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  • 1.
    Arnetz, B
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Arnetz, J
    Uppsala University.
    Psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal symptoms in a high-tech work environment.1992In: Arbete och Hälsa, no 17, p. 28-30Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 2.
    Arnetz, B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnetz, J
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Johansson, A-M
    Rundquist, A
    Patienternas syn på hälso- och sjukvården. Vad berättar klagomål till Patientnämnden?2001Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 3.
    Arnetz, Bengt B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Broadbridge, Carissa L
    Jamil, Hikmet
    Lumley, Mark A
    Pole, Nnamdi
    Barkho, Evone
    Fakhouri, Monty
    Talia, Yousif Rofa
    Arnetz, Judith E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees2014In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1055-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10 %, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3 %, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations.

  • 4.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, USA; Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Lewalski, Philip
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Emergency Med, Detroit, MI USA..
    Arnetz, Judy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, USA; Umea Univ, Umea, Sweden.
    Breejen, Karen
    Michigan State Univ, Coll Human Med, Dept Family Med, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Przyklenk, Karin
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Emergency Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Res Inst, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Physiol, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..
    Examining self-reported and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents: a single-centre cross-sectional assessment in the USA2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To examine the relationship between perceived and biological stress and near misses among Emergency Medicine residents. Design Self-rated stress and stress biomarkers were assessed in residents in Emergency Medicine before and after a day shift. The supervising physicians and residents reported numbers of near misses. Setting The study took place in the Emergency Department of a large trauma 1 centre, located in Detroit, USA. Participants Residents in Emergency Medicine volunteered to participate. The sample consisted of 32 residents, with complete data on 28 subjects. Residents' supervising physicians assessed the clinical performance of each resident. Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants' preshift and postshift stress, biological stress (salivary cortisol, plasma interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), residents' and supervisors' reports of near misses, number of critically ill and patients with trauma seen during the shift. Results Residents' self-reported stress increased from an average preshift level of 2.79 of 10 (SD 1.81) to a postshift level of 5.82 (2.13) (p<0.001). Residents cared for an average of 2.32 (1.52) critically ill patients and 0.68 (1.06) patients with trauma. Residents reported a total of 7 near misses, compared with 11 reported by the supervising physicians. After controlling for baseline work-related exhaustion, residents that cared for more patients with trauma and had higher levels of TNF-a reported a higher frequency of near misses (R-2=0.72; p=0.001). Residents' preshift ratings of how stressful they expected the shift to be were related to the supervising physicians' ratings of residents' near misses during the shift. Conclusion Residents' own ratings of near misses were associated with residents' TNF-alpha, a biomarker of systemic inflammation and the number of patients with trauma seen during the shift. In contrast, supervisor reports on residents' near misses were related only to the residents' preshift expectations of how stressful the shift would be.

  • 5.
    Arnetz, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almin, I
    Bergstrom, K
    Franzén, Y
    Nilsson, H
    Active Patient Involvement in the Establishment of Physical Therapy Goals: Effects on Treatment Outcome and Quality of Care2004In: Advances in Physiotherapy, no 6, p. 50-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Arnetz, Judith E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Några exempel på genomförda kvalitets- och förbättringsarbeten i vården2012In: Kvalitetsarbete för bättre och säkrare vård / [ed] Gun Nordström / Bodil Wilde-Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1:1, p. 239-263Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Aranyos, Deanna
    Ager, Joel
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Development and Application of a Population-Based System for Workplace Violence Surveillance in Hospitals2011In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 925-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A unique and comprehensive reporting and population-based violence surveillance system in a multi-site hospital system is presented. Methods Incidence rates and rate ratios (RR) were calculated by year, hospital, violence type, and job category in six hospitals, 2003-2008. Results Incidence rates per hospital for the 6-year period ranged from a low of 1.52 to a high of 10.89 incidents/100 full-time equivalents (FTEs), with the highest risk at a hospital with an outpatient mental health facility (RR = 7.16, 95% CI = 5.17-10.26). Rates for worker-on-worker violence exceeded rates for patient-to-worker violence from 2004 to 2008. Mental health technicians (RR = 13.82, 95% CI = 11.13-17.29) and security personnel (RR = 2.25, CI = 1.68-3.00) were at greatest risk for violence. Conclusions This surveillance system provides ongoing information on professional groups and hospital departments at risk and trends in violence reporting over time. It can be used to determine where appropriate violence prevention efforts are most needed, and to evaluate violence interventions.

  • 8.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Aranyos, Deanna
    Ager, Joel
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Worker-on-worker Violence among Hospital Employees2011In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 328-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence toward hospital workers is an internationally recognized occupational hazard. While patients are frequently perpetrators of physical violence, other employees are often responsible for acts of nonphysical violence. However, few hospitals have systems for documenting and monitoring worker-on-worker violence. This study encompassed all incidents of worker-on-worker violence recorded by employees in a hospital system database over a six-year period. Incidence rates per 100 full-time equivalents (FTEs) and rate ratios (RR) were calculated by year, hospital, and job category. The majority (87%) of worker-on-worker incidents involved nonphysical conflict. The overall incidence rate was 1.65/100 FTEs, ranging among the six hospitals from 0.54 to 3.42/100 FTEs. Based on multivariate analysis, no single professional group was at increased risk for worker-on-worker violence. Co-worker violence threatens the well-being of hospital employees and should be regularly tracked with other forms of work-place violence so that suitable intervention programs can be implemented and assessed.

  • 9.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Gender differences in patient perceptions of involvement in myocardial infarction care2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gender differences in the clinical presentation, treatment and outcomes of myocardial infarction (MI) have been demonstrated. However, few studies have examined gender differences in patients' perceptions of involvement in MI care, and whether differing levels of involvement might be associated with gender differences in treatment and outcome. AIM: To examine possible gender differences in MI patients' perceptions of their involvement during hospitalization. METHODS: Questionnaire study conducted in 2005-2006 among MI patients under the age of 75 at eleven hospitals. Patient ratings of their involvement during hospitalization were analyzed for age-stratified gender differences. RESULTS: Younger (<70 years of age) female MI patients placed significantly more value on shared decision-making than younger (<70) men. More than one third of patients would have liked to be more involved in their care during hospitalization and discharge planning, with women significantly more dissatisfied than men. Significantly fewer younger female patients discussed secondary preventive lifestyle changes with cardiology staff prior to hospital discharge. CONCLUSION: Significant age-specific gender differences exist in MI patient ratings of, and satisfaction with, involvement during hospitalization. Further study is needed regarding the possible role of involvement in the recognized gender differences in the treatment and outcomes of MI.

  • 10.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Ager, Joel
    Aranyos, Deanna
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Luborsky, Mark
    Russell, Jim
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Application and Implementation of the Hazard Risk Matrix to Identify Hospital Workplaces at Risk for Violence2014In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 1276-1284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundA key barrier to preventing workplace violence injury is the lack of methodology for prioritizing the allocation of limited prevention resources. The hazard risk matrix was used to categorize the probability and severity of violence in hospitals to enable prioritization of units for safety intervention. MethodsProbability of violence was based on violence incidence rates; severity was based on lost time management claims for violence-related injuries. Cells of the hazard risk matrix were populated with hospital units categorized as low, medium, or high probability and severity. Hospital stakeholders reviewed the matrix after categorization to address the possible confounding of underreporting. ResultsForty-one hospital units were categorized as medium or high on both severity and probability and were prioritized for forthcoming interventions. Probability and severity were highest in psychiatric care units. ConclusionsThis risk analysis tool may be useful for hospital administrators in prioritizing units for violence injury prevention efforts.  

  • 11.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Ager, Joel
    Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Luborsky, Mark
    Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Detroit Med Ctr Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit, MI USA..
    Russell, Jim
    Detroit Med Ctr Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit, MI USA..
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Detroit Med Ctr Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit, MI USA..
    Response to Letter to the Editor, "Measurement of Workplace Violence Reporting"2016In: Workplace Health & Safety, ISSN 2165-0799, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 46-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Ager, Joel
    Luborsky, Mark
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Russell, Jim
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Underreporting of Workplace Violence Comparison of Self-Report and Actual Documentation of Hospital Incidents2015In: Workplace Health & Safety, ISSN 2165-0799, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 200-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined differences between self-report and actual documentation of workplace violence (WPV) incidents in a cohort of health care workers. The study was conducted in an American hospital system with a central electronic database for reporting WPV events. In 2013, employees (n = 2010) were surveyed by mail about their experience of WPV in the previous year. Survey responses were compared with actual events entered into the electronic system. Of questionnaire respondents who self-reported a violent event in the past year, 88% had not documented an incident in the electronic system. However, more than 45% had reported violence informally, for example, to their supervisors. The researchers found that if employees were injured or lost time from work, they were more likely to formally report a violent event. Understanding the magnitude of underreporting and characteristics of health care workers who are less likely to report may assist hospitals in determining where to focus violence education and prevention efforts.

  • 13.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Ager, Joel
    Luborsky, Mark
    Understanding patient-to-worker violence in hospitals: a qualitative analysis of documented incident reports2015In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 338-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To explore catalysts to, and circumstances surrounding, patient-to-worker violent incidents recorded by employees in a hospital system database. Background. Violence by patients towards healthcare workers (Type II workplace violence) is a significant occupational hazard in hospitals worldwide. Studies to date have failed to investigate its root causes due to a lack of empirical research based on documented episodes of patient violence. Design. Qualitative content analysis. Methods. Content analysis was conducted on the total sample of 214 Type II incidents documented in 2011 by employees of an American hospital system with a centralized reporting system. Findings. The majority of incidents were reported by nurses (39.8%),security staff (15.9%) and nurse assistants (14.4%). Three distinct themes were identified from the analysis: Patient Behaviour, Patient Care and Situational Events. Specific causes of violence related to Patient Behaviour were cognitive impairment and demanding to leave. Catalysts related to patient care were the use of needles, patient pain/discomfort and physical transfers of patients. Situational factors included the use/presence of restraints; transitions in the care process; intervening to protect patients and/or staff; and redirecting patients. Conclusions. Identifying catalysts and situations involved in patient violence in hospitals informs administrators about potential targets for intervention. Hospital staff can be trained to recognize these specific risk factors for patient violence and can be educated in how to best mitigate or prevent the most common forms of violent behaviour. A social-ecological model can be adapted to the hospital setting as a framework for prevention of patient violence towards staff.

  • 14.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, Dept Family Med, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.; Wayne State Univ, Dept Family Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Hamblin, Lydia
    Wayne State Univ, Dept Family Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Psychol, 71 W Warren Ave, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Russell, Jim
    Wayne State Univ, Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit Med Ctr, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Upfal, Mark J.
    Wayne State Univ, Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit Med Ctr, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Emergency Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Luborsky, Mark
    Wayne State Univ, Inst Gerontol, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Caring Sci & Soc, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Janisse, James
    Wayne State Univ, Dept Family Med, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Essenmacher, Lynnette
    Wayne State Univ, Occupat Hlth Serv, Detroit Med Ctr, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Preventing Patient-to-Worker Violence in Hospitals: Outcome of a Randomized Controlled Intervention2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a randomized controlled intervention on the incidence of patient-to-worker (Type II) violence and related injury in hospitals. Methods: Forty-one units across seven hospitals were randomized into intervention (n = 21) and control (n = 20) groups. Intervention units received unit-level violence data to facilitate development of an action plan for violence prevention; no data were presented to control units. Main outcomes were rates of violent events and injuries across study groups over time. Results: Six months post-intervention, incident rate ratios of violent events were significantly lower on intervention units compared with controls (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29 to 0.80). At 24 months, the risk for violence-related injury was lower on intervention units, compared with controls (IRR 0.37, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.83). Conclusions: This data-driven, worksite-based intervention was effective in decreasing risks of patient-to-worker violence and related injury.

  • 15.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Staff views and behaviour regarding patient involvement in myocardial infarction care: development and evaluation of a questionnaire2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Healthcare legislation in several nations now dictates the responsibility of health care professionals to involve patients in decisions concerning care and treatment. However, few studies have examined the impact of patient involvement on the work of health care professionals. A better understanding of staff views and behaviour might enhance patient involvement.

    AIM

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire for measuring views and behaviour regarding patient involvement among physicians and nursing staff caring for patients with myocardial infarction.

    METHODS

    Focus groups among cardiology staff provided the basis for the construction of the questionnaire. Questionnaire validity and reliability were evaluated in a small pilot study and a larger cross-sectional study among cardiology staff at twelve Swedish hospitals.

    RESULTS

    The questionnaire demonstrated good validity and reliability, with two factors measuring staff views and four measuring behaviour.

    CONCLUSION

    The questionnaire appears to be a useful tool for evaluating the perceptions and behaviour of physicians and nursing staff regarding patient involvement in myocardial infarction care. Use of this questionnaire may provide insight regarding areas of staff-patient interaction that need improvement, as well as implications of patient involvement for the work of each professional group on cardiology wards.

  • 16.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient involvement in myocardial infarction care2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients' involvement in their healthcare has been associated with better health outcomes. However, few studies have examined whether patient involvement affects the work of healthcare professionals. A better understanding of professionals' views and behaviour is necessary for improving clinical practice and optimizing patient involvement. Aim: To measure perceptions and behaviour regarding patient involvement among physicians and nursing staff caring for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods: A questionnaire study conducted in 2005 among cardiology staff at twelve Swedish hospitals. The questionnaire included six scales measuring staff views and behaviour. Results: Physicians, registered nurses, and practical nurses did not differ significantly in their views of patient involvement, but did differ significantly in behaviour (p<.001). All three groups felt that an actively involved patient enriched their work, at the same time increasing their work load and taking time from other tasks. Physicians discussed daily activities and lifestyle changes with myocardial infarction patients before hospital discharge to a greater extent than nursing staff (p<.001). Conclusion: Physicians and registered nurses viewed time constraints as a hinder for patient involvement, while practical nurses felt unsure in communicating with patients. Considering these organizational and professional issues may improve patient involvement and health outcomes in myocardial infarction care. (C) 2007 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Spångberg, Kalle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wang, Yun
    Ager, Joel
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Is patient involvement during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction associated with post-discharge treatment outcome?: an exploratory study2010In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 298-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate whether patient involvement during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (MI) was associated with health and behavioural outcomes 6–10 weeks after hospital discharge.

    Background Patient involvement has been associated with improved health outcomes in chronic disease, but less research has focused on the effects of patient involvement in acute conditions, such as MI.

    Design Self-administered questionnaire study. Questionnaire results were run against medical outcome data in a national database of cardiac patients.

    Setting and participants Cardiac patients (n = 591) on their first follow-up visit after hospitalization for MI at 11 Swedish hospitals.

    Main outcome measures Patient ratings of three questionnaire scales related to involvement; cardiovascular symptoms, medication compliance, participation in cardiac rehabilitation, and achievement of secondary preventive goals.

    Results More positive patient ratings of involvement were significantly associated with fewer cardiovascular symptoms 6–10 weeks after hospital discharge. In contrast, patients who attended cardiac rehabilitation and achieved the goals for smoking cessation and systolic blood pressure were significantly less satisfied with their involvement. No association was found between involvement ratings and medication compliance.

    Conclusion This study represents a first attempt to examine associations between patient involvement in the acute phase of illness and short-term health outcomes. Some significant associations between involvement and health and behavioural outcomes after acute MI were found. However, higher involvement ratings were not consistently associated with more desirable outcomes, and involvement during hospitalization was not associated with MI patient health and behaviour 6–10 weeks after hospital discharge to the extent hypothesized.

  • 18.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Zhdanova, Ludmila
    Patient involvement climate: views and behaviours among registered nurses in myocardial infarction care2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 475-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To introduce and define the patient involvement climate and measure its quality and strength via views and behaviours among nurses in coronary care units. Background. Patient involvement is receiving increased attention among health-care providers. To better understand and optimise the interpersonal dynamics of patient involvement, it is important to study the organisational context in which the patient-provider interaction occurs. Design. Cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire study. Methods. Registered nurses across 12 coronary care units (n = 303) completed a questionnaire reporting their views and behaviours regarding patient involvement. Analyses assessed climate quality (the positive or negative nature of nurses' perceptions) and climate strength (the degree of consensus within coronary care units). Results. Climate quality and strength were greatest for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of patient involvement, the nurse-patient information exchange process and nurses' responsiveness to patient needs. Climate quality and strength were weaker for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of the hindrances associated with patient involvement, discussion of daily activities and efforts to motivate patients to take responsibility for their health. In units with consensus that patient involvement poses hindrances, nurses were less likely to address patient needs. Conclusions. When nurses perceived patient involvement as less of a hindrance in their work, they were more responsive to patient needs. A patient involvement climate characterised by motivational behaviour among nurses was marked by better information exchange and discussion of suitable activities postdischarge. Relevance to clinical practice. Managers can capitalise on positive climate aspects by encouraging ward activities that facilitate active patient involvement among nurses. One suggestion is educational interventions at the workplace focused on reducing perceptions of patient involvement as a hindrance and encouraging the attitudes that it can enrich nursing work and patient outcomes.

  • 19.
    Arnetz, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Zhdanova, Ludmila S.
    Elsouhag, Dalia
    Lichtenberg, Peter
    Luborsky, Mark R.
    Arnetz, Bengt B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes2011In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 739-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to identify organizational climate predictors of specific aspects of the staff-rated resident safety culture (RSC) in a sample of nursing homes. Design and Methods: Staff at 4 Michigan nursing homes responded to a self-administered questionnaire measuring organizational climate and RSC. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify organizational climate factors that predicted the safety culture dimensions nonpunitive response to mistakes, communication about incidents, and compliance with procedures. Results: The organizational climate factors efficiency and work climate predicted nonpunitive response to mistakes (p < .001 for both scales) and compliance with procedures (p < .05 and p < .001 respectively). Work stress was an inverse predictor of compliance with procedures (p < .05). Goal clarity was the only significant predictor of communication about incidents (p < .05). Implications: Efficiency, work climate, work stress, and goal clarity are all malleable organizational factors that could feasibly be the focus of interventions to improve RSC. Future studies will examine whether these results can be replicated with larger samples.

  • 20.
    Arnetz, Judith
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hasson, Henna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Evaluation of an educational "toolbox" for improving nursing staff competence and psychosocial work environment in elderly care: Results of a prospective, non-randomized controlled intervention2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 723-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lack of professional development opportunities among nursing staff is a major concern in elderly care and has been associated with work dissatisfaction and staff turnover. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies evaluating the effects of educational interventions on nursing competence and work satisfaction. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of an educational "toolbox" intervention on nursing staff ratings of their competence, psychosocial work environment and overall work satisfaction. Design: The study was a prospective, non-randomized, controlled intervention. Participants and settings: Nursing staff in two municipal elderly care organizations in western Sweden. Methods: In an initial questionnaire survey, nursing staff in the intervention municipality described several areas in which they felt a need for competence development. Measurement instruments and educational materials for improving staff knowledge and work practices were then collated by researchers and managers in a "toolbox." Nursing staff ratings of their competence and work were measured pre and post-intervention by questionnaire. Staff ratings in the intervention municipality were compared to staff ratings in the reference municipality, where no toolbox was introduced. Results: Nursing staff ratings of their competence and psychosocial work environment, including overall work satisfaction, improved significantly over time in the intervention municipality, compared to the reference group. Both competence and work environment ratings were largely unchanged among reference municipality staff. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction effect between municipalities over time for nursing staff ratings of participation, leadership, performance feedback and skills' development. Staff ratings for these four scales improved significantly in the intervention municipality as compared to the reference municipality. Conclusions: Compared to a reference municipality, nursing staff ratings of their competence and the psychosocial work environment improved in the municipality where the toolbox was introduced.

  • 21.
    Elsouhag, D.
    et al.
    Univ Detroit Mercy, Dept Biomed Sci, Sch Dent, Detroit, MI 48208 USA.;Baker Coll, Dept Hlth Sci, Clinton, MI USA..
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Inst Cardiovasc Res, Detroit, MI USA..
    Jamil, H.
    Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA..
    Lumley, M. A.
    Wayne State Univ, Dept Psychol, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Broadbridge, C. L.
    Kentucky Wesleyan Coll, Div Social Sci, Owensboro, KY USA..
    Arnetz, Judy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.;Wayne State Univ, Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA..
    Factors Associated with Healthcare Utilization Among Arab Immigrants and Iraqi Refugees2015In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 1305-1312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arab migrants-both immigrants and refugees-are exposed to pre- and post- migration stressors increasing their risk for health problems. Little is known, however, about rates of, or factors associated with, healthcare utilization among these two groups. A sample of 590 participants were interviewed approximately 1 year post-migration to the United States. Factors associated with healthcare utilization, including active and passive coping strategies, were examined using logistic regressions. Compared to national healthcare utilization data, immigrants had significantly lower, and refugees had significantly higher rates of healthcare utilization. Being a refugee, being married, and having health insurance were significantly associated with medical service utilization. Among refugees, less use of psychological services was associated with the use of medications and having problem-focused (active) strategies for dealing with stress. Healthcare utilization was significantly higher among refugees, who also reported a greater need for services than did immigrants.

  • 22.
    Flink, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Publ Dent Hlth Vastmanland, Publ Dent Clin, Sala, Sweden..
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Malmo Univ, Fac Odontol, Malmo, Sweden.;Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Arnetz, Judith E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, Coll Human Med, Dept Family Med, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Fersens Vag, Malmo, Sweden..
    Patient-reported negative experiences related to caries and its treatment among Swedish adult patients2017In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 17, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been suggested that dental caries should be regarded as a chronic disease as many individuals repeatedly develop new caries lesions. How this is perceived by caries active patients is unclear. The aim of this study was to measure patient-reported attitudes and negative experiences related to caries and dental treatment.

    Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to 134 caries active (CA) and 40 caries inactive (CI) adult patients treated at a Swedish public dental service clinic. The questionnaire included items regarding patient-reported oral health; attitudes towards caries and efforts to prevent them; and negative experiences related to caries and dental treatment. Questionnaire data were supplemented with data on caries and caries prophylaxis from patients' dental records. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on items related to patients' perceptions of problems to see whether scales could be created. Experiences, perceptions and dental records of CA and CI patients were compared.

    Results: The overall response rate was 69%. Dental records confirmed that CA patients had significantly more decayed teeth per year and a longer period of caries-active time than CI patients. Factor analysis resulted in 3 distinct scales measuring problems related to caries; 1) caries-related information; 2) negative experiences; and 3) negative treatment/staff attitudes. A fourth scale measuring perceived problems related to caries was also created. The CA group reported significantly more problems related to caries and dental treatment, received significantly more caries-related information, and reported significantly more negative treatment experiences compared to CI patients.

    Conclusions: Caries prophylaxis methods need to be improved in order to better meet the needs of caries active patients and to create a more positive experience with dental care.

  • 23.
    Flink, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Arnetz, Judy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Correlation between perceived experience of caries disease and recorded caries activity among adult patients at a Swedish Public Dental Clinic: A longitudinal study2013In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 1486-1492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To compare patients' perceived experiences of caries activity with recorded longitudinal caries prevalence, consequences of caries and length of recall intervals. Materials and methods. A questionnaire was mailed to 134 caries active (CA) and 40 caries inactive (CI) adult patients at a Swedish Public Dental Clinic. The overall response rate was 69%. The questionnaire included items regarding perceived caries activity, general health, dietary and oral hygiene habits, level of education and socioeconomic status. Questionnaire responses were studied for their association to clinical data extracted from patient dental records. Results. There was a correlation between patient-perceived and documented caries activity for all respondents (rho = 0.65; p < 0.001). CA patients had significantly more perceived caries activity (p < 0.001), decayed teeth (p < 0.001), root fillings (p = 0.001) and extractions (p < 0.001) than CI patients. The mean recall interval was 1.5 years for CA and 2.1 years for CI (p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis, CA patients were at increased risk for xerostomia (OR = 22.66, p = 0.003), sleep disturbances (OR = 4.36, p = 0.04) and more frequent use of daily extra fluoride (OR = 3.58, p = 0.03). Conclusions. Patient-perceived experience of caries correlated well with recorded caries activity in this group of middle-aged Swedish adults. Individuals with active caries were aware of their disease and made more frequent attempts to reduce caries activity by use of daily extra fluoride. Individual risk-based recall intervals did not seem to eliminate consequences of disease activity such as root fillings and extractions during the follow-up period.

  • 24.
    Flink, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Publ Dent Hlth Vastmanland, Publ Dent Clin Sala, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Malmo Univ, Fac Odontol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Arnetz, Judy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Michigan State Univ, Dept Family Med, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Patient-reported outcomes of caries prophylaxis among Swedish caries active adults in a long-term perspective2016In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]