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  • 1.
    Andrews, David J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Barabash, S.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden..
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Hall, B. E. S.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Phys & Astron, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Holmström, M.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden..
    Lester, M.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Phys & Astron, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Morgan, D. D.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Opgenoorth, Hermann J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ramstad, R.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden..
    Sanchez-Cano, B.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Phys & Astron, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Way, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. NASA Goddard Inst Space Studies, New York, NY USA..
    Witasse, O.
    ESA ESTEC, Noordwijjk, Netherlands..
    Plasma observations during the Mars atmospheric "plume" event of March-April 20122016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 3139-3154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present initial analyses and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported "Mars plume event" of March-April 2012. During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude "plume" over the Martian dawn terminator, the cause of which remains to be explained. The estimated brightness of the plume exceeds that expected for auroral emissions, and its projected altitude greatly exceeds that at which clouds are expected to form. We report on in situ measurements of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters throughout this interval made by Mars Express, obtained over the same surface region but at the opposing terminator. Measurements in the ionosphere at the corresponding location frequently show a disturbed structure, though this is not atypical for such regions with intense crustal magnetic fields. We tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the altitudes where it was observed could be due in part to the result of a large interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) encountering the Martian system. Interestingly, we note that the only similar plume detection in May 1997 may also have been associated with a large ICME impact at Mars.

  • 2.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Li, Wenya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Toledo-Redondo, S.
    European Space Agcy ESAC, Madrid, Spain..
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Burch, J.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, G.
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ergun, R.
    Univ Colorado, LASP, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Torbert, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Giles, B.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Moore, T. E.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Chandler, M. O.
    NASA, Marshall Space Flight Ctr, Huntsville, AL USA..
    Pollock, C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Young, D. T.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, Toulouse, France.;CNRS, UMR 5277, Toulouse, France..
    Saito, Y.
    Inst Space & Astronaut Sci, JAXA, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan..
    Magnetic reconnection and modification of the Hall physics due to cold ions at the magnetopause2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 6705-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are used to investigate the Hall physics of a magnetopause magnetic reconnection separatrix layer. Inside this layer of currents and strong normal electric fields, cold (eV) ions of ionospheric origin can remain frozen-in together with the electrons. The cold ions reduce the Hall current. Using a generalized Ohm's law, the electric field is balanced by the sum of the terms corresponding to the Hall current, the vxB drifting cold ions, and the divergence of the electron pressure tensor. A mixture of hot and cold ions is common at the subsolar magnetopause. A mixture of length scales caused by a mixture of ion temperatures has significant effects on the Hall physics of magnetic reconnection.

  • 3.
    André, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Karlsson, T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Johansson, Fredrik L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France.
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Bern, Switzerland.
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Lower hybrid waves at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 469, p. S29-S38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the generation of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range by density gradients in the near plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. When the plasma is dominated by water ions from the comet, a situation with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions is favourable for the generation of lower hybrid waves. These waves can transfer energy between ions and electrons and reshape the plasma environment of the comet. We consider cometocentric distances out to a few hundred km. We find that when the electron motion is not significantly interrupted by collisions with neutrals, large average gradients within tens of km of the comet, as well as often observed local large density gradients at larger distances, are often likely to be favourable for the generation of lower hybrid waves. Overall, we find that waves in the lower hybrid frequency range are likely to be common in the near plasma environment.

  • 4.
    Broiles, Thomas W.
    et al.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Chae, K.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Clark, G.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 USA..
    Cravens, T. E.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Phys & Astron, 1450 Jayhawk Blvd, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Frahm, R. A.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Gasc, S.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Goldstein, R.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Henri, P.
    CNRS, LPC2E, F-45071 Orleans, France..
    Koenders, C.
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Mendelssohnstr 3, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Livadiotis, G.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Mandt, K. E.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA.;Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Phys & Astron, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Mokashi, P.
    Southwest Res Inst, Div Space Sci & Engn, 6220 Culebra Rd, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA..
    Nemeth, Z.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary..
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Univ Kansas, Dept Phys & Astron, 1450 Jayhawk Blvd, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Rubin, M.
    Univ Bern, Phys Inst, Sidlerstr 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Samara, M.
    Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Heliophys Div, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Statistical analysis of suprathermal electron drivers at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 462, p. S312-S322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use observations from the Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) on board the Rosetta spacecraft to study the relationship between the cometary suprathermal electrons and the drivers that affect their density and temperature. We fit the IES electron observations with the summation of two kappa distributions, which we characterize as a dense and warm population (similar to 10 cm(-3) and similar to 16 eV) and a rarefied and hot population (similar to 0.01 cm(-3) and similar to 43 eV). The parameters of our fitting technique determine the populations' density, temperature, and invariant kappa index. We focus our analysis on the warm population to determine its origin by comparing the density and temperature with the neutral density and magnetic field strength. We find that the warm electron population is actually two separate sub-populations: electron distributions with temperatures above 8.6 eV and electron distributions with temperatures below 8.6 eV. The two sub-populations have different relationships between their density and temperature. Moreover, the two sub-populations are affected by different drivers. The hotter sub-population temperature is strongly correlated with neutral density, while the cooler sub-population is unaffected by neutral density and is only weakly correlated with magnetic field strength. We suggest that the population with temperatures above 8.6 eV is being heated by lower hybrid waves driven by counterstreaming solar wind protons and newly formed, cometary ions created in localized, dense neutral streams. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first observations of cometary electrons heated through wave-particle interactions.

  • 5. Brunetti, D
    et al.
    Cooper, W A
    Graves, J P
    Halpern, F
    Wahlberg, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Lutjens, H
    Luciani, J F
    MHD properties in the core of ITER-like hybrid scenarios2012In:  , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brunetti, D.
    et al.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy..
    Graves, J. P.
    SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Lazzaro, E.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy..
    Mariani, A.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.;SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Nowak, S.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy..
    Cooper, W. A.
    SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Analytic stability criteria for edge MHD oscillations in high performance ELM free tokamak regimes2018In: Nuclear Fusion, ISSN 0029-5515, E-ISSN 1741-4326, Vol. 58, no 1, article id 014002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new dispersion relation, and associated stability criteria, is derived for low-n external kink and infernal modes, and is applied to modelling the stability properties of quiescent H-mode like regimes. The analysis, performed in toroidal geometry with large edge pressure gradients associated with a local flattening of the safety factor, includes a pedestal, sheared toroidal rotation and a vacuum region separating the plasma from an ideal metallic wall. The external kink-infernal modes found here exhibit similarities with experimentally observed edge harmonic oscillations.

  • 7.
    Brunetti, D.
    et al.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Graves, J. P.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Lazzaro, E.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Mariani, A.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Nowak, S.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Cooper, W. A.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Excitation Mechanism of Low-n Edge Harmonic Oscillations in Edge Localized Mode-Free, High Performance, Tokamak Plasmas2019In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 122, no 15, article id 155003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The excitation mechanism for low-n edge harmonic oscillations in quiescent H-mode regimes is identified analytically. We show that the combined effect of diamagnetic and poloidal magnetohydrodynamic flows, with the constraint of a Doppler-like effect of the ion flow, leads to the stabilization of short wavelength modes, allowing low-n perturbation to grow. The analysis, performed in tokamak toroidal geometry, includes the effects of large edge pressure gradients, associated with the local flattening of the safety factor and diamagnetic flows, sheared parallel and E x B rotation, and a vacuum region between plasma and the ideal metallic wall. The separatrix also is modeled analytically.

  • 8.
    Brunetti, D.
    et al.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Graves, J. P.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Lazzaro, E.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Mariani, A.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Nowak, S.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Cooper, W. A.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Astronomy and Space Physics. EURATOM VR Fus Assoc, POB 515, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Helical equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic flow effects on the stability properties of low-n ideal external-infernal modes in weak shear tokamak configurations2019In: Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, ISSN 0741-3335, E-ISSN 1361-6587, Vol. 61, no 6, article id 064003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of equilibrium helical flows on the stability properties of low shear tokamak plasmas is assessed. The corrections due to such helical flow to the equilibrium profiles (mass density, pressure, Shafranov shift, magnetic fluxes) are computed by minimising order by order the generalised Grad-Shafranov equation. By applying the same minimisation procedure, a set of three coupled equations, suitable for the study of magnetohydrodynamic perturbations localised within core or edge transport barriers is derived in circular tokamak geometry. We apply these equations to modelling the impact of strong poloidal flow shear in the edge region caused by a radial electric field on the stability of edge infernal modes retaining vacuum effects. Due to the poloidal flow shearing, the effect of plasma rotation is not simply a Doppler shift of the eigenfrequency. Stabilisation is found even for weak flow amplitude.

  • 9.
    Brunetti, Daniele
    et al.
    EPFL, Lausanne, Schweiz.
    Wahlberg, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Resistive instabilities in low magnetic shear tokamak configuration2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Chapman, I. T.
    et al.
    Walkden, N. R.
    Graves, J. P.
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    The effects of sheared toroidal rotation on stability limits in tokamak plasmas2011In: Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, ISSN 0741-3335, E-ISSN 1361-6587, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 125002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sheared toroidal rotation is found to increase the ideal external kink stability limit, thought to be the ultimate performance limit in fusion tokamaks. However, at rotation speeds approaching a significant fraction of the Alfven speed, the toroidal rotation shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz-like global plasma instability. Optimizing the rotation profile to maximize the pressure before encountering external kink modes, but simultaneously avoiding flow-driven instabilities, can lead to a window of stability that might be attractive for operating future high-performance fusion devices such as a spherical tokamak component test facility.

  • 11.
    Chiaretta, Marco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Numerical modelling of Langmuir probe measurements for the Swarm spacecraft2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work studies the current collected by the spherical Langmuir probes to be mounted on the ESA Swarm satellites in order to quantify deviations from idealized cases caused by non-ideal probe geometry. The finite-element particle-in-cell code SPIS is used to model the current collection of a realistic probe, including the support structures, for two ionospheric plasma conditions with and without drift velocity. SPIS simulations are verified by comparing simulations of an ideal sphere at rest to previous numerical results by Laframboise parametrized to sufficient accuracy. It is found that for probe potentials much above the equivalent electron temperature, the deviations from ideal geometry decrease the current by up to 25 % compared to the ideal sphere case and thus must be corrected if data from this part of the probe curve has to be used for plasma density derivations. In comparison to the non-drifting case, including a plasma ram flow increases the current for probe potentials around and below the equivalent ion energy, as the contribution of the ions to the shielding is reduced by their high flow energy.

  • 12. Coates, A.J.
    et al.
    Wahlund, J.-E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ågren, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Edberg, N.J.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cui, J.
    Wellbrock, A.
    Szego, K
    Recent results from Titan’s ionosphere2011In: Space Science Reviews, ISSN 0038-6308, E-ISSN 1572-9672, Vol. 162, no 1-4, p. 85-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Ågren, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Opgenoorth, Hermann J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Cravens, T. E.
    Girazian, Z.
    Solar cycle modulation of Titan's ionosphere2013In: Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, Vol. 118, no 8, p. 5255-5264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the six Cassini Titan flybys T83-T88 (May 2012 to November 2012) the electron density in the ionospheric peak region, as measured by the radio and plasma wave science instrument/Langmuir probe, has increased significantly, by 15-30%, compared to previous average. These measurements suggest that a longterm change has occurred in the ionosphere of Titan, likely caused by the rise to the new solar maximum with increased EUV fluxes. We compare measurements from TA, TB, and T5, from the declining phase of solar cycle 23 to the recent T83-T88 measurements during cycle 24, since the solar irradiances from those two intervals are comparable. The peak electron densities normalized to a common solar zenith angle N-norm from those two groups of flybys are comparable but increased compared to the solar minimum flybys (T16-T71). The integrated solar irradiance over the wavelengths 1-80nm, i.e., the solar energy flux, F-e, correlates well with the observed ionospheric peak density values. Chapman layer theory predicts that Nnorm<mml:msubsup>Fek</mml:msubsup>, with k=0.5. We find observationally that the exponent k=0.540.18. Hence, the observations are in good agreement with theory despite the fact that many assumptions in Chapman theory are violated. This is also in good agreement with a similar study by Girazian and Withers (2013) on the ionosphere of Mars. We use this power law to estimate the peak electron density at the subsolar point of Titan during solar maximum conditions and find it to be about 6500cm(-3), i.e., 85-160% more than has been measured during the entire Cassini mission.

  • 14.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Shebanits, Oleg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ågren, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Opgenoorth, Hermann J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Roussos, E.
    Garnier, P.
    Cravens, T. E.
    Badman, S. V.
    Modolo, R.
    Bertucci, C.
    Dougherty, M. K.
    Extreme densities in Titan's ionosphere during the T85 magnetosheath encounter2013In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 2879-2883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Cassini Langmuir probe measurements of the highest electron number densities ever reported from the ionosphere of Titan. The measured density reached 4310cm(-3) during the T85 Titan flyby. This is at least 500cm(-3) higher than ever observed before and at least 50% above the average density for similar solar zenith angles. The peak of the ionospheric density is not reached on this flyby, making the maximum measured density a lower limit. During this flyby, we also report that an impacting coronal mass ejection (CME) leaves Titan in the magnetosheath of Saturn, where it is exposed to shocked solar wind plasma for at least 2 h 45 min. We suggest that the solar wind plasma in the magnetosheath during the CME conditions significantly modifies Titan's ionosphere by an addition of particle impact ionization by precipitating protons.

  • 15.
    Edberg, Niklas J. T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, D. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Burch, J. L.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Carr, C. M.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Cupido, E.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Space & Atmospher Phys Grp, London, England..
    Glassmeier, K. -H
    Goldstein, R.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Halekas, J. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Henri, P.
    Lab Phys & Chim Environm & Espace, Orleans, France..
    Koenders, C.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany..
    Mandt, K.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Mokashi, P.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Nemeth, Z.
    Wigner Res Ctr Phys, Budapest, Hungary..
    Nilsson, H.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Ramstad, R.
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Richter, I.
    TU Braunschweig, Inst Geophys & Extraterr Phys, Braunschweig, Germany..
    Wieser, G. Stenberg
    Swedish Inst Space Phys, S-98128 Kiruna, Sweden..
    Solar wind interaction with comet 67P: Impacts of corotating interaction regions2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 949-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present observations from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium of the effects of stormy solar wind on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Four corotating interaction regions (CIRs), where the first event has possibly merged with a coronal mass ejection, are traced from Earth via Mars (using Mars Express and Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission) to comet 67P from October to December 2014. When the comet is 3.1-2.7AU from the Sun and the neutral outgassing rate approximate to 10(25)-10(26)s(-1), the CIRs significantly influence the cometary plasma environment at altitudes down to 10-30km. The ionospheric low-energy (approximate to 5eV) plasma density increases significantly in all events, by a factor of >2 in events 1 and 2 but less in events 3 and 4. The spacecraft potential drops below -20V upon impact when the flux of electrons increases. The increased density is likely caused by compression of the plasma environment, increased particle impact ionization, and possibly charge exchange processes and acceleration of mass-loaded plasma back to the comet ionosphere. During all events, the fluxes of suprathermal (approximate to 10-100eV) electrons increase significantly, suggesting that the heating mechanism of these electrons is coupled to the solar wind energy input. At impact the magnetic field strength in the coma increases by a factor of 2-5 as more interplanetary magnetic field piles up around the comet. During two CIR impact events, we observe possible plasma boundaries forming, or moving past Rosetta, as the strong solar wind compresses the cometary plasma environment. We also discuss the possibility of seeing some signatures of the ionospheric response to tail disconnection events.

  • 16.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Plasma and Dust around Icy Moon Enceladus and Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Saturn's moon Enceladus and comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko both are examples of icy solar system objects from which gas and dust flow into space. At both bodies, the gas becomes partly ionized and the dust grains get charged. Both bodies have been visited by spacecraft carrying similar Langmuir probe instruments for observing the plasma and the charged dust. As it turns out, the conditions at Enceladus and the comet are different and we emphasize different aspects of their plasma environments. At Enceladus, we concentrate on the characteristic plasma regions and charged dust. At the comet, we investigate the plasma and in particular plasmavariations and cold electrons.

    At Enceladus, internal frictional heating leads to gas escaping from cracks in the ice from the south pole region. This causes a plume of gas, which becomes partially ionized, and dust, becoming charged. We have investigated the plasma and charged nanodust in this region by the use of the Langmuir probe (LP) of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument on Cassini. The dust charge density can be calculated from the quasineutrality condition, the difference between ion and electron density measurements from LP. We found support for this method by comparing to measurements of larger dust grains by the RPWS electric antennas. We use the LP method to find that the plasma and dust environment of Enceladus can be divided into at least three regions. In addition to the well known plume, these are the plume edge and the trail region.

    At the comet, heat from the Sun sublimates ice to gas dragging dust along as it flows out into space. When the neutral gas molecules are ionized, by photoionization and electron impact ionization, we get a plasma. Models predict that the electron temperature just after ionization is around 10 eV, but that collisions with the neutral gas should cool the electron gas to below 0.1 eV. We used the Langmuir probe instrument (LAP) on Rosetta to estimate plasma temperatures and show a co-existence of cold and warm electrons in the plasma. We find that the cold plasma often is observed as brief pulses not only in the LAP data but also in the measurements of magnetic field, plasma density and ion energy by other Rosetta plasma instruments. We interpret these pulses as filaments of plasma propagating outwards from a diamagnetic cavity, as predicted by hybrid simulations. The gas production rate of comet 67P varied by more than three orders of magnitude during the Rosetta mission (up to March 2016). We therefore have an excellent opportunity to investigate how the electron cooling in a cometary coma evolves with activity. We used a method combining LAP and the Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) for deriving the presence of cold electrons. We show that cold electrons were present intermittently during a large part of the mission and as far out as 3 AU. Models suggest only negligible cooling and we suggest that the ambipolar field keeps the electrons close to the nucleus and giving them more time to lose energy by collision.

    List of papers
    1. Plasma regions, charged dust and field-aligned currents near Enceladus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma regions, charged dust and field-aligned currents near Enceladus
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 117, p. 453-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We use data from several instruments on board Cassini to determine the characteristics of the plasma and dust regions around Saturn's moon Enceladus. For this we utilize the Langmuir probe and the electric antenna connected to the wideband receiver of the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument package as well as the magnetometer (MAG). We show that there are several distinct plasma and dust regions around Enceladus. Specifically they are the plume filled with neutral gas, plasma, and charged dust, with a distinct edge boundary region. Here we present observations of a new distinct plasma region, being a dust trail on the downstream side. This is seen both as a difference in ion and electron densities, indicating the presence of charged dust, and directly from the signals created on RPWS antennas by the dust impacts on the spacecraft. Furthermore, we show a very good scaling of these two independent dust density measurement methods over four orders of magnitude in dust density, thereby for the first time cross-validating them. To establish equilibrium with the surrounding plasma the dust becomes negatively charged by attracting free electrons. The dust distribution follows a simple power law and the smallest dust particles in the dust trail region are found to be 10 nm in size as well as in the edge region around the plume. Inside the plume the presence of even smaller particles of about 1 nm is inferred. From the magnetic field measurements we infer strong field-aligned currents at the geometrical edge of Enceladus.

    Keywords
    Enceladus, Langmuir probe, Plasma, Charged dust, MAG, RPWS
    National Category
    Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268421 (URN)10.1016/j.pss.2015.09.010 (DOI)000364257400039 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Space Board, 171/12Swedish National Space Board, 162/14
    Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Cold and warm electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cold and warm electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 605, article id A15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context. Strong electron cooling on the neutral gas in cometary comae has been predicted for a long time, but actual measurements of low electron temperature are scarce. Aims. Our aim is to demonstrate the existence of cold electrons in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and show filamentation of this plasma.

    Methods. In situ measurements of plasma density, electron temperature and spacecraft potential were carried out by the Rosetta Langmuir probe instrument, LAP. We also performed analytical modelling of the expanding two-temperature electron gas.

    Results. LAP data acquired within a few hundred km from the nucleus are dominated by a warm component with electron temperature typically 5-10 eV at all heliocentric distances covered (1.25 to 3.83 AU). A cold component, with temperature no higher than about 0.1 eV, appears in the data as short (few to few tens of seconds) pulses of high probe current, indicating local enhancement of plasma density as well as a decrease in electron temperature. These pulses first appeared around 3 AU and were seen for longer periods close to perihelion. The general pattern of pulse appearance follows that of neutral gas and plasma density. We have not identified any periods with only cold electrons present. The electron flux to Rosetta was always dominated by higher energies, driving the spacecraft potential to order -10 V.

    Conclusions. The warm (5-10 eV) electron population observed throughout the mission is interpreted as electrons retaining the energy they obtained when released in the ionisation process. The sometimes observed cold populations with electron temperatures below 0.1 eV verify collisional cooling in the coma. The cold electrons were only observed together with the warm population. The general appearance of the cold population appears to be consistent with a Haser-like model, implicitly supporting also the coupling of ions to the neutral gas. The expanding cold plasma is unstable, forming filaments that we observe as pulses.

    Keywords
    comets: general, plasmas, space vehicles: instruments
    National Category
    Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337755 (URN)10.1051/0004-6361/201630159 (DOI)000412231200111 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Space Board, 109/12; 171/12; 135/13; 166/14; 168/15Swedish Research Council, 621-2013-4191
    Note

    Funding: The results presented here are only possible thanks to the combined efforts over 20 yr by many groups and individuals involved in Rosetta, including but not restricted to the ESA project teams at ESTEC, ESOC and ESAC and all people involved in designing, building, testing and operating RPC and LAP. We thank Kathrin Altwegg for discussions of the pulses in LAP and COPS. Rosetta is a European Space Agency (ESA) mission with contributions from its member states and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The work on RPC-LAP data was funded by the Swedish National Space Board under contracts 109/12, 171/12, 135/13, 166/14 and 168/15, and by Vetenskapsradet under contract 621-2013-4191. This work has made use of the AMDA and RPC Quicklook database, provided by a collaboration between the Centre de Donnees de la Physique des Plasmas CDPP (supported by CNRS, CNES, Observatoire de Paris and Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse), and Imperial College London (supported by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council).

    Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Plasma Density Structures at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma Density Structures at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
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    2018 (English)In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 477, no 1, p. 1296-1307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We present Rosetta RPC case study from four events at various radial distance, phase angle and local time from autumn 2015, just after perihelion of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Pulse like (high amplitude, up to minutes in time) signatures are seen with several RPC instruments in the plasma density (LAP, MIP), ion energy and flux (ICA) as well as magnetic field intensity (MAG). Furthermore the cometocentric distance relative to the electron exobase is seen to be a good organizing parameter for the measured plasma variations. The closer Rosetta is to this boundary, the more pulses are measured. This is consistent with the pulses being filaments of plasma originating from the diamagnetic cavity boundary as predicted by simulations. 

    National Category
    Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics
    Research subject
    Physics with specialization in Space and Plasma Physics; Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347003 (URN)10.1093/mnras/sty765 (DOI)000432660300090 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Space Board, 171/12Swedish National Space Board, 109/12
    Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
    4. Cold electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cold electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, article id A51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context. The electron temperature of the plasma is one important aspect of the environment. Electrons created by photoionization or impact ionization of atmospheric gas have energies ∼10 eV. In an active comet coma the gas density is high enough for rapid cooling of the electron gas to the neutral gas temperature (few hundred kelvin). How cooling evolves in less active comets has not been studied before.

    Aims. To investigate how electron cooling varied as comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko changed its activity by three orders of magnitude during the Rosetta mission.

    Methods. We use in-situ data from Rosetta plasma and neutral gas sensors. By combining Langmuir probe bias voltage sweeps and Mutual Impedance Probe measurements we determine when cold electrons form at least 25% of the total electron density. We compare the results to what is expected from simple models of electron cooling, using the observed neutral gas density as input.

    Results. We demonstrate that the slope of the Langmuir probe sweep can be used as a proxy for cold electron presence. We show statistics of cold electron observations over the 2 year mission period. We find cold electrons at lower activity than expected by a simple model based on free radial expansion and continuous loss of electron energy. Cold electrons are seen mainly when the gas density indicates an exobase may have formed.

    Conclusions. Collisional cooling of electrons following a radial outward path is not sufficient for explaining the observations. We suggest the ambipolar electric field is important for the observed cooling. This field keeps electrons in the inner coma for much longer time, giving them time to dissipate energy by collisions with the neutrals. We conclude there is need of better models to describe the plasma environment of comets, including at least two populations of electrons and the ambipolar field.

    National Category
    Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics
    Research subject
    Physics with specialization in Space and Plasma Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348472 (URN)10.1051/0004-6361/201833251 (DOI)000441817100004 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Space Board, 171/12, 109/12, 166/14The European Space Agency (ESA)
    Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
  • 17.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Plasma and Dust at Saturn's Icy Moon Enceladus and Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Saturn’s moon Enceladus and comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko both are examples of icy solar system objects from which gas and dust flow into space. At both bodies, the gas becomes partly ionized and the dust grains get charged. Both bodies have been visited by spacecraft carrying similar Langmuir probe instruments for observing the plasma and the charged dust. The conditions at Enceladus and the comet turn out to be different, so we emphasize different aspects of their plasma environments. At Enceladus, we concentrate on the characteristic plasma regions and charged dust. At the comet, we investigate cold electrons.

    At Enceladus, internal frictional heating leads to gas escaping from cracks in the ice in the south pole region. This causes a plume of gas, which becomes partially ionized, and dust, becoming charged. We have investigated the plasma and charged nanodust in this region by the use of the Langmuir Probe (LP) of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument on Cassini. The dust charge density can be calculated from the quasineutrality condition, the difference between ion and electron density measurements from LP. We found support for this method by comparing to measurements of larger dust grains by the RPWS electric antennas. We use the LP method to find that the plasma and dust environment of Enceladus can be divided into at least three regions. In addition to the well known plume, these are the plume edge and the trail region.

    At the comet, heat from the Sun sublimates ice to gas dragging dust along as it flows out into space. When gas molecules are hit by ionizing radiation we get a plasma. Models predict that the electron temperature just after ionization is around 10 eV, but that this collisions with the neutral gas should cool the electrons to below 0.1 eV. The Langmuir Probe instrument LAP has previously been used to show that the warm component exists at the comet. We present the first measurements of the cold component, co-existing with the warm component. We find that that the cold plasma often is observed as brief pulses in the LAP data, which we interpret as filamentation of the cold plasma.

    List of papers
    1. Plasma regions, charged dust and field-aligned currents near Enceladus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma regions, charged dust and field-aligned currents near Enceladus
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 117, p. 453-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We use data from several instruments on board Cassini to determine the characteristics of the plasma and dust regions around Saturn's moon Enceladus. For this we utilize the Langmuir probe and the electric antenna connected to the wideband receiver of the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument package as well as the magnetometer (MAG). We show that there are several distinct plasma and dust regions around Enceladus. Specifically they are the plume filled with neutral gas, plasma, and charged dust, with a distinct edge boundary region. Here we present observations of a new distinct plasma region, being a dust trail on the downstream side. This is seen both as a difference in ion and electron densities, indicating the presence of charged dust, and directly from the signals created on RPWS antennas by the dust impacts on the spacecraft. Furthermore, we show a very good scaling of these two independent dust density measurement methods over four orders of magnitude in dust density, thereby for the first time cross-validating them. To establish equilibrium with the surrounding plasma the dust becomes negatively charged by attracting free electrons. The dust distribution follows a simple power law and the smallest dust particles in the dust trail region are found to be 10 nm in size as well as in the edge region around the plume. Inside the plume the presence of even smaller particles of about 1 nm is inferred. From the magnetic field measurements we infer strong field-aligned currents at the geometrical edge of Enceladus.

    Keywords
    Enceladus, Langmuir probe, Plasma, Charged dust, MAG, RPWS
    National Category
    Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268421 (URN)10.1016/j.pss.2015.09.010 (DOI)000364257400039 ()
    Funder
    Swedish National Space Board, 171/12Swedish National Space Board, 162/14
    Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
  • 18.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vigren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Valliéres, X.
    Rubin, M.
    Gilet, N.
    Henri, P.
    Cold electrons at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2018In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, article id A51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. The electron temperature of the plasma is one important aspect of the environment. Electrons created by photoionization or impact ionization of atmospheric gas have energies ∼10 eV. In an active comet coma the gas density is high enough for rapid cooling of the electron gas to the neutral gas temperature (few hundred kelvin). How cooling evolves in less active comets has not been studied before.

    Aims. To investigate how electron cooling varied as comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko changed its activity by three orders of magnitude during the Rosetta mission.

    Methods. We use in-situ data from Rosetta plasma and neutral gas sensors. By combining Langmuir probe bias voltage sweeps and Mutual Impedance Probe measurements we determine when cold electrons form at least 25% of the total electron density. We compare the results to what is expected from simple models of electron cooling, using the observed neutral gas density as input.

    Results. We demonstrate that the slope of the Langmuir probe sweep can be used as a proxy for cold electron presence. We show statistics of cold electron observations over the 2 year mission period. We find cold electrons at lower activity than expected by a simple model based on free radial expansion and continuous loss of electron energy. Cold electrons are seen mainly when the gas density indicates an exobase may have formed.

    Conclusions. Collisional cooling of electrons following a radial outward path is not sufficient for explaining the observations. We suggest the ambipolar electric field is important for the observed cooling. This field keeps electrons in the inner coma for much longer time, giving them time to dissipate energy by collisions with the neutrals. We conclude there is need of better models to describe the plasma environment of comets, including at least two populations of electrons and the ambipolar field.

  • 19.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Stenberg Wieser, G.
    Goetz, C.
    Rubin, M.
    Henri, P.
    Nilsson, H.
    Odelstad, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Hajra, R.
    Valliéres, X.
    Plasma Density Structures at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko2018In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 477, no 1, p. 1296-1307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Rosetta RPC case study from four events at various radial distance, phase angle and local time from autumn 2015, just after perihelion of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Pulse like (high amplitude, up to minutes in time) signatures are seen with several RPC instruments in the plasma density (LAP, MIP), ion energy and flux (ICA) as well as magnetic field intensity (MAG). Furthermore the cometocentric distance relative to the electron exobase is seen to be a good organizing parameter for the measured plasma variations. The closer Rosetta is to this boundary, the more pulses are measured. This is consistent with the pulses being filaments of plasma originating from the diamagnetic cavity boundary as predicted by simulations. 

  • 20.
    Engelhardt, Ilka. A. D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Wahlund, Jan -Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andrews, David J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Eriksson, Anders. I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ye, S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Kurth, W. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Phys & Astron, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Morooka, M. W.
    Univ Colorado, Atmospher & Space Phys Lab, Boulder, CO 80303 USA..
    Farrell, W. M.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Dougherty, M. K.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Blackett Lab, London SW7 2BZ, England..
    Plasma regions, charged dust and field-aligned currents near Enceladus2015In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 117, p. 453-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use data from several instruments on board Cassini to determine the characteristics of the plasma and dust regions around Saturn's moon Enceladus. For this we utilize the Langmuir probe and the electric antenna connected to the wideband receiver of the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument package as well as the magnetometer (MAG). We show that there are several distinct plasma and dust regions around Enceladus. Specifically they are the plume filled with neutral gas, plasma, and charged dust, with a distinct edge boundary region. Here we present observations of a new distinct plasma region, being a dust trail on the downstream side. This is seen both as a difference in ion and electron densities, indicating the presence of charged dust, and directly from the signals created on RPWS antennas by the dust impacts on the spacecraft. Furthermore, we show a very good scaling of these two independent dust density measurement methods over four orders of magnitude in dust density, thereby for the first time cross-validating them. To establish equilibrium with the surrounding plasma the dust becomes negatively charged by attracting free electrons. The dust distribution follows a simple power law and the smallest dust particles in the dust trail region are found to be 10 nm in size as well as in the edge region around the plume. Inside the plume the presence of even smaller particles of about 1 nm is inferred. From the magnetic field measurements we infer strong field-aligned currents at the geometrical edge of Enceladus.

  • 21.
    Engelhardt, Ilka A.D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Plasma Structures at the Enceladus Plume2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cassini-RPWS high resolution (20 Hz) Langmuir probe data was analyzed to find the source of fast variations in the electron density especially in the Enceladus plume region. The spatial scale on the variations is between 1 and 10 km in size. The approaches were to check for correlations between the plasma density and its variations on one hand, and boundary conditions such as the cracks on Enceladus surface as well as dust and single jets on the other hand. None of these mechanisms could be identified as the only or dominating source of observed fine structure, though partial correlation can sometimes be found and the comparison to dust presence is qualitative more than quantitative. Along the way the charging mechanism in the plume was found to be most likely due to solar UV ionization since the maximum electron density was found to be around 200km altitude. Also the deformation of the plume in the corotation direction is visible in the 20 Hz data. 

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Graham, Daniel. B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Yordanova, Emiliya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Hietala, H.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    CNRS, IRAP, Toulouse, France..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Pollock, C. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Saito, Y.
    JAXA, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C.
    Torbert, R.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Ergun, R.
    Univ Colorado, Atmospher & Space Phys Lab, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Lindqvist, P-A
    Burch, J.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Strong current sheet at a magnetosheath jet: Kinetic structure and electron acceleration2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 10, p. 9608-9618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Localized kinetic-scale regions of strong current are believed to play an important role in plasma thermalization and particle acceleration in turbulent plasmas. We present a detailed study of a strong localized current, 4900 nA m(-2), located at a fast plasma jet observed in the magnetosheath downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The thickness of the current region is similar to 3 ion inertial lengths and forms at a boundary separating magnetosheath-like and solar wind-like plasmas. On ion scales the current region has the shape of a sheet with a significant average normal magnetic field component but shows strong variations on smaller scales. The dynamic pressure within the magnetosheath jet is over 3 times the solar wind dynamic pressure. We suggest that the current sheet is forming due to high velocity shears associated with the jet. Inside the current sheet we observe local electron acceleration, producing electron beams, along the magnetic field. However, there is no clear sign of ongoing reconnection. At higher energies, above the beam energy, we observe a loss cone consistent with part of the hot magnetosheath-like electrons escaping into the colder solar wind-like plasma. This suggests that the acceleration process within the current sheet is similar to the one that occurs at shocks, where electron beams and loss cones are also observed. Therefore, electron beams observed in the magnetosheath do not have to originate from the bow shock but can also be generated locally inside the magnetosheath.

  • 23.
    Fu, H. S.
    et al.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Cao, J. B.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Andre, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Dunlop, M.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Liu, W. L.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Lu, H. Y.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Huang, S. Y.
    Wuhan Univ, Sch Elect & Informat, Wuhan 430072, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Y. D.
    Beihang Univ, Sch Space & Environm, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Eriksson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Identifying magnetic reconnection events using the FOTE method2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 1263-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A magnetic reconnection event detected by Cluster is analyzed using three methods: Single-spacecraft Inference based on Flow-reversal Sequence (SIFS), Multispacecraft Inference based on Timing a Structure (MITS), and the First-Order Taylor Expansion (FOTE). Using the SIFS method, we find that the reconnection structure is an X line; while using the MITS and FOTE methods, we find it is a magnetic island (O line). We compare the efficiency and accuracy of these three methods and find that the most efficient and accurate approach to identify a reconnection event is FOTE. In both the guide and nonguide field reconnection regimes, the FOTE method is equally applicable. This study for the first time demonstrates the capability of FOTE in identifying magnetic reconnection events; it would be useful to the forthcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. ion

  • 24. Garnier, P.
    et al.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Holmberg, Madeleine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Grimald, S.
    Morooka, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Kurth, W. S.
    Mapping 300 eV electrons at Saturn with the Cassini RPWS Langmuir probe2011In: EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cassini Langmuir probe (onboard RPWS experiment) has provided wealth of information about the kronian cold plasma environment since the Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004. The usage of the Langmuir probe is based on the fitting of the currentvoltage curve which brings information on several plasma parameters in cold and dense plasma regions. The ion part of the I-V curve may however be influenced by energetic particles hitting the probe, leading to an enhanced ion current measured. We report here the influence of 300 eV electrons on the probe current, with a current belt observed between Dione and Rhea.

  • 25. Garnier, P.
    et al.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Holmberg, Madeleine K. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Morooka, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Grimald, S.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Schippers, P.
    Gurnett, D. A.
    Krimigis, S. M.
    Krupp, N.
    Coates, A.
    Crary, F.
    Gustafsson, Georg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    The detection of energetic electrons with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 117, p. A10202-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cassini Langmuir probe, part of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument, has provided a wealth of information about the cold and dense plasma in the Saturnian system. The analysis of the ion side current (current for negative potentials) measured by the probe from 2005 to 2008 reveals also a strong sensitivity to energetic electrons (250-450 eV). These electrons impact the surface of the probe, and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. A broad secondary electrons current region is inferred from the observations in the dipole L Shell range of similar to 6-10, with a peak full width at half maximum (FWHM) at L = 6.4-9.4 (near the Dione and Rhea magnetic dipole L Shell values). This magnetospheric flux tube region, which displays a large day/night asymmetry, is related to the similar structure in the energetic electron fluxes as the one measured by the onboard Electron Spectrometer (ELS) of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS). It corresponds spatially to both the outer electron radiation belt observed by the Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument (MIMI) at high energies and to the low-energy peak which has been observed since the Voyager era. Finally, a case study suggests that the mapping of the current measured by the Langmuir probe for negative potentials can allow to identify the plasmapause-like boundary recently identified at Saturn, and thus potentially identify the separation between the closed and open magnetic field lines regions.

  • 26.
    Garnier, Philippe
    et al.
    Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP).
    Holmberg, Mika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Wahlund, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lewis, G R
    Grimald, S Rochel
    Thomsen, M F
    Gurnetti, D A
    Coates, A J
    Crary, F J
    Dandouras, I
    The influence of the secondary electrons induced by energetic electrons impacting the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn2013In: Journal of geophysical research Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 7054-7073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cassini Langmuir Probe (LP) onboard the Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment has provided much information about the Saturnian cold plasma environment since the Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004. A recent analysis revealed that the LP is also sensitive to the energetic electrons (250–450 eV) for negative potentials. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a current of secondary electrons, inducing an energetic contribution to the DC level of the current-voltage (I-V) curve measured by the LP. In this paper, we further investigated this influence of the energetic electrons and (1) showed how the secondary electrons impact not only the DC level but also the slope of the (I-V) curve with unexpected positive values of the slope, (2) explained how the slope of the (I-V) curve can be used to identify where the influence of the energetic electrons is strong, (3) showed that this influence may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept detailed by Lai and Tautz (2008), thus providing the first observational evidence for the existence of the anticritical temperature, (4) derived estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface without using laboratory measurements, and (5) showed how to model the energetic contributions to the DC level and slope of the (I-V) curve via several methods (empirically and theoretically). This work will allow, for the whole Cassini mission, to clean the measurements influenced by such electrons. Furthermore, the understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, Rosetta at the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and even the probes onboard spacecrafts in the Earth magnetosphere.

  • 27.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Swedish Inst Space Phys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Marklund, G. T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn, Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Atmospher & Space Phys Lab, Campus Box 392, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Pollock, C. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse UPS, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, Toulouse, France.;CNRS, Toulouse, France..
    Saito, Y.
    JAXA, Inst Space & Astronaut Sci, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C. T.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8010 Graz, Austria.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA..
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    SW Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Electron currents and heating in the ion diffusion region of asymmetric reconnection2016In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 4691-4700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this letter the structure of the ion diffusion region of magnetic reconnection at Earth's magnetopause is investigated using the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft. The ion diffusion region is characterized by a strong DC electric field, approximately equal to the Hall electric field, intense currents, and electron heating parallel to the background magnetic field. Current structures well below ion spatial scales are resolved, and the electron motion associated with lower hybrid drift waves is shown to contribute significantly to the total current density. The electron heating is shown to be consistent with large-scale parallel electric fields trapping and accelerating electrons, rather than wave-particle interactions. These results show that sub-ion scale processes occur in the ion diffusion region and are important for understanding electron heating and acceleration.

  • 28.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Toledo-Redondo, S.
    European Space Agcy ESAC, Madrid, Spain..
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Marklund, G. T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn, Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA..
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD USA..
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Pollock, C. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA..
    Avanov, L. A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD USA..
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse UPS, Inst Rech Astrophys & Plantol, Toulouse, France.;Ctr Natl Rech Sci, Toulouse, France..
    Saito, Y.
    JAXA, Inst Space & Aeronaut Sci, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA..
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Lower hybrid waves in the ion diffusion and magnetospheric inflow regions2017In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 517-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and properties of lower hybrid waves in the ion diffusion region and magnetospheric inflow region of asymmetric reconnection are investigated using the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. Two distinct groups of lower hybrid waves are observed in the ion diffusion region and magnetospheric inflow region, which have distinct properties and propagate in opposite directions along the magnetopause. One group develops near the ion edge in the magnetospheric inflow, where magnetosheath ions enter the magnetosphere through the finite gyroradius effect and are driven by the ion-ion cross-field instability due to the interaction between the magnetosheath ions and cold magnetospheric ions. This leads to heating of the cold magnetospheric ions. The second group develops at the sharpest density gradient, where the Hall electric field is observed and is driven by the lower hybrid drift instability. These drift waves produce cross-field particle diffusion, enabling magnetosheath electrons to enter the magnetospheric inflow region thereby broadening the density gradient in the ion diffusion region.

  • 29.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Norgren, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    André, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Webster, J. M.
    Rice Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Houston, TX 77005 USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX 78238 USA.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-11428, Sweden.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.
    Gershman, D. J.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Astron, College Pk, MD 20742 USA;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA.
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, A-8042 Graz, Austria.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Instability of Agyrotropic Electron Beams near the Electron Diffusion Region2017In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 119, no 2, article id 025101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During a magnetopause crossing the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered an electron diffusion region (EDR) of asymmetric reconnection. The EDR is characterized by agyrotropic beam and crescent electron distributions perpendicular to the magnetic field. Intense upper-hybrid (UH) waves are found at the boundary between the EDR and magnetosheath inflow region. The UH waves are generated by the agyrotropic electron beams. The UH waves are sufficiently large to contribute to electron diffusion and scattering, and are a potential source of radio emission near the EDR. These results provide observational evidence of wave-particle interactions at an EDR, and suggest that waves play an important role in determining the electron dynamics.

  • 30.
    Graves, J. P.
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Generalised zonal modes in stationary axisymmetric plasmas2017In: Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, ISSN 0741-3335, E-ISSN 1361-6587, Vol. 59, no 5, article id 054011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The MHD model enables derivation and analysis of the rich structure of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal modes in axisymmetric magnetic confined plasmas. The modes are identifiable from a single dispersion relation as two branches of slow magnetosonic continua. The lower frequency branch can be identified as a zonal flow (ZF), which in the simplified limit of static plasmas, has vanishing magnetic component. It is shown in this contribution that axisymmetric, and lesser known non-axisymmetric, zonal modes can be derived from MHD and kinetic models. The work provides a comprehensive derivation of the GAMs and ZF continua in stationary toroidally rotating plasmas, and investigates the exact solution and structure of a generalised family of zonal modes in static equilibria.

  • 31.
    Graves, J. P.
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Zullino, D.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Brunetti, D.
    CNR, IFP, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan, Italy.
    Lanthaler, S.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, SPC, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Wahlberg, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Plasma Physics.
    Reduced models for parallel magnetic field fluctuations and their impact on pressure gradient driven MHD instabilities in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas2019In: Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, ISSN 0741-3335, E-ISSN 1361-6587, Vol. 61, no 10, article id 104003Article in journal (Refereed)