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  • 1.
    Andersson, Claes-Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Ott, Sascha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Grennberg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and IR Spectroelectrochemical Studies of a [60]Fulleropyrrolidine-(tricarbonyl)chromium Complex: Probing C-60 Redox States by IR Spectroscopy2011In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, no 11, p. 1744-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of a new fulleropyrrolidine-(tricarbonyl)chromium complex: 1-methyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,4-[60]fulleropyrrolidine-(tricarbonyl)chromium is described together with its characterization by IR, NMR and cyclic voltammetry. IR spectro-electrochemistry has been used to probe the redox level of the fullerene derivative via the relative position of the vibrational bands of the CO ligands, which are sensitive to the electronic state of the complex. Other strategies to incorporate a tricarbonylchromium moiety to fullerene C60 are also briefly discussed and evaluated.

  • 2.
    Artero, Vincent
    et al.
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, Lab Chem & Biol Met, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Atta, Mohamed
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, Lab Chem & Biol Met, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Caserta, Giorgio
    Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Coll France, Lab Chim Proc Biol, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Roy, Souvik
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, Lab Chem & Biol Met, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Pecqueur, Ludovic
    Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Coll France, Lab Chim Proc Biol, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Fontecave, Marc
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, Lab Chem & Biol Met, F-38000 Grenoble, France.;Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Coll France, Lab Chim Proc Biol, F-75005 Paris, France..
    From Enzyme Maturation to Synthetic Chemistry: The Case of Hydrogenases2015In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 2380-2387Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONSPECTUS: Water splitting into oxygen and hydrogen is one of the most attractive strategies for storing solar energy and electricity. Because the processes at work are multielectronic, there is a crucial need for efficient and stable catalysts, which in addition have to be cheap for future industrial developments (electrolyzers, photoelectrochemicals, and fuel cells). Specifically for the water/hydrogen interconversion, Nature is an exquisite source of inspiration since this chemistry contributes to the bioenergetic metabolism of a number of living organisms via the activity of fascinating metalloenzymes, the hydrogenases. In this Account, we first briefly describe the structure of the unique dinuclear organometallic active sites of the two classes of hydrogenases as well as the complex protein machineries involved in their biosynthesis, their so-called maturation processes. This knowledge allows for the development of a fruitful bioinspired chemistry approach, which has already led to a number of interesting and original catalysts mimicking the natural active sites. More specifically, we describe our own attempts to prepare artificial hydrogenases. This can be achieved via the standard bioinspired approach using the combination of a synthetic bioinspired catalyst and a polypeptide scaffold. Such hybrid complexes provide the opportunity to optimize the system by manipulating both the catalyst through chemical synthesis and the protein component through mutagenesis. We also raise the possibility to reach such artificial systems via an original strategy based on mimicking the enzyme maturation pathways. This is illustrated in this Account by two examples developed in our laboratory. First, we show how the preparation of a lysozyme-{Mn-I(CO)(3)} hybrid and its clean reaction with a nickel complex led us to generate a new class of binuclear Ni-Mn H-2-evolving catalysts mimicking the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Then we describe how we were able to rationally design and prepare a hybrid system, displaying remarkable structural similarities to an [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and we show here for the first time that it is catalytically active for proton reduction. This system is based on the combination of HydF, a protein involved in the maturation of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA), and a close mimic of the active site of this class of enzymes. Moreover, the synthetic [Fe-2(adt)(CO)(4)(CN)(2)](2-) (adt(2-) = aza-propanedithiol) mimic, alone or within a HydF hybrid system, was shown to be able to maturate and activate a form of HydA itself lacking its diiron active site. We discuss the exciting perspectives this "synthetic maturation" opens regarding the "invention" of novel hydrogenases by the chemists.

  • 3.
    Aster, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström. Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Chem, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Wang, Shihuai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Mirmohades, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Esmieu, Charlène
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. CNRS, LCC, 205 Route Narbonne,BP 44099, F-31077 Toulouse 4, France.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Lomoth, Reiner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Metal vs. ligand protonation and the alleged proton-shuttling role of the azadithiolate ligand in catalytic H-2 formation with FeFe hydrogenase model complexes2019In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 5582-5588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron and proton transfer reactions of diiron complexes [Fe(2)adt(CO)(6)] (1) and [Fe(2)adt(CO)(4)(PMe3)(2)] (4), with the biomimetic azadithiolate (adt) bridging ligand, have been investigated by real-time IR- and UV-vis-spectroscopic observation to elucidate the role of the adt-N as a potential proton shuttle in catalytic H-2 formation. Protonation of the one-electron reduced complex, 1(-), occurs on the adt-N yielding 1H and the same species is obtained by one-electron reduction of 1H(+). The preference for ligand vs. metal protonation in the Fe-2(i,0) state is presumably kinetic but no evidence for tautomerization of 1H to the hydride 1Hy was observed. This shows that the adt ligand does not work as a proton relay in the formation of hydride intermediates in the reduced catalyst. A hydride intermediate 1HHy(+) is formed only by protonation of 1H with stronger acid. Adt protonation results in reduction of the catalyst at much less negative potential, but subsequent protonation of the metal centers is not slowed down, as would be expected according to the decrease in basicity. Thus, the adtH(+) complex retains a high turnover frequency at the lowered overpotential. Instead of proton shuttling, we propose that this gain in catalytic performance compared to the propyldithiolate analogue might be rationalized in terms of lower reorganization energy for hydride formation with bulk acid upon adt protonation.

  • 4. Bacchi, Marine
    et al.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Niklas, Jens
    Veinberg, Elias
    Mara, Michael W.
    Shelby, Megan L.
    Poluektov, Oleg G.
    Chen, Lin X.
    Tiede, David M.
    Cavazza, Christine
    Field, Martin J.
    Fontecave, Marc
    Artero, Vincent
    Cobaloxime-Based Artificial Hydrogenases2014In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 53, no 15, p. 8071-8082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cobaloximes are popular H2 evolution molecular catalysts but have so far mainly been studied in nonaqueous conditions. We show here that they are also valuable for the design of artificial hydrogenases for application in neutral aqueous solutions and report on the preparation of two well-defined biohybrid species via the binding of two cobaloxime moieties, {Co(dmgH)2} and {Co(dmgBF2)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime), to apo Sperm-whale myoglobin (SwMb). All spectroscopic data confirm that the cobaloxime moieties are inserted within the binding pocket of the SwMb protein and are coordinated to a histidine residue in the axial position of the cobalt complex, resulting in thermodynamically stable complexes. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations indicated a coordination preference for His93 over the other histidine residue (His64) present in the vicinity. Interestingly, the redox activity of the cobalt centers is retained in both biohybrids, which provides them with the catalytic activity for H2 evolution in near-neutral aqueous conditions.

  • 5. Beckmann, K.
    et al.
    Uchtenhagen, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Thapper, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Messinger, J.
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Kurz, P.
    Formation of stoichiometrically O-18-labelled oxygen from the oxidation of O-18-enriched water mediated by a dinuclear manganese complex: a mass spectrometry and EPR study2008In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 668-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen formation was detected for the oxidations of various multinuclear manganese complexes by oxone (HSO5-) in aqueous solution. To determine to what extent water was the source of the evolved O-2, (H2O)-O-18 isotope-labelling experiments coupled with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) were carried out. We discovered that during the reaction of oxone with [Mn-2(OAc)(2)(bpmp)](+) (1), stoichiometrically labelled oxygen (O-18(2)) was formed. This is the first example of a homogeneous reaction mediated by a synthetic manganese complex where the addition of a strong chemical oxidant yields O-18(2) with labelling percentages matching the theoretically expected values for the case of both O-atoms originating from water. Experiments using lead acetate as an alternative oxidant supported this finding. A detailed investigation of the reaction by EPR spectroscopy, MIMS and Clark-type oxygen detection enabled us to propose potential reaction pathways.

  • 6. Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Adamska, A.
    Lambertz, C.
    Simmons, T. R.
    Esselborn, J.
    Atta, M.
    Gambarelli, S.
    Mouesca, J. M.
    Reijerse, E.
    Lubitz, W.
    Happe, T.
    Artero, V.
    Fontecave, M.
    Biomimetic assembly and activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases2013In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 499, no 7456, p. 66-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Anderlund, Magnus, F.
    Magnuson, Ann
    Åkermark, Björn
    Eriksson, Lars
    Sodium [1,2-bis(2-methyl-2-oxopropanamido)-benzene](tetrahydrofuran) manganese(III) methanol solvate2005In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 61, p. M1169-M1171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Thapper, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    FTIR Study of Manganese Dimers with Carboxylate Donors As Model Complexes for the Water Oxidation Complex in Photosystem II2012In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 2332-2337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carboxylate stretching frequencies of two high-valent, di-mu-oxido bridged, manganese dimers has been studied with IR spectroscopy in three different oxidation states. Both complexes contain one monodentate carboxylate donor to each Mn ion, in one complex, the carboxylate is coordinated perpendicular to the Mn-(mu-O)(2)-Mn plane, and in the other complex, the carboxylate is coordinated in the Mn-(mu-O)(2)-Mn plane. For both complexes, the difference between the asymmetric and the symmetric carboxylate stretching frequen-cies decrease for both the Mn-2(IV,IV) to Mn-2(III,IV) transition and the Mn-2(III,IV) to Mn-2(III,III) transition, with only minor differences observed between the two arrangements of the carboxylate ligand versus the Mn-(mu-O)(2)-Mn plane. The IR spectra also show that both carboxylate ligands are affected for each one electron reduction, i.e., the stretching frequency of the carboxylate coordinated to the Mn ion that is not reduced also shifts. These results are discussed in relation to FTIR studies of changes in carboxylate stretching frequencies in a one electron oxidation step of the water oxidation complex in Photosystem II.

  • 9. Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Duraffourg, Nicolas
    Sahlin, Margareta
    Sjoberg, Britt-Marie
    Semiquinone-Induced Maturation of Bacillus anthracis Ribonucleotide Reductase by a Superoxide Intermediate2014In: Journal of Biological ChemistryArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and represent the only de novo pathway to provide DNA building blocks. Three different classes of RNR are known, denoted I-III. Class I RNRs are heteromeric proteins built up by α and β subunits and are further divided into different subclasses, partly based on the metal content of the β-subunit. In subclass Ib RNR the β-subunit is denoted NrdF, and harbors a manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor. The generation of this cofactor is dependent on a flavodoxin-like maturase denoted NrdI, responsible for the formation of an active oxygen species suggested to be either a superoxide or a hydroperoxide. Herein we report on the magnetic properties of the manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of Bacillus anthracis NrdF and the redox properties of B. anthracis NrdI. The tyrosyl radical in NrdF is stabilized through its interaction with a ferromagnetically coupled manganese dimer. Moreover, we show through a combination of redox titration and protein electrochemistry that in contrast to hitherto characterized NrdIs, the B. anthracis NrdI is stable in its semiquinone form (NrdIsq) with a difference in electrochemical potential of approximately 110 mV between the hydroquinone and semiquinone state. The under anaerobic conditions stable NrdIsq is fully capable of generating the oxidized, tyrosyl radical-containing form of Mn-NrdF when exposed to oxygen. This latter observation strongly supports that a superoxide radical is involved in the maturation mechanism, and contradicts the participation of a peroxide species. Additionally, EPR spectra on whole cells revealed that a significant fraction of NrdI resides in its semiquinone form in vivo, underscoring that NrdIsq is catalytically relevant.

  • 10. Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Garcia-Serres, Ricardo
    Brazzolotto, Xavier
    Clemancey, Martin
    Gambarelli, Serge
    Atta, Mohamed
    Latour, Jean-Marc
    Hernandez, Heather L.
    Subramanian, Sowmya
    Johnson, Michael K.
    Fontecave, Marc
    An EPR/HYSCORE, Mossbauer, and resonance Raman study of the hydrogenase maturation enzyme HydF: a model for N-coordination to 4Fe-4S clusters2014In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 75-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Huang, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity Study of a New Penta-Coordinated Mn(II) Complex2009In: Applied Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 0937-9347, E-ISSN 1613-7507, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A penta-coordinated Mn(II) compound [dqpMnCl(2)] (1) (dqp = 2,6-di-(8-quinoline-yl)-pyridine) has been synthesized and its X-ray crystallographic structure is reported here. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed a high-spin Mn(II) (S = 5/2) center in 1. The X-band EPR spectrum of 1 in dimethylformamide solution exhibits widely distributed transitions in the spectral range from 0 to 700 mT with particularly well-resolved hyperfine lines due to the Mn-55 (I = 5/2) nucleus. The abundance of highly resolved transition lines in the spectrum facilitated the electron paramagnetic resonance spectral simulation which revealed large zero-field splitting and g-anisotropies. When dissolved, 1 exists in equilibrium with a hexa-coordinated species, the latter probably resulting from disassociation of one chlorido-ligand allowing ligation of two solvent molecules. The redox behavior of 1 was studied and was compared to that of a structural analog for which water oxidation in the presence of a chemical oxidant has been shown. The results from water oxidation trials of 1 are discussed.

  • 12.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Huang, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Thapper, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Synthesis and characterisation of low valent Mn-complexes as models for Mn-catalases2010In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 39, no 45, p. 11035-11044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we report the synthesis of two novel manganese complexes, [L1(3)Mn(6)(II)](ClO4)(6) (1 center dot(ClO4)(6)) and [L2Mn(2)(II)(mu-OAc)(mu-Cl)](ClO4)(2) (2 center dot(ClO4)(2)), where L1(2-) is the 2,2'-(1,3-phenylenebis(methylene))bis-((2-(bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)ethyl)azanediyl)diacetic acid anion and L2 is N1,N1'-(1,3-phenylenebis(methylene))bis(N2,N2'-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine). The ligands Na(2)L1 and L2 are built on the same backbone, L2 only contains nitrogen donors, while two carboxylate arms have been introduced in Na(2)L1. The two complexes have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry. X-Ray crystallography revealed that 1 is a manganese(II) hexamer and 2 is a manganese(II) dimer featuring an unprecedented mono-mu-acetato, mono-mu-chlorido bridging motif. The ability of the complexes to catalyse H2O2 disproportionation, thereby acting as models for manganese catalases, has been investigated and compared to the activity of two other related manganese complexes. The introduction of carboxylate donors in the ligands, leading to increased denticity, resulted in a drop in H2O2 disproportionation activity.

  • 13.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Kaynak, F. B.
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Eriksson, L.
    Åkermark, B.
    Tetraethylammonium [12,12-diethyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraza-5,6-benzotridecane-3 ,8,11,13-tetraone(4-)]oxidomanganate(V)2007In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 63, no 11, p. M2672-M2673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mn-V complex in the title compound, (C8H20N)[ Mn(C21H26N4O4)O], is interesting as it has been suggested that Mn-V oxospecies are intermediates both in epoxidation of alkenes and in water oxidation in PSII, i.e. photosystem II, the protein found in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, which uses light to split water into O-2, protons and electrons. The Mn atom has a square-pyramidal coordination of four N atoms with an apical O atom. The four N atoms coordinating to Mn [Mn-N = 1.872 (2)-1.882 (2) angstrom] form a plane within 0.03 (3) angstrom from which the Mn ion is displaced by 0.582 (2) angstrom.

  • 14.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Homo- and Heterometallic Dinuclear Manganese Proteins: Active Site Assembly2017In: Metalloprotein Active Site Assembly, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 215-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Sahlin, Margareta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crona, Mikael
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tholander, Fredrik
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Compounds with capacity to quench the tyrosyl radical in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ribonucleotide reductase2019In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 841-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) has been extensively probed as a target enzyme in the search for selective antibiotics. Here we report on the mechanism of inhibition of nine compounds, serving as representative examples of three different inhibitor classes previously identified by us to efficiently inhibit RNR. The interaction between the inhibitors and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RNR was elucidated using a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and thermal shift analysis. All nine inhibitors were found to efficiently quench the tyrosyl radical present in RNR, required for catalysis. Three different mechanisms of radical quenching were identified, and shown to depend on reduction potential of the assay solution and quaternary structure of the protein complex. These results form a good foundation for further development of P. aeruginosa selective antibiotics. Moreover, this study underscores the complex nature of RNR inhibition and the need for detailed spectroscopic studies to unravel the mechanism of RNR inhibitors.

  • 16. Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Thapper, Anders
    Huang, Ping
    Eriksson, Lars
    Kurz, Philipp
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Anderlund, Magnus
    Two tetranuclear Mn-complexes as biomimetic models of the oxygen evolving complex in Photosystem II. A synthesis, characterisation and reactivity study2009In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, no 45, p. 10044-10054Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Berggren, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science.
    Thapper, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Huang, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Anderlund, Magnus F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Mechanistic Studies on the Water-Oxidizing Reaction of Homogeneous Manganese-Based Catalysts: Isolation and Characterization of a Suggested Catalytic Intermediate2011In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 3425-3430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis, isolation, and characterization of two high-valent manganese dimers with isomeric ligands are reported. The complexes are synthesized and crystallized from solutions of low-valent precursors exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide. The crystal structures display centrosymmetric complexesconsisting of Mn2 IV,IV(μ-O)2 cores, with one ligand coordinating to each manganese. The ligands coordinate with the diaminoethane backbone, the carboxylate, and one of the two pyridines, while the second pyridine is noncoordinating. The activity of these complexes, under water oxidation conditions, is discussed in light of a proposed mechanism for water oxidation, in which this type of complexes have been suggested as a key intermediate.

  • 18.
    Esmieu, Charlene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. CNRS, LCC, 205 Route Narbonne,BP 44099, F-31077 Toulouse 4, France.
    Guo, Meiyuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Redman, Holly J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Lundberg, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Synthesis of a miniaturized [FeFe] hydrogenase model system2019In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 2280-2284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reaction occurring during artificial maturation of [FeFe] hydrogenase has been recreated using molecular systems. The formation of a miniaturized [FeFe] hydrogenase model system, generated through the combination of a [4Fe4S] cluster binding oligopeptide and an organometallic Fe complex, has been monitored by a range of spectroscopic techniques. A structure of the final assembly is suggested based on EPR and FTIR spectroscopy in combination with DFT calculations. The capacity of this novel H-cluster model to catalyze H-2 production in aqueous media at mild potentials is verified in chemical assays.

  • 19.
    Esmieu, Charlène
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Characterization of a monocyanide model of FeFe hydrogenases - highlighting the importance of the bridgehead nitrogen for catalysis2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 48, p. 19242-19248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An azadithiolate bridged monocyanide derivative [Fe-2(adt)(CO)(5)(CN)](-) of [Fe-2(adt)(CO)(4)(CN)(2)](2-) has been prepared and extensively characterized as a model of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site, using a combination of FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemical methods and catalytic assays with chemical reductants. The presence of two basic nitrogen sites opens up multiple protonation pathways, enabling catalytic proton reduction. To our knowledge [Fe-2(adt)(CO)(5)(CN)](-) represents the first example of a cyanide containing [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site mimic capable of catalytic H-2 formation in aqueous media.

  • 20.
    Esmieu, Charlène
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Raleiras, Patricia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    From protein engineering to artificial enzymes - biological and biomimetic approaches towards sustainable hydrogen production2018In: SUSTAINABLE ENERGY & FUELS, ISSN 2398-4902, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 724-750Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen gas is used extensively in industry today and is often put forward as a suitable energy carrier due its high energy density. Currently, the main source of molecular hydrogen is fossil fuels via steam reforming. Consequently, novel production methods are required to improve the sustainability of hydrogen gas for industrial processes, as well as paving the way for its implementation as a future solar fuel. Nature has already developed an elaborate hydrogen economy, where the production and consumption of hydrogen gas is catalysed by hydrogenase enzymes. In this review we summarize efforts on engineering and optimizing these enzymes for biological hydrogen gas production, with an emphasis on their inorganic cofactors. Moreover, we will describe how our understanding of these enzymes has been applied for the preparation of bio-inspired/-mimetic systems for efficient and sustainable hydrogen production.

  • 21. Esselborn, Julian
    et al.
    Lambertz, Camilla
    Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka
    Simmons, Trevor
    Berggren, Gustav
    Noth, Jens
    Siebel, Judith
    Hemschemeier, Anja
    Artero, Vincent
    Reijerse, Edward
    Fontecave, Marc
    Lubitz, Wolfgang
    Happe, Thomas
    Spontaneous activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases by an inorganic [2Fe] active site mimic2013In: Nature Chemical Biology, ISSN 1552-4450, E-ISSN 1552-4469, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 607-609Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Grinberg, Inna Rozman
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundin, Daniel
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hasan, Mahmudul
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Biochem & Struct Biol, Lund, Sweden..
    Crona, Mikael
    Swedish Ophan Biovitrum AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jonna, Venkateswara Rao
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Umea, Sweden..
    Loderer, Chrishtoph
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sahlin, Margareta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Markova, Natalia
    Malvern Instruments Inc, Malvern, Sweden..
    Borovok, Ilya
    Tel Aviv Univ, Dept Mol Microbiol & Biotechnol, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Umea, Sweden..
    Logan, Derek T.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biochem & Struct Biol, Lund, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Novel ATP-cone-driven allosteric regulation of ribonucleotide reductase via the radical-generating subunit2018In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 7, article id e31529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are key enzymes in DNA metabolism, with allosteric mechanisms controlling substrate specificity and overall activity. In RNRs, the activity master-switch, the ATP-cone, has been found exclusively in the catalytic subunit. In two class I RNR subclasses whose catalytic subunit lacks the ATP-cone, we discovered ATP-cones in the radical-generating subunit. The ATP-cone in the Leeuwenhoekiella blandensis radical-generating subunit regulates activity via quaternary structure induced by binding of nucleotides. ATP induces enzymatically competent dimers, whereas dATP induces non-productive tetramers, resulting in different holoenzymes. The tetramer forms by interactions between ATP-cones, shown by a 2.45 A crystal structure. We also present evidence for an (MnMnIV)-Mn-III metal center. In summary, lack of an ATP-cone domain in the catalytic subunit was compensated by transfer of the domain to the radical-generating subunit. To our knowledge, this represents the first observation of transfer of an allosteric domain between components of the same enzyme complex.

  • 23.
    Grinberg, Inna Rozman
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundin, Daniel
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlin, Margareta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crona, Mikael
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, SE-11276 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Sjoberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    A glutaredoxin domain fused to the radical-generating subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) functions as an efficient RNR reductant2018In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 293, no 41, p. 15889-15900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) consists of a catalytic subunit (NrdA) and a radical-generating subunit (NrdB) that together catalyze reduction of ribonucleotides to their corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. NrdB from the firmicute Facklamia ignava is a unique fusion protein with N-terminal addons of a glutaredoxin (Grx) domain followed by an ATP-binding domain, the ATP cone. Grx, usually encoded separately from the RNR operon, is a known RNR reductant. We show that the fused Grx domain functions as an efficient reductant of the F. ignava class I RNR via the common dithiol mechanism and, interestingly, also via a monothiol mechanism, although less efficiently. To our knowledge, a Grx that uses both of these two reaction mechanisms has not previously been observed with a native substrate. The ATP cone is in most RNRs an N-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit. It is an allosteric on/off switch promoting ribonucleotide reduction in the presence of ATP and inhibiting RNR activity in the presence of dATP. We found that dATP bound to the ATP cone of F. ignava NrdB promotes formation of tetramers that cannot form active complexes with NrdA. The ATP cone bound two dATP molecules but only one ATP molecule. F. ignava NrdB contains the recently identified radical-generating cofactor Mn-III/Mn-IV. We show that NrdA from F. ignava can form a catalytically competent RNR with the Mn-III/Mn-IV-containing NrdB from the flavobacterium Leeuwenhoekiella blandensis. In conclusion, F. ignava NrdB is fused with a Grx functioning as an RNR reductant and an ATP cone serving as an on/off switch.

  • 24.
    Grāve, Kristīne
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lambert, Wietske
    PRA Health Sciences, Assen, The Netherlands.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Griese, Julia J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology. Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Bennett, Matthew D.
    Stockholm University.
    Logan, Derek T.
    Lund University.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University.
    Redox-induced structural changes in the di-iron and di-manganese forms of Bacillus anthracis ribonucleotide reductase subunit NrdF suggest a mechanism for gating of radical access2019In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 849-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNR) utilize a di-nuclear manganese or iron cofactor for reduction of superoxide or molecular oxygen, respectively. This generates a stable tyrosyl radical (Y·) in the R2 subunit (NrdF), which is further used for ribonucleotide reduction in the R1 subunit of RNR. Here, we report high-resolution crystal structures of Bacillus anthracis NrdF in the metal-free form (1.51 Å) and in complex with manganese (MnII/MnII, 1.30 Å). We also report three structures of the protein in complex with iron, either prepared anaerobically (FeII/FeII form, 1.32 Å), or prepared aerobically in the photo-reduced FeII/FeII form (1.63 Å) and with the partially oxidized metallo-cofactor (1.46 Å). The structures reveal significant conformational dynamics, likely to be associated with the generation, stabilization, and transfer of the radical to the R1 subunit. Based on observed redox-dependent structural changes, we propose that the passage for the superoxide, linking the FMN cofactor of NrdI and the metal site in NrdF, is closed upon metal oxidation, blocking access to the metal and radical sites. In addition, we describe the structural mechanics likely to be involved in this process.