uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Barclay, Victoria K. H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Tyrefors, Niklas L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Johansson, I. Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Acidic transformation of nordiazepam can affect recovery estimate during trace analysis of diazepam and nordiazepam in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2019In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 411, no 17, p. 3919-3928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a special interest was focused on the stability of diazepam and nordiazepam in aqueous samples at acidic and neutral pH. The aim of the study was to isolate and illustrate one of the many possible sources of error that can be encountered when developing and validating analytical methods. This can be of particular importance when developing multi-analyte methods where there is limited time to scrutinize the behavior of each analyte. A method was developed for the analysis of the benzodiazepines diazepam and nordiazepam in treated wastewater. The samples were extracted by solid phase extraction, using SPEC C18AR cartridges, and analyzed by the use of liquid chromatography, with a C18 stationary phase, coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Environmental water samples are often acidified during storage to reduce the microbial degradation of the target compounds and to preserve the sample. In some cases, the samples are acidified before extraction. In this study, it was found that a chemical equilibrium between nordiazepam and a transformation product could cause inaccurately high extraction recovery values when the samples were stored at low sample pH. The stability of nordiazepam was shown to be low at pH3. Within 12days, 20% of the initial concentration of nordiazepam was transformed. Interestingly, the transformed nordiazepam was shown to be regenerated and reformed to nordiazepam during sample handling. At a sample pH of 7, diazepam and nordiazepam were stable for 12days. It was concluded that great care must be taken when acidifying water samples containing nordiazepam during storage or extraction. The storage and the extraction should be conducted at neutral pH if no internal standard is used to compensate for degradation and conversion of nordiazepam. The developed method was validated in treated wastewater and applied for the quantification of diazepam and nordiazepam in treated wastewater samples.

  • 2.
    Lindell Jonsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Erngren, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Engskog, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Laurell, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Exploring Radiation Response in Two Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell Lines Through Metabolic Profiling2019In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 9, p. 1-16, article id 825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common form of cancer worldwide. Radiotherapy, with or without surgery, represents the major approach to curative treatment. However, not all tumors are equally sensitive to irradiation. It is therefore of interest to apply newer system biology approaches (e.g., metabolic profiling) in squamous cancer cells with different radiosensitivities in order to provide new insights on the mechanisms of radiation response. In this study, two cultured HNSCC cell lines from the same donor, UM-SCC-74A and UM-SCC-74B, were first genotyped using Short Tandem Repeat (STR), and assessed for radiation response by the means of clonogenic survival and growth inhibition assays. Thereafter, cells were cultured, irradiated and collected for subsequent metabolic profiling analyses using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). STR verified the similarity of UM-SCC-74A and UM-SCC-74B cells, and three independent assays proved UM-SCC-74B to be clearly more radioresistant than UM-SCC-74A. The LC-MS metabolic profiling demonstrated significant differences in the intracellular metabolome of the two cell lines before irradiation, as well as significant alterations after irradiation. The most important differences between the two cell lines before irradiation were connected to nicotinic acid and nicotinamide metabolism and purine metabolism. In the more radiosensitive UM-SCC-74A cells, the most significant alterations after irradiation were linked to tryptophan metabolism. In the more radioresistant UM-SCC-74B cells, the major alterations after irradiation were connected to nicotinic acid and nicotinamide metabolism, purine metabolism, the methionine cycle as well as the serine, and glycine metabolism. The data suggest that the more radioresistant cell line UM-SCC-74B altered the metabolism to control redox-status, manage DNA-repair, and change DNA methylation after irradiation. This provides new insights on the mechanisms of radiation response, which may aid future identification of biomarkers associated with radioresistance of cancer cells.

  • 3.
    Sänger-van de Griend, Cari E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    CE-SDS method development, validation, and best practice-An overview.2019In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 40, no 18-19, p. 2361-2374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CE-SDS has been implemented in the biopharmaceutical industry and is being used for the characterization of therapeutic proteins in most Biological License Applications currently submitted. An overview is presented on the separation mechanism, methodology, and good working practices/best practices. The CE-SDS platform method development and validation are discussed and typical scientifically and regulatory issues and troubleshooting situations are highlighted.

  • 4. van Tricht, Ewoud
    et al.
    Geurink, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Galindo Garre, Francisca
    Schenning, Martijn
    Backus, Harold
    Germano, Marta
    Somsen, Govert W
    Sänger-van de Griend, Cari E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Implementation of at-line capillary zone electrophoresis for fast and reliable determination of adenovirus concentrations in vaccine manufacturing.2019In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 40, no 18-19, p. 2277-2284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A CZE method was validated and implemented for fast and accurate in-process determination of adenovirus concentrations of downstream process samples obtained during manufacturing of adenovirus vector-based vaccines. An analytical-quality-by-design approach was embraced for method development, method implementation, and method maintenance. CZE provided separation of adenovirus particles from sample matrix components, such as cell debris, residual DNA and proteins. The intermediate precision of the virus particle concentration was 6.9% RSD and the relative bias was 2.3%. In comparison, the CZE method is intended to replace a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method which requires three replicates in three analytical runs to achieve an intermediate precision of 8.1% RSD. Given that, in addition, the time from sampling till reporting results of the CZE method was less than 2 h, whereas quantitative polymerase chain reaction requires 3 days, it follows that the CZE method enables faster processing times in downstream processing.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf