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  • 1.
    Agathangelidis, A.
    et al.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Bystry, V.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Hadzidimitriou, A.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Sutton, L. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Minga, E.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Kienle, D.
    Univ Ulm, Dept Internal Med 3, D-89069 Ulm, Germany..
    Davis, Z.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Yan, X. J.
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Shanafelt, T.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Med, Dept Hematol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Boudjogra, M.
    Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Plevova, K.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Gounari, M.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Xochelli, A.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Navarro, A.
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Unidad Hematopatol, Serv Anat Patol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Chatzouli, M.
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Pedersen, L. B.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfo, L.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Rossi, D.
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Hematol, Novara, Italy..
    Veronese, S.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Hematol, Milan, Italy..
    Facco, M.
    Univ Padua, Sch Med, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, Dept Med, Padua, Italy..
    Bikos, V.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Karan-Djurasevic, T.
    Univ Belgrade, Inst Mol Genet & Genet Engn, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Pavlovic, S.
    Univ Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia..
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Poiron, C.
    Univ Montpellier, IMGT, LIGM, IGH, Montpellier, France..
    Chu, C. C.
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Stalika, E.
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Giudicelli, V.
    Univ Montpellier, IMGT, LIGM, IGH, Montpellier, France..
    Panagiotidis, P.
    Univ Athens, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, Athens, Greece..
    Sudarikov, A.
    Natl Hematol Res Ctr, Dept Mol Hematol, Moscow, Russia..
    Anagnostopoulos, A.
    G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Trentin, L.
    Univ Padua, Sch Med, Hematol & Clin Immunol Branch, Dept Med, Padua, Italy..
    Catherwood, M.
    Belfast City Hosp, Dept Hematooncol, Belfast BT9 7AD, Antrim, North Ireland..
    Montillo, M.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Mol Pathol Unit, Milan, Italy.;Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Niguarda Canc Ctr, Dept Hematol, Milan, Italy..
    Gaidano, G.
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Dept Hematol, Novara, Italy..
    Campo, E.
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Unidad Hematopatol, Serv Anat Patol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Geisler, C. H.
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Langerak, A. W.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pospisilova, S.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic.;Univ Hosp Brno, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Lefranc, M. P.
    Univ Montpellier, IMGT, LIGM, IGH, Montpellier, France..
    Chiorazzi, N.
    North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Feinstein Inst Med Res, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Oscier, D.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Haematol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Jelinek, D. F.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Immunol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Stilgenbauer, S.
    Univ Ulm, Dept Internal Med 3, D-89069 Ulm, Germany..
    Belessi, C.
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Davi, F.
    Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Dept Hematol, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ghia, P.
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Dept Oncohematol, I-20132 Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Darzentas, N.
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, Dept Hematol, Thessaloniki, Greece.;G Papanicolaou Hosp, HCT Unit, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    HIGHER-ORDER IMMUNOGLOBULIN SEQUENCE RELATIONS FOR MAJOR SUBSETS OF CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: UNIQUENESS VERSUS EQUIVALENCE2015In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 100, p. 47-48Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Darzentas, Nikos
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Brochet, Xavier
    Murray, Fiona
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Davis, Zadie
    van Gastel-Mol, Ellen J.
    Tresoldi, Cristina
    Chu, Charles C.
    Cahill, Nicola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Giudicelli, Veronique
    Tichy, Boris
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Foroni, Letizia
    Bonello, Lisa
    Janus, Agnieszka
    Smedby, Karin
    Anagnostopoulos, Achilles
    Merle-Beral, Helene
    Laoutaris, Nikolaos
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    di Celle, Paola Francia
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Jurlander, Jesper
    Geisler, Christian
    Tsaftaris, Athanasios
    Lefranc, Marie-Paule
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Oscier, David Graham
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Davi, Frederic
    Rosenquist Brandell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Stereotyped B-cell receptors in one-third of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a molecular classification with implications for targeted therapies2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 119, no 19, p. 4467-4475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mounting evidence indicates that grouping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) into distinct subsets with stereotyped BCRs is functionally and prognostically relevant. However, several issues need revisiting, including the criteria for identification of BCR stereotypy and its actual frequency as well as the identification of "CLL-biased" features in BCR Ig stereotypes. To this end, we examined 7596 Ig VH (IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ) sequences from 7424 CLL patients, 3 times the size of the largest published series, with an updated version of our purpose-built clustering algorithm. We document that CLL may be subdivided into 2 distinct categories: one with stereotyped and the other with nonstereotyped BCRs, at an approximate ratio of 1: 2, and provide evidence suggesting a different ontogeny for these 2 categories. We also show that subset-defining sequence patterns in CLL differ from those underlying BCR stereotypy in other B-cell malignancies. Notably, 19 major subsets contained from 20 to 213 sequences each, collectively accounting for 943 sequences or one-eighth of the cohort. Hence, this compartmentalized examination of VH sequences may pave the way toward a molecular classification of CLL with implications for targeted therapeutic interventions, applicable to a significant number of patients assigned to the same subset.

  • 3. Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Unlocking the secrets of immunoglobulin receptors in mantle cell lymphoma: Implications for the origin and selection of the malignant cells2011In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 299-307Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunogenetic analysis of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has offered important evidence helping to decipher the immune pathways leading to its development and also prompting a reappraisal of the views about its ontogeny. In particular, older and more recent studies have demonstrated that MCL is characterized by a highly distinctive immunoglobulin gene repertoire with remarkable predominance of the IGHV3-21 and IGHV4-34 genes; restricted associations of IGHV,IGHD and IGHJ genes, culminating in the creation of quasi-identical ("stereotyped") heavy complementarity-determining region 3 sequences in roughly 10% of cases; and, very precisely targeted and, probably, functionally driven somatic hypermutation, ranging from minimal (in most cases) to pronounced. Furthermore, comparison to other entities, in particular CLL, revealed that several of these immunogenetic features are "MCL-biased". On these grounds, an antigen-driven origin of MCL could be envisaged, at least for subsets of cases.

  • 4.
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Scarfo, Lydia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Fazi, Claudia
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Gounari, Maria
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy;Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pandzic, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Tonon, Giovanni
    IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Funct Genom Canc Unit, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Strateg Res Program CLL, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, B Cell Neoplasia Unit, Milan, Italy;IRCCS Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Highly similar genomic landscapes in monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia with low frequency of driver mutations2018In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent discovery of recurrent driver mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the genetic factors involved in disease onset remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we per-formed whole-genome sequencing in 11 individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, both of the low-count and high-count subtypes, and 5 patients with ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia (>10 years without progression from initial diagnosis). All three entities were indistinguishable at the genomic level exhibiting low genomic complexity and similar types of somatic mutations. Exonic mutations were not frequently identified in putative chronic lymphocytic leukemia driver genes in all settings, including low-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. To corroborate these findings, we also performed deep sequencing in 11 known frequently mutated genes in an extended cohort of 28 monoclonal B-cell lym phocytosis/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases. Interestingly, shared mutations were detected between clonal B cells and paired polymorphonuclear cells, strengthening the notion that at least a fraction of somatic mutations may occur before disease onset, likely at the hematopoietic stem cell level. Finally, we identified previously unreported non-coding variants targeting pathways relevant to B-cell and chronic lymphocytic leukemia development, likely associated with the acquisition of the characteristic neoplastic phenotype typical of both monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  • 5.
    Agathangelidis, Andreas
    et al.
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia
    Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Tresoldi, Cristina
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Immunol Transplantat & Infect, Milan, Italy.
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Lab Med Immunol, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Nikea Gen Hosp, Hematol Dept, Piraeus, Greece.
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, AP HP, Dept Hematol, Paris, France;UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 1138, Paris, France.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Ctr Res & Technol Hellas, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS Ist Scientifico San Raffaele, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Immunoglobulin Gene Sequence Analysis In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: From Patient Material To Sequence Interpretation2018In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 141, article id e57787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During B cell maturation, the complex process of immunoglobulin (IG) gene V(D)J recombination coupled with somatic hypermutation (SHM) gives rise to a unique DNA sequence within each individual B cell. Since B cell malignancies result from the clonal expansion of a single cell, IG genes represent a unique molecular signature common to all the malignant cells within an individual patient; thus, IG gene rearrangements can be used as clonal markers. In addition to serving as an important clonal identifier, the IG gene sequence can act as a 'molecular timeline' since it is associated with specific developmental stages and hence reflects the history of the B cell involved in the neoplastic transformation. Moreover, for certain malignancies, in particular chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the IG gene sequence holds prognostic and potentially predictive capabilities. That said, extrapolating meaningful conclusions from IG gene sequence analysis would be impossible if robust methods and tools were not available to aid in their analysis. This article, drawing on the vast experience of the European Research Initiative on CLL (ERIC), details the technical aspects and essential requirements necessary to ensure reliable and reproducible IG gene sequence analysis in CLL, a test that is now recommended for all CLL patients prior to treatment. More specifically, the various analytical stages are described ranging from the identification of the clonotypic IG gene rearrangement and the determination of the nucleotide sequence to the accurate clinical interpretation of the IG gene sequence data.

  • 6.
    Amarasinghe, H.
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Wojdacz, T.
    Aarhus Univ, Aarhus Inst Adv Studies, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Rose-Zerilli, M.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Beattie, A.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Forster, J.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Kadalayil, L.
    Univ Southampton, Genet Epidemiol & Bioinformat, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Blakemore, S.
    Univ Cologne, Dept Internal Med, Cologne, Germany..
    Parker, H.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Larrayoz, M.
    Univ Navarra, Div Hematooncol, Pamplona, Spain..
    Clifford, R.
    Univ Oxford, Oxford Natl Inst Hlth Res, Biomed Res Ctr, Mol Diagnost Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Davis, Z.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Mol Pathol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Else, M.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Mol Pathol, London, England..
    Cohen, D.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Clin Trials Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Steele, A.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Collins, A.
    Univ Southampton, Human Dev & Hlth, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Pettitt, A.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mol & Clin Canc Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Hillmen, P.
    St James Univ Hosp, Dept Haematol, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Plass, C.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Epigen & Canc Risk Factors, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Catovsky, D.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Mol Pathol, London, England..
    Schuh, A.
    Univ Oxford, Oxford Natl Inst Hlth Res, Biomed Res Ctr, Mol Diagnost Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Oscier, D.
    Royal Bournemouth Hosp, Dept Mol Pathol, Bournemouth, Dorset, England..
    Oakes, C.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Strefford, J.
    Univ Southampton, Acad Unit Canc Sci, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Patients with a Memory-like DNA Methylation Signature exhibit long-term survival after first-line immuno-chemotherapy: Data from the UK CLL4, ARCTIC and ADMIRE trials2018In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    von Heideman, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lagercrantz, Svetlana
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    A novel B-cell line (U-2932) established from a patient with a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma following Hodgkin lymphoma2002In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 2179-2189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about mechanisms leading to secondary non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) in patients treated for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Our aim was to characterise in detail a cell line derived from a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that had developed in a patient with relapsing HL. The cell line U-2932 was established from ascites in a patient suffering from DLBCL previously treated for HL with multiple chemotherapy regimens. Characterisation was based on morphology, immunophenotype, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-status, IgH gene rearrangement status, tumourigenicity, p53 sequencing, and immunohistochemical expression of p53, BCL-2 and BCL-6. The karyotype was investigated using G-banding, comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and spectral karyotype (SKY) analysis. This cell line shows typical morphological features of a DLBCL and grows as colonies in nude mice. It expresses a B-cell phenotype with a somatically hypermutated V(H)4-39 gene and is negative for EBV. The origin of U-2932 was confirmed by demonstrating an identical V(H)4 rearrangement in ascites from the patient. A point mutation of the tumour-suppressor gene p53 was detected in amino acid position 176 and immunohistochemical over-expression of the p53 protein was also demonstrated. U-2932 carries a complex karyotype including high-level amplifications of the chromosomal bands 18q21 and 3q27 and expresses aberrant BCL-2 and BCL-6 immunohistochemically. We were unable to investigate the clonal relationship between the original HL and U-2932. In conclusion, U-2932 is a unique B cell line established from a patient suffering from HL followed by NHL. Overexpression of BCL-2, BCL-6 and p53 may play a role in the tumourigenesis and drug resistance. This cell line may become a useful tool to better understand the mechanisms responsible for development of secondary NHL in patients treated for HL.

  • 8. Andréasson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Dictor, Michael
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Linderoth, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Borrebaeck, Carl A K
    Ek, Sara
    Identification of molecular targets associated with transformed diffuse large B cell lymphoma using highly purified tumor cells2009In: American Journal of Hematology, ISSN 0361-8609, E-ISSN 1096-8652, Vol. 84, no 12, p. 803-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) frequently transforms into the more aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL-tr), but no protein biomarkers have been identified for predictive or early diagnosis. Gene expression analyses have identified genes changing on transformation but have failed to be reproducible in different studies, reflecting the heterogeneity within the tumor tissue and between tumor samples. Gene expression analyses on Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays were performed, using flow cytometry sorted tumor cells derived from FL and transformed DLBCL. To identify molecular targets associated with the transformation, subsequent immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses of the corresponding proteins were performed. Using highly purified cells, this study identified 163 genes, which were significantly deregulated during the transformation in a majority of cases. Among the upregulated transcripts, 13 genes were selected for validation using IHC, based on the availability of commercial antibodies, and galectin-3 and NEK2 proteins specifically identify DLBCL-tr, when compared with FL. We demonstrate that by purifying tumor cells through cell sorting, thereby reducing the heterogeneity due to infiltrating cells, it was possible to identify distinct differences between tumor entities rather than variations due to cellular composition. Galectin-3 and NEK2 both identified a subgroup of DLBCL-tr, and the function of these protein markers also suggests a biological role in the transformation process.

  • 9. Andréasson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Ek, Sara
    Merz, Hartmut
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Andersen, Niels
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Dictor, Michael
    Borrebaeck, Carl A K
    B cell lymphomas express CX(3)CR1 a non-B cell lineage adhesion molecule2008In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 259, no 2, p. 138-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the differential expression of cell membrane-bound receptors and their potential role in growth and/or survival of the tumor cells, highly purified follicular lymphoma cells were analyzed, using gene expression analysis, and compared to non-malignant B cell populations. Filtering the genome for overexpressed genes coding for cell membrane-bound proteins/receptors resulted in a hit list of 27 identified genes. Among these, we have focused on the aberrant over expression of CX3CR1, in different types of B cell lymphoma, as compared to non-malignant B cells. We show that CX3CR1, which normally is not expressed on B cells, is expressed both at the mRNA and protein level in several subtypes of lymphoma. CX3CR1 has also shown to be involved in the homing to specific tissues that express the ligand, CX3CL1, in breast and prostate cancer and may thus be involved in dissemination of lymphoma.

  • 10. Antoniou, Antonis C.
    et al.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    Soucy, Penny
    Beesley, Jonathan
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Lee, Andrew
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    Healey, Sue
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    Loman, Niklas
    Harbst, Katja
    Lindblom, Annika
    Arver, Brita
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Karlsson, Per
    Nathanson, Kate
    Domchek, Susan
    Rebbeck, Tim
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Lubinski, Jan
    Jaworska, Katarzyna
    Durda, Katarzyna
    Zlowowcka-Perlowska, Elzbieta
    Osorio, Ana
    Duran, Mercedes
    Andres, Raquel
    Benitez, Javier
    Hamann, Ute
    Hogervorst, Frans B.
    van Os, Theo A.
    Verhoef, Senno
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.
    Wijnen, Juul
    Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez
    Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.
    Kriege, Mieke
    Collee, Margriet
    Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.
    Oosterwijk, Jan C.
    Peock, Susan
    Frost, Debra
    Ellis, Steve D.
    Platte, Radka
    Fineberg, Elena
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Jacobs, Chris
    Eeles, Ros
    Adlard, Julian
    Davidson, Rosemarie
    Cole, Trevor
    Cook, Jackie
    Paterson, Joan
    Douglas, Fiona
    Brewer, Carole
    Hodgson, Shirley
    Morrison, Patrick J.
    Walker, Lisa
    Rogers, Mark T.
    Donaldson, Alan
    Dorkins, Huw
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    Bove, Betsy
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Houdayer, Claude
    Buecher, Bruno
    de Pauw, Antoine
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    Calender, Alain
    Leone, Melanie
    Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte
    Caron, Olivier
    Sobol, Hagay
    Frenay, Marc
    Prieur, Fabienne
    Ferrer, Sandra Fert
    Mortemousque, Isabelle
    Buys, Saundra
    Daly, Mary
    Miron, Alexander
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Hopper, John L.
    John, Esther M.
    Southey, Melissa
    Goldgar, David
    Singer, Christian F.
    Fink-Retter, Anneliese
    Tea, Muy-Kheng
    Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    Nielsen, Finn C.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Gaudet, Mia
    Kirchhoff, Tomas
    Joseph, Vijai
    Dutra-Clarke, Ana
    Offit, Kenneth
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Kirk, Judy
    Cohn, David
    Hurteau, Jean
    Byron, John
    Fiorica, James
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Montagna, Marco
    Oliani, Cristina
    Imyanitov, Evgeny
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Blanco, Ignacio
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Teule, Alex
    Del Valle, J.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Odunsi, Kunle
    Gross, Jenny
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Olah, Edith
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Beattie, Mary S.
    Dorfling, Cecelia M.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth Jansen
    Diez, Orland
    Kwong, Ava
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    Engel, Christoph
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ditsch, Nina
    Arnold, Norbert
    Heidemann, Simone
    Niederacher, Dieter
    Preisler-Adams, Sabine
    Gadzicki, Dorothea
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Deissler, Helmut
    Gehrig, Andrea
    Sutter, Christian
    Kast, Karin
    Fiebig, Britta
    Schaefer, Dieter
    Caldes, Trinidad
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Muranen, Taru A.
    Lesperance, Bernard
    Spurdle, Amanda B.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Ding, Yuan C.
    Wang, Xianshu
    Fredericksen, Zachary
    Pankratz, Vernon S.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Peissel, Bernard
    Zaffaroni, Daniela
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Bernard, Loris
    Dolcetti, Riccardo
    Papi, Laura
    Ottini, Laura
    Radice, Paolo
    Greene, Mark H.
    Loud, Jennifer T.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Ozcelik, Hilmi
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Glendon, Gord
    Thomassen, Mads
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Jensen, Uffe B.
    Skytte, Anne-Bine
    Kruse, Torben A.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Simard, Jacques
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers2012In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. R33-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2).

    Methods: To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework.

    Results: Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 x 10(-4)). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 x 10(-5), P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 x 10(-5)) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER- negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049).

    Conclusions: The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  • 11.
    Apollonio, Benedetta
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Nicholas, Nicole S.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Salisbury, Jon
    Kings Coll Hosp London, London, England..
    Patten, Piers E.
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Haematol, London, England..
    Kassam, Shireen
    Kings Coll Hosp London, London, England..
    Devereux, Stephen
    Kings Coll Hosp London, Haematol, London, England..
    Amini, Rose Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ramsay, Alan G.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Haematooncol, London WC2R 2LS, England..
    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Tumor Cells Reprogram Lymphatic Fibroblasts into Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) That Contribute to Tumor Microenvironment (TME)-Driven Immune Privilege2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Askling, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Klareskog, Lars
    Rheumatoid arthritis and malignant lymphomas2004In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, ISSN 1040-8711, E-ISSN 1531-6963, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

    The reason for the increased lymphoma risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has remained unclear. Reports of lymphomas in patients treated with TNF-blockers have brought renewed interest in this issue. This review summarizes data on possible associations between RA and lymphomas, including different treatments and RA disease related risk factors.

    RECENT FINDINGS:

    Some recent studies reported increased lymphoma risks linked to RA disease activity. The hypothesis that disease-modifying drugs, and in particular methotrexate, would increase the lymphoma risk receives little support. Observation times for the TNF-blocking therapies are still short, but so far no clear increased risk for lymphoma has been observed. Presence of Epstein-Barr virus, as analyzed with EBER in situ hybridization, appears to be uncommon in RA related lymphomas. Hypothetically, an increased proliferative drive caused by self or non-self antigens may play a role in lymphoma development in RA patients, but this has to be further studied.

    SUMMARY:

    Rheumatologists need to be aware of the increased lymphoma risk in their RA patients. The reason for the increased lymphoma risk in RA patients is still unclear, but available studies rather support the hypothesis of a link between RA disease severity and the risk of lymphoma than increased risks associated with specific treatment regimens. To facilitate the future evaluation of lymphoma risks in connection with treatment, we suggest that patients treated with new drugs should be subject to structured surveillance. Collected information should include data about RA disease activity and severity.

  • 13.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Iliadou, Anastasia
    Granath, Fredrik
    Ekbom, Anders
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Askling, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphomas in rheumatoid arthritis2006In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 3774-3781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of malignant lymphomas, with a correlation between RA disease severity and lymphoma risk, most pronounced for diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs), which also constitute the majority of RA-associated lymphomas. DLBCLs can be further subdivided into germinal center (GC)-like and non-GC-like subtypes, with different cellular origins and prognoses. This study was undertaken to investigate whether RA displays a specific association with any of the DLBCL subtypes.

    METHODS:

    We identified 139 patients with DLBCLs within a population-based case-control study of 378 RA patients with lymphoma. The DLBCLs were examined for CD10, Bcl-6, and interferon regulatory factor 4 expression patterns, subclassified into GC and non-GC subtypes, and then correlated with clinical parameters.

    RESULTS:

    We found a statistically significant predominance of the non-GC subtype (97 patients; 70% of all DLBCLs). These patients more often had an advanced stage of lymphoma at diagnosis and had a worse 5-year overall survival rate (16% versus 33%) compared with patients with the GC subtype. There was a strong association with RA disease activity in both subtypes, with >70% of the GC and non-GC cases occurring in RA patients with the highest overall disease activity scores.

    CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that severe RA is particularly associated with the non-GC subtype of DLBCL, and indicate a critical role of activated peripheral B cells as the cells of origin in these lymphomas.

  • 14.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Iliadou, Anastasia
    Askling, Johan
    Ekbom, Anders
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Catrina, Anca Irinel
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Feltelius, Nils
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Association of chronic inflammation, not its treatment, with increased lymphoma risk in rheumatoid arthritis2006In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 692-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been associated with malignant lymphomas. This study was undertaken to investigate which patients are at highest risk, and whether antirheumatic treatment is hazardous or protective.

    METHODS:

    We performed a matched case-control study of 378 consecutive Swedish RA patients in whom malignant lymphoma occurred between 1964 and 1995 (from a population-based RA cohort of 74,651 RA patients), and 378 controls. Information on disease characteristics and treatment from onset of RA until lymphoma diagnosis was abstracted from medical records. Lymphoma specimens were reclassified and tested for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Relative risks (odds ratios [ORs]) for lymphomas (by subtype) associated with deciles of cumulative disease activity were assessed, as were ORs associated with drug treatments.

    RESULTS:

    The relative risks of lymphoma were only modestly elevated up to the seventh decile of cumulative disease activity. Thereafter, the relative risk increased dramatically (OR ninth decile 9.4 [95% confidence interval 3.1-28.0], OR tenth decile 61.6 [95% confidence interval 21.0-181.0]). Most lymphomas (48%) were of the diffuse large B cell type, but other lymphoma subtypes also displayed an association with cumulative disease activity. Standard nonbiologic treatments did not increase lymphoma risk. EBV was present in 12% of lymphomas.

    CONCLUSION:

    Risk of lymphoma is substantially increased in a subset of patients with RA, those with very severe disease. High inflammatory activity, rather than its treatment, is a major risk determinant.

  • 15.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Natkunam, Yasodha
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Iliadou, Anastasia
    Askling, Johan
    Ekbom, Anders
    Feltelius, Nils
    Klareskog, Lars
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Lossos, Izidore S.
    Levy, Ronald
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Expression of the human germinal-centre-associated lymphoma protein in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2008In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 141, no 1, p. 69-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) can be subdivided into germinal centre (GC)-like and non-GC-like subtypes by CD10, BCL6 and MUM1/IRF4 status. We previously reported that patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of non-GC DLBCL. This study examined a new GC-marker, human germinal-centre-associated lymphoma (HGAL) protein, in RA-DLBCL. Of 111, 38 (34%) DLBCL were HGAL-positive and showed less disseminated disease and a tendency toward improved overall survival compared to HGAL-negative cases. This supports that a majority of RA-DLBCL are of non-GC origin, indicating a specific role for activated peripheral B cells in the pathogenesis of RA-DLBCL.

  • 16.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Askling, Johan
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lymphoma development in patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders: What are the driving forces?2014In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 24, p. 61-70Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, it has been known that patients with certain autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS), have an increased risk of developing malignant lymphoma. Although the clinico-biological reasons for this association remain largely unknown, our knowledge has improved and new insights have been obtained. First, the direct link between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been strengthened by large epidemiological studies showing a consistent risk increase of lymphoma associated with certain autoimmune/inflammatory conditions in independent cohorts from different countries. Second, a number of local and systemic disease-related risk factors in these diseases have been repeatedly linked to lymphoma development, with the prime examples being disease severity and the degree of inflammatory activity. Considering the key role of B- and T-cell activation in the pathogenesis of both autoimmunity and lymphoma, it is perhaps not surprising that longstanding chronic inflammation and/or antigen stimulation have emerged as major predisposing factors of lymphoma in patients with active autoimmune disease. Finally, increasing evidence suggests that lymphomas associated with autoimmunity constitute a different spectrum of entities compared to lymphomas arising in patients without any known autoimmune or inflammatory conditions, pointing to a different pathobiology. In this review, we summarize the recent literature that supports a direct or indirect link between immune-mediated disease and lymphoma and describe the characteristics of lymphomas developing in the different diseases. We also discuss molecular, genetic and microenvironmental factors that may come into play in the pathobiology of these disorders.

  • 17. Baecklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Foo, Jia-Nee
    Askling, Johan
    Eloranta, Sandra
    Glimelius, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Jianjun
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Possible Interaction Between Cigarette Smoking and HLA-DRB1 Variation in the Risk of Follicular Lymphoma2017In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 185, no 8, p. 681-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) risk is strongly associated with germline genetic variation in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Cigarette smoking has been suggested to increase FL risk, primarily among women. We hypothesized that amino acids in HLA-antigen D-related beta 1 subunit (DRB1) interact with smoking in FL risk, as shown for rheumatoid arthritis. We analyzed 373 patients with FL and 818 controls from 2 population-based case-control studies in Sweden and Denmark (1999-2003). Haplotypes in HLA-DRB1 were imputed at amino acid positions 11, 13, 28, 30, and 70-74 (shared epitope). We estimated the relative risk of FL as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for different smoking status/haplotype combinations. Interaction was defined as departure from additivity of effects and quantified by the attributable proportion (AP). Relative to never-smokers carrying no shared epitope alleles, smoking was associated with the risk of FL among all subjects (for former smokers, odds ratio (OR) = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 4.41; ORcurrent = 3.56, 95% CI: 1.60, 7.92) and women (ORformer = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.18, 7.37; ORcurrent = 5.63, 95% CI: 2.07, 15.3) carrying 2 shared epitope alleles but not among those carrying zero or 1 shared epitope allele. Smoking and shared epitope status interacted significantly as measured by AP (overall, AP = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.15, 1.0; for women, AP = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.005, 1.0). These results suggest a possible interaction between smoking and HLA-DRB1-associated antigen presentation in FL risk and provide a model to further unravel FL etiology.

  • 18. Baecklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Foo, Jia-Nee
    Bracci, Paige
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karlsson, Robert
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Rosenquist Brandell, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Adami, Hans-Olov