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  • 1. Abarca-Gómez, L.
    et al.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Ezzati, M
    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10113, p. 2627-2642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults.

    METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity).

    FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m(2) per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m(2) per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m(2) per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m(2) per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m(2) per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4-1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8-6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5-1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7-9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0-12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8-10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4-19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3-14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7-29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5-38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44-117) million girls and 117 (70-178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24-89) million girls and 74 (39-125) million boys worldwide were obese.

    INTERPRETATION: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults.

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  • 2. Abrahamsson, Christina
    et al.
    Ahlund, Catherine
    Nordlander, Margareta
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    A method for heart rate-corrected estimation of baroreflex sensitivity.2003In: J Hypertens, ISSN 0263-6352, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 2133-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahlström, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Rudberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Correlation between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a community-based cohort of men and women2009In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 673-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: In recent years, an association has been noted between several abnormalities that characterize the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). These abnormalities include dyslipidaemia, obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. The correlations between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the variables in the MetS in a normal population are still unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe correlations between plasma calcium and PTH and the various abnormalities present in the MetS in a healthy population.

    DESIGN: We studied 1016 healthy individuals from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) population of 70 years old, by means of plasma analyses of calcium, PTH, creatinine, lipids, insulin and glucose, as well as by standardized blood pressure measurements. Further, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were determined.

    RESULTS: The more National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria for the MetS that were met, the higher the s-PTH and albumin-corrected s-calcium. Further, positive correlations between plasma calcium and BMI (P = 0.0003), waist circumference (P = 0.0009) and insulin resistance (P = 0.079) were found. PTH and BMI (P < 0.0001), waist circumference (P < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.0034), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0008), serum triglycerides (P = 0.0003) and insulin resistance (P = 0.0003) were positively correlated, whereas serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) (P = 0.036) and PTH were negatively correlated.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that PTH correlates with several of the metabolic factors included in the MetS within a normocalcaemic population. In addition, individuals with mild pHPT present significantly more NCEP criteria for MetS. We postulate that increased levels of PTH in pHPT may be associated with the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in pHPT.

  • 4. Ahlund, Catherine
    et al.
    Pettersson, Knut
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Influence of different types of stressors on the waveform of the peripheral arterial pulse in humans.2003In: Blood Press, ISSN 0803-7051, Vol. 12, no 5-6, p. 291-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kennedy, Beatrice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ganna, Andrea
    Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology. The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Division of and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Magnusson, Patrik KE
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Medical epidemiology. Unit of Cardiovascular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Effect of General Adiposity and Central Body Fat Distribution on the Circulating Metabolome: A Multi-Cohort Nontargeted Metabolomics Observational and Mendelian Randomization Study2022In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 329-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is associated with adverse health outcomes, but the metabolic effects have not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the association between adiposity with circulating metabolites and to address causality with Mendelian randomization (MR). Metabolomics data was generated by non-targeted ultra-performance liquid-chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass-spectrometry in plasma and serum from three population-based Swedish cohorts: ULSAM (N=1,135), PIVUS (N=970), and TwinGene (N=2,059). We assessed associations between general adiposity measured as body mass index (BMI) and central body fat distribution measured as waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI) with 210 annotated metabolites. We employed MR analysis to assess causal effects. Lastly, we attempted to replicate the MR findings in the KORA and TwinsUK cohorts (N=7,373), the CHARGE consortium (N=8,631), the Framingham Heart Study (N=2,076) and the DIRECT consortium (N=3,029). BMI was associated with 77 metabolites, while WHRadjBMI was associated with 11 and 3 metabolites in women and men, respectively. The MR analyses in the Swedish cohorts suggested a causal association (p-value <0.05) of increased general adiposity and reduced levels of arachidonic acid, dodecanedioic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine (P-16:0) as well as with increased creatine levels. The replication effort provided support for a causal association of adiposity on reduced levels of arachidonic acid (p-value 0.03). Adiposity is associated with variation of large parts of the circulating metabolome, however causality needs further investigation in well-powered cohorts.

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  • 6.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Muscle Morphology And Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease2010In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, p. E353-E353Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN:

    Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS:

    We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS:

    During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Helén
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rönn, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Eva, Brittebo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Experimental studies of bisphenol A in cardiovascular cells and tissues: effects on genes that regulate angiogenesis and vascular tone2012In:  , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Annuk, Margus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cyclooxygenase inhibition improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with chronic renal failure2002In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 17, no 12, p. 2159-2163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Some studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of L-arginine as a substrate for nitric oxide synthesis, and diclofenac as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived vasoconstrictive agents on vascular responses in humans during several pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of L-arginine and diclofenac on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDV) in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF).

    METHODS: Effects of L-arginine and diclofenac on EDV and EIDV were measured in 15 patients with CRF and in 15 healthy controls by means of forearm blood flow measurements with venous occlusion plethysmography during local intra-arterial infusions of methacholine (2 and 4 micro g/min evaluating EDV) and sodium nitroprusside (5 and 10 micro g/min evaluating EIDV).

    RESULTS: L-Arginine infusion increased methacholine-induced vasodilatation both in patients with CRF and healthy controls. Diclofenac infusion increased methacholine-induced vasodilatation only in patients with CRF. There was no significant change in nitroprusside-induced vasodilatation after L-arginine and diclofenac infusions both in patients with CRF and healthy controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that COX inhibition reduces the levels of a prostanoid-derived vasoconstrictive agent contributing to the impaired EDV in patients with CRF, while in this age group L-arginine improves EDV regardless of renal function.

  • 10.
    Annuk, Margus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Linde, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in renal failure in humans2001In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The main causes of death in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) are cardiovascular complications. The aim of the present study was to compare endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in patients with chronic renal failure with a control population controlling for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia.

    METHODS: Fifty-six patients with moderate CRF (mean creatinine clearance 29.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) underwent evaluation of EDV and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDV) by means of forearm blood flow (FBF) measurements with venous occlusion plethysmography during local intra-arterial infusions of methacholine (Mch, 2 and 4 microg/min evaluating EDV) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 5 and 10 microg/min evaluating EIDV). Fifty-six control subjects without renal impairment underwent the same investigation.

    RESULTS: Infusion of Mch increased FBF significantly less in patients with renal failure than in controls (198 vs 374%, P<0.001), whereas no significant difference was seen regarding the vasodilatation induced by SNP (278 vs 269%). The differences in EDV between the groups were still significant after controlling for hypertension, blood glucose, and serum cholesterol in multiple regression analysis (P<0.001). EDV was related to serum creatinine (r=-0.37, P<0.01), creatinine clearance (r=0.45, P<0.005) and to serum triglyceride levels (r=-0.29, P<0.005) in the CRF group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with moderate CRF have an impaired EDV even after correction for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and this impairment is related to the degree of renal failure.

  • 11.
    Annuk, Margus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Linde, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Erythropoietin impairs endothelial vasodilatory function in patients with renal anemia and in healthy subjects2006In: Nephron. Clinical practice, ISSN 1660-8151, E-ISSN 2235-3186, Vol. 102, no 1, p. c30-c34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: The mechanisms underlying the aggravation or development of hypertension frequently seen during treatment of renal anemia with epoetins are not fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epoetin alfa on endothelial vasodilatory function in patients with renal anemia and in healthy subjects. Methods: Eighteen preuremic patients with anemia (GFR 23.4 ± 11 SD ml/min, Hb 101 ± 8 g/l) and 10 healthy subjects underwent evaluation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV) by means of forearm blood flow (FBF) measurements with venous occlusion plethysmography during local intra-arterial infusions of methacholine (MCh, evaluating EDV) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, evaluating EIDV). These investigations were performed before and 30 min after an intravenous injection of epoetin alfa (10,000 IU). Ten healthy subjects underwent the same procedure with the exception that saline were given instead of epoetin. The patients were treated with epoetin alfa subcutaneously for 12-19 weeks and revaluated when Hb exceeded 120 g/l. Results: EDV was attenuated after the epoetin injection in both renal patients and healthy subjects. This impairment persisted after anemia had been treated. EDIV and blood pressure remained constant. Saline had no effect on the variables measured. Conclusion: Our results indicate that epoetin alfa impairs endothelial function in renal patients and healthy subjects which may have an impact on vascular complications.

  • 12.
    Annuk, Margus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Soveri, Inga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Zilmer, Mihkel
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hulthe, Johannes
    Fellström, Bengt
    Endothelial function, CRP and oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease2005In: JN. Journal of Nephrology (Milano. 1992), ISSN 1121-8428, E-ISSN 1724-6059, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 721-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Apart from traditional risk factors, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, malnutrition and endothelial dysfunction are important in CVD development in renal patients. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), endothelium dependent vasodilation (EDV) and oxidative stress markers in patients with CKD K/DOQI stage 3-5.

    METHODS: Measurements of CRP, conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), oxidized low density lipoprotein,glutathione and albumin were performed in 44 consecutive patients with CKD stage 3-5. EDV was measured by methacholine infusion in the brachial artery and venous occlusion plethysmography.

    RESULTS: Patients with high CRP had significantly lower glomerular filtration rates and albumin, but increased LOOH and CD. In multiple regression analysis, only LOOH and CD remained significant. Patients with poor EDV had increased urea and lower glutathione (GSH). In multiple regression analysis, GSH and urea were independently related to EDV. No correlation was found between CRP and endothelial function.

    CONCLUSION: CRP was related to lipid peroxidation, while endothelial function was related to intracellular oxidative stress in patients with CKD. CRP and EDV were unrelated to each other. Therefore, CRP and endothelial function could provide complementary prognostic information regarding future cardiovascular disorders in renal patients.

  • 13.
    Annuk, Margus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Zilmer, Mikhel
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Linde, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Oxidative stress and endothelial function in chronic renal failure2001In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 2747-2752Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Thirty-seven patients with CRF underwent evaluation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent vasodilation by means of forearm blood flow measurements with venous occlusion plethysmography during local intra-arterial infusions of methacholine (evaluating endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and sodium nitroprusside (evaluating endothelium-independent vasodilation). Lag phase of lipoprotein fraction to oxidation, total antioxidative activity, diene conjugates, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxide, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized GSH (GSSG), and the GSH redox ratio (GSSG/GSH) were all measured as markers of oxidative stress. Two groups of healthy subjects (61 and 37 subjects, respectively) were used as controls. In one group, oxidative stress markers were measured, whereas endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent vasodilation were assessed in the other group. Compared with controls, the patients with renal insufficiency had an impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, a shorter lag phase of lipoprotein fraction, and higher levels of diene conjugates, lipid hydroperoxide, and GSSG levels. The GSSG/GSH ratio was lower in patients with CRF. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was positively correlated with total antioxidative activity (r = 0.41, P = 0.016), GSH (r = 0.44, P < 0.0098), and lag phase of LDL (r = 0.35, P = 0.036) and negatively correlated with GSSG (r = -0.40, P < 0.018), GSSG/GSH (r = -0.47, P = 0.0057), and diene conjugates (r = -0.53 P < 0.0015) in patients with CRF. These results show that an impaired endothelium vasodilation function and oxidative stress are related to each other in patients with CRF.

  • 14.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction2014In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 325-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Given the indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in people who use snus, a moist smokeless tobacco product, we hypothesized that discontinuation of snus use after an MI would reduce mortality risk. Methods and Results-All patients who were admitted to coronary care units for an MI in Sweden between 2005 and 2009 and were <75 years of age underwent a structured examination 2 months after discharge (the baseline of the present study). We investigated the risk of mortality in post-MI snus quitters (n=675) relative to post-MI continuing snus users (n=1799) using Cox proportional hazards analyses. During follow-up (mean 2.1 years), 83 participants died. The mortality rate was 9.7 (95% confidence interval, 5.7-16.3) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI snus quitters and 18.7 (14.8-23.6) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI continuing snus users. After adjustment for age and sex, post-MI snus quitters had half the mortality risk of post-MI continuing snus users (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.91). In a multivariable-adjusted model, the hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-1.02). The corresponding estimate for people who quit smoking after MI versus post-MI continuing smokers was 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.69). Conclusions-In this study, discontinuation of snus use after an MI was associated with a nearly halved mortality risk, similar to the benefit associated with smoking cessation. These observations suggest that the use of snus after MI should be discouraged.

  • 15.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Response to Letter Regarding Article, "Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction"2015In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 131, no 17, p. E423-E423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hergens, M. P.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ye, W.
    Nyrén, O.
    Lambe, M.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) And Risk Of Heart Failure In Two Swedish Cohorts2010In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, p. E48-E49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hergens, Maria-Pia
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ye, Weimin
    Nyrén, Olof
    Lambe, Mats
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure: Results from Two Swedish Cohorts2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1120-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Oral moist snuff (snus) is discussed as a safer alternative to smoking, and its use is increasing. Based on its documented effect on blood pressure, we hypothesized that use of snus increases the risk of heart failure.

    Design:

    Two independent Swedish prospective cohorts; the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a community-based sample of 1076 elderly men, and the Construction Workers Cohort (CWC), a sample of 118,425 never-smoking male construction workers.

    Methods:

    Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate possible associations of snus use with risk of a first hospitalization for heart failure.

    Results:

    In ULSAM, 95 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 8.9 years. In a model adjusted for established risk factors including past and present smoking exposure, current snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure [hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-4.22] relative to non-use. Snus use was particularly associated with risk of non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 2.55, 95% CI 1.12-5.82). In CWC, 545 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 18 years. In multivariable-adjusted models, current snus use was moderately associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.00-1.64) and non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.97-1.68) relative to never tobacco use.

    Conclusion:

    Data from two independent cohorts suggest that use of snus may be associated with a higher risk of heart failure.

  • 18. Arking, Dan E
    et al.
    Pulit, Sara L
    Crotti, Lia
    van der Harst, Pim
    Munroe, Patricia B
    Koopmann, Tamara T
    Sotoodehnia, Nona
    Rossin, Elizabeth J
    Morley, Michael
    Wang, Xinchen
    Johnson, Andrew D
    Lundby, Alicia
    Gudbjartsson, Daníel F
    Noseworthy, Peter A
    Eijgelsheim, Mark
    Bradford, Yuki
    Tarasov, Kirill V
    Dörr, Marcus
    Müller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Lahtinen, Annukka M
    Nolte, Ilja M
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Bis, Joshua C
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Newhouse, Stephen J
    Evans, Daniel S
    Post, Wendy S
    Waggott, Daryl
    Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka
    Hicks, Andrew A
    Eisele, Lewin
    Ellinghaus, David
    Hayward, Caroline
    Navarro, Pau
    Ulivi, Sheila
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Tester, David J
    Chatel, Stéphanie
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kumari, Meena
    Morris, Richard W
    Naluai, Asa T
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Kluttig, Alexander
    Strohmer, Bernhard
    Panayiotou, Andrie G
    Torres, Maria
    Knoflach, Michael
    Hubacek, Jaroslav A
    Slowikowski, Kamil
    Raychaudhuri, Soumya
    Kumar, Runjun D
    Harris, Tamara B
    Launer, Lenore J
    Shuldiner, Alan R
    Alonso, Alvaro
    Bader, Joel S
    Ehret, Georg
    Huang, Hailiang
    Kao, W H Linda
    Strait, James B
    Macfarlane, Peter W
    Brown, Morris
    Caulfield, Mark J
    Samani, Nilesh J
    Kronenberg, Florian
    Willeit, Johann
    Smith, J Gustav
    Greiser, Karin H
    Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette
    Werdan, Karl
    Carella, Massimo
    Zelante, Leopoldo
    Heckbert, Susan R
    Psaty, Bruce M
    Rotter, Jerome I
    Kolcic, Ivana
    Polašek, Ozren
    Wright, Alan F
    Griffin, Maura
    Daly, Mark J
    Arnar, David O
    Hólm, Hilma
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Denny, Joshua C
    Roden, Dan M
    Zuvich, Rebecca L
    Emilsson, Valur
    Plump, Andrew S
    Larson, Martin G
    O'Donnell, Christopher J
    Yin, Xiaoyan
    Bobbo, Marco
    D'Adamo, Adamo P
    Iorio, Annamaria
    Sinagra, Gianfranco
    Carracedo, Angel
    Cummings, Steven R
    Nalls, Michael A
    Jula, Antti
    Kontula, Kimmo K
    Marjamaa, Annukka
    Oikarinen, Lasse
    Perola, Markus
    Porthan, Kimmo
    Erbel, Raimund
    Hoffmann, Per
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Kälsch, Hagen
    Nöthen, Markus M
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Thelle, Dag S
    Gieger, Christian
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Perz, Siegfried
    Peters, Annette
    Prucha, Hanna
    Sinner, Moritz F
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    de Boer, Rudolf A
    Franke, Lude
    van der Vleuten, Pieter A
    Beckmann, Britt Maria
    Martens, Eimo
    Bardai, Abdennasser
    Hofman, Nynke
    Wilde, Arthur A M
    Behr, Elijah R
    Dalageorgou, Chrysoula
    Giudicessi, John R
    Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia
    Barc, Julien
    Kyndt, Florence
    Probst, Vincent
    Ghidoni, Alice
    Insolia, Roberto
    Hamilton, Robert M
    Scherer, Stephen W
    Brandimarto, Jeffrey
    Margulies, Kenneth
    Moravec, Christine E
    Greco M, Fabiola Del
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R
    Lee, Wai K
    Watt, Graham C M
    Campbell, Harry
    Wild, Sarah H
    El Mokhtari, Nour E
    Frey, Norbert
    Asselbergs, Folkert W
    Mateo Leach, Irene