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  • 1.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Association between angiogenic factors and signs of arterial aging in women with pre-eclampsia2017In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 50, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. In PE there is a substantial increase in levels of the anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt1) and decreased levels of the pro-angiogenic factor placental growth factor (PlGF). Elevated levels of sFlt1 are also found in individuals with CVD. The aims of this study were to assess sFlt1, PlGF and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio and their correlation with signs of arterial aging by measuring common carotid artery (CCA) intima and media thicknesses and their ratio (I/M ratio) in women with and without PE.

    METHODS: Serum sFlt1 and PlGF levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and CCA intima and media thicknesses were estimated using high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasonography in 55 women at PE diagnosis and 64 women with normal pregnancies at a similar gestational age, with reassessment one year postpartum. A thick intima, thin media and a high I/M ratio indicate a less healthy arterial wall.

    RESULTS: During pregnancy, higher levels of sFlt1, lower levels of PlGF and thicker intima, thinner media and higher I/M ratios were found in women with PE vs. controls (all p < 0.0001). Further, sFlt1 and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio were positively correlated with intima thickness and I/M ratio (all p < 0.0001), but negatively correlated with media thickness (p = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). About one year postpartum, levels of sFlt1 and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio had decreased in both groups, but compared with controls women in the PE group still had higher levels (p = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). Further, sFlt1 levels and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio were still positively correlated with intima thickness and I/M ratio.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher sFlt1 levels and sFlt1/PlGF ratios in women with PE were positively associated with signs of arterial aging during pregnancy. About one year postpartum sFlt1 levels and the sFlt1/PlGF ratios were still higher in the PE group, and also associated with the degree of arterial aging.

  • 2.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Serum Pentraxin 3 is associated with signs of arterial alteration in women with preeclampsia.2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 241, p. 417-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia (PE) in pregnancy is a state of exaggerated inflammation and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. Levels of pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a novel inflammation marker, are increased during PE and in individuals with CVD. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether serum PTX3 in women with PE is associated with adverse arterial effects; a thicker intima and higher intima/media (I/M) ratio in the common carotid artery (CCA).

    METHODS: Serum PTX3 levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and individual CCA intima and media thicknesses were estimated by 22MHz non-invasive ultrasound in 55 women at PE diagnosis and 64 women with normal pregnancies at a similar gestational age, and about one year postpartum. A thick intima, thin media and high I/M ratio indicate a less healthy artery wall.

    RESULTS: During pregnancy serum PTX3 correlated positively with intima thickness and I/M ratio but negatively with media thickness (all p<0.0001), indicating adverse arterial effects. About one year postpartum, PTX3 levels had decreased in both groups and there remained no significant group difference or significant correlation with CCA wall layers.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of serum PTX3 in women with PE were significantly associated with signs of adverse arterial effects during pregnancy, but not one year postpartum, supporting the rapid dynamics of PTX3.

  • 3.
    Axfors, Cathrine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eckerdal, Patricia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Volgsten, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Neuroticism is not independently associated with adverse obstetric or neonatal outcomes: An observational studyIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Axfors, Cathrine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Volgsten, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Neuroticism is associated with higher antenatal care utilization in obstetric low-risk women2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 470-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Elevated neuroticism is associated with higher health care utilization in the general population. This study aimed to investigate the association between neuroticism and the use of publicly financed antenatal care in obstetric low‐risk women, taking predisposing and need factors for health care utilization into consideration.

    Material and methods

    Participants comprised 1052 obstetric low‐risk women (no chronic diseases or adverse pregnancy conditions) included in several obstetrics/gynecology studies in Uppsala, Sweden. Neuroticism was self‐rated on the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Medical records of their first subsequent pregnancy were scanned for antenatal care use. Associations between antenatal care use and neuroticism were analyzed with logistic regression (binary outcomes) or negative binomial regression (count outcomes) comparing the 75th and 25th neuroticism percentiles. Depending on the Akaike information criterion the exposure was modeled as either linear or with restricted cubic splines. Analyses were adjusted for predisposing (sociodemographic and parity) and need factors (body mass index and psychiatric morbidity).

    Results

    After adjustment, women with higher neuroticism had more fetal ultrasounds (incidence rate ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02‐1.16), more emergency visits to an obstetrician/gynecologist (incidence rate ratio = 1.22, 95% CI 1.03‐1.45) and were more likely to visit a fear‐of‐childbirth clinic (odds ratio = 2.71, 95% CI 1.71‐4.29). Moreover, they more often consulted midwives in specialized antenatal care facilities (significant J‐shaped association).

    Conclusions

    Neuroticism was associated with higher utilization of publicly financed antenatal care in obstetric low‐risk women, even after adjusting for predisposing and need factors. Future studies should address the benefits of interventions as a complement to routine antenatal care programs to reduce subclinical anxiety.

  • 5.
    Bergendahl, Sandra
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ankarcrona, Victoria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leijonhufvud, Asa
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci Helsingborg, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Karlstrom, Sofie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallner, Helena Kopp
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wendel, Sophia Brismar
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lateral episiotomy versus no episiotomy to reduce obstetric anal sphincter injury in vacuum-assisted delivery in nulliparous women: study protocol on a randomised controlled trial2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e025050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) occurs in 5%-7% of normal deliveries and increases with vacuum extraction (VE) to 12%-14% in nulliparous women in Sweden. Lateral/mediolateral episiotomy may reduce the prevalence of OASIS at VE in nulliparous women. The current use of episiotomy is restrictive. The protective effect and consequences are uncertain. This trial will investigate if lateral episiotomy can reduce the prevalence of OASIS and assess short-term and long-term effects. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre randomised controlled trial of lateral episiotomy versus no episiotomy in nulliparous women with a singleton, live fetus, after gestational week 34+0 with indication for VE. A lateral episiotomy of 4 cm is cut at crowning, 1-3 cm from the midline, at a 60 degrees angle. The primary outcome is OASIS by clinical diagnosis analysed according to intention to treat. To demonstrate a 50% reduction in OASIS prevalence (from 12.4% to 6.2%), 710 women will be randomised at a 1:1 ratio. Secondary outcomes are pain, blood loss, other perineal injuries, perineal complications, Apgar score, cord pH and neonatal complications. Web-based questionnaires at baseline, 2 months, 1 and 5 years will be used to assess pain, incontinence, prolapse, sexual function, quality of life and childbirth experience. A subset of women will receive follow-up by pelvic floor sonography and pelvic examination. Mode of delivery and recurrence of OASIS/episiotomy in subsequent pregnancies will be assessed at 5 and 10 years using register data. Ethics and dissemination The trial is open for enrolment. The trial has received ethical approval from the Regional Ethical Review Board of Stockholm and full funding from the Swedish Research Council. Women are interested in participation. The predominant restrictive view on episiotomy may limit recruitment. Results are of global interest and will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at international congresses.

  • 6.
    Bergman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Torres-Vergara, Pablo
    Univ Concepcion, Fac Pharm, Pharm Dept, Concepcion, Chile ;Grp Res & Innovat Vasc Hlth GRIVAS Hlth, Chillan, Chile.
    Penny, Jeffrey
    Univ Manchester, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Div Pharm & Optometry, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nelander, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Leon, Jose
    Grp Res & Innovat Vasc Hlth GRIVAS Hlth, Chillan, Chile ; Univ Bio Bio, Fac Sci, Grp Invest Tumor Angiogenesis LFV GIANT, Vasc Physiol Lab,Dept Basic Sci, Chillan, Chile.
    Tolcher, Mary
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Roberts, James M
    Univ Pittsburgh, Magee Womens Res Inst, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, Epidemiol & Clin & Translat Res, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Escudero, Carlos
    Grp Res & Innovat Vasc Hlth GRIVAS Hlth, Chillan, Chile ; Univ Bio Bio, Fac Sci, Grp Invest Tumor Angiogenesis LFV GIANT, Vasc Physiol Lab,Dept Basic Sci, Chillan, Chile.
    Investigating Maternal Brain Alterations in Preeclampsia: the Need for a Multidisciplinary Effort2019In: Current Hypertension Reports, ISSN 1522-6417, E-ISSN 1534-3111, Vol. 21, no 9, article id 72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying cerebral pathophysiology and to highlight possible methods for evaluation, screening, and surveillance of cerebral complications in preeclampsia.

    RECENT FINDINGS: The pathophysiology of eclampsia remains enigmatic. Animal studies show that the cerebral circulation in pregnancy and preeclampsia might be affected with increased permeability over the blood-brain barrier and altered cerebral blood flow due to impaired cerebral autoregulation. The increased blood pressure cannot be the only underlying cause of eclampsia and cerebral edema, since some cases of eclampsia arise without simultaneous hypertension. Findings from animal studies need to be confirmed in human tissues. Evaluation of brain alterations in preeclampsia and eclampsia is challenging and demands a multidisciplinary collaboration, since no single method can accurately and fully describe how preeclampsia affects the brain. Cerebral complications of preeclampsia are significant factors in maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. No single method can accurately describe the full picture of how preeclampsia affects the brain vasculature and parenchyma. We recommend an international and multidisciplinary effort not only to overcome the issue of limited sample availability but also to optimize the quality of research.

  • 7.
    Bergman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Ctr Clin Res, Falun, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Molndal, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Clin Neurochem Lab, Molndal, Sweden;UCL Inst Neurol, Queen Sq, London, England;UK Dementia Res Inst, London, England.
    Kaihola, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Hagberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Perinatal Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Gothenburg, Sweden;Kings Coll London, Ctr Developing Brain, London, England.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Molndal, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Clin Neurochem Lab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Blood-based cerebral biomarkers in preeclampsia: Plasma concentrations of NfL, tau, S100B and NSE during pregnancy in women who later develop preeclampsia - A nested case control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e0196025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate if concentrations of the neuronal proteins neurofilament light chain and tau are changed in women developing preeclampsia and to evaluate the ability of a combination of neurofilament light chain, tau, S100B and neuron specific enolase in identifying neurologic impairment before diagnosis of preeclampsia. Methods A nested case-control study within a longitudinal study cohort was performed. 469 healthy pregnant women were enrolled between 2004-2007 and plasma samples were collected at gestational weeks 10, 25, 28, 33 and 37. Plasma concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain were analyzed in 16 women who eventually developed preeclampsia and 36 controls throughout pregnancy with single molecule array (Simoa) method and compared within and between groups. S100B and NSE had been analyzed previously in the same study population. A statistical model with receiving characteristic operation curve was constructed with the four biomarkers combined. Results Plasma concentrations of neurofilament light chain were significantly increased in women who developed preeclampsia in gestational week 33 (11.85 ng/L, IQR 7.48-39.93 vs 6.80 ng/L, IQR 5.65-11.40) and 37 (22.15 ng/L, IQR 10.93-35.30 vs 8.40 ng/L, IQR 6.40-14.30) and for tau in gestational week 37 (4.33 ng/L, IQR 3.97-12.83 vs 3.77 ng/L, IQR 1.91-5.25) in contrast to healthy controls. A combined model for preeclampsia with tau, neurofilament light chain, S100B and neuron specific enolase in gestational week 25 displayed an area under the curve of 0.77, in week 28 it was 0.75, in week 33 it was 0.89 and in week 37 it was 0.83. Median week for diagnosis of preeclampsia was at 38 weeks of gestation. Conclusion Concentrations of both tau and neurofilament light chain are increased in the end of pregnancy in women developing preeclampsia in contrast to healthy pregnancies. Cerebral biomarkers might reflect cerebral involvement before onset of disease.

  • 8.
    Dahlqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Örnsköldsvik Hospital, Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Neonatal outcomes of deliveries in occiput posterior position when delayed pushing is practiced: a cohort study2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, article id 377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dehaene, Isabelle
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, UZ Gent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Bergman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Turtiainen, Paula
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Tampere, Finland.
    Ridout, Alexandra
    Kings Coll London, Div Womens Hlth, London, England.
    Mol, Ben Willem
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Lorthe, Elsa
    Paris Descartes Univ, Ctr Epidemiol & Stat, Obstet Perinatal & Pediat Epidemiol Res Team EPOP, Sorbonne Paris Cite, DHU Risks Pregnancy, INSERM, Paris, France..
    Maintaining and repeating tocolysis: A reflection on evidence2017In: Seminars in Perinatology, ISSN 0146-0005, E-ISSN 1558-075X, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 468-476Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is inherent to human logic that both doctors and patients want to suppress uterine contractions when a woman presents in threatened preterm labor. Tocolysis is widely applied in women with threatened preterm labor with a variety of drugs. According to literature, tocolysis is indicated to enable transfer to a tertiary center as well as to ensure the administration of corticosteroids for fetal maturation. There is international discrepancy in the content and the implementation of guidelines on preterm labor. Tocolysis is often maintained or repeated. Nevertheless, the benefit of prolonging pregnancy has not yet been proven, and it is not impossible that prolongation of the pregnancy in a potential hostile environment could harm the fetus. Here we reflect on the use of tocolysis, focusing on maintenance and repeated tocolysis, and compare international guidelines and practices to available evidence. Finally, We propose strategies to improve the evaluation and use of tocolytics, with potential implications for future research.

  • 10.
    Eckerdal, Patricia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Georgakis, Marios K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece .
    Kollia, Natasa
    Department of Biostatistics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Delineating the association between mode of delivery and postpartum depression symptoms: A  longitudinal study2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 301-311, article id 29215162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Although a number of perinatal factors have been implicated in the etiology of postpartum depression, the role of mode of delivery remains controversial. Our aim was to explore the association between mode of delivery and postpartum depression, considering the potentially mediating or confounding role of several covariates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a longitudinal-cohort study in Uppsala, Sweden, with 3888 unique pregnancies followed up postpartum, the effect of mode of delivery (spontaneous vaginal delivery, vacuum extraction, elective cesarean section, emergency cesarean section) on self-reported postpartum depression symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale >/=12) at 6 weeks postpartum was investigated through logistic regression models and path analysis. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of postpartum depression was 13%. Compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery, women who delivered by emergency cesarean section were at higher risk for postpartum depression 6 weeks after delivery in crude (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.01) but not in adjusted analysis. However, the path analysis revealed that emergency cesarean section and vacuum extraction were indirectly associated with increased risk of postpartum depression, by leading to postpartum complications, self-reported physical symptoms postpartum, and therefore a negative delivery experience. In contrast, history of depression and fear of delivery increased the odds of postpartum depression and led more frequently to elective cesarean section; however, it was associated with a positive delivery experience. CONCLUSIONS: Mode of delivery has no direct impact on risk of postpartum depression; nevertheless, several modifiable or non-modifiable mediators are present in this association. Women delivering in an emergency setting by emergency cesarean section or vacuum extraction, and reporting negatively experienced delivery, constitute a high-risk group for postpartum depression.

  • 11.
    Eckerdal, Patricia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kollia, Natasa
    Department of Biostatistics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Karlsson, Linnea
    Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland .
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Epidural analgesia during Childbirth and Postpartum depressive symptoms: A cohort studyIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ekstrand Ragnar, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Hultstrand, Jenny Niemeyer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Development of an evidence-based website on Preconception health2018In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 116-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Many women and men lack knowledge about fertility, including timing of the fertile window, age-related decline, and lifestyle factors that may impair fertility. The Internet has become an important source of information, but evidence-based information on fertility and reproduction in Swedish on the Internet is limited. The present study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence-based fertility awareness website, 'reproduktivlivsplan.se', to increase awareness of fertility and provide guidance for improved preconception health and care among individuals and healthcare providers. Methods: The website's content, design, and layout were evaluated qualitatively among a total of 20 nursing students. An expert group of researchers also provided feedback on the content. Finally, healthcare providers (n = 24) answered a questionnaire covering attitudes and views on the Reproductive Life Plan website as a tool for counselling. Results: The developing process resulted in a mobile-friendly website, 'reproduktivlivsplan.se' (in English: Reproductive Life Plan). The website, including the content and layout, was positively evaluated by most participants and was amended according to suggested improvements. Uppsala University was found to be a trustworthy source. Conclusion: The evidence-based website 'reproduktivlivsplan.se' was well received among users and healthcare providers and may provide guidance for improved preconception health and care if it becomes well known and frequently used.

  • 13.
    Endler, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cnattingius, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granfors, Michaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The inherited risk of retained placenta: a population based cohort study.2018In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 125, no 6, p. 737-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether retained placenta in the first generation is associated with an increased risk of retained placenta in the second generation.

    Design: Population‐based cohort study.

    Setting: Sweden.

    Population: Using linked generational data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register 1973–2012, we identified 494 000 second‐generation births with information on the birth of the mother (first‐generation index birth). For 292 897 of these births there was information also on the birth of the father.

    Methods: Risk of retained placenta in the second generation was calculated as adjusted odds ratios (aOR) by unconditional logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) according to whether retained placenta occurred in a first generation birth or not.

    Main outcome: Retained placenta in the second generation.

    Results: The risk of retained placenta in a second‐generation birth was increased if retained placenta had occurred at the mother's own birth (aOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.52–1.82), at the birth of one of her siblings (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.43–1.76) or both (aOR 2.75, 95% CI 2.18–3.46). The risk was slightly increased if retained placenta had occurred at the birth of the father (aOR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.41). For preterm births in both generations, the risk of retained placenta in the second generation was increased six‐fold if retained placenta had occurred at the mother's birth (OR 6.55, 95% CI 2.68–16.02).

    Conclusion: There is an intergenerational recurrence of retained placenta on the maternal and most likely also on the paternal side. The recurrence risk seems strongest in preterm pregnancies.

    Tweetable abstract: A population‐based cohort study suggests that there is an intergenerational recurrence of retained placenta.

  • 14.
    Granfors, Michaela
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stephansson, Olof
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Endler, Margit
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Sandström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Placental location and pregnancy outcomes in nulliparous women: A population-based cohort study2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 988-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The impact of placenta previa on pregnancy, delivery and infant outcomes has been extensively studied. However, less is known about the possible association of placental location other than previa with pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate if placental location other than previa is associated with adverse pregnancy, delivery and infant outcomes.

    Material and methods: This is a population-based cohort study, with data from the regional population-based Stockholm-Gotland Obstetric Cohort, Sweden, from 2008 to 2014. The study population included 74 087 nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies resulting in live-born infants, with information about placental location from the second-trimester ultrasound screening. The association between placental location (fundal, lateral, anterior or posterior) and pregnancy outcomes was estimated using logistic regression analysis. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated, and adjustments were made for maternal age, height, country of birth, smoking in early pregnancy, sex of the infant and in vitro fertilization. Main outcome measures were pregnancy, delivery and infant outcomes.

    Results: Compared with posterior placental location, fundal and lateral placental locations were associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, the most important being: very preterm birth (<32 weeks of gestation) (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.78, 95% CI 1.18-2.63 and aOR 2.12, 95% CI 1.39-2.25, respectively), moderate preterm birth (32-36 weeks of gestation) (aOR 1.23, 95% CI 1.001-1.51 and aOR 1.62, 95% CI 1.32-2.00, respectively), small-for-gestational-age birth (aOR 1.67, 95% CI 1.34-2.07 and aOR 1.77, 95% CI 1.39-2.25, respectively) and manual removal of the placenta in vaginal births (aOR 3.27, 95% CI 2.68-3.99 and aOR 3.27, 95% CI 2.60-4.10, respectively). Additionally, lateral placental location was associated with preeclampsia (aOR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.65) and severe postpartum hemorrhage (aOR 1.42, 95% CI 1.27-1.82).

    Conclusions: Compared with posterior placental location, fundal and lateral placental locations are associated with a number of adverse pregnancy, delivery and infant outcomes.

  • 15.
    Gunnarsdottir, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health).
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated height gain in early childhood2018In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Preeclampsia is associated with low birth weight, both because of increased risks of preterm and of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. Low birth weight is associated with accelerated childhood height gain and cardiovascular diseases later in life. The aim was to investigate if prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated childhood height gain, also after adjustments for SGA-status and gestational age at birth. Methods In a cohort of children prenatally exposed to preeclampsia (n = 865) or unexposed (n = 22,898) we estimated height gain between birth and five years of age. The mean difference in height gain between exposed and unexposed children was calculated and adjustments were done with linear regression models. Results Children exposed to preeclampsia were on average born shorter than unexposed. Exposed children grew on average two cm more than unexposed from birth to five years of age. After adjustments for maternal characteristics including socioeconomic factors, height, body mass index (BMI) and diabetes, as well as for parents smoking habits, infant's breastfeeding and childhood obesity, the difference was 1.6 cm (95% CI 1.3-1.9 cm). Further adjustment for SGA birth only slightly attenuated this estimate, but adjustment for gestational age at birth decreased the estimate to 0.5 cm (95% CI 0.1-0.7 cm). Conclusion Prenatal exposure to preeclampsia is associated with accelerated height gain in early childhood. The association seemed independent on SGA-status, but partly related to shorter gestational age at birth.

  • 16.
    Gunnarsdóttir, Jóhanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Akhter, Tansim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska University Hospital, and Institutet.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyds sjukhus, Karolinska Institutet.
    Elevated diastolic blood pressure until mid-gestation is associated with preeclampsia and small-for-gestational-age birth: a population-based register study2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, p. 1-8, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gestational hemodynamic adaptations, including lowered blood pressure (BP) until mid-gestation, might benefit placental function. We hypothesized that elevated BP from early to mid-gestation increases risks of preeclampsia and small-for-gestational-age birth (SGA), especially in women who also deliver preterm (< 37 weeks). Methods: In 64,490 healthy primiparous women, the change in systolic and diastolic BP from early to midgestation was categorized into lowered (≥ 0 mmHg decreased), and elevated (≥ 1 mmHg increase). Women with chronic hypertension, chronic renal disease, pre-gestational diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus were excluded. Risks of preeclampsia and SGA birth were estimated by logistic regression, presented with adjusted odds ratio (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Further, the effect of BP change in combination with stage 1 hypertension (systolic BP 130–139 mmHg or diastolic BP 80–89 mmHg) in early gestation was estimated. Results: Compared to women with lowered diastolic BP from early to mid-gestation, those with elevated diastolic BP had increased risks of preeclampsia (aOR: 1.8 [1.6–2.0]) and SGA birth (aOR: 1.3 [1.2–1.5]). The risk estimates were higher for preeclampsia and SGA when combined with preterm birth (aORs: 2.2 [1.8–2.8] and 2.3 [1.8–3.0], respectively). The highest rate of preeclampsia (9.9%) was seen in women with stage 1 hypertension in early gestation and a diastolic BP that was elevated until mid-gestation. This was three times the risk, compared to women with normal BP in early gestation and a diastolic BP that was decreased until mid-gestation. The association between elevated systolic BP from early to mid-gestation and preeclampsia was weak, and no significant association was found between changes in systolic BP and SGA births. Conclusion: Elevated diastolic BP from early to mid-gestation was associated with increased risks of preeclampsia and SGA, especially for women also delivering preterm. The results may imply that the diastolic BP starts to increase around mid-gestation in women later developing placental dysfunction disorders

  • 17.
    Hastie, Roxanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Mercy Hosp Women, Mercy Perinatal, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Translat Obstet Grp, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia.
    Bergman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Cluver, Catherin A.
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Translat Obstet Grp, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Wikman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Hannan, Natalie J.
    Mercy Hosp Women, Mercy Perinatal, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Translat Obstet Grp, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia.
    Walker, Susan P.
    Mercy Hosp Women, Mercy Perinatal, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Tong, Stephen
    Mercy Hosp Women, Mercy Perinatal, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Translat Obstet Grp, Heidelberg, Vic, Australia.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Proton Pump Inhibitors and Preeclampsia Risk Among 157 720 Women A Swedish Population Register-Based Cohort Study2019In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 1097-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy with a high rate of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The only definite treatment is delivery. Preclinical investigations have identified proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are commonly used to treat reflux during pregnancy, as a potential treatment for preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to determine the association between PPI use during pregnancy and preeclampsia risk in a population-based register cohort. Using the Swedish Pregnancy Register, we conducted a cohort study of nulliparous pregnant women delivering from January 2013 to July 2017. Associations between PPI use and preeclampsia were investigated using logistic regression analyses with risk estimates presented as crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% CI. Of 157 720 nulliparous pregnant women, 6051 (3.8%) reported PPI use during pregnancy. PPI use during any point of pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of overall preeclampsia (aOR of 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32) and preeclampsia at term (aOR of 1.20; 95% CI, 1.04-1.39). However, PPI use recorded after 28 gestational weeks was associated with a reduced risk of preterm (delivery <37 weeks) preeclampsia (aOR of 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41-0.96) and early (delivery <34 weeks) preeclampsia (aOR of 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20-0.82). These findings highlight the heterogeneity of this disease, with a potential role PPIs for preventing preterm preeclampsia when used in close proximity to disease onset. Targeting PPI use to women at greatest risk of preterm preeclampsia may help prevent this severe form of disease.

  • 18.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Authors' reply re: Abdominal adhesions in gynaecologic surgery after caesarean section: a longitudinal populationbased register study2018In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 631-631Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Bergman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Risk of fistula formation and long-term health effects after a benign hysterectomy complicated by organ injury: A population-based register study2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 12, p. 1463-1470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of data on the impact of organ injury on long-term outcomes after a hysterectomy for benign indications. The aim of this study was to investigate fistula formation and patient-reported long-term health outcomes after organ injury at the time of a hysterectomy.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a population-based study of 22 538 women undergoing a hysterectomy between 2000 and 2014 in Sweden. Their medical history, characteristics of their surgery, and patient-reported outcomes were retrieved from Swedish national health and quality registers. Predictors for fistula formation were investigated with logistic regression and are presented as odds ratios with a 95% CI.

    RESULTS: Fistulas were reported in 7% of women with organ injuries, compared with 0.4% of those without organ injuries (adjusted odds ratio 15.29 [9.81-23.85]). Laparotomy and postoperative infection were associated with postoperative fistulas. Most of the women reported having better health 1 year after the hysterectomy, but 7% of those with organ injuries and 24% of those with fistulas reported deteriorated health, compared with 2% of women without injuries.

    CONCLUSION: Organ injury at the time of hysterectomy is associated with the development of fistulas involving the female genital tract and increases the proportion of women reporting deteriorated health 1 year after surgery.

  • 20.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Effect of remote cesarean delivery on complications during hysterectomy: a cohort study2017In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 217, no 5, p. 564.e1-564.e8, article id S0002-9378(17)30863-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cesarean section is frequently performed worldwide, and follow-up studies reporting complications at subsequent surgery are warranted.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between a previous abdominal delivery and complications during a subsequent hysterectomy, and to estimate the fraction of complications driven by the presence of adhesions.

    STUDY DESIGN: This was a longitudinal population based register study of 25354 women undergoing a benign hysterectomy at 46 hospital units in Sweden 2000-2014.

    RESULTS: Adhesions were found in 45 % of the women with a history of cesarean delivery. Organ injury affected 2.2 %. The risk of organ injury (aOR 1.74, 95 % CI 1.41-2.15) and post-operative infection (aOR 1.26, 95 % CI 1.15-1.39) was increased with prior cesarean section, irrespective of whether adhesions were present or not. The direct effect on organ injury by a personal history of cesarean delivery was estimated to 73 %, and only 27 % was mediated by the presence of adhesions. Previous cesarean was a predictor of bladder injury (aOR 1.86, 95 % CI 1.40-2.47) and bowel injury (aOR 1.83, 95 % CI 1.10-3.03) but not ureter injury. A personal history of other abdominal surgeries was associated with bowel injury (aOR 2.27, 95 % CI 1.37-3.78), and the presence of endometriosis increased the risk of ureter injury (aOR 2.15, 95 % CI 1.34-3.44).

    CONCLUSIONS: Prior cesarean delivery is associated with an increased risk of complications during a subsequent hysterectomy, but the risk is only partly attributable to the presence of adhesions. Previous cesarean delivery and presence of endometriosis were major predisposing factors of organ injury at the time of the hysterectomy whereas background and perioperative characteristics were of minor importance.

  • 21.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Råssjö, E-B
    Schytt, E
    Löfgren, M
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Abdominal adhesions in gynaecologic surgery after caesarean section: a longitudinal population-based register study.2018In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 597-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between abdominal adhesions at the time of gynaecologic surgery and a history of caesarean delivery, and to investigate obstetric factors contributing to adhesion formation after caesarean section (CS).

    DESIGN: Longitudinal population-based register study.

    SETTING: Sweden.

    POPULATION: Women undergoing benign hysterectomy and/or adnexal surgery in Sweden, 2000-2014, with a previous delivery during 1973-2013 (n = 15 479).

    METHODS: Information about abdominal adhesions during gynaecological surgery, prior medical history, pregnancies and deliveries were retrieved from Swedish National Health and Quality registers.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adhesions.

    RESULTS: In women with previous CS, adhesions were present in 37%, compared with 10% of women with no previous CS [odds ratio (OR): 5.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.70-5.71]. Adhesions increased with the number of caesarean sections: 32% after one CS; 42% after two CS and 59% after three or more CS (P < 0.001). Regardless of the number of CS, factors at CS such as age ≥35 years (aOR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.05-1.55), body mass index (BMI) ≥30 [adjusted OR (aOR): 1.91, 95% CI: 1.49-2.45] and postpartum infection (aOR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.05-2.30) increased the risk of adhesions.

    CONCLUSIONS: Presence of adhesions in abdominal gynaecological surgery is associated with women's personal history of caesarean delivery. The number of caesarean sections was the important predictor of adhesions; advanced age, obesity and postpartum infection further increased the incidence.

    TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Repeat caesarean, age, obesity and infection increased the risk of pelvic adhesions after caesarean section.

  • 22.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Ctr Clin Res, Falun, Sweden.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Råssjö, Eva-Britta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Shytt, Erica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Prevalence and risk factors of abdominal adhesions after caesarean section2017In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 124, no S1, p. 108-108Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hesselman, Susanne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Wikman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Neighborhood deprivation and adverse perinatal outcomes in Sweden: A population-based register study2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 1004-1013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Neighborhood deprivation has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes but it is unclear to what extent maternal and social risk factors explain the association and how a stressful environment per se contributes.

    Material and methods: A population-based register study including 218 030 deliveries in Sweden between January 2013 and July 2017 was conducted. Exposure was living in a deprived or severely deprived area defined by the National Operations Department of the Swedish Police Authority. Adverse perinatal outcomes included preterm births, small-for-gestational-age births and stillbirths. A propensity score-based method was used to control for individual baseline characteristics. Associations were investigated with logistic regression analyses and risk estimates are presented as crude (OR) and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI).

    Results: Living in a deprived neighborhood in Sweden was associated with extremely preterm births (deprived area OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07-2.11, severely deprived OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.40-2.58), small-for-gestational-age birth (deprived OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.31-1.60, severely deprived OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.69-2.03) and stillbirth (deprived OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.17-2.26, severely deprived OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11-2.19). After accounting for individual maternal and social risk factors, the risk of small for gestational age in severely deprived areas remained (aOR 1.45, 95% CI, 1.19-1.75).

    Conclusions: The contextual effect of living in a deprived neighborhood on the risk of extremely preterm births, small-for-gestational-age births and stillbirths was to a high extent explained by individual factors of women residing in exposed areas, yet remained for small-for-gestational-age births in severely deprived areas after adjustment for maternal and social risk factors.

  • 24.
    Hutcheon, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Stephansson, Olof
    Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Solna, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Solna, Sweden.
    Bodnar, Lisa M.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Johansson, Kari
    Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Solna, Sweden.
    Pregnancy Weight Gain Before Diagnosis and Risk of Preeclampsia: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Nulliparous Women2018In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weight gain in early pregnancy may influence a woman's risk of developing preeclampsia. However, the consequences of weight gain throughout pregnancy up to the diagnosis of preeclampsia are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether pregnancy weight gain before the diagnosis of preeclampsia is associated with increased risks of preeclampsia (overall and by preeclampsia subtype). The study population included nulliparous pregnant women in the Swedish counties of Gotland and Stockholm, 2008 to 2013, stratified by early pregnancy body mass index category. Electronic medical records were linked with population inpatient and outpatient records to establish date of preeclampsia diagnosis (classified as any, early preterm <34 weeks, late preterm 34-36 weeks, or term 37 weeks). Antenatal weight gain measurements were standardized into gestational age-specific z scores. Among 62705 nulliparous women, 2770 (4.4%) developed preeclampsia. Odds of preeclampsia increased by approximate to 60% with every 1 z score increase in pregnancy weight gain among normal weight and overweight women and by 20% among obese women. High pregnancy weight gain was more strongly associated with term preeclampsia than early preterm preeclampsia (eg, 64% versus 43% increased odds per 1 z score difference in weight gain in normal weight women, and 30% versus 0% in obese women, respectively). By 25 weeks, the weight gain of women who subsequently developed preeclampsia was significantly higher than women who did not (eg, 0.43 kg in normal weight women). In conclusion, high pregnancy weight gain before diagnosis increases the risk of preeclampsia in nulliparous women and is more strongly associated with later-onset preeclampsia than early-onset preeclampsia.

  • 25.
    Liljeström, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Obstetric emergencies as antecedents to neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, does parity matter?2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 11, p. 1396-1404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Our aim was to investigate the risk of moderate to severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) by obstetric emergencies, with focus on the distribution of obstetric emergencies by parity, taking the history of a previous cesarean into account.

    Material and methods: Population-based cohort study of 692 428 live births at >= 36 weeks of gestation in Sweden, 2009-2015. Data were retrieved by linking the Swedish Medical Birth Register with the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register. Therapeutic hypothermia served as surrogate for moderate to severe HIE. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations between HIE and placental abruption, eclampsia, cord prolapse, uterine rupture, and shoulder dystocia, presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with 95% CI.

    Results: An obstetric emergency occurred in 133/464 (29%) of all HIE cases, more commonly in the parous (overall 37%; 48% with and 31% without a previous cesarean) than in the nulliparous (21%). Among nulliparas, shoulder dystocia was the most common obstetric emergency with the strongest association with HIE (aOR 48.2; 95% CI 28.2-82.6). In parous women without a previous cesarean, shoulder dystocia was most common, but placental abruption had the strongest association with HIE. Among parous women with a previous cesarean, uterine rupture was the most prevalent obstetric emergency with the strongest association with HIE (aOR 45.6; 95% CI 24.5-84.6).

    Conclusions: Obstetric emergencies are common among cases of moderate to severe HIE. The strong association with shoulder dystocia in nullipara, and with uterine rupture in women with previous cesarean deliveries, implies an opportunity for reducing the incidence of HIE.

  • 26.
    Liljeström, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Antepartum risk factors for moderate to severe neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: a Swedish national cohort study2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 615-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Our aim was to identify antepartum risk factors for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, with a focus on maternal body mass index and height.

    Material and methods

    National population-based cohort study of 692 428 live-born infants 36 gestational weeks in Sweden, 2009-2015. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register and the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register were linked. Short maternal stature was defined as 155 cm, and overweight as body mass index 25 kg/m(2). Therapeutic hypothermia served as surrogate marker of moderate to severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Associations between maternal and infant characteristics and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were calculated with logistic regression analyses, and risks were presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals.

    Results

    Moderate to severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy occurred in 0.67/1000 infants. Nulliparity, previous cesarean delivery, short stature, overweight, gestational age, occiput posterior presentation and birthweight were all independently associated with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The risk of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy increased with decreasing maternal height and increasing body mass index. Compared with non-short women (156 cm) with normal weight (body mass index <25 kg/m(2)), those with both short stature and overweight had increased risk of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (odds ratio 3.66; 95% confidence intervals 2.41-5.55). Among parous women with both short stature and overweight, the risk was almost sixfold (odds ratio 5.74; 95% confidence intervals 3.41-9.66).

    Conclusions

    Antepartum risk factors for moderate to severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy included nulliparity, previous cesarean delivery, short stature, overweight, gestational age, occiput posterior presentation and birthweight. The combination of maternal short stature and overweight was associated with a more than threefold risk of subsequent hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  • 27.
    Lindström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Bergman, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Growth patterns during early childhood in children born small for gestational age and moderate preterm2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today we lack knowledge if size at birth and gestational age interacts regarding postnatal growth pattern in children born at 32 gestational weeks or later.

    This population-based cohort study comprised 41,669 children born in gestational weeks 32-40 in Uppsala County, Sweden, between 2000 and 2015. We applied a generalized least squares model including anthropometric measurements at 1.5, 3, 4 and 5 years. We calculated estimated mean height, weight and BMI for children born in week 32+0, 35+0 or 40+0 with birthweight 50th percentile (standardized appropriate for gestational age, sAGA) or 3rd percentile (standardized small for gestational age, sSGA).

    Compared with children born sAGA at gestational week 40+0, those born sAGA week 32+0 or 35+0 had comparable estimated mean height, weight and BMI after 3 years of age. Making the same comparison, those born sSGA week 32+0 or 35+0 were shorter and lighter with lower estimated mean BMI throughout the whole follow-up period.

    Our findings suggest that being born SGA and moderate preterm is associated with short stature and low BMI during the first five years of life. The association seemed stronger the shorter gestational age at birth.

  • 28.
    Lindström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Bergman, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Postnatal growth in children born small for gestational age with and without smoking mother2019In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 85, no 7, p. 961-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Maternal smoking impairs fetal growth; however, if postnatal growth differs between children born small for gestational age (SGA) with smoking and non-smoking mother is unknown.

    Methods: Cohort-study of term born children born appropriate for gestational age with non-smoking mother (AGA-NS, n=30,561), SGA (birthweight <10th percentile) with smoking mother (SGA-S, n=171) or SGA with non-smoking mother (SGA-NS, n=1761). Means of height and weight measurements, collected at birth, 1.5, 3, 4 and 5 years, were compared using a generalized linear mixed effect model. Relative risks of short stature (<10th percentile) were expressed as adjusted risk ratios (aRR).

    Results: At birth, children born SGA-S were shorter than SGA-NS, but they did not differ in weight. At 1.5 years, SGA-S had reached the same height as SGA-NS. At 5 years, SGA-S were 1.1 cm taller and 1.2 kg heavier than SGA-NS. Compared with AGA-NS, SGA-S did not have increased risk of short stature at 1.5 or 5 years, while SGA-NS had increased risk of short stature at both ages; aRRs 3.0 (95% CI 2.6;3.4) and 2.3 (95% CI 2.0;2.7), respectively.

    Conclusions: Children born SGA-S have a more rapid catch-up growth than SGA-NS. This may have consequences for metabolic and cardiovascular health in children with smoking mothers.

  • 29.
    Maack, Heidrun Petursdottir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sjöholm, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eurenius-Orre, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Maternal body mass index moderates antenatal depression effects on infant birthweight2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 6213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity and depression are two common medical problems that pregnant women present with in antenatal care. Overweight and obesity at the beginning of the pregnancy, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy, are independent explanatory variables for fetal birthweight and independent risk factors for giving birth to a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. However, the effect of co-morbid depression has received little attention. This study set out to investigate if maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy moderates antenatal depression effects on infant birthweight. 3965 pregnant women participated in this longitudinal cohort study, where cases (n = 178) had Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score >= 17 in gestational week 17 or 32, and remaining women (n = 3787) were used as controls. The influence of maternal BMI and antenatal depressive symptoms on standardized birthweight was evaluated by analysis of covariance, with adjustment for relevant confounders. Depressed women with BMI 25.0 kg/m(2) or more gave birth to infants with significantly greater standardized birthweight than non-depressed overweight women, whereas the opposite pattern was noted in normal weight women (BMI by antenatal depressive symptoms interaction; F(1,3839) = 6.32; p = 0.012. The increased birthweight in women with co-prevalent overweight and depressive symptoms was not explained by increased weight gain during the pregnancy. Maternal BMI at the beginning of pregnancy seems to influence the association between antenatal depressive symptoms and infant birthweight, but in opposite directions depending on whether the pregnant women is normal weight or overweight. Further studies are needed to confirm our finding.

  • 30.
    Nelander, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Hannsberger, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Bergman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Weis, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1212-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral complications are the main reasons for morbidity and mortality in preeclampsia and eclampsia. As yet, we do not know whether the pathophysiology entails hypo- or hyperperfusion of the brain, or how and when edema emerges, due to the difficulty of examining the cerebral circulation.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have used a non-invasive diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging technique, intravoxel incoherent motion, to study cerebral perfusion on the capillary level and cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia (n = 30), normal pregnancy (n = 32), and non-pregnant women (n = 16). Estimates of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, and edema were measured in 5 different regions. These points were chosen to represent blood supply areas of both the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries, and to include both white and gray matter.

    RESULTS: Except for the caudate nucleus, we did not detect any differences in cerebral perfusion measures on a group level. In the caudate nucleus, we found lower cerebral blood volume and lower blood flow in preeclampsia than in either normal pregnancy (P = .01 and P = .03, respectively) or non-pregnant women (both P = .02). No differences in edema were detected between study groups.

    CONCLUSION: The cerebral perfusion measures were comparable between the study groups, except for a portion of the basal ganglia where hypoperfusion was detected in preeclampsia but not in normal pregnancy or non-pregnant women.

  • 31.
    Nelander, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Weis, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bergman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study2018In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 847-853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cerebral complications contribute substantially to mortality in preeclampsia. Pregnancy calls for extensive maternal adaptations, some associated with increased propensity for seizures, but the pathophysiology behind the eclamptic seizures is not fully understood. Plasma osmolality and sodium levels are lowered in pregnancy. This could result in extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes, including the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, but this remains to be determined. The hypothesis of this study was that cerebral levels of organic osmolytes are decreased during pregnancy, and that this decrease is even more pronounced in women with preeclampsia.

    Method: We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare levels of cerebral organic osmolytes, in women with preeclampsia (n=30), normal pregnancy (n=32) and non-pregnant controls (n=16). Cerebral levels organic osmolytes were further correlated to plasma osmolality, and plasma levels of glutamate and sodium.

    Results: Compared to non-pregnant women, women with normal pregnancy and preeclampsia had lower levels of the cerebral osmolytes myo-inositol, choline and creatine (p=0.001 or less), and all these metabolites correlated with each other (p<0.05). Women with normal pregnancies and preeclampsia had similar levels of osmolytes, except for glutamate, which was significantly lower in preeclampsia. Cerebral and plasma glutamate levels were negatively correlated with each other (p<0.008), and cerebral myo-inositol, choline and creatine levels were all positively correlated with both plasma osmolality and sodium levels (p<0.05).

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that pregnancy is associated with extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes. This includes the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which may be involved in the pathophysiology of seizures in preeclampsia.

  • 32.
    Niemeyer Hultstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Contraception use and unplanned pregnancies in a peri-urban area of eSwatini (Swaziland)2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite reported high levels of contraception use in eSwatini, unplanned pregnancies are common. The aims of this study were to investigate prevalence and determinants of contraception use and unplanned pregnancies in a disadvantaged area in the Kingdom of eSwatini (Swaziland), and to investigate the association between unplanned pregnancies and antenatal care attendance. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the non-governmental organization Siphilile Maternal and Child Health in Matsapha, a peri-urban industrial area, using data from pre-existing client records. The sample included clients (n = 1436) registered during pregnancy or up to three months postpartum between August 2014 and April 2016. Contraception use before conception and unplanned pregnancies were analysed with logistic regression to find associations with socio-demographic factors and health care utilization. Results: In this population, 59% (n = 737) stated to have used contraception before becoming pregnant. Teenagers and first-time mothers were less likely to have used contraception. Seventy percent (789/1124) of the pregnancies were unplanned. Older women ( 35 years) were less likely while teenagers and multiparas (>= 3 children) were more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy. Women with unplanned pregnancies were less likely to attend the recommended number of antenatal care visits compared to women with planned pregnancies. Conclusion: The rate of unplanned pregnancies is high in this population, especially among teenagers. Family planning interventions need to focus on preconception care for teenagers to enable pregnancy planning including improved antenatal care attendance.

  • 33.
    Norman, Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Pediat, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neonatal Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Vasterbotten Cty Council, Swedish Neonatal Qual Register SNQ, Umea, Sweden.
    Källén, Karin
    Vasterbotten Cty Council, Swedish Neonatal Qual Register SNQ, Umea, Sweden;Lund Univ, Ctr Reprod Epidemiol, Lund, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Erik
    Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Stellan
    Vasterbotten Cty Council, Swedish Neonatal Qual Register SNQ, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Div Pediat, Umea, Sweden.
    Skiöld, Beatrice
    Swedish Neonatal Soc, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Navér, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Gothenburg Univ, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Nyholm, Annika
    Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Ingemansson, Fredrik
    Jonkoping Acad, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Söderberg: Ophthalmic Biophysics.
    Björklund, Lars
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wallin-Gyökeres, Annica
    Parent Representat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register - contents, completeness and validity2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers.

    Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers' agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years.

    Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24-34, completeness of SNQ was 98-99%. Below and above these gestational ages, completeness was lower. Infants missing in SNQ were term or near-term in 99% of the cases, and their diagnoses indicated conditions managed in maternity units, or re-admissions for acute infections, managed in paediatric units. For most diagnoses, the agreement between SNQ and population registers was high, but some (bronchopulmonary dysplasia and grade of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy) were often missing in the population registers.

    Conclusion: SNQ completeness and agreement against other registers, especially for preterm infants, is excellent. SNQ is a valid tool for benchmarking, quality improvement and research.

  • 34.
    Selin, Lotta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden;NU Hosp Grp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Dencker, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Person Ctr Care, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallin, Gunnar
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wiberg-Itzel, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Soder Hosp, Sect Obstet & Gynaecol, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almström, Elisabeth
    NU Hosp Grp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trollhattan, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Hlth Metr Unit, Gothenmurg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Obstet Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    High-dose versus low-dose of oxytocin for labour augmentation: a randomised controlled trial2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 356-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Delayed labour progress is common in nulliparous women, often leading to caesarean section despite augmentation of labour with synthetic oxytocin.

    Background: High-or low-dose oxytocin can be used for augmentation of delayed labour, but evidence for promoting high-dose is weak.

    Aim: To ascertain the effect on caesarean section rate of high-dose versus low-dose oxytocin for augmentation of delayed labour in nulliparous women.

    Methods: Multicentre parallel double-blind randomised controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01587625) in six labour wards in Sweden. Healthy nulliparous women at term with singleton cephalic fetal presentation, spontaneous labour onset, confirmed delay in labour and ruptured membranes (n = 1351) were randomised to labour augmentation with either high-dose (6.6 mU/minute) or low-dose (3.3 mU/minute) oxytocin infusion.

    Findings: 1295 women were included in intention-to-treat analysis (high-dose n = 647; low-dose n = 648). Caesarean section rates did not differ between groups (12.4% and 12.3%, 95% Confidence Interval -3.7 to 3.8). Women with high-dose oxytocin had: shorter labours (-23.4 min); more uterine tachysystole (43.2% versus 33.5%); similar rates of instrumental vaginal births, with more due to fetal distress (43.8% versus 22.7%) and fewer due to failure to progress (39.6% versus 58.8%). There were no differences in neonatal outcomes.

    Discussion: Our study could not confirm results of two systematic reviews indicating, with weak evidence, that use of high-dose oxytocin was associated with lower frequency of caesarean section.

    Conclusion: We found no advantages for routine use of high-dose oxytocin in the management of delay in labour. Low-dose oxytocin regimen is recommended to avoid unnecessary events of tachysystole and fetal distress. 

  • 35.
    Simard, Julia F.
    et al.
    Stanford Sch Med, Div Immunol & Rheumatol, Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Chaichian, Yashaar
    Stanford Sch Med, Immunol & Rheumatol Div, Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Rossides, Marios
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Shaw, Gary M.
    Stanford Sch Med, Div Neonatol & Dev Med, Pediat, Stanford, CA USA..
    Druzin, Maurice
    Stanford Sch Med, Obstet & Gynecol, Stanford, CA USA..
    Preterm Delivery Phenotypes in SLE Pregnancies2017In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Simard, Julia F.
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Hlth Res & Policy, Div Epidemiol, HRP Redwood Bldg,Room T152,259 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Div Rheumatol & Immunol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chaichian, Yashaar
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Div Rheumatol & Immunol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Rossides, Marios
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shaw, Gary M.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Pediat, Div Neonatol & Dev Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Druzin, Maurice L.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Preterm Delivery Phenotypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancies2019In: American Journal of Perinatology, ISSN 0735-1631, E-ISSN 1098-8785, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 964-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at a greater risk of preterm delivery, many of which may be medically indicated (iatrogenic). We investigated preterm delivery phenotypes in SLE and general population comparators and assessed the role of preeclampsia.

    Study Design: We used population-based Swedish Register data (2001-2013) and defined maternal SLE as >= 2 SLE-coded discharge diagnoses from the Patient Register with >= 1 coded by an appropriate specialist. Women from the general population were identified using the Total Population Register. Preterm delivery was defined as <37 weeks and separated into spontaneous and iatrogenic, as well as later versus extremely preterm (32 to <37 weeks vs. <32 weeks). Maternal comorbidity was assessed, and the proportion mediated by preeclampsia was calculated examining first, subsequent, and all pregnancies.

    Results: Preterm delivery was more common in SLE for the first (22 vs. 6%) and subsequent (15 vs. 4%) pregnancies among 781 SLE-exposed pregnancies and 11,271 non-SLE pregnancies. Of SLE-exposed first births, 27% delivered before 32 weeks, and 90% were iatrogenic (compared with 47% of non-SLE first births).

    Conclusion: Preterm delivery complicates a greater proportion of SLE pregnancies than general population pregnancies, and a considerable proportion of risk is mediated through preeclampsia.

  • 37. Stephansson, Olof
    et al.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Björk, Camilla
    Conner, Peter
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Swedish Pregnancy Register - for quality of care improvement and research2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 466-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The objective was to present the Swedish Pregnancy Register and to explore regional differences in maternal characteristics, antenatal care, first trimester combined screening and delivery outcomes in Sweden.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Pregnancy Register (www.graviditetsregistret.se) collects data on pregnancy and childbirth, starting at the first visit to antenatal care and ending at the follow-up visit to the antenatal care, which usually occurs at around 8-16 weeks postpartum. The majority of data is collected directly from the electronic medical records. The Register includes demographic, reproductive and maternal health data, as well information on prenatal diagnostics, and pregnancy outcome for the mother and the newborn.

    RESULTS: Today the Register covers more than 90% of all deliveries in Sweden, with the aim to include all deliveries within 2018. The care providers can visualize quality measures over time and compare results with other clinics, regionally and nationally by creating reports on an aggregated level or using case-mix adjusted Dash Boards in real time. Detailed data can be extracted after ethical approval for research. In this report, we showed regional differences in patient characteristics, antenatal care, fetal diagnosis and delivery outcomes in Sweden.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our report indicates that quality in antenatal and delivery care in Sweden varies between regions, which warrants further actions. The Swedish Pregnancy Register is a new and valuable resource for benchmarking, quality improvement and research in pregnancy, fetal diagnosis and delivery.

  • 38.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Thomopoulos, T P
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Kollia, N
    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Correlates of postpartum depression in first time mothers without previous psychiatric contact2017In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 40, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common disorder after childbirth. The strongest known predictors are a history of depression and/or a history of PPD. However, for a significant proportion of women, PPD constitutes their first depressive episode. This study aimed to gain further insight into the risk factors for PPD in first time mothers without previous psychiatric contact.

    METHODS: Women delivering in Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, from May 2006 to June 2007, were asked to participate and filled out questionnaires five days and six weeks postpartum, containing inter alia the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Univariate logistic regression models, as well as a path analysis, were performed to unveil the complex interplay between the study variables.

    RESULTS: Of the 653 participating primiparas, 10.3% and 6.4% reported depressive symptoms (EPDS≥12 points) five days and six weeks postpartum, respectively. In the path analysis, a positive association between anxiety proneness and depressive symptoms at five days and six weeks postpartum was identified. For depressive symptoms six weeks after delivery, additional risk factors were detected, namely depressive symptoms five days postpartum and subjective experience of problems with the baby. Caesarean section and assisted vaginal delivery were associated with fewer depressive symptoms at 6 six weeks postpartum.

    CONCLUSIONS: Identification of anxiety proneness, delivery mode and problems with the baby as risk factors for self-reported depressive symptoms postpartum in this group of primiparas can be important in helping health care professionals identify women at increased risk of affective disorders in the perinatal period, and provide a base for early intervention.

  • 39.
    Valdimarsdottir, Ragnheidur
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Valgeirsdóttir, Heiddis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Ubhayasekera, Kumari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.