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  • 1. Andersson, G
    et al.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    A critical review of the construct and its application in audiology. 2003In: Int J Audiol, Vol. 42, p. S97-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    DSM-5 and ICD-11 symptom profiles in a diverse sample of trauma victims2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Screening for chronic PTSD after disasters: The gap between self-reported posttraumatic stress and PTSD cases in psychiatric services2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Symptom profiles of posttraumatic stress among Swedish survivors of a natural disaster and their prospective value to long-term distress2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Roberts, Neil
    Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Cardiff, Wales, UK.
    Bisson, Jonathan
    Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, Wales, UK.
    Hyland, Philip
    Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, Ireland.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
    Reliability and validity of the Swedish international trauma interview for posttraumatic stress disorders in the ICD-112019In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Trauma in Transition: Building Bridges, 2019, Vol. 10, article id 1613836Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    A Prospective Study of ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD, Functional Disability and Quality of Life2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Arnberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Similarity in symptom patterns of posttraumatic stress among disaster-survivors: a three-step latent profile analysis2018In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1546083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Individuals express symptoms of posttraumatic stress in various ways, noted for example in the many symptom combinations in the diagnostic manuals. Studies aiming to examine differences of symptom presentations by extracting latent classes or profiles indicate both the presence of subtypes with differing symptomatology and subtypes distinguished by severity levels. Few studies have examined subtype associations with long-term outcomes. Objective: The current study aimed to apply latent profile analysis on posttraumatic stress (PTS) in a highly homogenous sample of Swedish tourists exposed to the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami and to examine if classes differed in their long-term outcome. Methods: An latent profile analysis was conducted using self-report data collected one year after the disaster from 1638 highly exposed survivors that endorsed 1 symptom of PTS. Associations were examined between the classes and predictors of PTS (loss of a relative or friend, subjective life threat) and levels of PTS at a three-year follow up. Results: The latent profile analysis indicated four classes: minimal, low, moderate, and severe symptoms. The classes were distinguished mainly by their levels of PTS. Loss of a relative or friend and subjective life threat were associated with a higher likelihood of belonging to any other class than the minimal class. The severity level of the classes at one year were predictive of PTS severity at the three-year follow-up. Conclusions: Homogeneous profiles of posttraumatic stress differing mainly in symptom severity were found in this sample of disaster survivors. Profile diversity may be related to sample variation and unmeasured confounders rather than reflect qualitatively different disorders.

  • 8.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Prediction of psychological symptoms in family members of patients with burns 1 year after injury2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 384-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To report a study of predictors of psychological symptoms in family members of patients with burns.

    Background

    Family members are important as a source of social support for patients undergoing prolonged rehabilitation. Little is known about psychological symptoms of family members of patients with burns, especially in the long term.

    Design

    The design of the study was prospective and longitudinal.

    Methods

    Forty-four family members of adult patients treated in a burn centre between 2000-2007 completed questionnaires during care and at 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. Psychological symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Predictors for anxiety and depression were explored in regression analyses.

    Results

    The mean scores indicated normal to mild symptoms in general. Moderate and severe symptom levels during care and at 12 months were demonstrated on the anxiety subscale by 15/44 and 5/39, respectively, and on the depression subscale by 5/44 and 0/39 of the family members, respectively. In the final regression models, the primary predictor was psychological symptoms at the previous assessment. Other predictors were previous life events, age, and the coping strategy avoidance.

    Conclusion

    Family members of patients with burns demonstrate normal to mild levels of psychological symptoms that decrease over time. One-third show moderate to severe anxiety symptoms during care and may benefit from counselling. Previous symptoms predict later symptoms, indicating that screening with a validated instrument is useful. The results provide guidance for nurses in assessing and planning adequate interventions for family members.

  • 9.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden The Burn Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Being a family member of a burn survivor –: Experiences and needs2018In: Burns Open, ISSN 2468-9122, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Family members are important in the recovery process of persons with severe burns; however, few previous studies have focused on how this group experiences care and rehabilitation.

    Objective

    To explore family members’ experiences and needs, during the time in hospital and after discharge.

    Methodology

    Explorative study with a qualitative descriptive design. Ten semi-structured interviews with family members of injured persons treated at the national burn centres were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.

    Findings

    Five categories were related to experiences during care: Experiencing excellent treatment and support, Experiencing mistrust and a rejecting attitude, Feelings of chaos and shock, Being the hub of the family network, Feeling hope and thankfulness. Three categories were related to experiences during rehabilitation: Ambiguous feelings, Multifaceted support and Handling the situation.

    Conclusion

    The experiences of the time in hospital and during rehabilitation are individual and comprise a mixture of positive and negative experiences and a diversity of needs. The results suggest that healthcare professionals should be proactive and identify specific needs for support as well as provide individualized treatment of family members.

  • 10.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Health-related quality of life in family members of patients with burns2014In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A severe burn not only affects the patients, but may also have a great impact on the lives of family members. It is known that family members of patients with burns experience psychological distress, but health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has not been studied in this group. The aim was to study predictors of HRQoL in family members of patients with burns. Forty-four family members of adult patients treated in a burn center, between 2000 and 2007, completed questionnaires during care, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. HRQoL was assessed with the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), which consists of the dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain, and anxiety/depression. The questionnaire generates an EQ-5D index and a visual analog scale (VAS) score. Overall, the EQ-5D index was similar to that of the general population. A slight improvement in HRQoL was found in the VAS scores and in the anxiety/depression dimension over time. In regression models, HRQoL was primarily predicted by earlier life events, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and HRQoL, assessed during the patients’ hospitalization. In summary, HRQoL assessed with VAS scores increased slightly during the first year postburn, and early screening for life events and psychological symptoms, and HRQoL might be useful in identifying family members in need of support.

  • 11.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forslin, Per
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Strandlund, Carola
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Is the Internet-administered CIDI-SF Equivalent to a Clinician-administered SCID Interview?2002In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Zanzi, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    No regrets: Young adult patients in psychiatry report positive reactions to biobank participation2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research in vulnerable individuals must insure voluntariness and minimize negative reactions caused by participation. This study aimed to describe consent and completion rate in young psychiatric patients in relation to study components, degree of disability and to compare response to research participation in patients and controls.

    METHODS: Between 2012 and 2015, 463 patients with psychiatric disorders between the ages of 18-25 from the Dept. of General Psychiatry at Uppsala University Hospital and 105 controls were recruited to donate data and samples to a biobank. Consent and completion in relation to questionnaires, biological sampling of blood, saliva or feces, were monitored. Both groups were also asked about their perceived disability and how research participation affected them.

    RESULTS: Most patients who participated consented to and completed questionnaires and blood sampling. The majority also consented to saliva sampling, while less than half consented to collect feces. Of those who gave consent to saliva and feces only half completed the sampling. Both patients and controls reported high voluntariness and were positive to research participation. Within the patient group, those with greater perceived disability reported greater distress while participating in research, but there was no difference in consent or completion rates or level of regret.

    CONCLUSIONS: With the described information procedures, psychiatric patients, regardless of perceived disability, reported high voluntariness and did not regret participation in biobanking. Compared to questionnaires and blood sampling, given consent was reduced for feces and completion was lower for both saliva and feces sampling.

  • 13.
    Cunningham, Janet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Zanzi, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Erratum to: No regrets2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Cunningham, Janet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Zanzi, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    No regrets: Young adult patients in psychiatry report positive reactions to biobank participation.2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research in vulnerable individuals must insure voluntariness and minimize negative reactions caused by participation. This study aimed to describe consent and completion rate in young psychiatric patients in relation to study components, degree of disability and to compare response to research participation in patients and controls.

    METHODS: Between 2012 and 2015, 463 patients with psychiatric disorders between the ages of 18-25 from the Dept. of General Psychiatry at Uppsala University Hospital and 105 controls were recruited to donate data and samples to a biobank. Consent and completion in relation to questionnaires, biological sampling of blood, saliva or feces, were monitored. Both groups were also asked about their perceived disability and how research participation affected them.

    RESULTS: Most patients who participated consented to and completed questionnaires and blood sampling. The majority also consented to saliva sampling, while less than half consented to collect feces. Of those who gave consent to saliva and feces only half completed the sampling. Both patients and controls reported high voluntariness and were positive to research participation. Within the patient group, those with greater perceived disability reported greater distress while participating in research, but there was no difference in consent or completion rates or level of regret.

    CONCLUSIONS: With the described information procedures, psychiatric patients, regardless of perceived disability, reported high voluntariness and did not regret participation in biobanking. Compared to questionnaires and blood sampling, given consent was reduced for feces and completion was lower for both saliva and feces sampling.

  • 15.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Return to work and health-related quality of life after burn injury2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although severe burn injury is associated with long-term rehabilitation and disability, research on returning to work in burn patients is limited. The aims of this study were: (i) to explore injury- and personality-related predictors of returning to work, and (ii) to compare health-related quality of life and health outcome in working versus non-working individuals.Design: Cross-sectional study.Subjects: Forty-eight former patients with pre-burn employment were evaluated on average 3.8 years after the burn.Methods: Data were collected from medical records and by a questionnaire in which the patients were asked about their main activity status described in the terms: work, studies, pension, disability pension, sick leave or unemployment. It also contained the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, SF-36, Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief, items assessing fear-avoidance, Impact of Event Scale-Revised and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.Results: Thirty-one percent had not returned to work. In logistic regression, returning to work was associated with time since injury, the extent of full-thickness injuries, and the personality trait embitterment. Those who did not work had lower health-related quality of life, poorer burn-specific health, more fear-avoidance and more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, but they did not differ from those who were working regarding general mood.Conclusion: Returning to work was explained by both injury severity and personality characteristics. Those who did not work were characterized by low health-related quality of life and poorer trauma-related physical and psychological health.

  • 16.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Department of Surgical Sciences. Plastikkirurgi.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Department of Surgical Sciences. Plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Work status and burn specific health after work-related burn injury.2004In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 839-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms following severe burn injury in relation to lifetime psychiatric morbidity2008In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 1349-1356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric history has been suggested to have an impact on long-term adjustment in burn survivors. A rigorous, prospective, longitudinal approach was used to study psychiatric history in a population-based burn sample and its impact on symptomatology of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at a 12-month follow-up. METHODS: Seventy-three consecutive patients admitted to the Uppsala Burn Unit were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for psychiatric disorders, of whom 64 were also assessed after 12 months. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients (66%) presented with at least one lifetime psychiatric diagnosis; major depression (41%), alcohol abuse or dependence (32%), simple phobia (16%), and panic disorder (16%) were most prevalent. At 12-months postburn, 10 patients (16%) met criteria for major depression, 6 (9%) for PTSD, and 11 (17%) for subsyndromal PTSD. Patients with lifetime anxiety disorder and with lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to be depressed at 12 months, whereas those with lifetime affective disorder, substance use disorder and psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to have symptoms of PTSD. CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of burn survivors exhibit a history of lifetime psychiatric disorders. Those with a psychiatric history have a higher risk of postburn psychiatric problems.

  • 18.
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, Psychiat, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Different patterns of attentional bias in antenatal and postpartum depression2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 11, article id e00844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundBiased information processing in attention, memory, and interpretation is proposed to be central cognitive alterations in patients with major depressive disorder, but studies in women with peripartum depression are scarce. Because of the many similarities with depression in nonperipartum states as regards symptom profile and risk factors, we hypothesized that women with antenatal and postpartum depression would display attentional bias to negatively and positively valenced words. MethodsOne hundred and seventy-seven pregnant and 157 postpartum women were included. Among these, 40 suffered from antenatal depressive disorder and 33 from postpartum depressive disorder. An emotional Stroop task with neutral, positive, negative, and negatively valenced obstetric words was used. ResultsNo significant difference in emotional interference scores was noted between women with antenatal depression and nondepressed pregnant women. In contrast, women with postpartum depression displayed shorter reaction times to both positive (p=.028) and negative (p=.022) stimuli, compared with neutral words. Pregnant women on antidepressant treatment displayed longer reaction times to negatively valenced obstetric words in comparison with untreated depressed women (p=.012), and a trend toward greater interference in comparison with controls (p=.061). ConclusionsIn contrast with the hypothesis, we found no evidence of attentional bias to emotionally valenced stimuli in women with untreated peripartum depression. However, the shorter reaction times to emotional stimuli in women with postpartum depression may indicate emotional numbing, which in turn, is a functional impairment that may have repercussions for child development and well-being. Our findings emphasize the need to identify and treat women with postpartum depression at the earliest possible time point to ensure swift recovery and support for the family.

  • 19.
    Gauffin, Emelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Stability in personality after physical traumaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although personality traits are considered stable during adult life, the clinical impression is that some persons exposed to severe physical trauma report that they feel different than before the injury. Our aim was therefore to assess the extent of stability in personality in burn patients the first year after injury. 

    Method: Eighty-four former burn patients, admitted to a national burn center, were assessed with the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) during acute care and at 12 months post-burn. Psychiatric disorders were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I).  

    Results: Burn patients scored lower on the trait Stress Susceptibility during the acute care and higher on the traits Somatic Trait AnxietyEmbittermentImpulsiveness and Social Desirability at 12 months post-burn, compared with norm values. While personality domain scores remained stable between acute care and 12 months post-burn, on the trait level there was an increase, and normalization, of Stress Susceptibility scores. 

    Conclusion: Personality traits remained relatively stable the first year after trauma. The multidisciplinary burn care during hospitalization might exert a potential stress reducing effect. This effect may however fade with time and the long, stressful load after a physical trauma can have a persisting effect on an individual’s susceptibility to stress.

  • 20.
    Kildal, Morten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Coping strategies, injury characteristics and long-term outcome after burn injury.2005In: Injury, Int. J. Care Injured, Vol. 36, p. 511-518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kildal, Morten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Personality characteristics and perceived health problems after burn injuryIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Low, Aili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Dyster Aas, Johan
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Chronic nightmares after severe burns; risk factors and implications for treatment.2003In: J Burn Care Rehabil, Vol. 24, p. 260-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Low, Aili J. F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Psychiatric morbidity predicts perceived burn-specific health 1 year after a burn2012In: General Hospital Psychiatry, ISSN 0163-8343, E-ISSN 1873-7714, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    Individual factors such as gender, age, coping and personality traits and injury-related factors such as injury severity have been implicated as risk factors for poor perceived health after burns. As psychiatric morbidity is common in individuals who sustain burns, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of preinjury psychiatric problems on perceived health after injury.

    Method:

    A total of 85 consecutive patients treated at a national burn center were prospectively assessed: the patients were interviewed during acute care with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. One year after injury, perceived health was assessed with the Bum-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B). Multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate the predictive effect of preinjury psychiatric history on perceived postinjury health.

    Results:

    Psychiatric morbidity, especially mood disorders, affected outcome for six of the nine BSHS-B subscales, with the covariates mainly being the length of hospital stay and total burn size.

    Conclusion:

    The results show that a history of preinjury psychiatric disorders, especially during the year before the burn, affects perceived outcome regarding both physical and psychological aspects of health 1 year after injury and that it is a risk factor for worse perceived outcome.

  • 24.
    Low, Aili Janina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    The presence of nightmares as a screening tool for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in burn survivors2006In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 727-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent nightmares can be a symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study evaluated the method of asking burn survivors about nightmares as a screening tool for the presence of PTSD symptomatology. The presence of nightmares in 85 individuals treated at the Burn Center in Uppsala, Sweden, between 1996 and 2000 (23 women, 62 men, average age 47 years, average burn size 17% TBSA, average time after burn 3.6 years) was evaluated by one question from the Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS) and by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria for nightmares. PTSD symptomatology was assessed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Sensitivity, Specificity, Discriminant Ability, and Likelihood Ratios for a positive and a negative result were calculated to evaluate the screening questions. As many as 46% of the burn survivors reported nightmares of some frequency in the BSHS and as many as 28% when using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria. Both approaches were useful tools for detecting or ruling out PTSD symptoms. The best Discriminant Ability was achieved with a screening test using the BSHS item "I have nightmares." Screening questions for presence of nightmares after burns can be useful in detecting PTSD symptomatology.

  • 25.
    Low, Aili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Meyer, Walter J
    University of Texas Medical School of Biomedical Science at Galveston, Texas, USA.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Thomas, Christofer R
    The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas, USA.
    Psychiatric Disorders Associated with Burn Injury2012In: Total Burn Care, Elsevier, 2012, 4th ed, p. 733-741Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Löfving-Gupta, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Koposov, Roman
    UiT, Reg Ctr Child & Youth Mental Hlth & Child Welf, Tromso, Norway.
    Blatny, Marek
    Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Psychol, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hrdlicka, Michal
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 2, Univ Hosp Motol, Dept Child Psychiat, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Yale Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Child Study, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Yale Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Child Study, New Haven, CT 06520 USA;Sater Forens Psychiat Clin, S-78327 Sater, Sweden.
    Community violence exposure and substance use: cross-cultural and gender perspectives2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative effects of community violence exposure on child and adolescent mental health are well documented and exposure to community violence has been linked both to a number of internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate cross-cultural and gender differences in the relationship between community violence exposure and substance abuse. A self-report survey was conducted among 10,575, 12-18 year old adolescents in three different countries, Czech Republic (N = 4537), Russia (N = 2377) and US (N = 3661). We found that in all three countries both substance use and problem behavior associated with it increased similarly along with severity of violence exposure and this association was not gender-specific. It was concluded that in spite of the differences in the levels of violence exposure and substance use cross-culturally and by gender, the pattern of their association is neither culturally nor gender bound.