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  • 1.
    Abdulcadir, Jasmine
    et al.
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Abdulcadir, Omar
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Caillet, Martin
    Outpatient Clinic for Women with FGM/C, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Geneva University Hospitals.
    Catania, Lucrezia
    Referral Centre for Preventing and Curing Female Genital Mutilation, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Cuzin, Béatrice
    Division of Urology and Transplantation, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Foldès, Pierre
    Institute of Reproductive Health, Saint Germain en Laye, Paris, France.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista
    Refugee Women's Health Clinic, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maricopa Integrated Health System.
    Nour, Nawal
    Global Ob/Gyn and African Women's Health Center, Ambulatory Obstetrics, Office for Multicultural Careers, Division of Global Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
    Ouedraogo, Charlemagne
    University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Warren, Nicole
    Department of Community Public Health Nursing, John Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Wylomanski, Sophie
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France.
    Clitoral Surgery After Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting2017In: Aesthetic surgery journal, ISSN 1090-820X, E-ISSN 1527-330X, Vol. 37, no 9, p. NP113-NP115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahrne, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A,8th Floor, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shytt, Erica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A,8th Floor, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Haugesund, Norway.
    Andersson, Ewa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A,8th Floor, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Small, Rhonda
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A,8th Floor, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;La Trobe Univ, Judith Lumley Ctr, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Adan, Aisha
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A,8th Floor, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Antenatal care for Somali-born women in Sweden: Perspectives from mothers, fathers and midwives2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 74, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To explore Somali-born parents' experiences of antenatal care in Sweden, antenatal care midwives' experiences of caring for Somali-born parents, and their respective ideas about group antenatal care for Somali-born parents.

    Design:

    Eight focus group discussions with 2-8 participants in each were conducted, three with Somaliborn mothers, two with fathers and three with antenatal care midwives. The transcribed text was analysed using Attride-Stirling's tool "Thematic networks".

    Setting:

    Two towns in mid-Sweden and a suburb of the capital city of Sweden. Participants: Mothers (n = 16), fathers (n = 13) and midwives (n = 7) were recruited using purposeful sampling.

    Findings:

    Somali-born mothers and fathers in Sweden were content with many aspects of antenatal care, but they also faced barriers. Challenges in the midwife-parent encounter related to tailoring of care to individual needs, dealing with stereotypes, addressing varied levels of health literacy, overcoming communication barriers and enabling partner involvement. Health system challenges related to accessibility of care, limited resources, and the need for clear, but flexible routines and supportive structures for parent education. Midwives confirmed these challenges and tried to address them but sometimes lacked the support, resources and tools to do so. Mothers, fathers and midwives thought that language-supported group antenatal care might help to improve communication, provide mutual support and enable better dialogue, but they were concerned that group care should still allow privacy when needed and not stereotype families according to their country of birth.

    Key conclusions:

    ANC interventions targeting inequalities between migrants and non-migrants may benefit from embracing a person-centred approach, as a means to counteract stereotypes, misunderstandings and prejudice. Group antenatal care has the potential to provide a platform for person-centred care and has other potential benefits in providing high-quality antenatal care for sub-groups that tend to receive less or poor quality care. Further research on how to address stereotypes and implicit bias in maternity care in the Swedish context is needed. (c) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 3.
    Allvin, Marie Klingberg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Atuhairwe, S
    Cleeve, A
    Byamugisha, J K
    Larsson, Elin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Makenzius, M
    Oguttu, M
    Gemzell-Danielsson, K
    Co-creation to scale up provision of simplified high-quality comprehensive abortion care in East Central and Southern Africa.2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1490106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universal access to comprehensive abortion care (CAC) is a reproductive right and is essential to reduce preventable maternal mortality and morbidity. In East Africa, abortion rates are consistently high, and the vast majority of all abortions are unsafe, significantly contributing to unnecessary mortality and morbidity. The current debate article reflects and summarises key action points required to continue to speed the implementation of and expand access to CAC in the East, Central, and Southern African (ECSA) health community. To ensure universal access to quality CAC, a regional platform could facilitate the sharing of best practices and successful examples from the region, which would help to visualise opportunities. Such a platform could also identify innovative ways to secure women's access to quality care within legally restrictive environments and would provide information and capacity building through the sharing of recent scientific evidence, guidelines, and training programmes aimed at increasing women's access to CAC at the lowest effective level in the healthcare system. This type of infrastructure for exchanging information and developing co-creation could be crucial to advancing the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 agenda.

  • 4.
    Alosaimi, Abdullah N.
    et al.
    Univ Tampere, Fac Social Sci, Hlth Sci Dept, Tampere 33014, Finland.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Riitta, Luoto
    Univ Tampere, Fac Social Sci, Hlth Sci Dept, Tampere 33014, Finland.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Univ Tampere, Fac Social Sci, Hlth Sci Dept, Tampere 33014, Finland;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mouniri, Halima
    Columbia Univ, Averting Maternal Death & Disabil Program, Dept Populat & Family Hlth, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Factors associated with female genital cutting in Yemen and its policy implications2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 74, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    A tremendous number of girls in Yemen are still subjected to female genital cutting (FGC), which carries an increased risk of health complications and violates children's rights. This study describes the prevalence of FGC in four Yemeni provinces and investigates the determinants of FGC.

    Methods:

    We analyzed data from women aged 15 to 49 years who responded to a sub-national household survey conducted in six rural districts of four Yemeni provinces in 2008-2009. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between individual and household socioeconomic factors and FGC practices and attitudes.

    Results:

    The prevalence of women's FGC was 48% while daughters' FGC was 34%. Almost 45.8% of the women surveyed believe the FGC practice should discontinue. Higher odds of FGC practice and positive attitude towards it were associated with older age, family marriage, and lower tertiles of wealth and education indices. Early marriage was also associated with increased odds of FGC practice (p < 0.01).

    Conclusions:

    Socioeconomic indices and other individual factors associated with FGC are differing and complex. Younger generations of women are more likely to not have FGC and to express negative attitudes towards the tradition. Appropriate strategies to invest in girls' education and women's empowerment with effective engagement of religious and community leaders might support the change of attitudes and practice of FGC in the younger generation.

  • 5.
    Arousell, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Carlbom, A.
    Malmö Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmö, Sweden.
    Larsson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Johnsdotter, S.
    Malmö Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmö, Sweden.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Unintended consequences of gender equality promotion in Swedish contraceptive counselling2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 105-105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Arousell, Jonna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Carlbom, A.
    Malmö Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmö, Sweden..
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Is multiculturalism bad for swedish abortion care?: Exploring the diversity of religious counselling in public healthcare institutions2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 122-122Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Sweden has one of the most liberal abortion laws in the world, granting women extensive rights to make autonomous reproductive decisions. At the same time, Swedish policy-makers are keen to protect society’s religious diversity. This ambition is reflected in decisions to grant religious leaders the possibility to provide ‘spiritual care’ in public hospitals. Through interviews with religious representatives in public healthcare institutions, we asked: In what ways would they counsel a religious woman who is seeking their advice about abortion? And how does this advice correspond with Swedish policies on, and provision of, abortion care?

    Methods:

    Individual interviews were conducted with religious representatives of the Swedish Church, the Catholic Church, and the Buddhist and Muslim communities. Interviews took place in 2016 and 2017.

    Findings:

    We found that informants saw it as their obligation to provide religious people with abortion advice according to religious norms, giving them limited opportunities to harmonise the content of their counselling with Swedish healthcare laws or regulations. Most informants argued that it was their responsibility to inform women about the wrongdoing of terminating a pregnancy, and to provide suggestions about how women could mitigate the sin in order to gain God’s forgiveness.

    Conclusion:

    Informants appeared inclined to deliver religious recommendations on abortion that were more conservative than what is established in the Swedish Abortion Act.

    Main messages:

    • ‘Spiritual care’ in the question of abortion favours the delivery of religious norms at the possible expense of women’s right to non-judgmental abortion counselling.

    • ‘Spiritual care’ is now an integral part of Swedish healthcare institutions. A critical discussion is needed about the extent to which such services should be in compliance with Swedish laws and public health aims on abortion.

  • 7.
    Arousell, Jonna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Carlbom, A.
    Malmö Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmö, Sweden..
    Johnsdotter, S.
    Malmö Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmö, Sweden..
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Are 'Low Socioeconomic Status' and 'Religiousness' barriers to minority women's contraceptive use in Sweden and Denmark?: A qualitative interrogation of a common argument in health research2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 121-121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Arousell, Jonna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Carlbom, Aje
    Malmo Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, S-20506 Malmo, Sweden.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Malmo Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, S-20506 Malmo, Sweden.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Are 'low socioeconomic status' and 'religiousness' barriers to minority women's use of contraception? A qualitative exploration and critique of a common argument in reproductive health research2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 75, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: 'Low socioeconomic status' and 'religiousness' appear to have gained status as nearly universal explanatory models for why women in minority groups are less likely to use contraception than other women in the Scandinavian countries. Through interviews with pious Muslim women with immigrant background, living in Denmark and Sweden, we wanted to gain empirical insights that could inform a discussion about what 'low socioeconomic status' and 'religiousness' might mean with regard to women's reproductive decisions.

    Design: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Denmark and Sweden between 2013 and 2016.

    Findings: We found that a low level of education and a low income were not necessarily obstacles for women's use of contraception; rather, these were strong imperatives for women to wait to have children until their life circumstances become more stable. Arguments grounded in Islamic dictates on contraception became powerful tools for women to substantiate how it is religiously appropriate to postpone having children, particularly when their financial and emotional resources were not yet established.

    Conclusion: We have shown that the dominant theory that 'low socioeconomic status' and 'religiousness' are paramount barriers to women's use of contraception must be problematized. When formulating suggestions for how to provide contraceptive counseling to women in ethnic and religious minority groups in Denmark and Sweden, one must also take into account that factors such as low financial security as well as religious convictions can be strong imperatives for women to use contraception.

    Implications for practice: This study can help inform a critical discussion about the difficulties of using broad group-categorizations for understanding individuals' health-related behavior, as well as the validity of targeted interventions towards large heterogeneous minority groups in Scandinavian contraceptive counseling.

  • 9.
    Arousell, Jonna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Carlbom, Aje
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Does Religious Counselling on Abortion Comply with Sweden’s ‘Women‑Friendly’ Abortion Policies?: A Qualitative Exploration Among Religious Counsellors2019In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1230-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abortion discourse in Sweden is marked by historically liberal ideals about women’s inviolable right to make autonomous reproductive decisions. However, to respond to the increase in cultural and religious pluralism building up over several decades, religious organizations have been given opportunities to provide so-called spiritual care in affiliation with Swedish hospitals since the 1980s. In this study we asked: in what ways do religious counsellors, affiliated with Swedish hospitals, construct their ideas on abortion, and how well do their ideas comply with Sweden’s ‘women-friendly’ abortion policies? Through interviews with Protestant, Catho-lic, Muslim, and Buddhist religious counsellors, we wanted to empirically test the presumption underlying the decisions to grant space to religious actors in Swedish healthcare, i.e., that religious counselling serves to complement existing services. We found that it cannot be expected that religious advice on abortion will always comply with Swedish abortion law and with the women-friendly abortion policy that the Swedish state seeks to impose. When policy-makers open up possibilities for diverse norms on abortion to manifest in close affiliation with healthcare institutions, they must be aware that some religious counsellors argue that only God—and not the woman herself—can decide whether a woman can terminate a pregnancy. We argue that the findings in this study speaks to what researchers have referred to as the “diversity-equality paradox”, which highlights the tension between the promotion of religious ideas on abortion on the one hand and the promotion of liberal ideas about women’s reproductive freedom on the other.

  • 10.
    Arousell, Jonna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Department of Social Work, Malmö University.
    Carlbom, Aje
    Department of Social Work, Malmö University.
    Modes of Governing: A Foucaultian Perspective on Encounters between Healthcare Providers and Muslim Women in Swedish Reproductive HealthcareManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are probably few groups of patients in Sweden today that arouse as much associations and thoughts as do Muslims from the Middle East. The core dilemma in much of these discussions is whether healthcare providers should adjust the provision of care to Muslims’ divergent religious preferences, or if they would be better off to treat Muslims in the same way as other patients. These debates are often entangled with both a concern about politics of equality (i.e. ambitions to treat everyone the same) and politics of diversity (i.e. to treatpeople from ethnic and religious minority groups differently). Inspired by Foucault’s concept of governmentality, we in this study intended to explore the principles of ‘equality’ and 'diversity’ as governing tools for the shaping of healthcare providers and patients’ conduct. We found that although these governing tools are presented as non-conflicting in health policies, there seems to be an often-present trade-off between diversity and equality ideals in their practical implementation. When these policies are assigned meaning and implemented inpractice, they appear to generate unforeseeable consequences, both for healthcare providers and for the patients. It thus appears that the policies that were introduced with the intention of improving the structure of multicultural care encounters, in some cases, had an opposite effect.

  • 11.
    Arvidsson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johnsdotter, Sarah
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Social Medicine and Global Health, Lund University.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Being questioned as parents:: An interview studywith Swedish commissioning parents usingtransnational surrogacy2019In: Reproductive Biomedicine and Society Online, E-ISSN 2405-6618, Vol. 8, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sought to explore how Swedish parents who had commissioned surrogacy abroad experienced the process ofparenthood recognition. The study consisted of in-depth interviews with five couples and 10 individuals representing 10 additionalcouples who had used surrogacy abroad, mainly in India. The construction of motherhood and fatherhood in the Swedish systemcontradicts how parenthood is defined in the surrogacy process. This study found that the formal recognition of parenthood involved acomplex and frustrating process where the presumption of fatherhood and step-child adoption as grounds for parenthood makepeople feel questioned as parents, negatively affecting parental welfare. Policy makers need to take into account the consequencesof an unregulated situation regarding surrogacy, and focus more on the child–parent relationship when regulating surrogacy.

  • 12.
    Axemo, Pia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Wijwardena, Kumudu
    Department of Community Medicine Health, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Colombo.
    Fonseka, Ruvani
    Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health, University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University, United States of America.
    Cooray, Sharika
    United Nations Population Fund, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Training university teachers and students in Sri Lanka on Gender Based Violence: testing of a participatory training program2018In: MedEdPublisher, ISSN 2312–7996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all societies, violence is a social problem and violation of human rights. Changing attitudes and behaviors, which accept violence atindividual and societal levels are key components in prevention strategies.

    The aim of this study was to produce educational material on Gender Based Violence (GBV). A participatory study design including educators and university students was used to create four teaching modules. The teaching was evaluated by descriptive surveys before andafter the training and focus group discussions followed the training session. The questionnaire covered attitudes to gender, violence and laws. One hundred eleven teachers and 25 students representing different faculties and universities participated in separate workshops in three Sri Lankan universities. The students lacked knowledge of the meaning of GBV, consequences and existing laws. Women held more gender-equitable attitudes. Both women and men favoured equal participation of work and decision in the households. Male undergraduates showed less accepting attitudes toward rape or blaming women for rape Three categories emerged after the FGDs; Maketraining module compulsory and teacher led; Mind your own business; What can be done.

    The newly prepared and context specific material was well-received by educators and students and they provided valuable inputs, which improved the educational modules.

  • 13.
    Bergström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ugarte Guevara, William J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Eustachio Colombo, Patricia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Knowledge about Sexual and Reproductive Health among School Enrolled Adolescents in Tololar, Nicaragua, A Cross-Sectional Study2018In: Journal of Public Health International, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nicaragua has the highest prevalence of teenage pregnancies in Latin America. Knowledge regarding sexual and reproductive health plays an integral part in sexual behavior. The objective was to assess school going adolescents' knowledge about sexual and reproductive health and possible factors affecting it in the semi-rural community of Tololar, Nicaragua.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study with a self-administered questionnaire on tablets was used for data collection. All 253 registered students at the school present at the time of fieldwork who gave written informed consent were deemed eligible for the study. A total of 225 participants in the ages of 11-19 years were included. Simple linear regression and multiple linear regression were performed analyzing the outcome knowledge. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant.

    Results: The general knowledge about sexual and reproductive health was moderate; however, knowledge gaps were found such as prevailing myths and poor knowledge regarding human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) transmission and contraceptive methods. Being female and single were significant negative determinants of knowledge (p-value < 0.01) and knowledge increased significantly with age (p-value < 0.05). School teachers, websites, social networks, and TV were the most frequently chosen sources of information on the topic.

    Conclusions: Increased education on sexual and reproductive health with new interventions particularly for young females is recommended. Using IT-based materials as a complement may be an effective way to reach out to adolescents.

  • 14.
    Berhane, Hanna Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Jirström, Magnus
    Berhane, Yemane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Turner, Christopher
    Alsanius, Beatrix W
    Trenholm, Jill E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Mixed blessings:: A qualitative exploration of mothers' experience of child care and feeding in the rapidly urbanizing city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have drawn attention to the vital role mothers have in safeguarding the health and nutritional wellbeing of their children. However, little is known about mothers' experiences and the challenges they face in fulfilling this role in rapidly urbanizing cities in Africa. This study aims to explore child care and feeding practices of mothers with children under five years of age in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This qualitative study was conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. A total of thirty-six interviews were conducted with purposively selected participants. All interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and translated for analysis. We used a thematic analysis approach, which was guided by a resilience framework. The findings are presented as three major themes. 1) 'Mixed blessings-balancing motherhood's expectations'. While mothers identified positively with the social recognition and sense of fulfillment of being a 'good mother', they were ambivalent/torn about earning the necessary income from outside work and fulfilling their duties at home. 2) 'Instabilities due to rampant urban sprawl'. While women expressed a keen desire to balance work and motherhood, the disintegrating social capital, due to large in-migration, market fluctuations and abrupt/forced resettlements to new housing units had left mothers without support for childcare, stressed and exhausted. 3) 'Anchored by faith: a source of resilience to cope with adversities'. In the face of the multiple adversities, mothers cited their strong faith as their most reliable foundation for their resilience. In summary, the societal and environmental changes accompanying the rapid urbanization in low income settings makes combining child care and working outside the home very challenging for mothers. As a result they suffer from fatigue and feelings of isolation. Efforts to improve child feeding and care in urban low-income settings need to consider context appropriate strategies that support mothers with small children.

  • 15.
    Berhane, Hanna Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Addis Continental Inst Publ Hlth, Addis Ababa 267511000, Ethiopia.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Jirström, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Dept Human Geog, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Berhane, Yemane
    Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, 26751/1000 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Turner, Christopher
    Lund Univ, Dept Human Geog, S-22362 Lund, Sweden;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London WC1E 7HT, England.
    Alsanius, Beatrix W
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biosyst & Technol, S-23053 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Trenholm, Jill E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    What Influences Urban Mothers' Decisions on What to Feed Their Children Aged Under Five-The Case of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mothers carry the prime responsibility for childcare and feeding in low-income countries. Understanding their experiences in providing food for their children is paramount to informing efforts to improve the nutritional status of children. Such information is lacking in Sub-Saharan Africa. To understand what influences urban mothers' food acquisition and their motivations for selecting food for their children, 36 in-depth interviews were carried out with mothers having children under five years of age. Interviews were conducted in the local language, audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis which led to the identification of four major themes: mothers give-in to a child-driven diet; quick-fix versus the privilege of planning; keen awareness on food safety, nutrition, and diet diversity; and social, familial, and cultural influences. The findings indicate that child feeding practices are influenced by interlinked social and environmental factors. Hence, nutrition education campaigns should focus on targeting not only families but also their children. Attention should also be given to food safety regulations, as well as to the much-needed support of mothers who are struggling to ensure their children's survival in low-income countries.

  • 16.
    Berhane, Hanna Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Jirström, Magnus
    Abdelmenan, Semira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Berhane, Yemane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Alsanius, Beatrix
    Trenholm, Jill E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Social Stratification, Diet Diversity and Malnutrition among Preschoolers: A Survey of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.2020In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 3, article id E712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, being overweight in childhood is rapidly rising while stunting is still remaining at unacceptable levels. A key contributor to this double burden of malnutrition is dietary changes associated with nutrition transition. Although the importance of socio-economic drivers is known, there is limited knowledge about their stratification and relative importance to diet and to different forms of malnutrition. The aim of this study was to assess diet diversity and malnutrition in preschoolers and evaluate the relative importance of socioeconomic resources. Households with children under five (5467) were enrolled using a multi-stage sampling procedure. Standardized tools and procedures were used to collect data on diet, anthropometry and socio-economic factors. Multivariable analysis with cluster adjustment was performed. The prevalence of stunting was 19.6% (18.5-20.6), wasting 3.2% (2.8-3.7), and overweight/obesity 11.4% (10.6-12.2). Stunting, overweight, wasting and limited diet diversity was present in all social strata. Low maternal education was associated with an increased risk of stunting (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.8; 1.4-2.2), limited diet diversity (AOR: 0.33; 0.26-0.42) and reduced odds of being overweight (AOR: 0.61; 0.44-0.84). Preschoolers in Addis Ababa have limited quality diets and suffer from both under- and over-nutrition. Maternal education was an important explanatory factor for stunting and being overweight. Interventions that promote diet quality for the undernourished whilst also addressing the burgeoning problem of being overweight are needed.

  • 17.
    Bjerneld, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    What has happened during the last two decades?: A follow up study of unaccompanied Somali girls in Sweden2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 101-101Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bjerneld, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Ismail, Nima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Experiences and reflections of Somali unaccompanied girls on their first years in Sweden: a follow-up study after two decades2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 305-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) from Somalia are one of the largest groups of UASC in Europe and Sweden. The current study is a follow-up of a Swedish study conducted in 1999, where unaccompanied asylum-seeking girls (UASG) from Somalia were interviewed. In 2013, UASG from the 1999 study were interviewed again, as adults who have settled and found a new life in Sweden. The purpose of this paper is to explore how these women experienced their transition into the Swedish society.

    Design/methodology/approach:

    A qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews was adopted for this descriptive study. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.

    Findings:

    UASG need support from different groups of adults, ranging from the staff at the group homes to community members, including countrymen, to establish a good life in their new country. The UASG need understanding and knowledgeable staff that can support them through the initial period, when they do not have their parents close to them. All actors in the supporter network need more knowledge about the difficulties in war situations. Former UASC can assist newcomers as well as being informants to authorities in a new country. Both parties involved need to be open and willing to learn from each other.

    Research limitations/implications:

    UASG who consider themselves successful in being integrated into the Swedish society were interviewed and, therefore, the study mainly describes aspects that promote integration.

    Originality/value:

    There are limited follow-up studies on how UASG have experienced their life after almost two decades in the new country.

  • 19.
    Bozorgmehr, Kayvan
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld.
    Biddle, Louise
    Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg.
    Rohleder, Sven
    Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg.
    Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Jahn, Rosa
    Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg.
    What is the evidence on availability and integration of refugee and migrant health data in health information systems in the WHO European Region?: Health Evidence Network synthesis report 66, Themed issues on migration and health, X2019In: Health Evidence Network, ISSN 2227-4316Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent rapid increases in population movements across borders highlight the importance of reliable data on refugee and migrant health for public health planning. This scoping report examined evidence on the availability and integration of refugee and migrant health data in health information systems in the WHO European Region. Refugee and migrant health data were available in 25 of the Region's 53 Member States, but differences existed in the availability, data types and main sources of data collection. Except for countries with population registers, the predominant data sources were medical records, disease-specific records and notification data. Data integration was often limited, and health monitoring surveys and data linkage approaches were underused. Policy considerations include harmonizing migrant definitions, promoting the coordination/governance of data collection, performance monitoring for health information systems, promoting cross-country exchange of experiences, exploiting data linkage, expanding existing health surveillance, reducing health-care barriers and strengthening general health information systems.

  • 20. Brolin Ribacke, Kim J
    et al.
    van Duinen, Alex J
    Nordenstedt, Helena
    Höijer, Jonas
    Molnes, Ragnhild
    Froseth, Torunn Wigum
    Koroma, A P
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Bolkan, Håkon Angel
    Ekström, AnnaMia
    The Impact of the West Africa Ebola Outbreak on Obstetric Health Care in Sierra Leone.2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0150080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As Sierra Leone celebrates the end of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, we can begin to fully grasp its impact on already weak health systems. The EVD outbreak in West Africa forced many hospitals to close down or reduce their activity, either to prevent nosocomial transmission or because of staff shortages. The aim of this study is to assess the potential impact of EVD on nationwide access to obstetric care in Sierra Leone.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: Community health officers collected weekly data between January 2014-May 2015 on in-hospital deliveries and caesarean sections (C-sections) from all open facilities (public, private for-profit and private non-profit sectors) offering emergency obstetrics in Sierra Leone. This was compared to official data of EVD cases per district. Logistic and Poisson regression analyses were used to compute risk and rate estimates. Nationwide, the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections decreased by over 20% during the EVD outbreak. The decline occurred early on in the EVD outbreak and was mainly attributable to the closing of private not-for-profit hospitals rather than government facilities. Due to difficulties in collecting data in the midst of an epidemic, limitations of this study include some missing data points.

    CONCLUSIONS: Both the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections substantially declined shortly after the onset of the EVD outbreak. Since access to emergency obstetric care, like C-sections, is associated with decreased maternal mortality, many women are likely to have died due to the reduced access to appropriate care during childbirth. Future research on indirect health effects of health system breakdown should ideally be nationwide and continue also into the recovery phase. It is also important to understand the mechanisms behind the deterioration so that important health services can be reestablished.

  • 21.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ahrne, Malin
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Small, Rhonda
    Mother and Child Health Research, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Andersson, Ewa
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Adan, Aisha
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahmed, Fardosa Hassen
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tesser, Karin
    Antenatal Care Clinic, Domnarvet, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Lidén, Yvonne
    Antenatal Care Clinic, Spånga-Tensta, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Monika
    Antenatal Care Clinic, Spånga-Tensta, Sweden.
    Åhman-Berndtsson, Anna
    Antenatal Care Clinic, Domnarvet, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Schytt, Erica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
    Rationale, development and feasibility of group antenatal care for immigrant women in Sweden: a study protocol for the Hooyo Project2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e030314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Somali-born women comprise a large group of immigrant women of childbearing age in Sweden, with increased risks for perinatal morbidity and mortality and poor experiences of care, despite the goal of providing equitable healthcare for the entire population. Rethinking how care is provided may help to improve outcomes.

    OVERALL AIM: To develop and test the acceptability, feasibility and immediate impacts of group antenatal care for Somali-born immigrant women, in an effort to improve experiences of antenatal care, knowledge about childbearing and the Swedish healthcare system, emotional well-being and ultimately, pregnancy outcomes. This protocol describes the rationale, planning and development of the study.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: An intervention development and feasibility study. Phase I includes needs assessment and development of contextual understanding using focus group discussions. In phase II, the intervention and evaluation tools, based on core values for quality care and person-centred care, are developed. Phase III includes the historically controlled evaluation in which relevant outcome measures are compared for women receiving individual care (2016-2018) and women receiving group antenatal care (2018-2019): care satisfaction (Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire), emotional well-being (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), social support, childbirth fear, knowledge of Swedish maternity care, delivery outcomes. Phase IV includes the process evaluation, investigate process, feasibility and mechanisms of impact using field notes, observations, interviews and questionnaires. All phases are conducted in collaboration with a stakeholder reference group.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants receive information about the study and their right to decline/withdraw without consequences. Consent is given prior to enrolment. Findings will be disseminated at antenatal care units, national/international conferences, through publications in peer-reviewed journals, seminars involving stakeholders, practitioners, community and via the project website. Participating women will receive a summary of results in their language.

  • 22.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, NO-7030 Trondheim, Norway.
    Chalise, Pratibha
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Kathmandu Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Nursing, Dhulikhel, Nepal.
    Shakya, Sunila
    Kathmandu Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dhulikhel Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Dhulikhel, Nepal.
    Barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening in Nepal: A qualitative study2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Despite being preventable, cervical cancer remains the most common cancer among women in Nepal, a country where there is no nationwide screening programme. Hence, the objective was to investigate and better understand Nepali women's perceptions on barriers to participation in cervical cancer screening and what might facilitate their participation. Methods: A qualitative study design with focus group discussions was employed and women were purposively invited. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using manifest content analysis. Findings: Women had misconceptions about the screening and low levels of knowledge. Sociocultural barriers, service providers' behaviour, geographical challenges, and limited finances were all perceived as obstacles to attending screening centres. Facilitating factors, such as participation in awareness programmes and support from family and women's groups, may convince women to attend screening clinics. Conclusions: The findings contribute information on Nepalese women's perceptions of cervical cancer screening. They may serve to support the Government of Nepal's promotion of cervical cancer screening and treatment as a right for all Nepali women, whenever necessary.

  • 23. Emtell Iwarsson, Karin
    et al.
    Larsson, Elin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Contraceptive use among migrant, second-generation migrant and non-migrant women seeking abortion care: a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in Sweden2019In: BMJ sexual & reproductive health, ISSN 2515-1991, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 118-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to compare ever-in life contraception use, use of contraception at current conception, and planned use of contraception after an induced abortion, among three groups of women: migrants, second-generation migrants and non-migrant women, and to compare the types of contraception methods used and intended for future use among the three groups of women.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional study administered a questionnaire face-to-face to women aged 18 years and older who were seeking abortion care at one of six abortion clinics in Stockholm County from January to April 2015.

    RESULTS: The analysis included 637 women. Migrants and second-generation migrants were less likely to have used contraception historically, at the time of the current conception, and to plan to use contraception after their induced abortion compared with non-migrant women. Historically, non-migrants had used pills (89%) and withdrawal (24%) while migrants had used the copper intrauterine device (24%) to a higher extent compared to the other two groups of women. Both the migrants (65%) and second-generation migrants (61%) were more likely than the non-migrants (48%) to be planning to use long-acting reversible contraception.

    CONCLUSIONS: Lower proportions of contraception use were found in migrants and second-generation migrants than in non-migrants. In addition, there were significant differences in the types of contraception methods used historically and intended for future use.

  • 24.
    Essén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Is research data used in education for health professionals on management of Female Genital Cutting?: results from Sweden2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14, no S2, article id 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Essén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Mosselmans, Luce
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Salzmann, Talia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children.: Technical guidance on refugee and migrant health2018Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Essén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Mosselmans, Luce
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Salzmann, Talia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Improving the health care of pregnant refugee and migrant women and newborn children: Technical guidance2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While the amplitude and direction of variations in outcomes differ between host countries, migrant origin/status and the outcome examined, there is a marked trend for worse pregnancy-related indicators among refugees and migrants. Being a migrant can be considered a risk factor in itself for poorer maternal and newborn health outcomes and also be a proxy for other risk factors and potential explanations. This technical guidance identifies problems and entry points for interventions for maternal and newborn health in refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region. Policy considerations are outlined for four main areas affecting refugee and migrant maternal and newborn health: individual health status, accessibility of health care, quality of care, and health care policy and financing systems.

  • 27. Gurung, Rejina
    et al.
    Litorp, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Department of Global Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Berkelhamer, Sara
    Zhou, Hong
    Tinkari, Bhim Singh
    Paudel, Prajwal
    Malla, Honey
    Sharma, Srijana
    KC, Ashish
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    The burden of misclassification of antepartum stillbirth in Nepal2019In: BMJ Global Health, E-ISSN 2059-7908, Vol. 4, no 6, article id e001936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Globally, every year 1.1 million antepartum stillbirths occur with 98% of these deaths taking place in countries where the health system is poor. In this paper we examine the burden of misclassification of antepartum stillbirth in hospitals of Nepal and factors associated with misclassification.

    Method A prospective observational study was conducted in 12 hospitals of Nepal for a period of 6 months. If fetal heart sounds (FHS) were detected at admission and during the intrapartum period, the antepartum stillbirth (fetal death ≥22 weeks prior labour) recorded in patient’s case note was recategorised as misclassified antepartum stillbirth. We further compared sociodemographic, obstetric and neonatal characteristics of misclassified and correctly classified antepartum stillbirths using bivariate and multivariate analysis.

    Result A total of 41 061 women were enrolled in the study and 39 562 of the participants’ FHS were taken at admission. Of the total participants whose FHS were taken at admission, 94.8% had normal FHS, 4.7% had abnormal FHS and 0.6% had no FHS at admission. Of the total 119 recorded antepartum stillbirths, 29 (24.4%) had FHS at admission and during labour and therefore categorised as misclassified antepartum stillbirths. Multivariate analysis performed to adjust the risk of association revealed that complications during pregnancy resulted in a threefold risk of misclassification (adjusted OR-3.35, 95% CI 1.95 to 5.76).

    Conclusion Almost 25% of the recorded antepartum stillbirths were misclassified. Improving quality of data is crucial to improving accountability and quality of care. As the interventions to reduce antepartum stillbirth differ, accurate measurement of antepartum stillbirth is critical.

  • 28. Hargreaves, Sally
    et al.
    Rustage, Kieran
    Nellums, Laura
    Powis, Jaynaide
    Milburn, James
    Severoni, Santino
    Dara, Masoud
    Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Friedland, Jon
    What constitutes an effective and efficient package of services for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care of tuberculosis among refugees and migrants in the WHO European Region?: Themed issues on migration and health, VIII2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The WHO European Region has faced high rates of external and internal migration in recent years, with concerns that this is contributing to the burden of tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and TB/HIV coinfection in some countries. This report examines evidence of effective and efficient service packages for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of TB to inform strategies to address the TB burden in refugee and migrant populations. Significant regional variations were identified in both migration levels and TB burden in refugees and migrants, as well as in approaches to TB control, with low quality of evidence in many cases. While it is unlikely that a single strategy/package will be effective for all situations, the evidence highlights some common approaches that could guide policy-making and service development. TB elimination targets for the Region will not be met unless inequalities in access to screening and treatment for migrants are addressed, alongside efforts to tackle

  • 29.
    Islam, Mohammad Redwanul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Trenholm, Jill E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Rahman, Anisur
    International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.
    Pervin, Jesmin
    International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.
    Ekström, Eva-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Rahman, Syed Moshfiqur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Sociocultural Influences on Dietary Practices and Physical Activity Behaviors of Rural Adolescents: A Qualitative Exploration2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 2916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of nutrition transition and ever-increasing sedentarism, adolescents globally are exposed to negative health consequences. Diverse sociocultural influences play a critical role in their adoption of unhealthy dietary practices and suboptimal physical activity behaviors. Context-specific understandings of how these sociocultural influences shape adolescents' dietary and physical activity patterns in a rural, resource-limited setting remained elusive. Aiming to address the gap, this qualitative study explored adolescents' and mothers' perception of broader sociocultural aspects that sculpt the food choices, eating habits and physical activity behaviors of adolescents in Matlab, Bangladesh. Six digitally-recorded focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim, translated into English and analyzed thematically. Marked taste-driven dietary preference of adolescents and its prioritization within family by the mothers, popularity of street foods, better understanding of the importance of food hygiene and safety contrasting with narrow perception of balance and diversity in diet, peer influence along with deficient school and community food environment, internalization and rigidity of gender norms were found to be exerting major influence. The findings highlighted key targets for community-based nutrition interventions and endorsed thorough consideration of socio-cultural factors in formulating strategies to promote healthful eating and physical activity behaviors among the adolescents.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Pottmeier, Philipp
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Suciu, Pascalina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahmed, Tauseef
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zaghlool, Ammar
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Halvardson, Jonatan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Gen Practice, Trondheim, Norway.
    Feuk, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Peuckert, Christiane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Stockholms Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Novel Y-Chromosome Long Non-Coding RNAs Expressed in Human Male CNS During Early Development2019In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 10, article id 891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global microarray gene expression analyses previously demonstrated differences in female and male embryos during neurodevelopment. In particular, before sexual maturation of the gonads, the differences seem to concentrate on the expression of genes encoded on the X- and Y-chromosomes. To investigate genome-wide differences in expression during this early developmental window, we combined high-resolution RNA sequencing with qPCR to analyze brain samples from human embryos during the first trimester of development. Our analysis was tailored for maximum sensitivity to discover Y-chromosome gene expression, but at the same time, it was underpowered to detect X-inactivation escapees. Using this approach, we found that 5 out of 13 expressed game to log pairs showed unbalanced gene dosage, and as a consequence, a male-biased expression. In addition, we found six novel non-annotated long non-coding RNAs on the Y-chromosome with conserved expression patterns in newborn chimpanzee. The tissue specific and time-restricted expression of these long non-coding RNAs strongly suggests important functions during central nervous system development in human males.

  • 31.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    FGM alerts and expert assessments from healthcare providers: legal case analysis2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14, no S2, article id 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Johnsdotter, Sara
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    The increasing demand for reconstructive clitoral surgery among circumcised women living in Europe: A nexus analysis2017In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 14, no S2, article id 7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    KC, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Axelin, Anna
    Litorp, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Tinkari, Bhim Singh
    Sunny, Avinash K
    Gurung, Rejina
    Coverage, associated factors, and impact of companionship during labor: A large-scale observational study in six hospitals in Nepal.2019In: Birth, ISSN 0730-7659, E-ISSN 1523-536XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Companionship at the time of birth is a nonclinical intervention that has been proven to improve the quality of intrapartum care. This study aims to evaluate the coverage, associated factors, and impact of companionship during labor at public hospitals in Nepal.

    METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional observational study in six public hospitals in Nepal. The study was conducted from July 2018 to August 2018. Data were collected on sociodemographic, maternal, obstetric, and neonatal characteristics from patient case notes and through predischarge interviews. Coverage of companionship during labor and its association with intrapartum care was analyzed. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were done to assess the association between companionship during labor and demographic, obstetric, and neonatal characteristics.

    RESULTS: A total of 63 077 women participated in the study with 19% of them having a companion during labor. Women aged 19-24 years had 65% higher odds of having a companion during labor compared with women aged 35 years and older (aOR 1.65 [95% CI, 1.40-1.94]). Women who were from an advantaged ethnic group (Chhetri/Brahmin) had fourfold higher odds of having a companion than women from a disadvantaged group (aOR 3.84; [95% CI, 3.24-4.52]). Women who had companions during labor had fewer unnecessary cesarean births than those who had no companions (5.2% vs 6.8%, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: In Nepal, sociodemographic factors affect women's likelihood of having a companion during labor. As companionship during labor is associated with improved quality of care, health facilities should encourage women's access to birth companions.

  • 34.
    KC, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Health Section, UNICEF, UN House, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Bergström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Chaulagain, Dipak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Lifeline Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Brunell, Olivia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Gurung, Abhishek
    Lifeline Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Litorp, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Edin, Per-Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Le Grange, Claire
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Lamichhane, Bikash
    Department of Health Services, Ministry of Health, Nepal.
    Shrestha, Parashuram
    Department of Health Services, Ministry of Health, Nepal.
    Pokharel, Amrit
    Department of Health Services, Ministry of Health, Nepal.
    Pun, Asha
    Health Section, UNICEF, UN House, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Singh, Chahana
    Health Section, UNICEF, UN House, Lalitpur, Nepal .
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Scaling up quality improvement intervention for perinatal care in Nepal (NePeriQIP); study protocol of a cluster randomised trial2017In: BMJ global health, Vol. 2, no 3, article id e000497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Nepal Perinatal Quality Improvement Project (NePeriQIP) intends to scale up a quality improvement (QI) intervention for perinatal care according to WHO/National guidelines in hospitals of Nepal using the existing health system structures. The intervention builds on previous research on the implementation of Helping Babies Breathe-quality improvement cycle in a tertiary healthcare setting in Nepal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of this scaled-up intervention on perinatal health outcomes.

    METHODS/DESIGN: Cluster-randomised controlled trial using a stepped wedged design with 3 months delay between wedges will be conducted in 12 public hospitals with a total annual delivery rate of 60 000. Each wedge will consist of 3 hospitals. Impact will be evaluated on intrapartum-related mortality (primary outcome), overall neonatal mortality and morbidity and health worker's performance on neonatal care (secondary outcomes). A process evaluation and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed to understand the functionality of the intervention and to further guide health system investments will also be performed.

    DISCUSSION: In contexts where resources are limited, there is a need to find scalable and sustainable implementation strategies for improved care delivery. The proposed study will add to the scarce evidence base on how to scale up interventions within existing health systems. If successful, the NePeriQIP model can provide a replicable solution in similar settings where support and investment from the health system is poor, and national governments have made a global pledge to reduce perinatal mortality.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN30829654.

  • 35.
    Larsson, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Emtell-Iwarsson, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gemzell-Danielsson, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Klingberg-Allvin, M.
    Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden.
    Contraceptive use among immigrant and non-immigrant women seeking abortion care in Stockholm County, Sweden2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 103-103Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Liyew, Ewnetu Firdawek
    et al.
    Yalew, Alemayehu Worku
    Afework, Mesganaw Fantahun
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Maternal near-miss and the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes: a prospective cohort study in selected public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, article id 345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Presence of maternal near-miss conditions in women is strongly associated with the occurrence of adverse perinatal outcomes, but not well-understood in low-income countries. The study aimed to ascertain the effect of maternal near-miss on the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in Ethiopia.

    METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in five public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Women admitted from May 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016 were recruited for the study. We followed a total of 828 women admitted for delivery or treatment of pregnancy-related complications along with their singleton newborn babies. Maternal near-miss was the primary exposure and was ascertained using the World Health Organization criteria. Women who delivered without complications were taken as the non-exposed groups. The main outcome was adverse perinatal outcomes. Data on maternal near-miss and perinatal outcomes were abstracted from medical records of the participants. Exposed and non-exposed women were interviewed by well-trained data collectors to obtain information about potential confounding factors. Logistic regressions were performed using Stata version 13.0 to determine the adjusted odds of adverse perinatal outcomes.

    RESULTS: A total of 207 women with maternal near-miss and 621 women with uncomplicated delivery were included in the study. After adjusting for potential confounders, women with maternal near-miss condition had more than five-fold increased odds of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to women who delivered without any complications (AOR = 5.69: 95% CI; 3.69-8.76). Other risk factors that were independently associated with adverse perinatal outcomes include: rural residence, history of prior stillbirth and primary educational level.

    CONCLUSIONS: Presence of maternal near-miss in women is an independent risk factor for adverse perinatal outcomes. Hence, interventions rendered at improvement in maternal health of Ethiopia can lead to an improvement in perinatal outcomes.

  • 37. McGarry, Orla
    et al.
    Hannigan, Ailish
    De Almeida, Maria Manuela
    Santino, Severoni
    Puthoopparambil, Soorej Jose
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. The World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe.
    MacFarlane, Anne
    What strategies to address communication barriers for refugees and migrants in health care settings have been implemented and evaluated across the WHO European Region? Themed issues on migration and health, IX2018Book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Mohammadi, Soheila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Gargari, S. Saleh
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Infertil & Reprod Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Fallahian, M.
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Infertil & Reprod Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Ziaei, Shirin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Källestål, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Afghan mothers with near-miss morbidity face disparity in obstetric care at university hospitals in Tehran, Iran2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 122-122Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Mohammadi, Soheila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Infertil & Reprod Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Gargari Saleh, Soraya
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Infertil & Reprod Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Fallahian, Masoumeh
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Infertil & Reprod Hlth Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran..
    Källestål, Carina
    Ziaei, Shirin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Essén, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Afghan Migrants Face more Suboptimal Care than Natives: a Maternal Near-Miss Audit Study at University Hospitals in Tehran, Iran2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women from low-income settings have higher risk of maternal near miss (MNM) and suboptimal care than natives in high-income countries. Iran is the second largest host country for Afghan refugees in the world. Our aim was to investigate whether care quality for MNM differed between Iranians and Afghans and identify potential preventable attributes of MNM. Methods: An MNM audit study was conducted from 2012 to 2014 at three university hospitals in Tehran. Auditors evaluated the quality of care by reviewing the hospital records of 76 MNM cases (54 Iranians, 22 Afghans) and considering additional input from interviews with patients and professionals. Main outcomes were frequency of suboptimal care and the preventable attributes of MNM. Crude and adjusted odds ratios with confidence intervals for the independent predictors were examined. Results: Afghan MNM faced suboptimal care more frequently than Iranians after adjusting for educational level, family income, and insurance status. Above two-thirds (71%, 54/76) of MNM cases were potentially avoidable. Preventable factors were mostly provider-related (85%, 46/54), but patient-(31%, 17/54) and health system-related factors (26%, 14/54) were also important. Delayed recognition, misdiagnosis, inappropriate care plan, delays in care-seeking, and costly care services were the main potentially preventable attributes of MNM. Conclusions: Afghan mothers faced inequality in obstetric care. Suboptimal care was provided in a majority of preventable near-miss events. Improving obstetric practice and targeting migrants' specific needs during pregnancy may avert near-miss outcomes.

  • 40. Odland, Maria Lisa
    et al.
    Membe-Gadama, Gladys
    Kafulafula, Ursula
    Jacobsen W, Geir
    Kumwenda, James
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,Trondheim, Norway; Department of Gynecology, St. Olav´s Hospital, NO-7030 Trondheim, Norway.
    The Use of Manual Vacuum Aspiration in the Treatment of Incomplete Abortions: A Descriptive Study from Three Public Hospitals in Malawi2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malawi has a high maternal mortality rate, of which unsafe abortion is a major cause. About 140,000 induced abortions are estimated every year, despite there being a restrictive abortion law in place. This leads to complications, such as incomplete abortions, which need to be treated to avoid further harm. Although manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) is a safe and cheap method of evacuating the uterus, the most commonly used method in Malawi is curettage. Medical treatment is used sparingly in the country, and the Ministry of Health has been trying to increase the use of MVA. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment of incomplete abortions in three public hospitals in Southern Malawi during a three-year period. All medical files from the female/gynecological wards from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. In total, information on obstetric history, demographics, and treatment were collected from 7270 women who had been treated for incomplete abortions. The overall use of MVA at the three hospitals during the study period was 11.4% (95% CI, 10.7–12.1). However, there was a major increase in MVA application at one District Hospital. Why there was only one successful hospital in this study is unclear, but may be due to more training and dedicated leadership at this particular hospital. Either way, the use of MVA in the treatment of incomplete abortions continues to be low in Malawi, despite recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Malawi Ministry of Health.

  • 41.
    Odland, Maria Lisa
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway.
    Membe-Gadama, Gladys
    Queen Elizabeth Cent Hosp, Blantyre, Malawi.
    Kafulafula, Ursula
    Kamuzu Coll Nursing, Blantyre, Malawi.
    Odland, Jon Öyvind
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway;Univ Malawi, Coll Med, Blantyre, Malawi;Univ Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway.
    "Confidence comes with frequent practice": health professionals' perceptions of using manual vacuum aspiration after a training program2019In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 16, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Malawi has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world, with unsafe abortion as a major contributor. Curettage is most frequently used as the surgical method for treating incomplete abortions, even though it is costly for an impoverished health system and the less expensive and safe manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) method is recommended.

    Methods: The aim of this 2016-17 study is to explore health worker's perception of doing MVA 1 year after an educational intervention. Focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis for interpreting the findings. A knowledge, attitude and practice survey was administered to health professionals to obtain background information before the MVA training program was introduced.

    Results: Prior to the training sessions, the participants demonstrated knowledge on abortion practices and had positive attitudes about participating in the service, but preferred curettage over MVA. The training was well received, and participants felt more confident in doing MVA after the intervention. However, focus group discussions revealed obstacles to perform MVA such as broken equipment and lack of support. Additionally, the training could have been more comprehensive. Still, the participants appreciated task-sharing and team work.

    Conclusion: Training sessions are considered useful in increasing the use of MVA. This study provides important insight on how to proceed in improving post-abortion care in a country where complications of unsafe abortion are common and the health system is low on resources.

  • 42.
    Ogbe, Emilomo
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Braeckel, Dirk
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Temmerman, Marleen
    Univ Ghent, Ghent, Belgium;Aga Khan Univ, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Larsson, Elin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Maternal and Reproductive Health and Migration.
    Keygnaert, Ines
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Aragon, Wilson De los Reyes
    RFSU Swedish Assoc Sexual Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cheng, Feng
    Tsinghua Univ, Sch Med, Beijing, Peoples R China;Tsinghua Univ, Res Ctr Publ Hlth, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Lazdane, Gunta
    Riga Stradins Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Riga, Latvia.
    Cooper, Diane
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Shamu, Simukai
    Fdn Profess Dev, Pretoria, South Africa;Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Publ Hlth, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Gichangi, Peter
    Univ Ghent, Ghent, Belgium;Univ Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya;Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Dias, Sonia
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Ctr Invest Saude Publ, Escola Nacl Saude Publ, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Barrett, Hazel
    Coventry Univ, Ctr Trust Peace & Social Relat, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Nobels, Anne
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Pei, Kaiyan
    Natl Res Inst Family Planning, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Galle, Anna
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Esho, Tammary
    Tech Univ Kenya, Dept Community & Publ Hlth, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Knight, Lucia
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Tabana, Hanani
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Degomme, Olivier
    Univ Ghent, Int Ctr Reprod Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Opportunities for linking research to policy: lessons learned from implementation research in sexual and reproductive health within the ANSER network2018In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 16, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]