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  • 1.
    Agee, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Between Strategy and Utopianism: Ethnic Violence and Strategic War in Lika, 19412018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis proposes two separate intents lying behind the use of violence: namely, “nationalizing” (Gumz 2001) or utopian ideology, and the strategic desire to control territory. Three hypotheses are formulated on this basis, and applied to the case of Lika in 1941. The first predicts that violence exercised by actors motivated by the first type of intent will become increasingly indiscriminate, and is strongly corroborated in the case of the Ustaše. The second hypothesis, building on Kalyvas’ (2006) model, predicts that the selective or indiscriminate nature of violence executed by actors motivated by the second type of intent will correlate with the actor’s level of control: this is largely corroborated in the case of the Italians, but only partly so in the case of the Partisans. The final hypothesis, combining the arguments of Kalyvas (2006) and Dulić and Hall (2014), predicts a stark contrast in the geographical spread of violence executed by strategic and ideological actors, and is strongly corroborated. The thesis works from a micro-level approach.

  • 2.
    Arai, Kaori
    Rikkyo University, Graduate School of Sociology.
    Öhman, May-Britt (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Subjectivity of the Ainu People Described in the Book ‘Nibutani’, Edited by Kaizawa Tadashi: A New Discovery and Approach to Ainu Research2014In: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 17-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ainu studies still lack an inside perspective from the Ainu themselves though the importance of such perspective has been recognized for a deeper understanding of the Ainu by a few Ainu and Wajin [ethnic Japanese] postmodern scholar. To begin with, Ainu “self telling history” have been considered by researchers of Ainu studies to be “non-existent.” In other words, it can be said that the very act of dealing with modern history in relation to the Ainu by those materials was under a taboo for both the Ainu and the Wajin.

    This article demonstrates that a history book of the Nibutani Community entitled “Nibutani” edited by Kaizawa Tadashi in cooperation with local residents is a rare ex- ample of modern Ainu history compiled by the Ainu themselves. The book covers all the details of each family with family trees though the Ainu hardly confessed them- selves as Ainu under severe discrimination at the time. Further most of its lifestories were collected through the interviewing of those families by Kaizawa himself. As far as the contents are concerned, some stories are related to the Ainu, whereas others are seemingly related to their personal life. Thus the book presented a variety of stories that represent the then lives of the local residents in the Nibutani Community.

    At the moment when ‘Nibutani’ was published the Ainu did not voluntari- ly talk about their own history, and neither were expected to do so. ‘Nibutani’, which was completed by Kaizawa, connected the individually divided histories to each other, and made clear the relationships between the individuals and the community. As a result, the local residents in the Nibutani Community have ap- preciated this book for highlighting their own perspectives on their local history.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • 3.
    Becker, Lior
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Devils of History: Understanding Mass-violence Through the Thinking of Horkheimer and Adorno – The Case of Cambodia 1975-19792016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Why does mass-violence happen at all? This paper takes the first steps to establish a model to answer this question and explain extreme mass-violence as a phenomenon. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the field of research, in which models exist to explain the phenomenon of violence, with cases of genocide being seen as problems or exceptions, and as such researched as individual cases rather than as part of a wider phenomenon. This paper uses a selected part of the writings of Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer to establish the basis for a model to explain extreme-cases of mass-violence. The Five-Pillar Model includes 5 social elements - (1) Culture Industry (2) Mass-Media (3) Propaganda (4) Dehumanization (5) Ideological Awareness. When these pillars all reach a high enough level of severity, conditions enable elites to use scapegoating - to divert revolutionary attention to a specific puppet group, resulting in extreme mass-violence. The Five-Pillar Model is then used to analyze an empirical case - Cambodia 1975-1979 and shows how these pillars all existed in an extreme form in that case. This paper presents scapegoating as a possible explanation for the Cambodian case. 

  • 4.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Kostic, RolandUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.Likic-Brboric, BrankaLinköpings universitet.
    Citizens at Heart?: Perspectives on integration of refugees in the EU after the Yugoslav wars of succession2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bidenko, Alona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Elimination and Rebirth: The German Occupation of Soviet Ukraine in the OUN-M Propaganda2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the way the OUN-M’s newspaper Ukraïns’ke slovo framed the German occupation of Soviet Ukraine. Using a qualitative text analysis, this paper investigates sixty-six issues of the periodical, published in September-December 1941, in order to identify collective action framing that the OUN-M utilises to portray the Nazi occupation and elements of fascist ideology that are present in these frames. Combining the conceptualisation of fascism and collective action framing, the results of this study are related to the political platform of the OUN-M. The findings demonstrate that Ukraïns’ke slovo used three collective action frames to diagnose the alleged “enemies” of Ukrainians, propose a solution of eliminating these “enemies,” and motivate its audience. In the framing process, the periodical embedded fascist rhetoric in its portrayal of the German occupation of Soviet Ukraine. Furthermore, as of September-December 1941, the political platform of the OUN-M also had a strong fascist foundation. However, further research is required to explore the OUN-M as a fascist organisation.

  • 6. Bliesemann De Guevara, Berit
    et al.
    Kostić, RolandUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Knowledge and Expertise in International Interventions: The Politics of Facts, Truth and Authenticity2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about violent conflict and international intervention is political. It involves power struggles over the objects of knowing (problematization/silencing), how they are known (epistemic practices), and what interpretations are taken into account in policymaking and implementation. This book unearths the politics, power and performances involved in the social construction of seemingly neutral concepts such as facts, truth and authenticity in knowing about violent conflict and international intervention. Contributors foreground problems of physical and social access to information, explore practices generating knowledge actors' authority and legitimacy, and analyse struggles over competing policy narratives. A first set of chapters focuses on the social construction of facts, truth and authenticity through studies of militia research in the DR Congo, politicians' on-site visits in intervention theatres in the Balkans and Afghanistan, and the epistemic practices of Human Rights Watch and comics journalism. A second set of contributions analyses the strategic side of knowledge through case studies of diplomatic counterinsurgency in Bosnia and Herzegovina, African governments' active role in the `bunkerization' of international aid workers, and authoritarian peacebuilding as a challenge to the liberal power/knowledge regime in world politics. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding.

  • 7.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Amerindian–Maroon interactions in Suriname and the Linguistic consequences2015In: Languages in contact, Wrocław: Prace Komisji Nauk Filologicznych Oddziału PAN we Wrocławiu , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Linguistic Archaeology, Kinship Terms, and Language contact in Suriname2013In: Anthropological Linguistics, ISSN 0003-5483, E-ISSN 1944-6527, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 1-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Particle verbs in Suriname’s creole languages2014In: Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics, ISSN 1383-4924, E-ISSN 1572-8552, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 223-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Rapid Automatized Picture Naming as a Proficiency Assessment for Endangered Language Contexts: Results from WilamowiceIn: Journal of Communication and Cultural TrendsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Ritual language formation and African retentions in Suriname: the case of Kumanti2016In: OSO — tijdschrift voor de Surinamistiek en het Caraïbisch gebied, Vol. 35, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Maroon Creoles of the Guyanas: Expansion, contact, hybridization2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Multilinguial ecologies in the Guyanas / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Pieter Muysken, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The people and languages of Suriname2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Language Contact in Multilingual Ecologies / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Muysken, Pieter C., Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017, p. 21-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Borges, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The role of extralinguistic factors in linguistic variation and contact induced language change among Suriname’s Kwinti and Ndyuka Maroons2014In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia. International Journal of Structural Linguistics, ISSN 0374-0463, E-ISSN 1949-0763, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Borges, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Muysken, Pieter
    Villerius, Sophie
    Yakpo, Kofi
    Tense, mood, and aspect in Surinamese Languages2017In: Boundaries and Bridges: Multilinguial ecologies in the Guyanas / [ed] Yakpo, Kofi and Pieter Muysken, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Young children as language policy-makers: studies of interaction in preschools in Finland and Sweden2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 359-373Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Ottesjö, Cajsa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Children’s agency in creating and maintaining language policy in practice in two “language profile” preschools in Sweden2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 501-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from an ethnographic study of language policy as it is enacted in everyday interaction in two language profile preschools in Sweden with explicit monolingual language policies: English and Finnish, respectively. However, in both preschools, children are free to choose language or code alternate. The study shows how children through their interactive choices create and modify language policy-in-practice. We analyze extracts from typical free play interactions in each setting. We show how children use code alternation as a contextualization cue in both settings, but with somewhat different interac- tional consequences. Children in both preschools tend to follow the lead of the preceding speaker’s language choice. Code alternation is also a means to manage conversational roles, for example, to show alignment. While the staff give priority to the profile language, the children show through their interaction that skills in both the preschool’s profile language and in Swedish are valuable.

  • 18.
    Carlsson, Carl Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Bildrik populärvetenskap om dansk-judisk historia: Review of Cecilie Felicia Stokholm Banke et al, En indvandringshistorie. Jøder i Danmark 400 år. English version: A Story of Immigration. Four Hundred Years of Jews in Denmark, trans. Virginia Laursen and Fran Hopenwasser.2018In: Nordisk judaistik - Scandinavian Jewish Studies, ISSN 0348-1646, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 79-82Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Carlsson, Carl Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    From Suwałki to Sweden:: Jewish Migration and Integration, 1850–19202018In: Avotaynu. The International Review of Jewish Genealogy, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 33-37Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Carlsson, Carl Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Tidiga judar i Stockholm2018In: Gravstenar berättar: Judiskt liv i Stockholm 1775-1875 / [ed] Jacobsson, Yvonne; Herdevall, Gabriel; Zupanc, Petr, Stockholm: Stockholmia , 2018, p. 113-143Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    cooke, michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The Kindertransport in Scotland: As Represented in Local Newspapers and Kinder testimony 2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 22.
    Dangoor, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    "No need to exaggerate": - The 1914 Ottoman Jihad declaration in genocide historiography2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 23.
    de Guevara, Berit Bliesemann
    et al.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Dyfed, Wales.
    Kostić, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Knowledge production in/about conflict and intervention:: finding 'facts', telling 'truth'2017In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article has a twofold aim. First, it discusses the contributions to the scholarly field of conflict knowledge and expertise in this special issue on Knowledge production in/about conflict and intervention: finding 'facts', telling 'truth'. Second, it suggests an alternative reading of the issue's contributions. Starting from the assumption that prevalent ways of knowing are always influenced by wider material and ideological structures at specific times, the article traces the influence of contemporary neoliberalism on general knowledge production structures in Western societies, and more specifically in Western academia, before re-reading the special issue's contributions through this prism. The main argument is that neoliberalism leaves limited space for independent critical knowledge, thereby negatively affecting what can be known about conflict and intervention. The article concludes with some tasks for reflexive scholarship in neoliberal times.

  • 24.
    Doğan, Recep
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara, Turkey.
    Do Women Really Kill for Honor?: Conceptualizing Women’s Involvement in Honor Killings.2018In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456, ISSN 0163-9625, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 1247-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    So far, women’s involvement in honor killings has been attempted to explain with the emphasis on either patriarchy or the concept of hegemonic masculinity.  However, the current conceptualization of women involved in honor killings is not completely representative of all of the cases. The accurate portrayal of women’s involvement in such killings requires a broader understanding of particular circumstances of the female perpetrators, the whole dynamic behind honor killings, and of the particular relationship between victim and the perpetrator. Through reflecting on the narratives of five female perpetrators, this article aims to provide this missing focus.

  • 25.
    Dulic, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    The patterns of violence in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Security, geography and the killing of civilians during the war of the 1990s2018In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 63, p. 148-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Among the Hyperboreans: Yugoslav prisoners in Norway 1942-19452019In: Forced Labour in Serbia: Producers, Consumers and Consequences of Forced Labour 1941-1944 / [ed] Sanela Schmid and Milovani Pisarri, Belgrade: Center for Holocaust Research and Education , 2019, p. 118-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides new insights into the violence suffered by more than four thousand Yugoslavs who were deported to Norway by Nazi Germany during the Second World War. Placed in labour camps throughout the country, they were made to work under extremely harsh conditions on projects such as road construction and military installations. Particular attention is paid to their interaction with prison guards and to the political conflicts that emerged within the prisoner group. The findings of sociologist Nils Christie on the camp guards are juxtaposed against new sources from Belgrade, which became fully available to scholars in the early 2000s. These new sources show how the camp administrations exploited the terrible hygienic conditions, malnutrition and negative stereotypes about a violence-prone “Balkan culture” to create emotional distance between prisoners and guards. The prisoners complained that they were not given enough food or sufficient opportunity to maintain their hygiene, which they attributed to a conscious policy on the part of the camp administration. Lice infestations, outbreaks of typhus and malaria, combined with extrajudicial executions, not least of prisoners who fell ill, resulted in a death toll of over sixty percent for the Yugoslavs. The Yugoslavs thus suffered among the highest death tolls of any national or ethnic community relocated to Scandinavia during the war. The analysis further deals with prisoner escapes to Sweden, which were often made possible by help from Norwegian civilians. Such experiences contributed to the very positive image of Norway and Norwegians in the witness statements taken by the Yugoslav embassy in Stockholm. These statements also show that the prisoners had a very positive view of how they were treated by the authorities upon arrival in Sweden.

  • 27.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Kod Hiperborejaca: Jugoslovenski zarobljenici u Norveškoj 1942–452018In: Prinudni rad u Srbiji: Proizvođači, korisnici i posledice prinudnograda 1941–1944 / [ed] Sanela Schmid; Milovan Pisarri, Beograd: Tomislav Dulić , 2018, p. 116-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Perpetuating Fear: Insecurity, Costly Signalling and the War in Central Bosnia, 19932016In: Journal of Genocide Research, ISSN 1462-3528, E-ISSN 1469-9494, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 463-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the relationship between the ethnic and societal security dilemmas on the one hand, and the way in which elites seek to prevent local-level cooperation through ‘costly signalling’, on the other. By analysing transcripts of tape-recorded conversations from the Security Council of the Republic of Croatia during the period 1992–95, the author shows that the Croatian elite based its initial strategy on the widespread fear that Croats would become dominated in an independent Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was during this phase that Franjo Tuđman and parts of the Bosnian Croat elite voiced the idea that parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina should—at least as a contingency—be joined with Croatia. However, the elite in Zagreb began backtracking in early 1992, when it became clear that the international community would not allow such a turn of events. It is also shown that fears of political domination began transforming into security concerns in the second half on 1992 due to the increasing tensions between the Bosniak and Croat armed forces. The final part of the analysis shows how local elites used nationalist symbols and the presence of foreign Mujahedin fighters in the vicinity of Zenica for the purpose of ethnic mobilization in the spring of 1993.

  • 29.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Perpetuating fear: insecurity, costly signalling and the war in central Bosnia, 19932016In: Journal of Genocide Research, ISSN 1462-3528, E-ISSN 1469-9494, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 463-484Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Miljan, Goran
    The Ustašas and Fascism: “Abolitionism,” Revolution, and Ideology (1929–42)2020In: Vol. 6, no 1, p. 281-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis departs from a discussion about whether one should consider the Croatian Ustašas as fascist, or whether they in fact are best described as radical nationalist group, as was recently argued by Oleksandr Zaitsev in a comparison with the OUN. By combining Mathiesen’s theory of “the unfinished” with the key elements of “generic fascism”, the authors present a new model for the holistic analysis of fascist ideology over time. Following the in-depth theoretical discussion of the phenomenon of fascistisation, they use the Ustašas as an empirical case to elucidate how “abolitionist” movements and organisations keep part of their ideology “unfinished” in public until the acquisition of state power. During an initial “abolitionist” phase, fascists will focus their communication on those ideological elements of importance for the “dogmatic negation” of “the old system”. The ideological elements relevant for the “positive construction” will instead be merely “suggested” until the assumption of power.  We can find the reason behind such strategies in the statist and monistic tenets of fascist ideology, which views the acquisition of political power as an essential prerequisite for the achievement of profound political and societal change. By connecting the process of fascsistisation to the role of agency and state power, the new model also provides a basis for a more refined analysis of the emergence and development of fascist entities.

  • 31.
    Fagan, Brad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    When Conditions Are Right for Colonial Genocide: A Critical Comparison of Two Indigenous Populations2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 32.
    Fonseca, Bruna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Fiat iustitia, pereat mundus: The International Criminal Tribunals and the Application of the Concept of Genocide2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of genocide is probably the most debated subject in Holocaust and genocide studies. The political implications to its usage, or resistance to do so, have also been lengthily discussed. Yet, when it came to the legal sphere of the concept it has been mostly descriptive, without much theorizing on the politicization of the convictions of genocide. This study investigates the relation between the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda application of the crime of genocide and how these judgements were informed. Through the court’s transcripts of a number of selected cases, the research will analyze the application qualitatively, identifying the key factors that determined its usage. The analyses rest on the legal and political aspects that influenced the chambers, evaluating which one explains best. The results indicate that there is no single explanation and that both legal and political reasonings merge in the international legal arena. The courts’ decisions have many inconsistencies that cannot be accounted by a solo description. Thus, matters of law interpretation, conflict’s ending, postcolonialism, and legitimacy all take a tool when convicting or acquitting someone for the crime of genocide.

  • 33.
    Franks, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    From the Destruction of Memory to the Destruction of People: Social Movements and their Impact on Memory, Legitimacy and Mass Violence - A Comparative Study of the West German Student Movement and the Serbian "Anti-Bureaucratic Revolution".2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Challenges to the legitimacy of established collective memory can prove so inflammatory that mass violence, ethnic cleansing and even genocide have followed in their wake. However, if few doubt that the ethno-nationalist memory wars during the 1980s collapse of Yugoslavia contributed to the real wars and ethnic cleansing witnessed in the 1990s, no previous research has been able to explain why this is so. This paper pinpoints the determinant variable and causal link between attacks on memory and subsequent mass violence (or a lack thereof). It uses a theoretical model that ties together memory, legitimacy and power to compare the cases of West Germany’s 1968 student movement and Serbia’s 1986-1989 anti-bureaucratic revolution before establishing that the level of prior state repression is one factor that determines whether memory challenges will turn violent. The paper recommends further theory building over the permeable boundary that separates state and civil society, particularly in terms of how accessible state functions are to those social movements that seek to challenge and delegitimise memory.

  • 34.
    Gilbert Gladitz, Georgia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Let Our Voices Also Be Heard: Memory Pluralism in Latvian Museums About World War II and the Post-War Period2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The decades following the fall of the Soviet Union have seen drastic changes in society and culture within Europe. The desire to create a unified, pan-European historical narrative has been challenged by the expansion of the European Union. Previous Western European discourse of history has been confronted by the alternative perspectives of many former Soviet countries, such as Poland, Hungary, and the Baltic states. One of the greatest challenges to a new, inclusive pan-European narrative has been the perceived exclusion of Holocaust recognition in these former Soviet-bloc countries – a topic made more volatile considering the vast majority of the violence of the Holocaust took place in Central and Eastern Europe. Recent governmental decisions regarding the recognition of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe have been extremely disconcerting to Holocaust scholars and survivors, as well as the broad Western European community. But Eastern Europe insists that they are not neglecting Holocaust narratives in their respective countries; instead, they claim the lack of Western recognition of their suffering under Soviet rule has forced them to compensate by focusing their attention on an exploration of Soviet oppression. Eastern European scholars maintain that the best way forward is to embrace a pluralist narrative that recognizes both the victims of the Holocaust and the Soviet project. This thesis analyses the adoption of memory pluralism in two places of cultural memory of one Eastern European city – Riga, Latvia.

  • 35.
    Glöckner, Olaf
    et al.
    Moses Mendelssohn-Zentrum für europäisch-jüdische Studien, Potsdam, Germany.
    Müssener, HelmutUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Roos, Lena (Contributor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, History of Religions.
    Deutschsprachige jüdische Emigration nach Schweden: 1774 bis 19452017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Goldberg, Samantha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Uppsala Programme for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
    We are strong: An analysis on the role of local forms of reconciliation through education in Rwanda2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 37.
    Gordon, Michelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Extreme Violence and the 'British Way': Colonial Warfare in Perak, Sierra Leone and Sudan2020Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the utilisation of extreme violence throughout the British Empire. The role of this violence in the colonisation process is considered in relation to the following three cases: the Perak War (1875–76); the ‘Hut Tax’ Revolt in Sierra Leone (1898–99) and the Anglo-Egyptian War of Reconquest in the Sudan (1896–99). Methods that were used include: looting; the use of collective reprisals on civilians and scorched earth policies; starvation tactics on the enemy as well as the wider population. The decision-making processes that led to atrocities being committed are explored, as well as the significance of individual colonial administrators in outbreaks of violence. The ways in which racial prejudices, the advocacy of a British ‘civilising mission’ and British racial ‘superiority’ informed colonial administrators’ decisions on the ground are considered.

    This violence needs to be written back into British history. Moreover, this study argues that such brutalities are relevant within a wider context of European warfare and the genocidal violence of the first half of the twentieth century. Instances of British colonial violence are revealing regarding the dynamics of extreme violence. The book is divided into five sections: first it considers the place of colonial violence within the history of the British Empire; the three case studies follow; the final chapter provides an analysis of the cases studies’ findings and discusses its relevance for our understanding of both European and colonial violence, thereby placing British colonial violence within a wider framework of extreme European violence.

  • 38.
    Gordon, Michelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Prospects for a ‘Bewältigung’ of Extreme Violence in Britain’s Imperial Past2020In: A ‘Crisis’ in Coming to Terms with the Past?: At the Crossroads of Translation and Memory / [ed] E. Spišiakova, C. Forsdick and J. Mark, Liverpool University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses how (‘selective’) British memory has served to emphasise the extreme violence perpetrated by others at the expense of a critical examination of brutalities in ‘British history’. Not least, the genocidal violence of (British) settler colonisers, as well as the extreme violence that was inherent throughout the systems of administrative colonialism. The ‘history wars’ in Australia have not penetrated ‘British history’. Assumptions are often based on ‘British exceptionalism’; an approach mirrored by British memorialisation and museum exhibitions, including Britain’s Holocaust Memorial Day and the Imperial War Museum. That the knowledge produced by scholars on the key linkages between Britain and extreme violence is not ‘translating’ to the wider public, has been demonstrated through Brexit debates. The British Empire has loomed large in Brexit debates, on all levels of society, and politicians have been particularly willing to use ahistorical narratives to further their causes. The ongoing significance of empire to British national identity is also demonstrated by recent polls on perceptions of the British Empire. National narratives are currently being confronted across Europe in the face of increased right-wing populism and anti-EU sentiments. In this context, thresholds are continuously being crossed. An example of ahistorical/‘selective’ narratives is the British foreign secretary’s comparison between the EU and a Soviet gulag. ‘Balance sheet’ approaches to the Empire in particular have served to continue narratives of British exceptionalism. This crisis or selectivity of memory has brought us to a crossroads. A responsible and critical assessment of Britain’s relationship with extreme violence is necessary; as argued by Richard Drayton, we must to move beyond a patriotic approach.

  • 39.
    Gordon, Michelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Viewing Violence in the British Empire: Images of Atrocity from the Battle of Omdurman, 18982019In: Journal of Perpetrator Research, ISSN 2514-7897, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 65-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores a range of photographs taken in the aftermath of the Battle of Omdurman on 2 September 1898, the final and decisive battle of the Anglo-Egyptian Reconquest of the Sudan (1896–98). This campaign was particularly controversial for the methods that were used against the Mahdia, which included the massacring of the enemy wounded and those trying to surrender. The photographs under examination are relevant to considerations of the ensuing controversies of the campaign in which Kitchener was obliged to write directly to Queen Victoria to explain his actions, notably in relation to the bombing of the Mahdi's tomb and the treatment of his remains. As historians have previously noted, the events in Omdurman constituted a massacre rather than a battle, and areas of dispute include whether Emirs were specifically targeted for destruction in the campaign. The photographs in question contribute to this debate. This article addresses the photographs in the wider context of violence throughout the British Empire and in the context of other images of British violence. That such photographs are not commonly viewed and discussed speaks to wider issues regarding popular perceptions of the 'benevolent' British Empire, particularly in comparison to its European counterparts.

  • 40.
    Grimshaw, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Britain’s Response to the Herero and Nama Genocide, 1904-07: A Realist Perspective on Britain’s Assistance to Germany During the Genocide in German South-West Africa2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 41.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Domokos, Johanna. 2018. Endangered Literature: Essays on Translingualism, Interculturality, and Vulnerability. Budapest: Károli Books. 195 ss.2019In: Multiethnica. Meddelande från Centrum för multietnisk forskning, Uppsala universitet, ISSN 0284-396X, Vol. 39, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Multiethnic Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. Institutionen för moderna språk.
    Emansipaatiota vai etnifiointia?: Kielellistä rajankäyntiä pohjoismaisessa kirjallisuudessa.2018In: Avain - Kirjallisuudentutkimuksen aikakauslehti, ISSN 1795-3790, E-ISSN 2242-3796, Vol. 3, p. 106-113Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Finland visar vägen för romsk integration: Panu Pulma (red.): De finska romernas historia från svenska tiden till 2000-talet. Övers. Leif Pietilä, Camilla Frostell och Sofia Gustafsson. 503 s.2016In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 2, p. 40-43Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. satu.grondahl@moderna.uu.se.
    Sweden-Finnish Literature: Generational and Cultural Changes2018In: Migrants and Literature in Finland and Sweden / [ed] Satu Gröndahl @ Eila Rantonen, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2018, p. 37-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre. satu.grondahl@moderna.uu.se.
    Rantonen, Eila (Contributor)
    ‘The Minoritarian Condition’: Studies in Finnish and Swedish Literatures after World War II2018In: Migrants and Literature in Finland and Sweden / [ed] Satu Gröndahl & Eila Rantonen, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2018, p. 11-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Gröndahl, Satu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Rantonen, Eila
    Migrants and Literature in Finland and Sweden2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Gudehus, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    On the significance of the past for present and future action2016In: Theorizing Social Memories. Concepts and Contexts / [ed] Gerd Sebald, Jatin Wagle, London & New York: Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 84-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Guthrey, Holly L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Microlevel Security after Armed Conflict: A New Framework for Analyzing Risks and Benefits of Peacebuilding Processes2019In: International Studies Review, ISSN 1521-9488, E-ISSN 1468-2486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance and/or achievement of security is of paramount importance within settings recovering from armed conflict; however existing studies in the field of peacebuilding do not sufficiently explore how various processes undertaken within peacebuilding programming result in different types of security outcomes at the individual and community level. In this article, I develop a novel conceptual framework for analyzing “micro-level” security risks and benefits of peacebuilding processes, through an adapted version of Johan Galtung’s work on direct and structural violence. For the purposes of this article, the framework is applied in the context of “local” transitional justice (TJ) processes used in the aftermath of armed conflict, for which advocacy and implementation has increased in the recent past. Relying on a social psychological definition of security, I disaggregate components of direct and structural violence and use illustrative examples from existing empirical studies about the effects of local TJ processes in various settings to demonstrate ways in which these types of violence may be perpetuated, or initiated in new forms through these processes, thus posing security risks. The framework is further developed through the elucidation of factors that may help to repair the consequences of direct and structural violence and/or hinder the likelihood of their repetition, thematically conceptualized as physical and psychological welfare and social justice (respective to direct and structural violence) that I suggest link to security benefits. The framework intends to provide new perspectives on understanding how peacebuilding processes may both promote and prevent security from being realized at the local level following armed conflict.

  • 49.
    Guthrey, Holly L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Brounéus, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The Challenge of Reconciling Tradition with Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: The Case of Solomon Islands2018In: Understanding Quality Peace: Peacebuilding after Civil War / [ed] Madhav Joshi, Peter Wallensteen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Haglund, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    “THEY SAY I AM A TRAITOR”: Contact as a Predictor for Reconciliation among Young Adults in Eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Even though peace accords are signed and peace is declared, many societies are far from peaceful. Rather than talking about peace, one could state that the conflict is moved from the battleground to another arena. Hence, some societies remain divided and polarized long after the war is over. This thesis explores contact among young adults from two towns in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina and how contact affects the reconciliation process twenty years after the Dayton Peace Accords. By using previous research social identity, socialization and intergroup contact, I argue that contact is an important step in order to break the intractability of the conflict and enhance the reconciliation process in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. Qualitative data was collected through eight in-depth in with young adults aged 21 to 24 at the end of January and the beginning of February 2016. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The main findings in this study are that the two towns, Goražde and Višegrad, do not provide opportunities for contact and are not suitable places for positive intergroup contact. In fact, contact with outgroup members in the lives of young adults from eastern BiH takes place in other areas of the country. The findings also indicate that contact has a positive effect on the factors vital in the reconciliation process, such as a common vision, sense of victimhood, and ingroup superiority. However, contact does not affect outgroup attitudes.

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