uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abramov, Sergei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Kazan Fed Univ, Inst Fundamental Med & Biol, Kazan, Russia.
    Kozyrev, Sergey V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Farias, Fabiana H. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Washington Univ, Genome Inst, Sch Med, St Louis, MO USA.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wilbe, Maria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hansson-Hamlin, H.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ronnblom, L.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The risk allele A of rs200395694 associated with SLE in Swedish patients affects on MEF2D gene regulation and alternative splicing2018In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 29, no 12, p. A44-A44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nystedt, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit,Rheumatol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjowall, Christopher
    Linkoping Univ, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Rheumatol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit,Rheumatol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit,Rheumatol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Whole-genome sequencing identifies complex contributions to genetic risk by variants in genes causing monogenic systemic lupus erythematosus2019In: Human Genetics, ISSN 0340-6717, E-ISSN 1432-1203, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, OMIM 152700) is a systemic autoimmune disease with a complex etiology. The mode of inheritance of the genetic risk beyond familial SLE cases is currently unknown. Additionally, the contribution of heterozygous variants in genes known to cause monogenic SLE is not fully understood. Whole-genome sequencing of DNA samples from 71 Swedish patients with SLE and their healthy biological parents was performed to investigate the general genetic risk of SLE using known SLE GWAS risk loci identified using the ImmunoChip, variants in genes associated to monogenic SLE, and the mode of inheritance of SLE risk alleles in these families. A random forest model for predicting genetic risk for SLE showed that the SLE risk variants were mainly inherited from one of the parents. In the 71 patients, we detected a significant enrichment of ultra-rare (0.1%) missense and nonsense mutations in 22 genes known to cause monogenic forms of SLE. We identified one previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation in the C1QC (Complement C1q C Chain) gene, which explains the immunodeficiency and severe SLE phenotype of that patient. We also identified seven ultra-rare, coding heterozygous variants in five genes (C1S, DNASE1L3, DNASE1, IFIH1, and RNASEH2A) involved in monogenic SLE. Our findings indicate a complex contribution to the overall genetic risk of SLE by rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE. The rare variants were inherited from the other parent than the one who passed on the more common risk variants leading to an increased genetic burden for SLE in the child. Higher frequency SLE risk variants are mostly passed from one of the parents to the offspring affected with SLE. In contrast, the other parent, in seven cases, contributed heterozygous rare variants in genes associated with monogenic forms of SLE, suggesting a larger impact of rare variants in SLE than hitherto reported.

  • 3.
    Bolin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Sjowall, C.
    Eriksson, P.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, H.
    Jonsen, A.
    Theander, E.
    Omdal, R.
    Jonsson, R.
    Sivils, K.
    Wahren-Herlenius, M.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Early B Cell Factor 1 is Associated to Clinical Manifestations in Primary Sjogren's Syndrome and SLE2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 416-416Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bolin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pucholt, Pascal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Loberg Haarhaus, Malena
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nititham, Joanne
    Russell/Engleman Rheumatology Research Center, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, United States of America.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Department of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    epartment of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A
    Department of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Lerang, Karoline
    Department of Rheumatology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Troldborg, Anne
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Voss, Anne
    Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Molberg, Øyvind
    Department of Rheumatology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Søren
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Criswell, Lindsey
    Russell/Engleman Rheumatology Research Center, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, United States of America.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Variants in BANK1 are associated with lupus nephritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a cause of significant morbidity in SLE. While the genetic background to SLE has been well characterized, less is known about genes predisposing to LN.

    Methods: The study consisted of 2886 SLE patients, including 947 (33%) with LN. The discovery cohort (Sweden, n=1091) and replication cohort 1 (US, n=962) were genotyped on the Immunochip and replication cohort 2 (Norway/Denmark, n=833) on a custom array chip. Allele frequencies were compared between patients with LN, proliferative nephritis, end-stage renal disease and LN negative patients. SNPs with p-value <0.001 in the discovery cohort were analyzed in replication cohort 1. Ten SNPs associated with LN in the discovery cohort (p<0.0002) were genotyped in replication cohort 2. DNA methylation data were available for 180 LN patients from the discovery cohort.

    Results: In the discovery cohort, six gene loci were associated with LN (p<1x10-4, NFKBIA, CACNA1S, ITGA1, BANK1, OR2Y and PHCA). SNPs in BANK1 showed the strongest association with LN in replication cohort 1 (p=9.5x10-4), with a tendency for an association in replication cohort 2 (p=0.052). In a meta-analysis of all three cohorts the association between LN and BANK1 rs4699259, was strengthened (p=1.7x10‑7). There were no associations to proliferative nephritis or ESRD in the meta-analysis. Methylation quantitative trait loci (MeQTL) effects between a CpG site and several SNPs in BANK1 were identified.

    Conclusion: Genetic variations in BANK1 are associated with LN. There is evidence for genetic regulation of DNA methylation within the BANK1 locus, however, the exact role of BANK1 in LN pathogenesis remains to be elucidated.

  • 5.
    Bremer, Hanna D.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Landegren, Nils
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, SE-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Hallgren, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, CMM, L8 01, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Renneker, Stefanie
    Euroimmun AG, D-23560 Lubeck, Germany..
    Lattwein, Erik
    Euroimmun AG, D-23560 Lubeck, Germany..
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, SE-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Andersson, Goran
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lilliehöök, Inger
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, USA..
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Autoimmunity. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, CMM, L8 01, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.; Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, KG Jebsen Ctr Autoimmune Disorders, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    ILF2 and ILF3 are autoantigens in canine systemic autoimmune disease2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dogs can spontaneously develop complex systemic autoimmune disorders, with similarities to human autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies directed at self-antigens are a key feature of these autoimmune diseases. Here we report the identification of interleukin enhancer-binding factors 2 and 3 (ILF2 and ILF3) as autoantigens in canine immune-mediated rheumatic disease. The ILF2 autoantibodies were discovered in a small, selected canine cohort through the use of human protein arrays; a method not previously described in dogs. Subsequently, ILF3 autoantibodies were also identified in the same cohort. The results were validated with an independent method in a larger cohort of dogs. ILF2 and ILF3 autoantibodies were found exclusively, and at a high frequency, in dogs that showed a speckled pattern of antinuclear antibodies on immunofluorescence. ILF2 and ILF3 autoantibodies were also found at low frequency in human patients with SLE and Sjogren's syndrome. These autoantibodies have the potential to be used as diagnostic biomarkers for canine, and possibly also human, autoimmune disease.

  • 6.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Sylwan, Lina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Sci Life Lab SciLifeLab, Solna, Sweden..
    Bäcklin, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden..
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden..
    Sjowall, Christopher
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, AIR Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Novel risk genes for systemic lupus erythematosus predicted by random forest classification2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies have identified risk loci for SLE, but a large proportion of the genetic contribution to SLE still remains unexplained. To detect novel risk genes, and to predict an individual's SLE risk we designed a random forest classifier using SNP genotype data generated on the "Immunochip" from 1,160 patients with SLE and 2,711 controls. Using gene importance scores defined by the random forest classifier, we identified 15 potential novel risk genes for SLE. Of them 12 are associated with other autoimmune diseases than SLE, whereas three genes (ZNF804A, CDK1, and MANF) have not previously been associated with autoimmunity. Random forest classification also allowed prediction of patients at risk for lupus nephritis with an area under the curve of 0.94. By allele-specific gene expression analysis we detected cis-regulatory SNPs that affect the expression levels of six of the top 40 genes designed by the random forest analysis, indicating a regulatory role for the identified risk variants. The 40 top genes from the prediction were overrepresented for differential expression in B and T cells according to RNA-sequencing of samples from five healthy donors, with more frequent over-expression in B cells compared to T cells.

  • 7.
    Farias, Fabiana H. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kozyrev, Sergey V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wilbe, Maria
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7023, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abramov, Sergei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, 420008, Russia.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7054, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Göran
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7023, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bengtsson, Anders A
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology/Division of Neuro and Inflammation Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, Umeå University, SE-901 85, Umeå, Sweden.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Broad Institute, Cambridge, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA.
    A rare regulatory variant in the MEF2D gene affects gene regulation and splicing and is associated with a SLE sub-phenotype in Swedish cohorts2019In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 27, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneous clinical presentation and complex etiology involving the interplay between genetic, epigenetic, environmental and hormonal factors. Many common SNPs identified by genome wide-association studies (GWAS) explain only a small part of the disease heritability suggesting the contribution from rare genetic variants, undetectable in GWAS, and complex epistatic interactions. Using targeted re-sequencing of coding and conserved regulatory regions within and around 215 candidate genes selected on the basis of their known role in autoimmunity and genes associated with canine immune-mediated diseases, we identified a rare regulatory variant rs200395694:G > T located in intron 4 of the MEF2D gene encoding the myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2D transcription factor and associated with SLE in Swedish cohorts (504 SLE patients and 839 healthy controls, p = 0.014, CI = 1.1-10). Fisher's exact test revealed an association between the genetic variant and a triad of disease manifestations including Raynaud, anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein (anti-RNP), and anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibodies (p = 0.00037) among the patients. The DNA-binding activity of the allele was further studied by EMSA, reporter assays, and minigenes. The region has properties of an active cell-specific enhancer, differentially affected by the alleles of rs200395694:G > T. In addition, the risk allele exerts an inhibitory effect on the splicing of the alternative tissue-specific isoform, and thus may modify the target gene set regulated by this isoform. These findings emphasize the potential of dissecting traits of complex diseases and correlating them with rare risk alleles with strong biological effects.

  • 8.
    Farias, Fabiana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wilbe, Maria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Kozyrev, Sergey
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    High-Throughput Sequencing of 219 Candidate Genes for Identification of SLE-Associated Risk Variants2014In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, Vol. 66, no S10, p. S1170-S1170, article id 2673Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Frodlund, M.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Reid, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wettero, J.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Dahlstrom, O.
    Linkoping Univ, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sjowall, C.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The majority of Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus patients are still affected by irreversible organ impairment: factors related to damage accrual in two regional cohorts2019In: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1261-1272, article id UNSP 0961203319860198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Although the survival of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has improved, irreversible organ damage remains a critical concern. We aimed to characterize damage accrual and its clinical associations and causes of death in Swedish patients. Methods Accumulation of damage was evaluated in 543 consecutively recruited and well-characterized cases during 1998-2017. The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI) was used to estimate damage. Results Organ damage (SDI >= 1) was observed in 59%, and extensive damage (SDI >= 3) in 25% of cases. SDI >= 1 was significantly associated with higher age at onset, SLE duration, the number of fulfilled SLICC criteria, neurologic disorder, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, depression and secondary Sjogren's syndrome (SS). In addition, SDI >= 3 was associated with serositis, renal and haematological disorders and interstitial lung disease. A multiple regression model identified not only well-known risk factors like APS, antihypertensives and corticosteroids, but pericarditis, haemolytic anaemia, lymphopenia and myositis as being linked to SDI. Malignancy, infection and cardiovascular disease were the leading causes of death. Conclusions After a mean SLE duration of 17 years, the majority of today's Swedish SLE patients have accrued damage. We confirm previous observations and report some novel findings regarding disease phenotypes and damage accrual.

  • 10.
    Gallo, Lina Marcela Diaz
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dept Med,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundstrom, Emeli
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dept Med,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oke, Vilija
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dept Med,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Unit Clin Immunol,Dept Med Solna,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wu, Yee Ling
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Res Inst, Columbus, OH USA.;Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dept Med,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jonsen, Andreas
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zickert, Agneta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dept Med,Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Yu, Chack-Yung
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Res Inst, Ctr Mol & Human Genet, Columbus, OH USA..
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    SLE Comprises Four Immune-Phenotypes, Which Differ Regarding HLA-DRB1 and Clinical Associations2017In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 69, no S10, article id 1675Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hagberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Berggren, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Weber, Gert
    Bryceson, Yenan T.
    Alm, Gunnar V.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    IFN-α Production by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Stimulated with RNA-Containing Immune Complexes Is Promoted by NK Cells via MIP-1β and LFA-12011In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 186, no 9, p. 5085-5094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several systemic autoimmune diseases display a prominent IFN signature. This is caused by a continuous IFN-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which are activated by immune complexes (ICs) containing nucleic acid. The IFN-α production by pDCs stimulated with RNA-containing IC (RNA-IC) consisting of anti-RNP autoantibodies and U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles was recently shown to be inhibited by monocytes, but enhanced by NK cells. The inhibitory effect of monocytes was mediated by TNF-α, PGE2, and reactive oxygen species, but the mechanisms for the NK cell-mediated increase in IFN-α production remained unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms whereby NK cells increase the RNA-IC–induced IFN-α production by pDCs. Furthermore, NK cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were evaluated for their capacity to promote IFN-α production. We found that CD56dim NK cells could increase IFN-α production >1000-fold after RNA-IC activation, whereas CD56bright NK cells required costimulation by IL-12 and IL-18 to promote IFN-α production. NK cells produced MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IFN-γ, and TNF-α via RNA-IC–mediated FcγRIIIA activation. The IFN-α production in pDCs was promoted by NK cells via MIP-1β secretion and LFA-mediated cell–cell contact. Moreover, NK cells from SLE patients displayed a reduced capacity to promote the RNA-IC–induced IFN-α production, which could be restored by exogenous IL-12 and IL-18. Thus, different molecular mechanisms can mediate the NK cell-dependent increase in IFN-α production by RNA-IC–stimulated pDCs, and our study suggests that the possibility to therapeutically target the NK–pDC axis in IFN-α–driven autoimmune diseases such as SLE should be investigated.

  • 12.
    Hagberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Joelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Reid, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mo, John
    AstraZeneca, Resp Inflammat & Autoimmun, IMED Biotech Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Magnus K.
    AstraZeneca, Resp Inflammat & Autoimmun, IMED Biotech Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bryceson, Yenan T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Broegelmann Res Lab, Bergen, Norway.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The STAT4 SLE risk allele rs7574865[T] is associated with increased IL-12-induced IFN-γ production in T cells from patients with SLE2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no 7, p. 1070-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Genetic variants in the transcription factor STAT4 are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a more severe disease phenotype. This study aimed to clarify how the SLE-associated intronic STAT4 risk allele rs7574865[T] affects the function of immune cells in SLE.

    Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 52 genotyped patients with SLE. Phosphorylation of STAT4 (pSTAT4) and STAT1 (pSTAT1) in response to interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ or interleukin (IL)-12, total levels of STAT4, STAT1 and T-bet, and frequency of IFN-γ+ cells on IL-12 stimulation were determined by flow cytometry in subsets of immune cells before and after preactivation of cells with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and IL-2. Cellular responses and phenotypes were correlated to STAT4 risk allele carriership. Janus kinase inhibitors (JAKi) selective for TYK2 (TYK2i) or JAK2 (JAK2i) were evaluated for inhibition of IL-12 or IFN-γ-induced activation of SLE PBMCs.

    Results In resting PBMCs, the STAT4 risk allele was neither associated with total levels of STAT4 or STAT1, nor cytokine-induced pSTAT4 or pSTAT1. Following PHA/IL-2 activation, CD8+ T cells from STAT4 risk allele carriers displayed increased levels of STAT4 resulting in increased pSTAT4 in response to IL-12 and IFN-α, and an augmented IL-12-induced IFN-γ production in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The TYK2i and the JAK2i efficiently blocked IL-12 and IFN-γ-induced activation of PBMCs from STAT4 risk patients, respectively.

    Conclusions T cells from patients with SLE carrying the STAT4 risk allele rs7574865[T] display an augmented response to IL-12 and IFN-α. This subset of patients may benefit from JAKi treatment.

  • 13.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Anders A
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    DNA methylation mapping identifies gene regulatory effects in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune condition with heterogeneous presentation and complex aetiology where DNA methylation changes are emerging as a contributing factor. In order to discover novel epigenetic associations and investigate their relationship to genetic risk for SLE, we analysed DNA methylation profiles in a large collection of patients with SLE and healthy individuals.

    Methods: DNA extracted from blood from 548 patients with SLE and 587 healthy controls were analysed on the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 k BeadChip, which targets 485 000 CpG sites across the genome. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data for 196 524 SNPs on the Illumina ImmunoChip from the same individuals were utilised for methylation quantitative trait loci (cis-meQTLs) analyses.

    Results: We identified and replicated differentially methylated CpGs (DMCs) in SLE at 7245 CpG sites in the genome. The largest methylation differences were observed at type I interferon-regulated genes which exhibited decreased methylation in SLE. We mapped cis-meQTLs and identified genetic regulation of methylation levels at 466 of the DMCs in SLE. The meQTLs for DMCs in SLE were enriched for genetic association to SLE, and included seven SLE genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci: PTPRC (CD45), MHC-class III, UHRF1BP1, IRF5, IRF7, IKZF3 and UBE2L3. In addition, we observed association between genotype and variance of methylation at 20 DMCs in SLE, including at the HLA-DQB2 locus.

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that several of the genetic risk variants for SLE may exert their influence on the phenotype through alteration of DNA methylation levels at regulatory regions of target genes.

  • 14.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Rheumatol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjowall, Christopher
    Linkoping Univ, Rheumatol AIR, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Treatment-Associated DNA Methylation Patterns in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus2017In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 69, no S10, article id 2654Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Sect Rheumatol, Uppsala, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Shared and Unique Patterns of DNA Methylation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Primary Sjogren's Syndrome2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 1686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To performa cross-comparative analysis of DNA methylation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS), and healthy controls addressing the question of epigenetic sharing and aiming to detect disease-specific alterations. Methods: DNA extracted from peripheral blood from 347 cases with SLE, 100 cases with pSS, and 400 healthy controls were analyzed on the Human Methylation 450k array, targeting 485,000 CpG sites across the genome. A linear regression model including age, sex, and blood cell type distribution as covariates was fitted, and association p-values were Bonferroni corrected. A random forest machine learning classifier was designed for prediction of disease status based on DNA methylation data. Results: We established a combined set of 4,945 shared differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs) in SLE and pSS compared to controls. In pSS, hypomethylation at type I interferon induced genes was mainly driven by patients who were positive for Ro/SSA and/or La/SSB autoantibodies. Analysis of differential methylation between SLE and pSS identified 2,244 DMCs with a majority of sites showing decreased methylation in SLE compared to pSS. The random forest classifier demonstrated good performance in discerning between disease status with an area under the curve (AUC) between 0.83 and 0.96. Conclusions: The majority of differential DNA methylation is shared between SLE and pSS, however, important quantitative differences exist. Our data highlight neutrophil dysregulation as a shared mechanism, emphasizing the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases. The current study provides evidence for genes and molecular pathways driving common and disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms.

  • 16.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, S.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Jonsen, A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Padyukov, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjowall, C.
    Linkoping Univ, Rheumatol Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Shared and unique patterns of DNA methylation in primary Sjogren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 3-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Jonsen, Andreas
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Anders A.
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    Hjalte, Frida
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Sjowall, Christopher
    Carlsson, Katarina Steen
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Willim, Minna
    Nived, Ola
    Direct and Indirect Costs For Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus In National Cohorts In Sweden2013In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 65, no Suppl. 10, p. S752-S752Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Jönsen, Andreas
    et al.
    Hjalte, Frida
    Willim, Minna
    Carlsson, Katarina Steen
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Zickert, Agneta
    Gustafsson, Johanna T
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Petersson, Ingemar F
    Bengtsson, Anders A
    Nived, Ola
    Direct and indirect costs for systemic lupus erythematosus in Sweden. A nationwide health economic study based on five defined cohorts2016In: Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism, ISSN 0049-0172, E-ISSN 1532-866X, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 684-690Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The main objectives of this study were to calculate total costs of illness and cost-driving disease features among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Sweden.

    METHODS: Five cohorts of well-defined SLE patients, located in different parts of the country were merged. Incident and prevalent cases from 2003 through 2010 were included. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria was used. From the local cohorts, data on demographics, disease activity (SLEDAI 2K), and organ damage (SDI) were collected. Costs for inpatient care, specialist outpatient care and drugs were retrieved from national registries at the National Board of Health and Welfare. Indirect costs were calculated based on sickness leave and disability pensions from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency.

    RESULTS: In total, 1029 SLE patients, 88% females, were included, and approximately 75% were below 65 years at the end of follow-up, and thus in working age. The mean number of annual specialist physician visits varied from six to seven; mean annual inpatient days were 3.1-3.6, and mean annual sick leave was 123-148 days, all per patient. The total annual cost was 208,555 SEK ($33,369 = 22,941€), of which direct cost was 63,672kr ($10,188 = 7004€) and the indirect cost was 144,883 SEK ($23,181 = 15,937€), all per patient. The costs for patients with short disease duration were higher. Higher disease activity as measured by a SLEDAI 2K score > 3 was associated with approximately 50% increase in both indirect and direct costs. Damage in the neuropsychiatric and musculoskeletal domains were also linked to higher direct and indirect costs, while organ damage in the renal and ocular systems increased direct costs.

    CONCLUSION: Based on this study and an estimate of slightly more than 6000 SLE patients in Sweden, the total annual cost for SLE in the country is estimated at $188 million (=129.5 million €). Both direct (30%) and indirect costs (70%) are substantial. Medication accounts for less than 10% of the total cost. The tax paid national systems for health care and social security in Sweden ensure equal access to health care, sick leave reimbursements, and disability pensions nationwide. Our extrapolated annual costs for SLE in Sweden are therefore the best supported estimations thus far, and they clearly underline the importance of improved management, especially to reduce the indirect costs.

  • 19.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cardiovascular Disease and Immune Mechanisms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory disease characterized by autoantibody production and an activated type I interferon system. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is as a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this thesis was to identify genetic risk factors for CVD in SLE. The role of T cells in regulation of the interferon-α (IFNα) production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was also investigated.

       In paper I, a thicker intima, thinner media and increased intima/media ratio was found in young premenopausal women with SLE compared to healthy controls indicating increased cardiovascular risk. As traditional ultrasound assessment of the common carotid intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) in SLE has given conflicting results separate measurement of the intima and media can be a useful tool to identify SLE patients at increased risk of CVD.

       In paper II, an association was demonstrated