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  • 1.
    Becker, Lior
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Devils of History: Understanding Mass-violence Through the Thinking of Horkheimer and Adorno – The Case of Cambodia 1975-19792016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Why does mass-violence happen at all? This paper takes the first steps to establish a model to answer this question and explain extreme mass-violence as a phenomenon. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the field of research, in which models exist to explain the phenomenon of violence, with cases of genocide being seen as problems or exceptions, and as such researched as individual cases rather than as part of a wider phenomenon. This paper uses a selected part of the writings of Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer to establish the basis for a model to explain extreme-cases of mass-violence. The Five-Pillar Model includes 5 social elements - (1) Culture Industry (2) Mass-Media (3) Propaganda (4) Dehumanization (5) Ideological Awareness. When these pillars all reach a high enough level of severity, conditions enable elites to use scapegoating - to divert revolutionary attention to a specific puppet group, resulting in extreme mass-violence. The Five-Pillar Model is then used to analyze an empirical case - Cambodia 1975-1979 and shows how these pillars all existed in an extreme form in that case. This paper presents scapegoating as a possible explanation for the Cambodian case. 

  • 2.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Kostic, RolandUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.Likic-Brboric, BrankaLinköpings universitet.
    Citizens at Heart?: Perspectives on integration of refugees in the EU after the Yugoslav wars of succession2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Amerindian–Maroon interactions in Suriname and the Linguistic consequences2015In: Languages in contact, Wrocław: Prace Komisji Nauk Filologicznych Oddziału PAN we Wrocławiu , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Linguistic Archaeology, Kinship Terms, and Language contact in Suriname2013In: Anthropological Linguistics, ISSN 0003-5483, E-ISSN 1944-6527, Vol. 55, no 1, 1-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Particle verbs in Suriname’s creole languages2014In: Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics, ISSN 1383-4924, E-ISSN 1572-8552, Vol. 26, no 3, 223-247 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Ritual language formation and African retentions in Suriname: the case of Kumanti2016In: OSO — tijdschrift voor de Surinamistiek en het Caraïbisch gebied, Vol. 35, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Maroon Creoles of the Guyanas: Expansion, contact, hybridization2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Multilinguial ecologies in the Guyanas / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Pieter Muysken, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The people and languages of Suriname2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Language Contact in Multilingual Ecologies / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Muysken, Pieter C., Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017, 21-54 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The role of extralinguistic factors in linguistic variation and contact induced language change among Suriname’s Kwinti and Ndyuka Maroons2014In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia. International Journal of Structural Linguistics, ISSN 0374-0364, E-ISSN 1949-0763, Vol. 45, no 2, 1-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Borges, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Muysken, Pieter
    Villerius, Sophie
    Yakpo, Kofi
    Tense, mood, and aspect in Surinamese Languages2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Multilinguial ecologies in the Guyanas / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Pieter Muysken, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11. Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Young children as language policy-makers: studies of interaction in preschools in Finland and Sweden: Introduction - Rationale and Aims2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, ISSN ISSN (Online) 1613-3684, ISSN (Print) 0167-8507Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dangoor, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    "No need to exaggerate": - the 1914 Ottoman Jihad declaration in genocide historiography 2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    de Guevara, Berit Bliesemann
    et al.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Dyfed, Wales.
    Kostić, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Knowledge production in/about conflict and intervention:: finding 'facts', telling 'truth'2017In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 11, no 1, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article has a twofold aim. First, it discusses the contributions to the scholarly field of conflict knowledge and expertise in this special issue on Knowledge production in/about conflict and intervention: finding 'facts', telling 'truth'. Second, it suggests an alternative reading of the issue's contributions. Starting from the assumption that prevalent ways of knowing are always influenced by wider material and ideological structures at specific times, the article traces the influence of contemporary neoliberalism on general knowledge production structures in Western societies, and more specifically in Western academia, before re-reading the special issue's contributions through this prism. The main argument is that neoliberalism leaves limited space for independent critical knowledge, thereby negatively affecting what can be known about conflict and intervention. The article concludes with some tasks for reflexive scholarship in neoliberal times.

  • 14.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Perpetuating fear: insecurity, costly signalling and the war in central Bosnia, 19932016In: Journal of Genocide Research, ISSN 1462-3528, E-ISSN 1469-9494, Vol. 18, no 4, 463-484 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Perpetuating Fear: Insecurity, Costly Signalling and the War in Central Bosnia, 19932016In: Journal of Genocide Research, ISSN 1462-3528, E-ISSN 1469-9494, Vol. 18, no 4, 463-484 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the relationship between the ethnic and societal security dilemmas on the one hand, and the way in which elites seek to prevent local-level cooperation through ‘costly signalling’, on the other. By analysing transcripts of tape-recorded conversations from the Security Council of the Republic of Croatia during the period 1992–95, the author shows that the Croatian elite based its initial strategy on the widespread fear that Croats would become dominated in an independent Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was during this phase that Franjo Tuđman and parts of the Bosnian Croat elite voiced the idea that parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina should—at least as a contingency—be joined with Croatia. However, the elite in Zagreb began backtracking in early 1992, when it became clear that the international community would not allow such a turn of events. It is also shown that fears of political domination began transforming into security concerns in the second half on 1992 due to the increasing tensions between the Bosniak and Croat armed forces. The final part of the analysis shows how local elites used nationalist symbols and the presence of foreign Mujahedin fighters in the vicinity of Zenica for the purpose of ethnic mobilization in the spring of 1993.

  • 16.
    Franks, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    From the Destruction of Memory to the Destruction of People: Social Movements and their Impact on Memory, Legitimacy and Mass Violence - A Comparative Study of the West German Student Movement and the Serbian "Anti-Bureaucratic Revolution".2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Challenges to the legitimacy of established collective memory can prove so inflammatory that mass violence, ethnic cleansing and even genocide have followed in their wake. However, if few doubt that the ethno-nationalist memory wars during the 1980s collapse of Yugoslavia contributed to the real wars and ethnic cleansing witnessed in the 1990s, no previous research has been able to explain why this is so. This paper pinpoints the determinant variable and causal link between attacks on memory and subsequent mass violence (or a lack thereof). It uses a theoretical model that ties together memory, legitimacy and power to compare the cases of West Germany’s 1968 student movement and Serbia’s 1986-1989 anti-bureaucratic revolution before establishing that the level of prior state repression is one factor that determines whether memory challenges will turn violent. The paper recommends further theory building over the permeable boundary that separates state and civil society, particularly in terms of how accessible state functions are to those social movements that seek to challenge and delegitimise memory.

  • 17.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Finland visar vägen för romsk integration: Panu Pulma (red.): De finska romernas historia från svenska tiden till 2000-talet. Övers. Leif Pietilä, Camilla Frostell och Sofia Gustafsson. 503 s.2016In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 2, 40-43 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gudehus, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    On the significance of the past for present and future action2016In: Theorizing Social Memories. Concepts and Contexts / [ed] Gerd Sebald, Jatin Wagle, London & New York: Routledge, 2016, 1, 84-97 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Haglund, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    “THEY SAY I AM A TRAITOR”: Contact as a Predictor for Reconciliation among Young Adults in Eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Even though peace accords are signed and peace is declared, many societies are far from peaceful. Rather than talking about peace, one could state that the conflict is moved from the battleground to another arena. Hence, some societies remain divided and polarized long after the war is over. This thesis explores contact among young adults from two towns in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina and how contact affects the reconciliation process twenty years after the Dayton Peace Accords. By using previous research social identity, socialization and intergroup contact, I argue that contact is an important step in order to break the intractability of the conflict and enhance the reconciliation process in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. Qualitative data was collected through eight in-depth in with young adults aged 21 to 24 at the end of January and the beginning of February 2016. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The main findings in this study are that the two towns, Goražde and Višegrad, do not provide opportunities for contact and are not suitable places for positive intergroup contact. In fact, contact with outgroup members in the lives of young adults from eastern BiH takes place in other areas of the country. The findings also indicate that contact has a positive effect on the factors vital in the reconciliation process, such as a common vision, sense of victimhood, and ingroup superiority. However, contact does not affect outgroup attitudes.

  • 20.
    Haglund, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    "THEY SAY I AM A TRAITOR": Contact as a Predictor for Reconciliation among Young Adults in Eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Master Programme in Holocaust and Genocide Studies

  • 21.
    Heuman, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, Hist, F-75013 Paris, France.
    Moral reflections and historical research: The Holocaust and French-Jewish historiography, 1945-19502016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 3, 472-494 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the role played by the historiography of the Holocaust in French society during the second half of the 1940s. The first research into the Holocaust originated with the Centre de documentation juive contemporaine (The Centre for Contemporary Jewish Documentation), CDJC, a private archive and research centre founded by Jews in Grenoble during the Second World War to provide historical evidence and prepare legal proceedings. The analysis focuses on the underlying intentions of the historiography of the CDJC, on how the Holocaust was depicted in their publications and on the reception of their studies. The driving force behind the CDJC research was a moral urge to give reparation and justice to the Jewish people after the Holocaust. The Centre came to present and comment on documents that demonstrated the Jewish people's suffering and the perpetrators' guilt in a way similar to how the sequence of events is established in a judicial process. Through documents created by the perpetrators, the independent antisemitic policy of the Vichy regime in France was revealed. However, the judicial approach of the research limited the possibilities to understand the events both from a long term perspective and from a broader cultural and political context. Internal discussions within the Centre also show tension between scientific norms about historical objectivity and the social function of history writing within the Jewish community. The type of moral and factual historiography produced by the CDJC is especially prominent in periods of political change when there is a need to highlight the experiences of the excluded. The CDJC's research did not play a significant role in France during the second half of the 1940s, however. Despite the Centre receiving an official recognition of sorts through participation in the Nuremberg Trials, its work suffered from a credibility problem because the CDJC was a private actor researching crimes committed by the Vichy regime. The limited attention paid by the French press took note of the importance of remembering these misdeeds, but the studies never gave rise to any thorough discussion in French society of Jewish experiences or French antisemitic policies during the occupation.

  • 22.
    Heuman, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, F-75013 Paris, France..
    The contested nation: Ethnicity, class, religion and gender in national histories2016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 2, 255-260 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hirvonen, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Education and Mass Violence: Representations of the Holocaust and Other Genocides in Swedish and Finnish Textbooks2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 24.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Utvärdering av Samiskt språkcentrum i ett revitaliseringsperspektiv: Bilaga 2 i Nästa steg?  Förslag för en stärkt minoritetspolitik. Delbetänkande av Utredningen om en stärkt minoritetspolitik, s. 319-382. SOU 2017:60. Stockholm: Kulturdepartementet.2017Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Jarstad, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Olivius, Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Åkebo, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Höglund, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Söderberg Kovacs, Mimmi
    the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala University.
    Söderström, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Department of Government, Uppsala University.
    Saati, Abrak
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Kostić, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Sahovic, Dzenan
    Umeå universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Peace agreements in the 1990s – what are the outcomes 20 years later?2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1990s, a number of protracted armed conflicts were finally ended. This period can be described as a paradigmatic shift with regards to how armed conflicts are brought to an end. When the logic of the Cold War no longer hindered the United Nations (UN) to intervene, the number of UN peace operations rose dramatically and became more comprehensive. In addition, conflicts increasingly ended through negotiated settlements rather than military victory. The peace processes of the 1990s gave rise to great optimism that negotiations and peacebuilding efforts, often with considerable international involvement, would bring sustainable peace to war-affected countries. The outcomes of these peace processes, however, appears to be far from unanimously positive. Today, 20 years after the war endings of the 1990s, it is therefore imperative to critically analyze and evaluate these peace processes and their long-term results. What is the situation like today in countries where conflicts ended in the 1990s? What has become of the peace? In this paper, the long-term outcomes of peace processes that took place in the 1990s are evaluated through brief analyses of a number of cases,demonstrating that the nature and quality of peace today show great diversity. The paper also includes a conceptualization of the ”peace triangle” aimed at distinguishing between different forms of peace, as well as a study of the relationship between peacebuilding and democracy in UN peace operations in the 1990s, concluding that outcomes with regards to democratic development in the intervened countries are generally poor.

  • 26.
    Kostic, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Hugo Valentin Centrum, Uppsala University.
    Ambivalent Peacebuilders?: Exploring Trends and Motivations in Transnational Practices of Bosnians-Herzegovinians in Sweden2016In: Citizens at Heart?: Perspectives on Integrations of Refugees in the EU after the Yugoslav Wars of Succession / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman, Roland Kostić, Branka Likić-Brborić, Hugo Valentin Centre: Hugo Valentin Centre , 2016, first, 117-136 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Kostić, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Shadow peacebuilders and diplomatic counterinsurgencies:: informal networks, knowledge production and the art of policy-shaping2017In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 11, no 1, 120-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role of informal networks in producing strategic knowledge and influencing policy responses to the 2011 post-election crisis in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The analytical focus is on networks of shadow peacebuilders, defined as actors who are often not visible to the public and who promote a mix of altruistic and personal interests of their broader network by generating strategic narratives and influencing peacebuilding policy. As this article shows, shadow peacebuilders engage in diplomatic counterinsurgencies waged by means of diplomacy, politics, public relations and legal means. Strategic narratives are instrumental in legitimizing diplomatic counterinsurgency, inducing internal cohesion within the network and delegitimizing alternative narratives and policy solutions. Yet the production of strategic knowledge by shadow peacebuilders has its limitations. When the gap between strategic narrative and actions becomes too big, the network risks fragmentation and defeat by other networks that promote alternative strategic narratives and paths of action in the battle over control of peacebuilding policy.

  • 28.
    Miljan, Goran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Brotherhood of Youth´ - A Case Study of the Ustaša and Hlinka Youth Connections and Exchanges2017In: Fascism Without Borders: Transnational Connections and Cooperation between Movements and Regimes in Europe from 1918 to 1945 / [ed] Arnd Bauerkämper and Grzegorz Rossoliński-Liebe, Berghahn Books, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ohlsson Al Fakir, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The Finnish Roma history from Swedish time to the 2000's2016In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 82, no 2, 132-134 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30. Olko, Justyna
    et al.
    Wicherkiewicz, TomaszBorges, RobertUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Integral Strategies for Language Revitalization2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Olsson, Henrietta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Whose Stories Do They Tell?: An analysis of the creation of the concept of victim in the reports by Human Rights Watch and Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Transitional justice emerged as an integral part of state- and peacebuilding processes during the same period as the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This created a market for human rights promotion in which non-governmental organizations were perceived as experts. Although transitional justice is a well-researched area, few studies have analyzed the production of knowledge by non-governmental organizations in this field. The aim of this study is to bridge this research gap by analyzing how two non-governmental organizations – Human Rights Watch and Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation – create and use the concept of victim in their reports. The reports were analyzed in two steps, based on qualitative content analysis. The first step was to code the material based on theoretical assumptions and the content. The second step was to create a narrative which was the base for the theoretical analysis of the material. The analysis centers around three key concepts: cosmopolitanism, representation and the subaltern. This theoretical framework is created based on the two scholars Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Ulrich Beck. The analysis shows that both organizations are creating a space in their reports, a cosmopolitan reality, in which they are legitimizing their own work. The creation of different subjects, such as victim, is also done in relation to this space. In other words, the organizations create the concept of victim to suit their own world-view and rationale. 

  • 32.
    Porkka, Jenni
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Terrorism and Genocide: The Islamic State and the Case of Yazidis2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Yazidi religious minority was a subject to extreme violence perpetrated by the so-called Islamic State (IS) in Iraq in 2014. This thesis argues that the violence was genocidal in nature and aimed to destroy the Yazidi group as such. Using theories from sociology, it seeks to explain how the violence caused a tremendous social change within the Yazidi community. The study further revises concepts of terrorism and perpetrators of genocide and demonstrates that the perpetrator does not necessarily need to be a state, but another kind of strong organization can be capable of committing such atrocities as well. 

  • 33.
    Rudberg, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    "Allt är harmoni": Om tillvaron på Stigbo, ett barnhem för judiska flyktingbarn år 19392017In: Tillfälliga stockholmare: Människor och möten under 600 år / [ed] Anna Götlin & Marko Lamberg, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Rudberg, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Deutsch-jüdischer Einfluss auf schwedisch-jüdische Rettungsarbeit 1933– 19392017In: Deutschsprachige jüdische Emigration nach Schweden / [ed] Andersson, Lars M; Glöckner, Olaf; Müssener, Helmut; Roos, Lena, Berlin: de Gruyter Verlag , 2017, 241-256 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Rudberg, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Rädda våra barn!: Svensk-judisk hjälp till flyktingbarn från Nazityskland2017In: På flykt från krig: Asylsökande, ensamkommande och internflyktingar i Sveriges historia / [ed] Anna Fredholm, Stockholm: Armémuseum , 2017, 82-117 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Rudberg, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Swedish Jews and the Holocaust2017Book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Schult, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Sodertorn Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Raoul Wallenberg on Stage - or at Stake?: Guilt and Shame as Obstacles in the Swedish Commemoration of their Holocaust Hero2015In: History, Memory, Performance / [ed] Dean, D., Meerzon, Y., Prince, K., Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 135-152 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Sjöqvist, Madeleine Sultán
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Everyday Lived Islam in Europe2015In: Journal of Contemporary Religion, ISSN 1353-7903, E-ISSN 1469-9419, Vol. 30, no 1, 170-172 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Torres Rubio, Juan Antonio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    DDR, Social Contact and Reconciliation: A case-study on Colombian former combatants2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the peacebuilding measures in scenarios of transformation from civil conflict to a state of post-conflict, the control of hostile forces constitutes a risky, yet necessary process. In such contexts there is also a concern to generate strong ties and incentives that minimize the recurrence of violence. For this purpose reconciliation emerges as a condition for long-lasting peace. This concept eventually requires that armed actors, victimized subjects and society in general agree on critical points and become able to live together. For former combatants these steps are especially challenging since they are confronted by an adverse environment that requires the assumption of new codes of conduct that are no longer ruled by any sort of weaponry. With this puzzle in mind, this study enquired about the extent to which social contact is likely to influence the perspectives of reconciliation held by demobilized combatants immerse in an institutional scheme of DDR. In order to gather a comprehensive discussion around this question, this thesis observed the Colombian DDR process, gathering unique empirical data from individuals exposed to varying degrees of contact. From the information collected and its qualitative analysis, it was found that inter-group interactions are able to promote deep understanding about out-groups; nonetheless, extended contact along ongoing hostilities does not ensure complete transformation of misperceptions, even among subjects coming to the end of their reintegration process.

  • 40.
    Vollmer, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Functionary Prisoners: Behavioural Patterns and Social Processes: A new approach at the example of Mittelbau-Dora Concentration Camp2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Master Programme in Holocaust and Genocide Studies

  • 41.
    Wynter Porter, Jim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    A "Precious Minority": Constructing the "Gifted" and "Academically Talented" Student in the Era of Brown v. Board of Education and the National Defense Education Act2017In: Isis (Chicago, Ill.), ISSN 0021-1753, E-ISSN 1545-6994, Vol. 108, no 3, 581-605 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay investigates the emergence of a profusion of lay and specialist literature in the late 1950s United States advocating on behalf of “gifted” and “academically talented” students. This call to reform schools around individualdifferences in “intelligence” was associated in its moment with the Sputnik crisis and the passage of the National Defense Education Act (NDEA). The essay demonstrates, however, that the emergence of intensified interest in education for the “academically talented” was actually closely coterminous with Brown v. Board of Education and should also be understood in the context of early efforts to desegregate the public schools. It holds that a closer look at the NDEA—and a supporting body of literature working in tandem with it—reveals continuities in psychometric conceptions of “intelligence” and testing from the interwar period into the post–World War II era. This essay thus makes contributions to thehistoriographies of the Cold War, civil rights, psychometrics, and education inthe 1950s.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-20 08:00
  • 42. Yakpo, Kofi
    et al.
    van den Berg, Margot
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    On the linguistic consequences of language contact in Suriname: The case of convergence2015In: In and out of Suriname / [ed] Carlin, Eithne, Isabelle Léglise, Bettina Migge, and Paul Tjon Sie Fat, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Young, Shannen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Where Have All the Women Gone?: The Production of Knowledge and Media Representation of Women's Participation in the Gacaca Courts2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
1 - 43 of 43
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