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  • 1. Abrahamsson, K.
    et al.
    Pakhomovc,, E.A.
    Loréna, A.
    Fronemanc,, P.W.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Chiericia,, M.
    Franssona, A.
    Variations of biochemical parameters along a transect in the Southern Ocean, with special emphasis on volatile halogenated organic compounds2004In: Deep Sea Research Part II:: Topical Studies in Oceanography, Vol. 51,, no 22-24, p. 2745-2756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of parameters of biogeochemical interest were monitored along a north–southerly transect (S 43–S 63°) in the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean from the 8th to the 20th of December 1997. Changes in total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and total alkalinity (AT) were mostly dependent on temperature and salinity until the ice edge was reached. After this point only a weak correlation was seen between these. Highest mean values of CT and AT were observed in the Winter Ice Edge (WIE) (2195 and 2319 μmol kg−1, respectively). Lowest mean AT (2277 μmol kg−1) was observed in the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF), whereas lowest mean CT concentration (2068 μmol kg−1) was associated with the Sub-Tropical Front (STF). The pH in situ varied between 8.060 and 8.156 where the highest values were observed in the southern part of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) and in the Summer Ice Edge (SIE) Region . These peaks were associated with areas of high chlorophyll a (chl a) and tribromomethane values. In the other areas the pH in situ was mainly dependent on hydrography. Bacterial abundance decreased more than one order of magnitude when going from north to south. The decrease appeared to be strongly related to water temperature and there were no elevated abundances at frontal zones. Microphytoplankton dominated in the SAF and APF, whereas the nano- and picoplankton dominated outside these regions.

    Volatile halogenated compounds were found to vary both with regions, and with daylight. For the iodinated compounds, the highest concentrations were found north of the STF. Brominated hydrocarbons had high concentrations in the STF, but elevated concentrations were also found in the APF and SIE regions. No obvious correlation could be found between the occurrence of individual halocarbons and chl a. On some occasions trichloroethene and tribromomethane related to the presence of nano- and microplankton, respectively.

  • 2.
    Ahmed Osman, Omneya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Beier, Sara
    Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res, Warnemunde, Germany..
    Grabherr, Manfred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists2017In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 83, no 7, article id UNSP e02634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1: 1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. L, D-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species-specific responses in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria were identified. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interspecies cellular interactions underpinning the persistence and collapse of cyanobacterial blooms.

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  • 3.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christofer M. G.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Divne, Anna-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergin, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Homa, Felix
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Lund, Sweden.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Translat Microbiome Res, Dept Mol Tumour & Cell Biol, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden.
    Ettema, Thijs J. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Genomes from uncultivated prokaryotes: a comparison of metagenome-assembled and single-amplified genomes2018In: Microbiome, E-ISSN 2049-2618, Vol. 6, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prokaryotes dominate the biosphere and regulate biogeochemical processes essential to all life. Yet, our knowledge about their biology is for the most part limited to the minority that has been successfully cultured. Molecular techniques now allow for obtaining genome sequences of uncultivated prokaryotic taxa, facilitating in-depth analyses that may ultimately improve our understanding of these key organisms.

    Results: We compared results from two culture-independent strategies for recovering bacterial genomes: single-amplified genomes and metagenome-assembled genomes. Single-amplified genomes were obtained from samples collected at an offshore station in the Baltic Sea Proper and compared to previously obtained metagenome-assembled genomes from a time series at the same station. Among 16 single-amplified genomes analyzed, seven were found to match metagenome-assembled genomes, affiliated with a diverse set of taxa. Notably, genome pairs between the two approaches were nearly identical (average 99.51% sequence identity; range 98.77-99.84%) across overlapping regions (30-80% of each genome). Within matching pairs, the single-amplified genomes were consistently smaller and less complete, whereas the genetic functional profiles were maintained. For the metagenome-assembled genomes, only on average 3.6% of the bases were estimated to be missing from the genomes due to wrongly binned contigs.

    Conclusions: The strong agreement between the single-amplified and metagenome-assembled genomes emphasizes that both methods generate accurate genome information from uncultivated bacteria. Importantly, this implies that the research questions and the available resources are allowed to determine the selection of genomics approach for microbiome studies.

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  • 4.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Galand, Pierre E.
    Casamayor, Emilio O.
    Pedros-Alio, Carlos
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    High bicarbonate assimilation in the dark by Arctic bacteria2010In: ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although both autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms incorporate CO2 in the dark through different metabolic pathways, this process has usually been disregarded in oxic marine environments. We studied the significance and mediators of dark bicarbonate assimilation in dilution cultures inoculated with winter Arctic seawater. At stationary phase, bicarbonate incorporation rates were high (0.5-2.5 mu gC L-1 d(-1)) and correlated with rates of bacterial heterotrophic production, suggesting that most of the incorporation was due to heterotrophs. Accordingly, very few typically chemoautotrophic bacteria were detected by 16S rRNA gene cloning. The genetic analysis of the biotin carboxylase gene accC putatively involved in archaeal CO2 fixation did not yield any archaeal sequence, but amplified a variety of bacterial carboxylases involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, anaplerotic pathways and leucine catabolism. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the seawater cultures (40-70% of cell counts), followed by Betaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria as shown by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARDFISH). Both Beta-and Gammaproteobacteria were active in leucine and bicarbonate uptake, while Flavobacteria did not take up bicarbonate, as measured by microautoradiography combined with CARDFISH. Within Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas-Colwellia and Oleispira were very active in bicarbonate uptake (ca. 30 and 70% of active cells, respectively), while the group Arctic96B-16 did not take up bicarbonate. Our results suggest that, potentially, the incorporation of CO2 can be relevant for the metabolism of specific Arctic heterotrophic phylotypes, promoting the maintenance of their cell activity and/or longer survival under resource depleted conditions.

  • 5.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zeder, Michael
    Harding, Tommy
    Pernthaler, Jakob
    Lovejoy, Connie
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pedros-Alio, Carlos
    Winter bloom of a rare betaproteobacteriurn in the Arctic Ocean2014In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 5, p. 425-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extremely low abundance microorganisms (members of the "rare biosphere") are believed to include dormant taxa, which can sporadically become abundant following environmental triggers. Yet, microbial transitions from rare to abundant have seldom been captured in situ, and it is uncertain how widespread these transitions are. A bloom of a single ribotype (>= 99% similarity in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene) of a widespread betaproteobacterium (Janthinobacterium sp.) occurred over 2 weeks in Arctic marine waters. The Janthinobactenum population was not detected microscopically in situ in January and early February, but suddenly appeared in the water column thereafter, eventually accounting for up to 20% of bacterial cells in mid February. During the bloom, this bacterium was detected at open water sites up to 50 km apart, being abundant down to more than 300 m. This event is one of the largest monospecific bacterial blooms reported in polar oceans. It is also remarkable because Betaproteobacteria are typically found only in low abundance in marine environments. In particular, Janthinobacterium were known from non-marine habitats and had previously been detected only in the rare biosphere of seawater samples, including the polar oceans. The Arctic Janthinobacterium formed mucilagenous monolayer aggregates after short (ca. 8 h) incubations, suggesting that biofilm formation may play a role in maintaining rare bacteria in pelagic marine environments. The spontaneous mass occurrence of this opportunistic rare taxon in polar waters during the energy-limited season extends current knowledge of how and when microbial transitions between rare and abundant occur in the ocean.

  • 6.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Andersson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    High archaeal diversity in Antarctic circumpolar deep waters2011In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 689-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaea are abundant in polar oceans but important ecological aspects of this group remain enigmatic, such as patterns of diversity and biogeography. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing population study of Antarctic archaea based on 198 bp fragments of the 16S rRNA gene, targeting different water masses across the Amundsen and Ross Seas. Our results suggest that archaeal community composition is strongly shaped by hydrography and significantly influenced by environmental parameters. Archaeal communities from cold continental shelf waters (SW) of the Ross Sea were similar over depth with a single thaumarchaeal phylotype dominating Antarctic surface waters (AASW) and deeper SW (contributing up to 80% of reads). However, this phylotype contributed less than 8% of reads in circumpolar deep waters (CDW). A related thaumarchaeon (98% identity) was almost absent in AASW, but contributed up to 30% of reads in CDW, suggesting ecological differentiation of closely related phylotypes. Significantly higher archaeal richness and evenness were observed in CDW, with Shannon indices (c. 2.5) twice as high as for AASW, and high contributions of Group II Euryarchaeota. Based on these results, we suggest that CDW is a hotspot of archaeal diversity and may play an important role in the dispersal of archaeal phylotypes to other oceanic water masses.

  • 7.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Waller, A. S.
    Mende, D. R.
    Bakker, K.
    Farnelid, H.
    Yager, P. L.
    Lovejoy, C.
    Tremblay, J. -E
    Potvin, M.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Estrada, M.
    Riemann, L.
    Bork, P.
    Pedrós-Alió, C.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Role for urea in nitrification by polar marine Archaea2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 44, p. 17989-17994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the high abundance of Archaea in the global ocean, their metabolism and biogeochemical roles remain largely unresolved. We investigated the population dynamics and metabolic activity of Thaumarchaeota in polar environments, where these microorganisms are particularly abundant and exhibit seasonal growth. Thaumarchaeota were more abundant in deep Arctic and Antarctic waters and grew throughout the winter at surface and deeper Arctic halocline waters. However, in situ single-cell activity measurements revealed a low activity of this group in the uptake of both leucine and bicarbonate (<5% Thaumarchaeota cells active), which is inconsistent with known heterotrophic and autotrophic thaumarchaeal lifestyles. These results suggested the existence of alternative sources of carbon and energy. Our analysis of an environmental metagenome from the Arctic winter revealed that Thaumarchaeota had pathways for ammonia oxidation and, unexpectedly, an abundance of genes involved in urea transport and degradation. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that most polar Thaumarchaeota had the potential to oxidize ammonia, and a large fraction of them had urease genes, enabling the use of urea to fuel nitrification. Thaumarchaeota from Arctic deep waters had a higher abundance of urease genes than those near the surface suggesting genetic differences between closely related archaeal populations. In situ measurements of urea uptake and concentration in Arctic waters showed that small-sized prokaryotes incorporated the carbon from urea, and the availability of urea was often higher than that of ammonium. Therefore, the degradation of urea may be a relevant pathway for Thaumarchaeota and other microorganisms exposed to the low-energy conditions of dark polar waters.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Anders F
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Riemann, Lasse
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Pyrosequencing reveals contrasting seasonal dynamics of taxa within Baltic Sea bacterioplankton communities2010In: ISME J, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variation in traits causes bacterial populations to respond in contrasting ways to environmental drivers. Learning about this will help us understand the ecology of individual populations in complex ecosystems. We used 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable region V6 of the 16S rRNA gene to study seasonal dynamics in Baltic Sea bacterioplankton communities, and link community and population changes to biological and chemical factors. Surface samples were collected from May to October 2003 and in May 2004 at the Landsort Deep in the central Baltic Sea Proper. The analysis rendered, on average, 20 200 sequence reads for each of the eight samples analyzed, providing the first detailed description of Baltic Sea bacterial communities. Community composition varied dramatically over time, supporting the idea of strong temporal shifts in bacterioplankton assemblages, and clustered according to season (including two May samples from consecutive years), suggesting repeatable seasonal succession. Overall, community change was most highly correlated with change in phosphorus concentration and temperature. Individual bacterial populations were also identified that tightly co-varied with different Cyanobacteria populations. Comparing the abundance profiles of operational taxonomic units at different phylogenetic distances revealed a weak but significant negative correlation between abundance profile similarity and genetic distance, potentially reflecting habitat filtering of evolutionarily conserved functional traits in the studied bacterioplankton.

  • 9. Bagatini, Inessa Lacativa
    et al.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Klaveness, Dag
    Tessarolli, Leticia Piton
    Henriques Vieira, Armando Augusto
    Host-Specificity and Dynamics in Bacterial Communities Associated with Bloom-Forming Freshwater Phytoplankton2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e85950-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many freshwater phytoplankton species have the potential to form transient nuisance blooms that affect water quality and other aquatic biota. Heterotrophic bacteria can influence such blooms via nutrient regeneration but also via antagonism and other biotic interactions. We studied the composition of bacterial communities associated with three bloom-forming freshwater phytoplankton species, the diatom Aulacoseira granulata and the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Experimental cultures incubated with and without lake bacteria were sampled in three different growth phases and bacterial community composition was assessed by 454-Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Betaproteobacteria were dominant in all cultures inoculated with lake bacteria, but decreased during the experiment. In contrast, Alphaproteobacteria, which made up the second most abundant class of bacteria, increased overall during the course of the experiment. Other bacterial classes responded in contrasting ways to the experimental incubations causing significantly different bacterial communities to develop in response to host phytoplankton species, growth phase and between attached and free-living fractions. Differences in bacterial community composition between cyanobacteria and diatom cultures were greater than between the two cyanobacteria. Despite the significance, major differences between phytoplankton cultures were in the proportion of the OTUs rather than in the absence or presence of specific taxa. Different phytoplankton species favoring different bacterial communities may have important consequences for the fate of organic matter in systems where these bloom forming species occur. The dynamics and development of transient blooms may also be affected as bacterial communities seem to influence phytoplankton species growth in contrasting ways.

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  • 10.
    Beier, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bacterial chitin degradation: mechanisms and ecophysiological strategies2013In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 4, p. 149-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitin is one the most abundant polymers in nature and interacts with both carbon and nitrogen cycles. Processes controlling chitin degradation are summarized in reviews published some 20 years ago, but the recent use of culture-independent molecular methods has led to a revised understanding of the ecology and biochemistry of this process and the organisms involved. This review summarizes different mechanisms and the principal steps involved in chitin degradation at a molecular level while also discussing the coupling of community composition to measured chitin hydrolysis activities and substrate uptake. Ecological consequences are then highlighted and discussed with a focus on the cross feeding associated with the different habitats that arise because of the need for extracellular hydrolysis of the chitin polymer prior to metabolic use. Principal environmental drivers of chitin degradation are identified which are likely to influence both community composition of chitin degrading bacteria and measured chitin hydrolysis activities.

  • 11.
    Beier, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Uncoupling of chitinase activity and uptake of hydrolyses products in freshwater bacterioplankton2011In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 1179-1188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated to what extent chitinolytic bacteria subsidize bacterial populations that do not produce chitinolytic enzymes but still use the products of chitin hydrolysis. Applying single-cell techniques to untreated and chitin-enriched lake water, we show that the number of planktonic cells taking up chitin hydrolysis products by far exceeds the number of cells expressing chitinases. Flavobacteria, Actinobacteria, and specifically members of the abundant and ubiquitous freshwater Ac1 cluster of the Actinobacteria, increased in abundance and were enriched in response to the chitin amendment. Flavobacteria were frequently observed in dense clusters on chitin particles, suggesting that they are actively involved in the hydrolysis and solubilization of chitin. In contrast, Actinobacteria were exclusively planktonic. We propose that planktonic Actinobacteria contain commensals specialized in the uptake of small hydrolysis products without expressing or possibly even possessing the machinery for chitin hydrolysis. More research is needed to assess the importance of such "cheater'' substrate acquisition strategies in the turnover and degradation of polymeric organic matter in aquatic ecosystems.

  • 12.
    Beier, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Jones, Christopher M.
    Mohit, Vani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Hallin, Sara
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Global Phylogeography of Chitinase Genes in Aquatic Metagenomes2011In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 1101-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogeny-based analysis of chitinase and 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic data suggests that salinity is a major driver for the distribution of both chitinolytic and total bacterial communities in aquatic systems. Additionally, more acidic chitinase proteins were observed with increasing salinity. Congruent habitat separation was further observed for both genes according to latitude and proximity to the coastline. However, comparison of chitinase and 16S rRNA genes extracted from different geographic locations showed little congruence in distribution. There was no indication that dispersal limited the global distribution of either gene.

  • 13.
    Beier, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Kim, Ok-Sun
    Junier, Pilar
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Witzel, Karl-Paul
    Betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers in root zones of aquatic macrophytes2010In: Fundamental and Applied Limnology, ISSN 1863-9135, Vol. 177, no 4, p. 241-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhanced nitrification and coupled denitrification in macrophyte root zones may contribute to the depletion of nitrogen from the rhizosphere and are both critical processes for agriculture and rhizoremediation. We examined one factor likely to affect these processes: the ammonia oxidizing betaproteobacterial community composition, and whether or not it is influenced by plant species (Eleocharis acicularis, Eleocharis palustris, Typha angustifolia) or sediment characteristics. Genes coding for ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and 16S rRNA of betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were targeted. The betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizing community in root surface biofilms was distinct from the surrounding rhizosphere sediment. In contrast, communities in rhizosphere and bulk sediment samples were very similar. Our results showed the occurrence of Nitrosomonas europaea-like bacteria nearly exclusively in the rhizoplane biofilms, while sequences affiliated with the Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosomonas communis and Nitrosospira-lineages were more frequently detected in the surrounding sediment. Our results further suggest that the presence of N. europaea on macrophyte roots depends on the sampling site rather than on the studied macrophyte species. We propose that the rhizoplane of aquatic macrophytes is a natural habitat for N. europaea.

  • 14.
    Beier, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mohit, Vani
    Département de Biologie, Québec-Océan and Institut de biologie integrative et des systèmes, Université Laval.
    Ettema, Thijs J. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Östman, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Pronounced seasonal dynamics of freshwater chitinase genes and chitin processing2012In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 2467-2479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal variation in activity of enzymes involved in polymer degradation, including chitinases, has been observed previously in freshwater environments. However, it is not known whether the seasonal dynamics are due to shifts in the activity of bacteria already present, or shifts in community structure towards emergence or disappearance of chitinolytic organisms. We traced seasonal shifts in the chitinase gene assemblage in a temperate lake and linked these communities to variation in chitinase activity. Chitinase genes from 20 samples collected over a full yearly cycle were characterized by pyrosequencing. Pronounced temporal shifts in composition of the chitinase gene pool (beta diversity) occurred along with distinct shifts in richness (alpha diversity) as well as chitin processing. Changes in the chitinase gene pool correlated mainly with temperature, abundance of crustacean zooplankton and phytoplankton blooms. Also changes in the physical structure of the lake, e.g. stratification and mixing were associated with changes in the chitinolytic community, while differences were minor between surface and suboxic hypolimnetic water. The lake characteristics influencing the chitinolytic community are all linked to changes in organic particles and we suggest that seasonal changes in particle quality and availability foster microbial communities adapted to efficiently degrade them.

  • 15. Bendall, Matthew L
    et al.
    Stevens, Sarah LR
    Chan, Leong-Keat
    Malfatti, Stephanie
    Schwientek, Patrick
    Tremblay, Julien
    Schackwitz, Wendy
    Martin, Joel
    Pati, Amrita
    Bushnell, Brian
    Froula, Jeff
    Kang, Dongwan
    Tringe, Susannah G
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Moran, Mary A
    Shade, Ashley
    Newton, Ryan J
    McMahon, Katherine D
    Malmstrom, Rex R
    Genome-wide selective sweeps and gene-specific sweeps in natural bacterial populations2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 1589-1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple models describe the formation and evolution of distinct microbial phylogenetic groups. These evolutionary models make different predictions regarding how adaptive alleles spread through populations and how genetic diversity is maintained. Processes predicted by competing evolutionary models, for example, genome-wide selective sweeps vs gene-specific sweeps, could be captured in natural populations using time-series metagenomics if the approach were applied over a sufficiently long time frame. Direct observations of either process would help resolve how distinct microbial groups evolve. Here, from a 9-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake (2005-2013), we explore changes in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in 30 bacterial populations. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied by >1000-fold among populations. SNP allele frequencies also changed dramatically over time within some populations. Interestingly, nearly all SNP variants were slowly purged over several years from one population of green sulfur bacteria, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were lost from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep in progress, a process predicted by the /`ecotype model/' of speciation but not previously observed in nature. In contrast, other populations contained large, SNP-free genomic regions that appear to have swept independently through the populations prior to the study without purging diversity elsewhere in the genome. Evidence for both genome-wide and gene-specific sweeps suggests that different models of bacterial speciation may apply to different populations coexisting in the same environment.

  • 16.
    Bertilsson, S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Jones, J B Jr
    Supply of dissolved organic matter to aquatic ecosystems: autochthonous sources2003In: Aquatic Ecosystems, Interactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter,, Elsevier Science, USA , 2003Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Trophic polymorphism is a common phenomenon in many species. Trade-offs in foraging efficiency on different resources are thought to be a primary cause of such polymorphism.

    2. To test for a trade-off in foraging efficiency perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) were used from a population that differs in morphology between the littoral and pelagic habitat of a lake. Indoor aquarium experiments were performed with three different prey types in two different environments. It was predicted that the morphology of the individual would affect foraging efficiency in the different environments and on the different prey types through search and attack behaviour.

    3. Overall the foraging efficiency of perch was found to be related to individual morphology. A connection was also found between individual morphology and search and attack behaviour. Search behaviour but not attack behaviour was affected by the structure in the aquaria. Furthermore our results show that there are relations between search behaviour and detection rates and between attack behaviour and attack success.

    4. Our results give a mechanistic explanation for the differences in foraging efficiency between littoral and pelagic perch. These differences are probably driven by a functional trade-off between foraging performance and general body form.

  • 17.
    Bertilsson, S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Widenfalk, A
    Photochemical degradation of PAHs in freshwaters and their impact on bacterial growth -influence of water chemistry.2002In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 469, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    How to see more: double hybridization to reveal ecological differentiation among close bacterial relatives2017In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 2110-2111Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Sjöns mikroskopiska liv: en myllrande mångfald2016In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, no 4, p. 10-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Strategies to Map the Microbiome of Freshwater Lakes: Sampling and Context2017In: Hydrocarbon and lipid microbiology protocols, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2017, p. 199-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freshwater lakes are indispensible resources for humankind and as such also exposed to significant pressure from anthropogenic activities and environmental change. Organic matter holds a central role in these ecosystems, both in providing energy for the food web and in modifying water quality. The transformation, degradation, and internal production of organic matter is largely mediated by microorganisms and there is hence great interest in learning more about the ecology and function of these microscopic but abundant key players in lake ecosystems. The focus of this chapter is thus on strategies to study the spatial and temporal organization of the freshwater lake microbiome, with special attention to representative and rational sampling of freshwater lakes for subsequent analyses of microbial process or community features. Within-system heterogeneity across spatial and temporal scales will be presented and linkages between the physical structur