uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 106
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abd El-Gaber, Amira S.
    et al.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm, Egypt.
    El Gendy, Abdel Nasser G.
    Natl Res Ctr, Med & Aromat Plants Res Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    Elkhateeb, Ahmed
    Natl Res Ctr, Phytochem & Plant Systemat Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    Saleh, Ibrahim A.
    Natl Res Ctr, Phytochem Dept, 33 El Bohouth St,PO 12622, Giza, Egypt.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm, Egypt;Univ Karachi, ICCBS, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.
    Microwave Extraction of Essential Oil from Anastatica hierochuntica (L): Comparison with Conventional Hydro-Distillation and Steam Distillation2018In: Journal of Essential Oil-Bearing Plants (JEOBP), ISSN 0972-060X, E-ISSN 0976-5026, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 1003-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article stands to introduce microwave assisted extraction (MAE) as a more effective method for extraction of Anastatica hierochuntica (L) essential oils (EOs) compared to traditional hydrodistillation (HD) and steam distillation (SD) methods. Analysis of EOs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) showed significant differences in the constituents and percentages of the obtained oils. Using MAE and HD obtained oxygenated monoterpenes 50.79 % whereas SD obtained sesquiterpene hydrocarbons 79.84 % as major contents of the extracted oils. This is the first report of EO composition of the aerials parts of A. heirochunatica. It offered several advantages of MAE technique as a green method with shorter extraction time (60 min) and better yield.

  • 2.
    Abdelmoniem, Amr M.
    et al.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Giza, Egypt.
    Elnagdi, Mohamed H.
    Cairo Univ, Giza, Egypt;Kuwait Univ, Safat, Kuwait.
    Elsehemy, Mohamed S.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Pharm, Giza, Egypt.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.
    Abdelhamid, Ismail A.
    Cairo Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Giza, Egypt.
    Synthesis, Chemistry and Utilities of Diaminoazoles with Special Reference to 3,5-Diaminopyrazoles2018In: Current Organic Synthesis, ISSN 1570-1794, E-ISSN 1875-6271, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 487-514Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the chemistry of heteroaromatic monoamino azoles has been surveyed more than once in the last decade, the chemistry of the di- and triaminoazoles has not been reviewed. In this article we will survey the synthesis, chemistry and utility of the diaminoazoles. In this review, the chemistry of the diaminoazoles as well as their most important utilities will be surveyed. Objective: The review focuses on recent progress in diaminoazoles (i.e. diaminopyrazoles, diaminoimidazoles, diaminotriazoles and diaminothiazole) with especial references to diaminopyrazoles. The synthesis as well as pharmaceutical utilities are reported. There are several methods for synthesis of diaminopyrazoles. 3,5-Diaminopyrazole and its derivatives are prepared through the reaction of malononitrile or arylhydrazononitrile with hydrazine derivatives. 3,4-Diaminopyrazoles are prepared via nitration of 3-aminopyrazole with subsequent reduction of the produced compound. The diaminopyrazoles have several applications in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. They also have useful utilities as a constituent in oxidative hair dyes. Conclusion: We managed to report the common methods for the synthesis of diaminoazoles with especial reference to aminopyrazoles that are prepared through the reaction of malononitrile or hydrazononitriles with hydrazine derivatives. Some important applications that include pharmaceutical utilities such as hair dye constituents are reported.

  • 3.
    Abdillahi, Suado M.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Maass, Tobias
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Kasetty, Gopinath
    Lund Univ, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Strömstedt, Adam A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Baumgarten, Maria
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Tati, Ramesh
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Nordin, Sara L.
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Walse, Björn
    Sarom Biostruct AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden.
    Wagener, Raimund
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Biochem, Ctr Mol Med Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany.
    Schmidtchen, Artur
    Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Dept Clin Sci, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Biomed Sci, Copenhagen Wound Healing Ctr, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mörgelin, Matthias
    Lund Univ, Div Infect Med, Dept Clin Sci, Tornavagen 10, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Colzyx AB, S-22381 Lund, Sweden.
    Collagen VI Contains Multiple Host Defense Peptides with Potent In Vivo Activity2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 3, p. 1007-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagen VI is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component that forms extensive microfibrillar networks in most connective tissues. In this study, we describe for the first time, to our knowledge, that the collagen VI von Willebrand factor type A like domains exhibit a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in human skin infections in vivo. In silico sequence and structural analysis of VWA domains revealed that they contain cationic and amphipathic peptide sequence motifs, which might explain the antimicrobial nature of collagen VI. In vitro and in vivo studies show that these peptides exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane disruption. Our findings shed new light on the role of collagen VI derived peptides in innate host defense and provide templates for development of peptide-based antibacterial therapies.

  • 4.
    Adl, Sina M.
    et al.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Soil Sci, Coll Agr & Bioresources, 51 Campus Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada.
    Bass, David
    Nat Hist Museum, Dept Life Sci, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England;CEFAS, Barrack Rd, Weymouth DT4 8UB, Dorset, England.
    Lane, Christopher E.
    Univ Rhode Isl, Dept Biol Sci, Kingston, RI 02881 USA.
    Lukes, Julius
    Czech Acad Sci, Biol Ctr, Inst Parasitol, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic;Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Schoch, Conrad L.
    Natl Inst Biotechnol Informat, Natl Lib Med, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Smirnov, Alexey
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Agatha, Sabine
    Univ Salzburg, Dept Biosci, Hellbrunnerstr 34, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria.
    Berney, Cedric
    CNRS, UMR 7144 AD2M, Grp Evolut Protistes & Ecosyst Pelag, Stn Biol Roscoff, Pl Georges Teissier, F-29680 Roscoff, France.
    Brown, Matthew W.
    Mississippi State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Starkville, MS 39762 USA;Mississippi State Univ, Inst Genom Biocomp & Biotechnol, Starkville, MS 39762 USA.
    Burki, Fabien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cárdenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Cepicka, Ivan
    Charles Univ Prague, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Vinicna 7, CR-12844 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Chistyakova, Lyudmila
    St Petersburg State Univ, Core Facil Ctr Culture Collect Microorganisms, St Petersburg 198504, Russia.
    del Campo, Javier
    CSIC, Inst Ciencies Mar, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Dunthorn, Micah
    Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Ecol, Erwin Schroedinger St, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany;Univ Duisburg Essen, Dept Eukaryot Microbiol, Univ Str 5, D-45141 Essen, Germany.
    Edvardsen, Bente
    Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, POB 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
    Eglit, Yana
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax B3H 4R2, NS, Canada.
    Guillou, Laure
    Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, Paris 6, CNRS,UMR 7144 AD2M,Stn Biol Roscoff, Pl Georges Teissier,,CS90074, F-29688 Roscoff, France.
    Hampl, Vladimir
    Charles Univ Prague, Dept Parasitol, Fac Sci, BIOCEV, Prumyslov 595, Vestec 25242, Czech Republic.
    Heiss, Aaron A.
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Dept Invertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA.
    Hoppenrath, Mona
    DZMB German Ctr Marine Biodivers Res, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany.
    James, Timothy Y.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Karnkowska, Anna
    Univ Warsaw, Dept Mol Phylogenet & Evolut, PL-02089 Warsaw, Poland.
    Karpov, Sergey
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia;RAS, Lab Parasit Worms & Protistol, Zool Inst, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Kim, Eunsoo
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Dept Invertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA.
    Kolisko, Martin
    Czech Acad Sci, Biol Ctr, Inst Parasitol, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Kudryavtsev, Alexander
    St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia;RAS, Lab Parasit Worms & Protistol, Zool Inst, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Lahr, Daniel J. G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Zool, Inst Biosci, Matao Travessa 14 Cidade Univ, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    Lara, Enrique
    Univ Neuchatel, Lab Soil Biodivers, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland;CSIC, Real Jardim Bot,Plaza Murillo 2, E-28014 Madrid, Spain.
    Le Gall, Line
    Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, Inst Systemat Evolut Biodiversit, 57 Rue Cuvier,CP 39, F-75005 Paris, France.
    Lynn, Denis H.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Summerlee Sci Complex, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada;Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, 4200-6270 Univ Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Mann, David G.
    Royal Bot Garden, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Midlothian, Scotland;Inst Agrifood Res & Technol, C Poble Nou Km 5-5, E-43540 San Carlos de la Rapita, Spain.
    Massana, Ramon
    CSIC, Inst Ciencies Mar, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Mitchell, Edward A. D.
    Univ Neuchatel, Lab Soil Biodivers, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland;Jardin Bot Neuchatel,Chemin Perthuis du Salut 58, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland.
    Morrow, Christine
    Natl Museums Northern Ireland, Dept Nat Sci, 153 Bangor Rd, Holywood BT18 0EU, England.
    Park, Jong Soo
    Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Earth Syst Sci, Dept Oceanog, Daegu, South Korea;Kyungpook Natl Univ, Sch Earth Syst Sci, Kyungpook Inst Oceanog, Daegu, South Korea.
    Pawlowski, Jan W.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet & Evolut, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.
    Powell, Martha J.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Biol Sci, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Richter, Daniel J.
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, CSIC, Inst Biol Evolut, Passeig Maritim Barceloneta 37-49, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
    Rueckert, Sonja
    Edinburgh Napier Univ, Sch Appl Sci, Edinburgh EH11 4BN, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Shadwick, Lora
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA.
    Shimano, Satoshi
    Hosei Univ, Sci Res Ctr, Chiyoda Ku, 2-17-1 Fujimi, Tokyo, Japan.
    Spiegel, Frederick W.
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA.
    Torruella, Guifre
    Univ Paris XI, Lab Evolut & Systemat, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Youssef, Noha
    Oklahoma State Univ, Dept Microbiol & Mol Genet, Stillwater, OK 74074 USA.
    Zlatogursky, Vasily V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. St Petersburg State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Invertebrate Zool, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    Zhang, Qianqian
    Chinese Acad Sci, Yantai Inst Coastal Zone Res, Yantai 264003, Peoples R China.
    Revisions to the Classification, Nomenclature, and Diversity of Eukaryotes2019In: Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, ISSN 1066-5234, E-ISSN 1550-7408, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 4-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes follows that of Adl et al., 2012 [J. Euk. Microbiol. 59(5)] and retains an emphasis on protists. Changes since have improved the resolution of many nodes in phylogenetic analyses. For some clades even families are being clearly resolved. As we had predicted, environmental sampling in the intervening years has massively increased the genetic information at hand. Consequently, we have discovered novel clades, exciting new genera and uncovered a massive species level diversity beyond the morphological species descriptions. Several clades known from environmental samples only have now found their home. Sampling soils, deeper marine waters and the deep sea will continue to fill us with surprises. The main changes in this revision are the confirmation that eukaryotes form at least two domains, the loss of monophyly in the Excavata, robust support for the Haptista and Cryptista. We provide suggested primer sets for DNA sequences from environmental samples that are effective for each clade. We have provided a guide to trophic functional guilds in an appendix, to facilitate the interpretation of environmental samples, and a standardized taxonomic guide for East Asian users.

  • 5.
    Ahnfelt, Nils-Otto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Fors, Hjalmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Hagströmer Library, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reconstructing early modern pharmacy through "Elixir amarum Hiaernei" and its Theriac ancestor2016In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Alajlani, M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Karl Franzens Univ Graz, Inst Pharmaceut Sci, Dept Pharmacognosy, Univ Pl 4, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Backlund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Predicting the mechanism of action of antituberculosis agents using chemical global positioning system - natural product2016In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ali, Sara E.
    et al.
    German Univ Cairo, Fac Pharm & Biotechnol, Dept Pharmaceut Biol, New Cairo 12613, Egypt.
    El Gedaily, Rania A.
    Cairo Univ, Fac Pharm, Pharmacognosy Dept, Kasr el Aini St, Cairo 11562, Egypt.
    Mocan, Andrei
    Iuliu Hatieganu Univ Med & Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Bot, Cluj Napoca 400337, Romania.
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    Cairo Univ, Fac Pharm, Pharmacognosy Dept, Kasr el Aini St, Cairo 11562, Egypt;Amer Univ Cairo, Sch Sci & Engn, Dept Chem, New Cairo 11835, Egypt.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.
    Profiling Metabolites and Biological Activities of Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum Linn.) Juice and Its Product Molasses via a Multiplex Metabolomics Approach2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 5, article id 934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is an important perennial grass in the Poaceae family cultivated worldwide due to its economical and medicinal value. In this study, a combined approach using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was employed for the large-scale metabolite profiling of sugarcane juice and its by-product molasses. The polyphenols were analysed via UPLC-UV-ESI-MS, whereas the primary metabolites such as sugars and organic and amino acids were profiled using NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). UPLC/MS was more effective than NMR spectroscopy or GC/MS for determining differences among the metabolite compositions of the products. Under the optimized conditions, UPLC/MS led to the identification of 42 metabolites, including nine flavonoids, nine fatty acids, and two sterols. C/O Flavone glycosides were the main subclass detected, with tricin-7-O-deoxyhexosyl glucuronide being detected in sugarcane and molasses for the first time. Based on GC/MS analysis, disaccharides were the predominant species in the sugarcane juice and molasses, with sucrose accounting for 66% and 59%, respectively, by mass of all identified metabolites. The phenolic profiles of sugarcane and molasses were further investigated in relation to their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging assays such as 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical-scavenging ability (DPPH), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). In view of its higher total phenolic content (TPC) (196 +/- 2.1 mg GAE/100 g extract) compared to that of sugarcane juice (93 +/- 2.9 mg GAE/100 g extract), molasses exhibited a substantially higher antioxidant effect. Interestingly, both extracts were also found to inhibit alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase enzymes, suggesting a possible antihyperglycaemic effect. These findings suggest molasses may be a new source of natural antioxidants for functional foods.

  • 8.
    Amir, Mohd.
    et al.
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Kumar, Vijay
    Amity Univ Noida, Amity Inst Neuropsychol & Neurosci, Noida, UP, India.
    Dohare, Ravins
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India;King Saud Univ, Dept Pharmacogmosy, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Rehman, Md. Tabish
    King Saud Univ, Dept Pharmacogmosy, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Hussain, Afzal
    King Saud Univ, Dept Pharmacogmosy, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Alajmi, Mohamed F.
    King Saud Univ, Dept Pharmacogmosy, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Hassan, Hani Mutlak A.
    King Abdulaziz Univ, King Fand Med Res Ctr, POB 80216, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia;King Abdulaziz Univ, Fac Appl Med Sci, Dept Med Lab Technol, POB 80216, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
    Islam, Asimul
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Ahmad, Faizan
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Investigating architecture and structure-function relationships in cold shock DNA-binding domain family using structural genomics-based approach2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 133, p. 484-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold (OB-fold) plays a major role in the regulation of central dogma of life via binding though DNA and RNA. The OB-fold domains are diverse in nature and present in large number of proteins with verities of molecular functions. Here, we have investigated the distribution of sequence, structure and repeats of cold shock DNA-binding proteins (CSDB), a member of OB-fold, in all three kingdoms to establish functional relationships. The CSDB is consists of 30 domains with a major contribution of S1 (>110,601 sequences), S12 (>23,760 sequences), S17 (>14,833 sequences) and S28e (>1615 sequence) domains. These domains are largely found in bacteria (70-90%). The number of S1 domain repeats in eukaryota varies from 1 to 15 and are well-correlated with the protein size. The molecular function analysis suggests that a large number of repeats in the S1 domain are involved in diverse molecular functions in bacteria and eukaryotes. In-depth structure analysis of Si, S12, S17 and S28e domain-containing proteins of the OB-fold family provides a reasonable basis to understand the relationship of size and number of repeats with the corresponding molecular functions.

  • 9.
    Andersson, H. S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Biomat Chem, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, Norra Vagen 49, S-39234 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Jacobsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Eriksson, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Hedstrom, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biotechnol, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Seth, H.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sundberg, P.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rosengren, K. J.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Biomed Sci, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia..
    Strand, M.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Backlosavagen 10, S-75651 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    The toxicity of ribbon worms: Alpha-nemertides or tetrodotoxin, or both?2016In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aneja, Babita
    et al.
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Dept Biosci, New Delhi 110025, India;Jamia Millia Islamia, Dept Chem, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Khan, Nashrah Sharif
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India;Jamia Millia Islamia, Dept Biotechnol, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Khan, Parvez
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Queen, Aarfa
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Dept Chem, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Hussain, Afzal
    King Saud Univ, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharmacognosy, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Rehman, Md. Tabish
    King Saud Univ, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharmacognosy, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    Alajmi, Mohamed F.
    King Saud Univ, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharmacognosy, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Ali, Sher
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Ctr Interdisciplinary Res Basic Sci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Abid, Mohammad
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Dept Biosci, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Design and development of Isatin-triazole hydrazones as potential inhibitors of microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 for the therapeutic management of cell proliferation and metastasis2019In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 163, p. 840-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) is a potential drug target as the same is found to be over expressed in several types of cancers. In search of effective MARK4 inhibitors, we have synthesized and characterized Isatin-triazole hydrazones (9a-i) and evaluated their inhibitory potential. Of all the compounds, 9g showed better binding affinity and enzyme inhibition potential in sub micromolar range. Human serum albumin (HSA) binding assay suggested an easy transportation of 9g in blood stream due to its binding affinity. In vitro anticancer studies performed on MCF-7, MDA-MB-435s and HepG2 cells using 9g showed inhibition of cell proliferation and cell migration. Further, 9g induces apoptosis in these cancerous cells, with IC50 values of 6.22, 9.94 and 8.14 mu M, respectively. Putatively, 9g seems to cause oxidative stress resulting in apoptosis. Functional assay of 9g with a panel of 26 kinases showed MARK4 specific profile. In conclusion, 9g seems to possess an effective inhibitory potential towards MARK4 adding an additional repertoire to anticancer therapeutics.

  • 11.
    Anwar, J.
    et al.
    Univ Agr, Dept Agr Chem, Peshawar 25100, Pakistan..
    Muhammad, Taj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Iqbal, Z.
    Univ Agr, Dept Agr Chem, Peshawar 25100, Pakistan..
    Fungi as a source for antibacterial compounds2016In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Backlund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Bioactivity mapping of chemical property space - possible applications in natural products research2016In: Planta Medica, ISSN 0032-0943, E-ISSN 1439-0221, Vol. 82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bagge, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Chromatography of Therapeutic Peptides - Contrasting SFC and HPLC2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work is a comparison of a well-established and a novel, "green" and efficient technique to separate peptides of pharmaceutical interest. An attempt is made to derive the chromatographic retention behaviour from these techniques to a number of property descriptors derived from the linear sequence of amino acids. A set of therapeutic peptides were carefully chosen to be experimentally evaluated using in silico-based descriptor calculations. A principle component analysis was performed to assess the distribution of calculated descriptors for including peptides with variable properties. A diluent optimization study was also included to find the optimal diluent for peptides with minimal diluent effects and peak splitting phenomena. The results showed that the solvents tert-butanol and methanol performed best between 20-30 and 50 volumetric percent water as additive in SFC and HPLC, respectively. These diluents were then used for the peptides within the set to evaluate the retention and selectivity in HPLC and SFC. SFC performed well in terms of resolving power. Inparticular, SFC was able to separate Leuprolide and Triptorelin while HPLC was not. A comparison was also made in between the two stationary phases CN and XT, where a global selectivity was shown to be higher for CN.

    This work does also assess a novel method for determining solubility of analytes in supercritical fluid. The method was evaluated using the pharmaceutical compounds caffeine and aspirin and then used to determine solubility of Leu-Enkephalin in 20% (v/v%) methanol. The solubility of caffeine was determined to be 0.45 mg ml-1 in pure SF-CO2 under 140 bar pressure and 3.9 mg ml-1 for aspirin in 2.4% methanol. Both values correlated well with measurements from four acknowledged papers within this field. Leu-Enkephalin was found to have a solubility of 1.90 mg ml-1 using a solvent corresponding to the initial phase condition of the gradient used for peptide analysis in SFC. Further experimental work is required before the method can be implemented as a useful tool in preparative chromatography, however the results presented here show the compatibility of assessing biomolecules in both pure SF-CO2 and mixed with modifier. The possibility to determine solubility with additional modifier infers an important step of including and evaluating these compounds creating a solid support to subsequent large scale separation.

  • 14.
    Benchoula, Khaled
    et al.
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Dept Basic Med Sci, Kulliyyah Pharm, Sultan Ahmad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Khatib, Alfi
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kulliyyah Pharm, Pharmacognosy Res Grp, Sultan Ahmad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia;Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Sci, Cent Res & Anim Facil CREAM, Sultan Ahamad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Jaffar, Ashika
    VIT Univ, Sch Biosci & Technol, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Ahmed, Qamar Udin
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kulliyyah Pharm, Pharmacognosy Res Grp, Sultan Ahmad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Sulaiman, Wan Mohd Azizi Wan
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Dept Basic Med Sci, Kulliyyah Pharm, Sultan Ahmad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Abd Wahab, Ridhwan
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyah Allied Hlth Sci, Sultan Ahmad Shah St, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Alrayan Med Coll, Medina 42541, Saudi Arabia.
    The promise of zebrafish as a model of metabolic syndrome2019In: Experimental animals, ISSN 1341-1357, E-ISSN 1881-7122, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 407-416Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster including hyperglycaemia, obesity, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridaemia as a result of biochemical and physiological alterations and can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Fundamental research on this disease requires validated animal models. One potential animal model that is rapidly gaining in popularity is zebrafish (Danio rerio). The use of zebrafish as an animal model conveys several advantages, including high human genetic homology, transparent embryos and larvae that allow easier visualization. This review discusses how zebrafish models contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome studies. Different diseases in the cluster of metabolic syndrome, such as hyperglycaemia, obesity, diabetes, and hypertriglyceridaemia, have been successfully studied using zebrafish; and the model is promising for hypertension and cardiovascular metabolic-related diseases due to its genetic similarity to mammals. Genetic mutation, chemical induction, and dietary alteration are among the tools used to improve zebrafish models. This field is expanding, and thus, more effective and efficient techniques are currently developed to fulfil the increasing demand for thorough investigations.

  • 15.
    Benchoula, Khaled
    et al.
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Basic Med Sci, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Khatib, Alfi
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Quzwain, Fairuz M. C.
    Univ Jambi, Fac Med, Jambi 36122, Indonesia.
    Mohamad, Che Anuar Che
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Basic Med Sci, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Sulaiman, Wan Mohd Azizi Wan
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Basic Med Sci, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Wahab, Ridhwan Abdul
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Dept Biomed Sci, Kulliyyah Allied Hlth Sci, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Ahmed, Qamar Uddin
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Ghaffar, Majid Abdul
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Kulliyyah Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kuantan 25200, Pahang, Malaysia.
    Saiman, Mohd Zuwairi
    Univ Malaya, Inst Biol Sci, Fac Sci, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia.
    Alajmi, Mohamed F.
    King Saud Univ, Dept Pharmacognosy, Coll Pharm, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi.
    Optimization of Hyperglycemic Induction in Zebrafish and Evaluation of Its Blood Glucose Level and Metabolite Fingerprint Treated with Psychotria malayana Jack Leaf Extract2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 8, article id 1506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A standard protocol to develop type 1 diabetes in zebrafish is still uncertain due to unpredictable factors. In this study, an optimized protocol was developed and used to evaluate the anti-diabetic activity of Psychotria malayana leaf. The aims of this study were to develop a type 1 diabetic adult zebrafish model and to evaluate the anti-diabetic activity of the plant extract on the developed model. The ability of streptozotocin and alloxan at a different dose to elevate the blood glucose levels in zebrafish was evaluated. While the anti-diabetic activity of P. malayana aqueous extract was evaluated through analysis of blood glucose and LC-MS analysis fingerprinting. The results indicated that a single intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg/kg alloxan was the optimal dose to elevate the fasting blood glucose in zebrafish. Furthermore, the plant extract at 1, 2, and 3 g/kg significantly reduced blood glucose levels in the diabetic zebrafish. In addition, LC-MS-based fingerprinting indicated that 3 g/kg plant extract more effective than other doses. Phytosterols, sugar alcohols, sugar acid, free fatty acids, cyclitols, phenolics, and alkaloid were detected in the extract using GC-MS. In conclusion, P. malayana leaf aqueous extract showed anti-diabetic activity on the developed type 1 diabetic zebrafish model.