of aphereses was mainly Leukapheresis (196, 33%), plasma exchange (149, 25%), photopheresis (127, 21%), and lipid aphereses (79, 13%). Blood access: peripheral vessels in 305 procedures (50 K, compared to 73% in adults), central venous catheter in 239 (38%), and AV-fistula in 2% and 0.3%, and in 8 (1.31%) procedures an arterial line was used. Anticoagulation was mostly by ACD (71%), heparin (18% or the combination of both (3%). 39 adverse events (AE) were registered in 22 (=3.59%) of the procedures. mostly graded as mild. Treatment was interrupted in 14 procedures (2.29%. AE's were abdominal pain, anaphylactic shock, flush, hyper- and hypotension, nausea, vertigo, cephalea and need for sedation and technical problems with the device and problems with the venous access. The rate of AE's was similar for stem cell harvesting and for plasma exchange (4%, and 4.7%). respectively). Conclusion: The paediatric data compared to the whole registry data set are showing that aphereses are performed as safe in paediatrics as in adults. Centres are mostly handling only a few cases younger than 21. Therefore more exchange of information and experience in paediatric apheresis is warranted.

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