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  • 1. Gyllenhammar, Irina
    et al.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Berger, Urs
    Ridefelt, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Benskin, Jonathan P
    Lignell, Sanna
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Glynn, Anders
    Perfluoroalkyl acid levels in first-time mothers in relation to offspring weight gain and growth2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 111, p. 191-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated if maternal body burdens of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) at the time of delivery are associated with birth outcome and if early life exposure (in utero/nursing) is associated with early childhood growth and weight gain. Maternal PFAA body burdens were estimated by analysis of serum samples from mothers living in Uppsala County, Sweden (POPUP), sampled three weeks after delivery between 1996 and 2011. Data on child length and weight were collected from medical records and converted into standard deviation scores (SDS). Multiple linear regression models with appropriate covariates were used to analyze associations between maternal PFAA levels and birth outcomes (n=381). After birth Generalized Least Squares models were used to analyze associations between maternal PFAA and child growth (n=200). Inverse associations were found between maternal levels of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), and birth weight SDS with a change of -0.10 to -0.18 weight SDS for an inter-quartile range (IQR) increase in ng/g PFAA. After birth, weight and length SDS were not significantly associated with maternal PFAA. However, BMI SDS was significantly associated with PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS at 3 and 4years of age, and with PFOS at 4 and 5years of age. If causal, these associations suggest that PFAA affects fetal and childhood body development in different directions.

  • 2.
    Heu, Verena
    et al.
    PMU, Univ Klin Kinder & Jugendheilkunde, Salzburg, Austria..
    Aigner, Elmar
    PMU, Univ Klin Innere Med 1, Salzburg, Austria..
    Bergsten, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Cadamuro, Janne
    PMU, Univ Inst Med Chem Lab Diagnost, Salzburg, Austria..
    Ciba, Iris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Dahlbom, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Forslund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Kedenko, Ludmilla
    PMU, Univ Klin Innere Med 1, Salzburg, Austria..
    Lang, Josef
    PMU, Univ Klin Innere Med 1, Salzburg, Austria..
    Manell, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Katharina, Paulmichl
    PMU, Univ Klin Kinder & Jugendheilkunde, Salzburg, Austria..
    Bernhard, Paulweber
    PMU, Univ Klin Innere Med 1, Salzburg, Austria..
    Kirsten, Roomp
    Univ Luxemburg, LCSB, Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Kurt, Widhalm
    PMU, Univ Klin Kinder & Jugendheilkunde, Salzburg, Austria..
    Fanni, Zsoldos
    PMU, Univ Klin Kinder & Jugendheilkunde, Salzburg, Austria..
    Daniel, Weghuber
    PMU, Univ Klin Kinder & Jugendheilkunde, Salzburg, Austria..
    Effect of Glucose Load on the Incretin Response (GLP-1) in obese Adolescents compared to the normal-weight Adolescents2017In: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, ISSN 0043-5325, E-ISSN 1613-7671, Vol. 129, no 19-20, p. 736-736Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Lindblad, Ida
    et al.
    The Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engström, Ann-Charlotte
    Child and Youth Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    The Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder require specific support from healthcare professionals2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1994-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Managing type 1 diabetes mellitus requires efficient cognitive and executive skills, and adolescents who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may face specific challenges. This study explored young people's experiences of diabetes treatment and care.

    METHOD: In a population-based study, comprising 175 patients aged 5-16 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus in two Swedish counties, we found that eight also met criteria for ADHD. Six of these, aged 14.5-16 years, participated 2013-2014 in interviews that targeted aspects of their diabetes treatment. Conducted by two psychologists, these used the inductive qualitative, semi-structured interview format.

    RESULTS: The two boys and four girls all reported difficulties in creating routines for their diabetes treatment and that problems were aggravated during stress. They had been criticised by their parents and the diabetes team when their blood levels indicated inadequate diabetes control. They requested ongoing information, involvement of their friends, group meetings and easy access to the healthcare system during difficult times.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and concomitant ADHD faced problems with their diabetes management, especially during stressful situations. Diabetes care provision should pay particular attention to patients with co-existing neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD.

  • 4.
    Manell, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Forslund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Bergsten, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    TNFSF14: a potential contributor to hyperinsulinaemia in childhood obesity2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S168-S168Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lindstrom, K.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Dept Neuropaediat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Khalifa, Najah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Fernell, E.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gillberg Neuropsychiat Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Previously undiagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder associated with poor metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 816-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managing modern diabetes treatment requires efficient executive functions. Patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and type 1 diabetes have poor metabolic control and present with ketoacidosis more often than patients without ADHD. Objective: To assess whether patients with type 1 diabetes and with indications of executive problems met criteria for ADHD, and to investigate whether these patients had difficulties achieving metabolic control. Methods: In a hospital-based study, including 3 pediatric departments at hospitals in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden, questionnaires regarding executive problems had been filled out by 12- to 18-year-old patients with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Out of 166 patients with completed questionnaires, 49 were selected for a clinical study due to reported executive problems/ADHD symptoms. However, 7 already had a diagnosis of ADHD, 21 denied follow-up, 8 did not respond, leaving 13 adolescents for the clinical assessment. Results: Of the clinically assessed adolescents, 9 (6 girls) met criteria for ADHD. Patients who did not respond to the follow-up and patients who were diagnosed with ADHD within the study, showed to a larger extent than the other study groups high HbA1c levels (>70 mmol/mol, 8,6%). HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (8.6%) was associated with diagnosed ADHD (prior to or within the study), odds ratio 2.96 (95% confidence interval 1.02-8.60). Conclusion: Patients with type 1 diabetes and poor metabolic control should be assessed with regard to ADHD. There is a need for paying special attention to girls with poor metabolic control.

  • 6.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Haas, Josephine
    Swenne, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Torbjörnsdotter, Torun
    Åkesson, Karin
    Örtqvist, Eva
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Self- and parent-reported executive problems in adolescents with type 1 diabetes are associated with poor metabolic control and low physical activity.2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Management of diabetes is demanding and requires efficient cognitive skills, especially in the domain of executive functioning. However, the impact of impaired executive functions on diabetes control has been studied to a limited extent. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between executive problems and diabetes control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and forty-one of 477 (51%) of 12- to 18-year-old adolescents, with a diabetes duration of >2 years in Stockholm, Uppsala, and Jönköping participated. Parents and adolescents completed questionnaires, including Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) and demographic background factors. Diabetes-related data were collected from the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry, SWEDIABKIDS. Self-rated and parent-rated executive problems were analyzed with regard to gender, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), frequency of outpatient visits, and physical activity, using chi-square tests or Fisher's test, where P-values <.05 were considered significant. Furthermore, adjusted logistic regressions were performed with executive problems as independent variable.

    RESULTS: Executive problems, according to BRIEF and/or ADHD-RS were for both genders associated with mean HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (patient rating P = .000, parent rating P = .017), a large number of outpatient visits (parent rating P = .015), and low physical activity (patient rating P = .000, parent rating P = .025). Self-rated executive problems were more prevalent in girls (P = .032), while parents reported these problems to a larger extent in boys (P = .028).

    CONCLUSION: Executive problems are related to poor metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Patients with executive problems need to be recognized by the diabetes team and the diabetes care should be organized to provide adequate support for these patients.

  • 7.
    Olivo, Gaia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Wiemerslage, Lyle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Swenne, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Zhukovsky, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Salonen-Ros, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Gaudio, Santino
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Univ Campus BioMed Roma, Ctr Integrated Res CIR, Area Diagnost Imaging, Rome, Italy.
    Brooks, Samantha J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Atypical anorexia nervosa is not related to brain structural changes in newly diagnosed adolescent patients.2018In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, ISSN 0276-3478, E-ISSN 1098-108X, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with atypical anorexia nervosa (AN) have many features overlapping with AN in terms of genetic risk, age of onset, psychopathology and prognosis of outcome, although the weight loss may not be a core factor. While brain structural alterations have been reported in AN, there are currently no data regarding atypical AN patients.

    METHOD: We investigated brain structure through a voxel-based morphometry analysis in 22 adolescent females newly-diagnosed with atypical AN, and 38 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). ED-related psychopathology, impulsiveness and obsessive-compulsive traits were assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and Obsessive-compulsive Inventory Revised (OCI-R), respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was also calculated.

    RESULTS: Patients and HC differed significantly on BMI (p < .002), EDE-Q total score (p < .000) and OCI-R total score (p < .000). No differences could be detected in grey matter (GM) regional volume between groups.

    DISCUSSION: The ED-related cognitions in atypical AN patients would suggest that atypical AN and AN could be part of the same spectrum of restrictive-ED. However, contrary to previous reports in AN, our atypical AN patients did not show any GM volume reduction. The different degree of weight loss might play a role in determining such discrepancy. Alternatively, the preservation of GM volume might indeed differentiate atypical AN from AN.

  • 8.
    Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics. Univ Newcastle, John Hunter Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat Endocrinol & Diabet, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Univ Newcastle, Fac Hlth & Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Dept Anat & Neurosci, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Bensing, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alimohammadi, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Dalin, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oscarson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhang, Ming-Dong
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Mol Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Perheentupa, Jaakko
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Hosp Children & Adolescents, Helsinki, Finland..
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology. U.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Fransson, Anette
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Meloni, Antonella
    Univ Cagliari, Dept Biomed Biotechnol Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Scott, Rodney J.
    Univ Newcastle, Informat Based Med, Hunter Med Res Inst, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Univ Newcastle, Sch Biomed Sci, Fac Hlth & Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Hunter Area Pathol Serv, Div Mol Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Crock, Patricia A.
    Univ Newcastle, John Hunter Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat Endocrinol & Diabet, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.;Univ Newcastle, Fac Hlth & Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Hunter Area Pathol Serv, Div Mol Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia..
    Identification of endothelin-converting enzyme-2 as an autoantigen in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 12017In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a rare monogenic autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. High titer autoantibodies are a characteristic feature of APS1 and are often associated with particular disease manifestations. Pituitary deficits are reported in up to 7% of all APS1 patients, with immunoreactivity to pituitary tissue frequently reported. We aimed to isolate and identify specific pituitary autoantigens in patients with APS1. Immunoscreening of a pituitary cDNA expression library identified endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-2 as a potential candidate autoantigen. Immunoreactivity against ECE-2 was detected in 46% APS1 patient sera, with no immunoreactivity detectable in patients with other autoimmune disorders or healthy controls. Quantitative-PCR showed ECE-2 mRNA to be most abundantly expressed in the pancreas with high levels also in the pituitary and brain. In the pancreas ECE-2 was co-expressed with insulin or somatostatin, but not glucagon and was widely expressed in GH producing cells in the guinea pig pituitary. The correlation between immunoreactivity against ECE-2 and the major recognized clinical phenotypes of APS1 including hypopituitarism was not apparent. Our results identify ECE-2 as a specific autoantigen in APS1 with a restricted neuroendocrine distribution.

  • 9.
    Swenne, Ingemar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Salonen-Ros, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Family-based intervention in adolescent restrictive eating disorders: early treatment response and low weight suppression is associated with favourable one-year outcome2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family-based treatments are first-line treatments for adolescents with restrictive eating disorders (ED) but have to be improved since outcome is poor for some. We have investigated the one-year outcome of a family-based intervention programme with defined and decisive interventions at the start of treatment.

    Method: Data pertaining 201 adolescents with restrictive ED with features of anorexia nervosa but not fulfilling the weight criterion starting treatment 2010-2015, had a wide range of body mass index (BMI) and of weight loss at presentation, and completed a one-year follow-up was analysed. Recovery from the ED was defined as an Eating Disorder Examination-questionnaire (EDE-Q) score < 2.0 or as not fulfilling criteria for an ED at a clinical interview.

    Results: By EDE-Q 130 (65%) had recovered at 1 year and by clinical interview 106 (53%). According to the EDE-Q criterion recovery was independently associated with lower EDE-Q score at presentation, higher weight gain after 3 months of treatment and lower weight suppression at follow-up, weight suppression being defined as the difference between premorbid and current BMI. Not fulfilling criteria for an ED was associated with the same factors and also by higher BMI at presentation.

    Conclusion: The observations that low weight and high ED cognitions confer a poor prognosis but that rapid weight gain at the start of treatment predicts a better prognosis are presently extended to adolescents with restrictive ED with a wide range of BMI at presentation. High weight suppression at follow-up is associated with a poor prognosis and indicates the importance of taking premorbid BMI into account when setting weight targets for treatment.

  • 10.
    Tidblad, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ritzen, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekstrom, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Comparison of Lipid And Glucose Metabolism Between Short Prepubertal Children And Healthy Children of Normal Height2017In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 88, p. 303-304Article in journal (Other academic)
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