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  • 1.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing an Audience in the StreetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis sets out to explore why people engage in, and how to design for, play in a public setting. It does this by separating design for play from design of games, describing play as a socially and mentally understood activity, and a playful approach to engaging in that activity. It emphasises that while play is voluntary, design can help shape the players’ mode of engagement.

    The thesis uses a qualitative and inductive approach to research, with an understanding of knowledge as being constructed in the individual. The research is grounded in human computer interaction and interaction design, and closely related to game studies and design science.

    The research question concerns how design can influence the player activity in order to create a desired player experience in public, by harnessing playful engagement. It’s foundation is a theory of play which describes play as a framed, or hedged-off, activity with a fragile border; where knowledge and feelings can leak both in and out of the activity, and affect the play as well as what is around it. The theory of enjoyment of play is discussed, and the problem of treating this as ‘fun’ is addressed, concluding in a presentation of how playful engagement can be harnessed through design.

    The theory is applied in five design cases: I’m Your Body, a locative storytelling app; Codename Heroes, a pervasive game of personal empowerment; Passing On, a slow-paced game about communication; Busking Studies, which involves observing street performers and their shows; and DigiFys, an architectural design exploration of playgrounds and play paths.

    Finally, three concepts, or design tools, are presented, which address: 1) a structure for understanding a design through three layers, constructs designed by the designer, inspiring play activity with the player, leading to experience; 2) an approach to designing invitations to play; and finally 3), a four faceted structure for understanding play engagement when players engage in non intended ways.

    List of papers
    1. Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268059 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    2. Designing an Audience in the Streets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an Audience in the Streets
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268058 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

    Keywords
    outdoor play, playscape, interactive play technology, landscape architecture
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268057 (URN)10.1145/2901790.2901875 (DOI)000390478300006 ()
    Conference
    11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS), Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, JUN 04-08, 2016
    Note

    The manuscript version of this article is part of the thesis: "Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience" by Jon Back. http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:876519

    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    4. ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Keywords
    Location-based, asymmetric gameplay, negotiating language, physical feedback, player behavior
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239070 (URN)978-0-9913982-2-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG), 2014, April 3-7, 2014, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. "We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    2013 (English)In: Defragging game studies: Proceedings of DIGRA 2013, DIGRA , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-aware design is important in computer games in general, and perhaps even more so in the design of pervasive games, as these are played in the ordinary world. As pervasive games blur the distinction between game and non-game situations, they influence the everyday lives of their players.

    We discuss the design process for the game ‘Codename Heroes’ from a gender-aware perspective. The focus is on how players reacted to the experience of playing the game during a sequence of design workshops. We found that playing the game made people less sensitive to ‘fear of the outside’. The participants were aware they ‘should’ feel unsafe in unknown neighbourhoods, but mostly did not. Furthermore, a combination of collaboration with internal competition fostered a sense of empowerment. Finally, we could confirm what previous researchers have seen, that women participants tended to blame themselves, rather than the technology or the situation, for errors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    DIGRA, 2013
    Keywords
    Game, Design, Gender, Pervasive game
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212715 (URN)
    Conference
    The sixth international conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA); 26-29 August 2013; Atlanta, GA, USA
    Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
    6. Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268055 (URN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    7. Experimental Game Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Game Design
    2015 (English)In: Game Research Methods: An Overview / [ed] Lankoski, Petri; Björk, Staffan, ETC press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ETC press, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268056 (URN)9781312884731 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 3.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

  • 4.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Paget, Susan
    Rau, Andreas
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Children’s Digital-Physical Play in Natural Outdoors Settings2016In: CHI Extended Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to develop solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. Here we report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of the schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment. We highlight in particular how the interactive technology contributed to the versatility of play activities, but also how the nature setting and the availability of natural materials contributed to the play activities around the interactive artefacts.

  • 5.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development.
    Rau, Andreas
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Children's Outdoor Play2016In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

  • 6.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Transformative Play2017In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 3, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have foregrounded how play is only partially shaped by the artifacts that their designers design. The play activity can change the structures framing it, turning players into co-designers through the mere act of playing. This article contributes to our understanding of how we can design for play taking into account that play has this transformative power. We describe four ways that players can engage with framing structures, which we classify in terms of whether players conform to explore, transgress, or (re)create them. Through the examples of three case studies, we illustrate how this model has been useful in design: as an analytical tool for deconstructing player behavior, to articulate design goals and support specific design choices, and for shaping the design process.

  • 7.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative PlayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing Close to Home: Interaction and Emerging Play in Outdoor Play Installations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor play is becoming an increasingly marginalised activity in the urban landscape. Even in HCI, research on interactive solutions for outdoor play has largely been limited to special areas and in particular playgrounds. But children play everywhere, and especially play close to home is central in children's play activities. In this article we draw upon knowledge about designing for children's play in interaction design as well as in landscape architecture, to study how interactive play installations can be integrated in outdoor environments of a residential area. We present a field study in which digitally enhanced play installations were installed, in dialogue with the landscape, in between the buildings of a residential area. We focus on how emerging play activities made use of the installations as well as of the surrounding landscape in expected as well as unexpected ways. Based on the observations, we discuss how residential play is special, and how this affects how to design for it.

  • 9.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Codename Heroes – Designing for Experience in Public Places in a Long Term Pervasive Game2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Codename Heroes is a persistent, multiplayer, crowd-sourced pervasive game that uses Bluetooth, GPS and the phone camera. It plays in the world around you and is always active. Players take the roles of secret superheroes, fighting for their rights and their beliefs. The game also makes use of physical objects and places in the environment.

    The game targets teenagers with a specific focus on young women. The purpose of the game is to engage and empower players. The design is informed by ethnographic studies of young women as well as by gender studies. The goal is to create an incitement for young people to appropriate spaces they do not usually move in, and try things they would not otherwise do.

    Codename Heroes is part of a project investigating pervasive games, games that are played in the physical world with the aid of mobile technology. The current research is focused at exploring large scale, long term, non-location-specific pervasive games, while still keeping the physical aspect of game-specific objects, to understand how this physicality affects the experience of the game.

  • 10.
    Bang, GiHoon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Human-Telepresence Robot Proxemics Interaction: An ethnographic approach to non-verbal communication2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to find distinct and crucial factors needed in order to design a better robot through exploring the meaning of movement. The researcher conducted six-weeks of iterative work to collect data via an ethnographic method. The researcher examined the interactions between a telepresence robot and human beings in an authentic environment through the collected data and analyzed it based on proxemics theory. The research observed that the robot was given social space when it approached the participants with pauses in between movements. Furthermore, the research introduces proxemics pivot and its notion. Proxemics pivot refers to the part of the robot that people perceive as a standard point when they adjust the proximity between the robot and themselves. The proxemics pivot was considered “a face” and was attributed social properties; the other parts of the robot did not receive the same consideration.

  • 11.
    Biehl, Marten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sketching Movement-based Interactions: Defining Guidelines for Tool Support in Interdisciplinary Teams2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Interaction Design there is an increased interest in designing for leisure and fun in contrast to an understanding of technology primarily as part of the workplace. Along with this, the relevance of experiential aspects of design is heightened compared to usability in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. At the same time, this created an interest in the relationship between the human body and technology use in research and industry.

    The starting point for this thesis is the perceived difficulty to combine exploration and technology in early stages of the design process without becoming technology-focused. Instead of picking a technology early in the process and therefore letting the design process be shaped by it, this thesis advocates introducing technology in a way that designers can explore different technologies similar to sketching with different materials.

    This thesis aims to identify the needs of designers in inter- disciplinary teams when designing with movement-based interactions. This is done by first summarizing important aspects of sketching from the literature. Secondly, the tools that are currently available are reviewed. Finally, an observational study of a design situation is conducted to complete this investigation.

    The main outcome of this thesis is a set of guidelines for designing a sketching tool for movement-based interactions in interdisciplinary teams. The most important are low transaction costs, overview over sketches, integration into the existing ecosystem, optimization for the team setting and clear articulation of material qualities. 

  • 12.
    Bohné, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Emotions at play: gaining emotional knowledge using a video game2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of video games for teaching children different subjects is commonly believed to be a good  approach. In  general  has  learning  theme  for  these  games  focused  on  traditionally subject, such as math or biology. Important as they can be for education, other softer aspects can also be considered important for the children and education. One such aspect is emotions and the role it has on a social level. However, it is not much research showing how to use emotions  in  a  learning  game. In  this  thesis, I  examine  how  children  perceive  and  use emotions as they play a game specially designed for teaching emotions. The game utilises emotions  in  a  new  design  that  let  the  player  interact  with  cartoon  animals  in  different scenarios. I report findings based on a sample of thirty-three (33) preschool children, and six (6) parents who took part in the study. Data was collected using a qualitative method in a two step procedure with observation of play and follow up interviews in the first step, followed by video recordings of play and demonstrations using cuddly pets in the second step. Using an ecological framework for analysis and theory from the field of emotional intelligence, I show that children playing this game can perceive emotions expressed in the game. I also show that it is possible to play this particular game without the need to involve emotions. Children do not learn emotions from playing the game. These results carries important implication for the design of learning games as it illuminates that learning can come from possible sources other than the gameplay.

  • 13.
    Chen, Yingjie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exploring Consumers’ Payment Behaviours atCompleting Micro-Transactions withVending Machines in Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis empirically investigated factors that affect consumers’ choice of paymentoptions including cash, credit card and mobile payment, in completingmicro-transactions with vending machines. For the purpose, a theory-informedqualitative study was conducted through semi-structured interviews in combinationwith observations. As a result, we found that consumers choose cash/coins as apriority payment with vending machines because they are traditionally perceived ascash-operated machines. However, since Sweden is moving toward a cashless society,credit card is suggested to be the most compatible with the purchase habit of Swedishpeople. Despite the compatibility, credit card payment with vending machines isperceived as insecure because of vagueness of transaction, pay without pin code andpotential risk of financial fraud. For mobile payment, the findings suggest thatperceived advantage of using mobile payment with vending machines are efficiency,security and privacy. Several barriers to consumers’ acceptance of mobile payment are also identified, which includes complexity and the lack of social influences.

  • 14.
    Clark, Valjean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exploring design and product development data in high-tech companies using data visualization2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In high-tech companies, user experience has become an important part of data-driven product development, but unfortunately the artifacts created by user experience work are often stored in disparate documents and databases, and it is difficult to get a big picture of all the artifacts that have been created and how they relate to each other and to other product development data. Data visualization is one way to approach solving these issues, but how can this data be presented to users in a meaningful way such that both the artifacts and the relationships between them are understood? Three hierarchical data visualizations - partition, sunburst, and zoomable treemap - were built around some early product development data. These visualizations were tested in a comparative exploratory usability test with six users to find how well users understood the data and the relationships between the data. The most significant results were that most users did not know how to interact with the partition and sunburst visualizations until prompted to do so, users had a difference in understanding the data between the sunburst and partition visualization, and some techniques worked very well to keep users oriented while others did not. Future work should first focus on adding a creative element to the tool, where data can be added and relationships can be built in the visualization itself, and then focus on testing the tool again with a more specific audience of strategic planners, UX designers, and requirements engineers. 

  • 15.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Christian Kehr, Peter Schüßler and Marc-Denis Weitze (eds.) Neue Technologien in der Gesellschaft. Akteure, Erwartungen, Kontroversen und Konjunkturen2012In: Tecnoscienza - Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 180-183Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology Encounters: Exploring the essence of ordinary computing2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As computing technology has become a vital part of everyday life, studies have increasingly scrutinized the underlying meaning of computational things. As different devices become interwoven with daily practices and routines, there is a growing interest in understanding not only their functional meaning in computational terms but also their meaning in relation to other non-computation artefacts.

    This thesis investigates how people relate to artefacts and how their individual values and attitudes affect this relationship.  The analysis is based on four ethnographic studies, which look at the richness of ordinary interactions with technology to understand the impact of technology upon practice and experience.

    The process through which humans develop a relationship to artefacts is framed as a continuous series of encounters, through which the individual constantly reshapes their relationship to things.  Artefacts are seen as lines in the mesh of everyday life, and the encounters are the intersections between lines. This approach–grounded in phenomenology and paired with an anthropological understanding of everyday life–reconceptualises understanding of the processes of adaption, meaning-making, disposing and recycling. The work reveals how human relations to all kinds of things–in the form of meaning–is continually transforming. Core to this understanding is the cultural relative essence that becomes perceived of the artefacts themselves. This essence deeply affects the way we encounter and thus interact with technology, as well as objects more broadly. In the daily interaction with computing devices we can observe that computing technology alters the mesh on a different level than non-computational artefacts: digital interfaces pull our lines together, bundle experiences an affect how we encounter the material and the social world. This enables computing devices to have meanings distinct from non-computing technology. To go further, computing is itself a mode of existence – a crucial difference in things that helps us understand the complexity of the material world.

    List of papers
    1. The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 751-756Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diffusion of computing in all areas of everyday life comes a need for re-thinking the design process in order to account for the changing meaning of digital technologies. This paper argues that there is a need to factor the cultural value that digital artifacts get assigned by users into the design process. Therefore a theoretical framework is developed that builds on phenomenology and Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Main objective is thereby to connect the individual experience with a cultural context and connect micro- and macro-perspective. This framework then builds the foundation for a model that accounts for the heterogeneity of values that artifacts get assigned.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
    Keywords
    Design research, phenomenology, ubiquitous computing, experiential computing, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191831 (URN)10.1145/2399016.2399132 (DOI)978-1-4503-1482-4 (ISBN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012, 14th-17th October, 2012, Copenhagen, DENMARK
    Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2016-08-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe interactions between families and their artefacts in the car using data from ethnographic work with eight families. We see how artefacts - through the interactions and practices around them and affected by family values - develop meaning over time. Outgoing from that artefacts are embedded in the socially dense environment of the car, we scrutinize the relationship between users and artefacts and the environment they are interacting in. Drawing on concepts from the field of material culture we show that the relationship between user and artefact is constituted through individual values and dispositions as they are reflected in everyday interactions with materiality. We observe that artefact interactions are closely tied with changing family dynamics, issues around technology appropriation and prevailing values and parenting practices. Our analysis points to the deliberation of the role of critical, value-based design for the design for families. 

    Keywords
    Car, family, meaning, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301106 (URN)
    Note

    Manuscript submitted for publication

    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    3. Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern day economy, families often have to be geographically flexible and within families computational technology plays a crucial role in making a home, even when far away from their place of origin. We report on an ethnographic study investigating the role of ICT for connectedness in a family context. In order to understand how families are dealing with relocation in their everyday life, we analyze situated material practices and discuss how expat families create a sense of connectedness through the procurement and maintenance of physical as well as digital artifacts. We show in particular how the roles of virtually procured artifacts, such as movies or music content, is tightly connected to but also different from the tangible ‘stuff’ that is a crucial part of home-making. This leads to a different role of ICT in the material fabric of the modern family home and at the same time to new challenges and challenges and potentials whendesigning for connectedness.

    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301107 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    4. Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    2015 (English)In: 34Th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, 2015, p. 1632-1643Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps allowing passengers to hail and pay for taxi service on their phone– such as Uber and Lyft–have affected the livelihood of thousands of workers worldwide. In this paper we draw on interviews with traditional taxi drivers, rideshare drivers and passengers in London and San Francisco to understand how “ride-sharing” transforms the taxi business. With Uber, the app not only manages the allocation of work, but is directly involved in ‘labour issues’: changing the labour conditions of the work itself. We document how Uber driving demands new skills such as emotional labour, while increasing worker flexibility. We discuss how the design of new technology is also about creating new labour opportunities – jobs – and how we might think about our responsibilities in designing these labour relations. 

    Keywords
    On demand labour, sharing economy, uber, ridesharing, on-demand labour, transport, labour issues
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276270 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858476 (DOI)000380532901062 ()9781450333627 (ISBN)
    Conference
    34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI4GOOD), MAY 07-12, 2016, San Jose, CA, USA
    Available from: 2016-02-10 Created: 2016-02-10 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
    5. Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301108 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    6. The tablet computer as a family canvas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The tablet computer as a family canvas
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301109 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
  • 17.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality2012In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 751-756Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diffusion of computing in all areas of everyday life comes a need for re-thinking the design process in order to account for the changing meaning of digital technologies. This paper argues that there is a need to factor the cultural value that digital artifacts get assigned by users into the design process. Therefore a theoretical framework is developed that builds on phenomenology and Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Main objective is thereby to connect the individual experience with a cultural context and connect micro- and macro-perspective. This framework then builds the foundation for a model that accounts for the heterogeneity of values that artifacts get assigned.

  • 18.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Cycil, Chandrika
    Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family carArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe interactions between families and their artefacts in the car using data from ethnographic work with eight families. We see how artefacts - through the interactions and practices around them and affected by family values - develop meaning over time. Outgoing from that artefacts are embedded in the socially dense environment of the car, we scrutinize the relationship between users and artefacts and the environment they are interacting in. Drawing on concepts from the field of material culture we show that the relationship between user and artefact is constituted through individual values and dispositions as they are reflected in everyday interactions with materiality. We observe that artefact interactions are closely tied with changing family dynamics, issues around technology appropriation and prevailing values and parenting practices. Our analysis points to the deliberation of the role of critical, value-based design for the design for families. 

  • 19.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    Robbins, Holly
    D'Olivo, Patricia
    Karana, Elvin
    Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the HomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern day economy, families often have to be geographically flexible and within families computational technology plays a crucial role in making a home, even when far away from their place of origin. We report on an ethnographic study investigating the role of ICT for connectedness in a family context. In order to understand how families are dealing with relocation in their everyday life, we analyze situated material practices and discuss how expat families create a sense of connectedness through the procurement and maintenance of physical as well as digital artifacts. We show in particular how the roles of virtually procured artifacts, such as movies or music content, is tightly connected to but also different from the tangible ‘stuff’ that is a crucial part of home-making. This leads to a different role of ICT in the material fabric of the modern family home and at the same time to new challenges and challenges and potentials whendesigning for connectedness.

  • 20.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life, SE-164 Kista, Sweden.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life, SE-164 Kista, Sweden.
    Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce2015In: 34Th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, 2015, p. 1632-1643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps allowing passengers to hail and pay for taxi service on their phone– such as Uber and Lyft–have affected the livelihood of thousands of workers worldwide. In this paper we draw on interviews with traditional taxi drivers, rideshare drivers and passengers in London and San Francisco to understand how “ride-sharing” transforms the taxi business. With Uber, the app not only manages the allocation of work, but is directly involved in ‘labour issues’: changing the labour conditions of the work itself. We document how Uber driving demands new skills such as emotional labour, while increasing worker flexibility. We discuss how the design of new technology is also about creating new labour opportunities – jobs – and how we might think about our responsibilities in designing these labour relations. 

  • 21.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    McMillan, Donald
    Cycil, Chandrika
    Tollmar, Konrad
    The tablet computer as a family canvasManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at homeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Gong, Liang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Adding software downloading tasks toLEGO-based assembly simulators for on-sitetraining2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 24.
    Han, Qi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Effects of Working Memory on User’s Performance in Creative Drawing2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Creative thinking ability is increasingly valuable in the nowadays society, especially in the innovation industry. The way to evaluate and somehow measure human’s creativity deserved the plenty researches for decades. Among approaches for creation, drawing has been used as a support for ideation for centuries. A widely well-known creativity test was Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), in which creative drawing tasks took apart in. Additionally, it was proposed that creativity was a result of continuously repetitive processes of working memory and some neurophysiologists had discovered that working memory and our cerebellum collaborate to produce creativity and innovation. To expand our knowledge on the potential relationship of working memory and creativity, the problem - to what extent does a load on working memory affect creative performance in drawing tasks - therefore was addressed.The exploratory study presented in this thesis was conducted as a continuation of a series of relevant previous researches investigating how multiple factors affect the outcomes of creative drawing tasks (Zabramski & Neelakannan, 2011) (Zabramski, et al., 2011) (Zabramski, et al., 2013). A controlled experiment investigating how the outcomes of a drawing creativity test are affected when the participants are given a load on visual working memory was launched. The computerized TTCT were performed in both the experimental group and the controlled group. The load on visual working memory – the so-called Trace Fade-out setting – was only loaded for the experimental group. The Trace Fade-out setting means that what the participant has drawn on the screen will fade out until disappear in 15 seconds.This thesis presents the results of the study, which show no significant effect on creativity scores earned by the participants, in general. Specifically, relative significant differences were detected between the quality scores of the drawing outcomes obtained by the two groups. The results imply that creative drawing activities can be unaffectedly achieved in an interference of working memory, although the involved people may think they are affected during the activities and believe that they may perform better without the interference.

  • 25.
    Hirsch, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Influencing body awareness through interactive technology in physical training: A design-oriented research in equestrian vaulting with an excursion into neuromuscular biofeedback2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Current research is underdeveloped regarding the application and development of interactive technology in instructed physical training. This includes the lack of training tools and methods targeting body awareness. Underdeveloped body awareness leads to a lack of self-confidence and the lack to relate to oneself emotionally, mentally and/or physically, as well as the inability to relate oneself to the external world. Therefore further research in this area is strongly required.

    Accordingly, this thesis deals with the questions of what types of body awareness can be designed for in a physical training context as well as how to influence the identified types through interactive technology. Reducing the thesis’ scope, the applied research concentrated on the physical training of equestrian vaulting. Therefore, a research through design approach was applied in combination with a selection of embodied interaction methods. In total, two epochés, two bodystorming workshops, two experienced prototyping sessions, one expert interview and one pilot study were conducted by focusing on an explorative, qualitative approach while putting high emphasize on the user involvement. Through the iterative development, the effect of neuromuscular biofeedback on body awareness was tested and discussed on a superficial level as one example of how interactive technology could influence body awareness.

    Overall, results identified various types of and issues with body awareness that re-occurred throughout different training situations and for which the integration of interactive technology could be beneficial. These results further lead to design implications for and insights about the design of interactive technology aiming at supporting the training of the identified body awareness issues.

  • 26. Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Bowen, Simon
    Dalsgaard, Peter
    Reeves, Stuart
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Framing IxD knowledge2015In: ACM Interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Ivanova, Vita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Open acess to customer product information? A case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson is a Swedish technology company that provides and operates telecommunication networks,television and video systems and related services in the world.A Case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs is a research work about technical informationavailability problems on Internet.According to customer product information standards, specific company’s divisions are responsible formeaningful technical information content creation and diffusion to the end user.The main research question is what information related to Ericsson RBS can be found on the Internetand what possible solutions should Ericsson offer to these groups in terms of technical informationavailability?An Internet analysis showed that on Internet appears user generated content about RBS 6000 in a wayof video instructions, manuals selling and consultation giving.This situation shows that users are interested and need information related to technical equipment, buton the other hand it is essentially illegal to spread information this way, and it might have seriousconsequences in terms of misuse or misinterpretation of information.This thesis is investigating Ericsson information sharing traditions in relation to the situation of openinformation on the Internet. Some recommendations for further work are given.

  • 28.
    Kesemen, Cem
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Mobile Companions for Cloud Storage Applications: Evaluation of interface differences between various platforms.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud computing and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) has grown immensely in the last couple of years. Thanks to cheap costs and ever-online mobile computers such as iOS and Android devices, services that do not need any central installation and only require web browsers and client softwares to be functional have become the norm for many users.

    I wanted to emphasize “users” speciZically, because not everyone is happy with certain aspects of this brave new world. Namely corporations, who are extremely paranoid on security and would like to control every bit of their data.

    As ownCloud decided to grow and become a “cloud Zile systems provider for companies”, they needed to catch up with other players, and they needed to catch up fast. While one body of resources were set to work on closing any functional gaps on the web interface, another team was working on getting mobile clients ready.

    My study here is on getting mobile counterparts of ownCloud, by both protecting the familiarity to the web based client and making the apps follow their respective interaction guidelines. I have created mockups for all three major platforms (iOS, Android and Windows Phone). 

  • 29.
    Kilicbay, Can
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Taking a step forward: Operator Oriented Solutions for the Future of the Assembly Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study targets assembly industry, which deals with varying businesses that require any product assembly. It reflects on the challenges of the current production lines at assembly industry regarding the trends of both the consumer and the industrial developments on technology investigated which aspects can be improved or re-designed under the given delimitations. Moreover further consideration is done on human operators’ role in the assembly line and their future role in correlation with their current challenges and expectations. Results and further analysis are done from the drift of the R&D on future assembly environment by considering interconnected software-hardware-human sides of the interaction, the change in the balance of products and also to point out new areas of research to Marketing and R&D Departments.

  • 30.
    Kjellin, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Winkler Pettersson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Seipel, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Different levels of 3D: An evaluation of visualized discrete spatiotemporal data in space-time cubes2010In: Information Visualization, ISSN 1473-8716, E-ISSN 1473-8724, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 152-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kjellin, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Winkler Pettersson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Seipel, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Evaluating 2D and 3D Visualizations of Spatiotemporal Information2010In: ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, ISSN 1544-3558, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 19:1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Lee, Young-Lim
    et al.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Bingham, Ned
    Bingham, Geoffrey P.
    Object recognition using metric shape2012In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 69, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most previous studies of 3D shape perception have shown a general inability to visually perceive metric shape. In line with this, studies of object recognition have shown that only qualitative differences, not quantitative or metric ones can be used effectively for object recognition. Recently. Bingham and Lind (2008) found that large perspective changes (>= 45 degrees) allow perception of metric shape and Lee and Bingham (2010) found that this, in turn, allowed accurate feedforward reaches-to-grasp objects varying in metric shape. We now investigated whether this information would allow accurate and effective recognition of objects that vary in respect to metric shape. Both judgment accuracies (d') and reaction times confirmed that, with the availability of visual information in large perspective changes, recognition of objects using quantitative as compared to qualitative properties was equivalent in accuracy and speed of judgments. The ability to recognize objects based on their metric shape is, therefore, a function of the availability or unavailability of requisite visual information. These issues and results are discussed in the context of the Two Visual System hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, 2006).

  • 33.
    Lehtimäki, Vera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Supporting Children's Self-esteem Development Using Mobile Application: Theoretical background and design of the user interface2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 34.
    Lopez, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Concept Design to improve an e-service: Improving one of the e-services offered by the municipality of Uppsala2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 35.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A reflection on interdisciplinarity research in universal design toward sustainability2017In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of universal design (UD) is growing from its devised domain of accessibility, thus becoming a stimulating research topic reaching further beyond the field of human/computer interaction. An inspiring characteristic of the universally designed end product and its value to the user would be its nature of sustainability. However, the many factors of that quality are yet to be fully learned by the practice and application of UD. One way to resolve this problem is to expand the UD research toward interdisciplinary practice. In this paper, the status of UD and its relationship to sustainability in terms of its possibility and perspective with interdisciplinary research are analyzed. A framework unfolds which explains and argues how interdisciplinary research could help UD advance toward the aim of sustainability. The proposed theoretical framework would open new research opportunities to expand the UD concepts along the path of creating holistic values on sustainability.

  • 36.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Study of Universal Design Principles Assessment2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goal in this pilot study is to explore the effect of universal design principles on the user’s behavior as they use a system. It is found that the universal design principles are not really able to symbolize the system’s attitude towards user’s action on the system. This research result is a part of a larger and ongoing research effort to discover if a system is designed universally or not based on the design principles and thereby come up with new innovative universal design principles.

  • 37.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessment of Universal Design Principles for Analyzing Computer Games’ Accessibility2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universal design is a significant topic of interest in the research of accessibility. However, to date there are no certain verification of these principles on the accessibility issues for computer games. In this paper the existing universal design principles were verified to assess accessibility in computer games. Quantitative analysis of collected data showed that some design principles are not really optimal for assessing computer games’ accessibility while other design principles were overlooked. The findings from this study take the argument of alternation of existing universal design principles further ahead and initializes the possibilities of developing accessible games design principles.

  • 38.
    Mustaquim, Moyen Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Automatic speech recognition: an approach for designing inclusive games2013In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer games are now a part of our modern culture. However, certain categories of people are excluded from this form of entertainment and social interaction because they are unable to use the interface of the games. The reason for this can be deficits in motor control, vision or hearing. By using automatic speech recognition systems (ASR), voice driven commands can be used to control the game, which can thus open up the possibility for people with motor system difficulty to be included in game communities. This paper aims at find a standard way of using voice commands in games which uses a speech recognition system in the backend, and that can be universally applied for designing inclusive games. Present speech recognition systems however, do not support emotions, attitudes, tones etc. This is a drawback because such expressions can be vital for gaming. Taking multiple types of existing genres of games into account and analyzing their voice command requirements, a general ASRS module is proposed which can work as a common platform for designing inclusive games. A fuzzy logic controller proposed then is to enhance the system. The standard voice driven module can be based on algorithm or fuzzy controller which can be used to design software plug-ins or can be included in microchip. It then can be integrated with the game engines; creating the possibility of voice driven universal access for controlling games.

  • 39.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.