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  • 1.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis sets out to explore why people engage in, and how to design for, play in a public setting. It does this by separating design for play from design of games, describing play as a socially and mentally understood activity, and a playful approach to engaging in that activity. It emphasises that while play is voluntary, design can help shape the players’ mode of engagement.

    The thesis uses a qualitative and inductive approach to research, with an understanding of knowledge as being constructed in the individual. The research is grounded in human computer interaction and interaction design, and closely related to game studies and design science.

    The research question concerns how design can influence the player activity in order to create a desired player experience in public, by harnessing playful engagement. It’s foundation is a theory of play which describes play as a framed, or hedged-off, activity with a fragile border; where knowledge and feelings can leak both in and out of the activity, and affect the play as well as what is around it. The theory of enjoyment of play is discussed, and the problem of treating this as ‘fun’ is addressed, concluding in a presentation of how playful engagement can be harnessed through design.

    The theory is applied in five design cases: I’m Your Body, a locative storytelling app; Codename Heroes, a pervasive game of personal empowerment; Passing On, a slow-paced game about communication; Busking Studies, which involves observing street performers and their shows; and DigiFys, an architectural design exploration of playgrounds and play paths.

    Finally, three concepts, or design tools, are presented, which address: 1) a structure for understanding a design through three layers, constructs designed by the designer, inspiring play activity with the player, leading to experience; 2) an approach to designing invitations to play; and finally 3), a four faceted structure for understanding play engagement when players engage in non intended ways.

    List of papers
    1. Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268059 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    2. Designing an Audience in the Streets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an Audience in the Streets
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268058 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

    Keywords
    outdoor play, playscape, interactive play technology, landscape architecture
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268057 (URN)10.1145/2901790.2901875 (DOI)000390478300006 ()
    Conference
    11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS), Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, JUN 04-08, 2016
    Note

    The manuscript version of this article is part of the thesis: "Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience" by Jon Back. http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:876519

    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    4. ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Keywords
    Location-based, asymmetric gameplay, negotiating language, physical feedback, player behavior
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239070 (URN)978-0-9913982-2-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG), 2014, April 3-7, 2014, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. "We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    2013 (English)In: Defragging game studies: Proceedings of DIGRA 2013, DIGRA , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-aware design is important in computer games in general, and perhaps even more so in the design of pervasive games, as these are played in the ordinary world. As pervasive games blur the distinction between game and non-game situations, they influence the everyday lives of their players.

    We discuss the design process for the game ‘Codename Heroes’ from a gender-aware perspective. The focus is on how players reacted to the experience of playing the game during a sequence of design workshops. We found that playing the game made people less sensitive to ‘fear of the outside’. The participants were aware they ‘should’ feel unsafe in unknown neighbourhoods, but mostly did not. Furthermore, a combination of collaboration with internal competition fostered a sense of empowerment. Finally, we could confirm what previous researchers have seen, that women participants tended to blame themselves, rather than the technology or the situation, for errors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    DIGRA, 2013
    Keywords
    Game, Design, Gender, Pervasive game
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212715 (URN)
    Conference
    The sixth international conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA); 26-29 August 2013; Atlanta, GA, USA
    Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
    6. Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268055 (URN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    7. Experimental Game Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Game Design
    2015 (English)In: Game Research Methods: An Overview / [ed] Lankoski, Petri; Björk, Staffan, ETC press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ETC press, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268056 (URN)9781312884731 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 2.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology Encounters: Exploring the essence of ordinary computing2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As computing technology has become a vital part of everyday life, studies have increasingly scrutinized the underlying meaning of computational things. As different devices become interwoven with daily practices and routines, there is a growing interest in understanding not only their functional meaning in computational terms but also their meaning in relation to other non-computation artefacts.

    This thesis investigates how people relate to artefacts and how their individual values and attitudes affect this relationship.  The analysis is based on four ethnographic studies, which look at the richness of ordinary interactions with technology to understand the impact of technology upon practice and experience.

    The process through which humans develop a relationship to artefacts is framed as a continuous series of encounters, through which the individual constantly reshapes their relationship to things.  Artefacts are seen as lines in the mesh of everyday life, and the encounters are the intersections between lines. This approach–grounded in phenomenology and paired with an anthropological understanding of everyday life–reconceptualises understanding of the processes of adaption, meaning-making, disposing and recycling. The work reveals how human relations to all kinds of things–in the form of meaning–is continually transforming. Core to this understanding is the cultural relative essence that becomes perceived of the artefacts themselves. This essence deeply affects the way we encounter and thus interact with technology, as well as objects more broadly. In the daily interaction with computing devices we can observe that computing technology alters the mesh on a different level than non-computational artefacts: digital interfaces pull our lines together, bundle experiences an affect how we encounter the material and the social world. This enables computing devices to have meanings distinct from non-computing technology. To go further, computing is itself a mode of existence – a crucial difference in things that helps us understand the complexity of the material world.

    List of papers
    1. The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Value of Things: Cultural Context in the Design of Digital Materiality
    2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 751-756Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the diffusion of computing in all areas of everyday life comes a need for re-thinking the design process in order to account for the changing meaning of digital technologies. This paper argues that there is a need to factor the cultural value that digital artifacts get assigned by users into the design process. Therefore a theoretical framework is developed that builds on phenomenology and Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Main objective is thereby to connect the individual experience with a cultural context and connect micro- and macro-perspective. This framework then builds the foundation for a model that accounts for the heterogeneity of values that artifacts get assigned.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
    Keywords
    Design research, phenomenology, ubiquitous computing, experiential computing, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191831 (URN)10.1145/2399016.2399132 (DOI)978-1-4503-1482-4 (ISBN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012, 14th-17th October, 2012, Copenhagen, DENMARK
    Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2016-08-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring meaning and values in artefacts: A case example of the family car
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe interactions between families and their artefacts in the car using data from ethnographic work with eight families. We see how artefacts - through the interactions and practices around them and affected by family values - develop meaning over time. Outgoing from that artefacts are embedded in the socially dense environment of the car, we scrutinize the relationship between users and artefacts and the environment they are interacting in. Drawing on concepts from the field of material culture we show that the relationship between user and artefact is constituted through individual values and dispositions as they are reflected in everyday interactions with materiality. We observe that artefact interactions are closely tied with changing family dynamics, issues around technology appropriation and prevailing values and parenting practices. Our analysis points to the deliberation of the role of critical, value-based design for the design for families. 

    Keywords
    Car, family, meaning, materiality
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301106 (URN)
    Note

    Manuscript submitted for publication

    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    3. Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connectedness in Mobile Families: Digital and Material Flows of Practices in the Home
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern day economy, families often have to be geographically flexible and within families computational technology plays a crucial role in making a home, even when far away from their place of origin. We report on an ethnographic study investigating the role of ICT for connectedness in a family context. In order to understand how families are dealing with relocation in their everyday life, we analyze situated material practices and discuss how expat families create a sense of connectedness through the procurement and maintenance of physical as well as digital artifacts. We show in particular how the roles of virtually procured artifacts, such as movies or music content, is tightly connected to but also different from the tangible ‘stuff’ that is a crucial part of home-making. This leads to a different role of ICT in the material fabric of the modern family home and at the same time to new challenges and challenges and potentials whendesigning for connectedness.

    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301107 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    4. Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Labour: Uber and the On-Demand Mobile Workforce
    2015 (English)In: 34Th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, 2015, p. 1632-1643Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps allowing passengers to hail and pay for taxi service on their phone– such as Uber and Lyft–have affected the livelihood of thousands of workers worldwide. In this paper we draw on interviews with traditional taxi drivers, rideshare drivers and passengers in London and San Francisco to understand how “ride-sharing” transforms the taxi business. With Uber, the app not only manages the allocation of work, but is directly involved in ‘labour issues’: changing the labour conditions of the work itself. We document how Uber driving demands new skills such as emotional labour, while increasing worker flexibility. We discuss how the design of new technology is also about creating new labour opportunities – jobs – and how we might think about our responsibilities in designing these labour relations. 

    Keywords
    On demand labour, sharing economy, uber, ridesharing, on-demand labour, transport, labour issues
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-276270 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858476 (DOI)000380532901062 ()9781450333627 (ISBN)
    Conference
    34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI4GOOD), MAY 07-12, 2016, San Jose, CA, USA
    Available from: 2016-02-10 Created: 2016-02-10 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
    5. Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stuck in-between: Embracing the ‘messiness’ of Internet of Things at home
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301108 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
    6. The tablet computer as a family canvas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The tablet computer as a family canvas
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301109 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-08-26
  • 3.
    Mohammedsalih, Salah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Mobile Journalism: Using smartphone in journalistic work2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones have had a drastic influence on media production, by providing a ubiquitous connection. This revolution has come about when smartphone turned into a powerful tool to do almost all the production-related work that was done previously by specialized equipment and computers. This has encouraged ordinary individuals to involve in media work and emerging the phenomenon of mobile journalism, where citizens and individuals can engage in journalism work carry out a job that was supposed to be done only by journalists for a long time ago. We are talking about hundreds of thousands of prosumers and amateurs who are making and covering news by their smartphones and contributing to journalism work. This has become particularly apparent in relation to reporting from remote and risky areas, where journalists cannot reach easily or may not arrive on time while important events occur. This was obvious during the Arab-spring - The role of smartphones in feeding both social media and traditional media with instant photos and videos taken by protesters themselves. This thesis focuses on the role of the smartphone in facilitating the work of journalists.

    As a part of the literature review, the author has gone through many texts, watched videos and listened to radio shows with journalists and workers in media spheres, in which journalists talk about their own experience with practicing mobile journalism. Then from a phenomenological perspective and framework the experience of technology and user aspects of mobile journalism are investigated. As the aim of this thesis is not to validate a hypothesis or a theory, a qualitative research method is used to come to an evaluation and explanation of the phenomenon of using mobile in journalism. For that purpose, several qualitative methods have been used to collect data such as auto-ethnography, observation, interviews and focus groups. The data are collected mainly from Kurdistan region in northern Iraq where journalists were covering news of war in dangerous and risky battle fields.  

    The findings from the results showed that the main factors that make smartphones powerful tools for journalists are: the low budget required for acquiring a smartphone compared to expensive equipment used in traditional media, the freedom and independence that a mobile can give to a journalist, the design aspects which provide a pocket-size tool with unsuspiciousness feature that make it possible to be carried and used even in areas where journalistic work is not allowed. The ubiquity feature of mobile has helped to cover news in areas where traditional media cannot be existing or cannot reach easily. The ability of individuals to obtain a smartphone in one hand and the universal design of mobile in another hand have helped to be used in journalism work by many people with no necessary training courses. This situation has created a good opportunity for media institutions and TV stations to expand their correspondents’ network all over the countries.

  • 4.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embodied Core Mechanics: Designing for movement-based co-located play2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interactive systems for play came into the spotlight over a decade ago, and were met with enthusiasm by the general public as well as the Human-Computer Interaction research community. Yet a decade of research and practice has not fully addressed the challenge of designing for the moving body and play. This thesis argues that often, the role of the technology to sustain the play activity, and to drive the design process, has been over-emphasized, and has resulted in limited design possibilities. This thesis explores an alternative design approach to address the problem through combining the design of the technology with designing aspects of the social and spatial context where the play activity takes place. The work is grounded in an embodied perspective of experience, action, and design. Methodologically, it belongs to the Research through Design tradition (RtD).

    A core concept and a characterization of design practices are presented as key contributions. The concept of embodied core mechanics is introduced to frame desirable and repeatable movement-based play actions, paying attention to the way these are supported by design resources including rules, physical and digital artifacts, and the physical and spatial arrangement of players and artifacts. The concept was developed during the two main design cases: the Oriboo case, targeting dance games for children, and the PhySeEar case, targeting rehabilitative therapy for the elderly. It was further substantiated in subsequent external design collaborations. To support the design process, this thesis presents embodied sketching: a set of ideation design practices that leverage the embodied experience and enable designers to scrutinize the desired embodied experience early in the design process. Three forms of embodied sketching are presented: embodied sketching for bodystorming, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers.

    Through reframing the design task as one of designing and studying embodied core mechanics, this thesis establishes an alternative approach to design for movement-based play in which significant aspects of the embodied play experience, lead, drive, and shape the design process and the design of the technology.

    List of papers
    1. The Design Space of Body Games: Technological, Physical, and Social Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Design Space of Body Games: Technological, Physical, and Social Design
    2013 (English)In: CHI 2013 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 3365-3374Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past decade has seen an increased focus on body movement in computer games. We take a step further to look at body games: games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement. We argue that for these games, the physical and social settings become just as important design resources as the technology. Although all body games benefit from an integrated design approach, the social and physical setting become particularly useful as design resources when the technology has limited sensing capabilities. We develop our understanding of body games through a literature study and a concrete design experiment with designing multiplayer games for the BodyBug, a mobile device with limited sensing capabilities. Although the device was designed for free and natural movements, previous games fell short in realizing this design ideal. By designing the technology function together with its physical and social context, we were able to overcome device limitations. One of the games was subsequently incorporated in its commercial release.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2013
    Keywords
    Body Game, Exertion Game, Gesture, Movement, Design, Sensing, Game, Dance, Children, Play, Interactive Toy, BodyBug, Oriboo, Social Play
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282335 (URN)10.1145/2470654.2466461 (DOI)978-1-4503-1899-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
    Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2016-05-23
    2. Embodied Sketching
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied Sketching
    2016 (English)In: 34th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 6014-6027Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing bodily experiences is challenging. In this paper, we propose embodied sketching as a way of practicing design that involves understanding and designing for bodily experiences early in the design process. Embodied sketching encompasses ideation methods that are grounded in, and inspired by, the lived experience and includes the social and spatial settings as design resources in the sketching. Embodied sketching is also based on harnessing play and playfulness as the principal way to elicit creative physical engagement. We present three different ways to implement and use embodied sketching in the application domain of co-located social play. These include bodystorming of ideas, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers. The latter helps to uncover and articulate significant, as well as novel embodied experiences, whilst the first two are useful for developing a better understanding of possible design resources. 

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016
    Keywords
    Ideation, Bodystorming, Embodied Sketching, Embodied Interaction, Design Methods, Sensitizing, Somaesthetics
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284600 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858486 (DOI)000380532905088 ()9781450333627 (ISBN)
    Conference
    34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI4GOOD), MAY 07-12, 2016, San Jose, CA, USA
    Funder
    VINNOVA
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
    3. Co-creating Embodied Sketches. Playing as a method to design with children.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creating Embodied Sketches. Playing as a method to design with children.
    2015 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 12Th International Conference On Advances In Computer Entertainment Technology, Iskandar, Malaysia, Nov 16-19, 2015, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing body games, games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement, is not an easy task. This article reports on a holistic design approach that considers the social and physical setting of the activity as design resources, together with the technology. We introduce the concept of embodied sketching as a method to gauge how different configurations of resources make for a good design. We report on the experience of using embodied sketching in exploratory workshops with children, as a way to co-create design ideas. The explorations were based on simple games implemented in a technological prototype, which allowed organizers and children to collectively explore game variations by changing the rules of the game, the physical configurations, and the roles of players. We report on our takeaways from four workshops at four different schools in three different countries

    Keywords
    Play; technology-supported; play engagement; co-located; social; movement-based; interactive toy; Oriboo; sociospatial; embodied sketching; exertion game; body-game.
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271291 (URN)10.1145/2832932.2832975 (DOI)000382173300018 ()
    Conference
    Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology (ACE)
    Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved
    4. YAMOVE! A Movement Synchrony Game that Choreographs Social Interaction.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>YAMOVE! A Movement Synchrony Game that Choreographs Social Interaction.
    Show others...
    (English)In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Human-Technology Choreographies: Body, Movement and Space [Special Issue].Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284598 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    5. Playification: The PhyseEar case
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playification: The PhyseEar case
    2016 (English)In: Chi Play 2016: Proceedings Of The 2016 Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2016, p. 376-388Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of playification has recently been proposed as an extension of, or alternative to, gamification. We present a playification design project targeting the re-design of physiotherapist rehabilitative therapy for elderly inpatients. The menial and repetitive nature of the physical exercises targeted for design might seem ideal for shallow widespread gamification approaches that add external rewards to entice usage. In our project, we introduced a “third agent” instead, a NAO robot that would take over some of the work typically carried out by the physiotherapist.  This technological intervention triggered the emergence of playfulness, when inpatients and the therapist re-signified the ongoing activity by engaging in playful role-taking, such as blaming the robot for mistakes, or for sensitivity to the inpatient’s inaccurate movements. Based on the experiences from this project, we discuss some of the major differences between playification and gamification.

    Keywords
    Gamification, Playification, Physiotherapy, Physical training, Rehabilitative therapy, NAO, Robot, Technology-supported design
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284599 (URN)10.1145/2967934.2968099 (DOI)000387871100037 ()9781450344562 (ISBN)
    Conference
    Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Austin, TX, OCT 16-19, 2016
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-05-08
  • 5.
    Spak, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Change Detection of the Unexpected: Enhancing change detection of the unexpected in a complex and high risk context – guiding visual attention in a digital display environment2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Change detection of objects and events in our visual surroundings is sometimes severely difficult, especially if these changes are unexpected. Such failures in change detection may cause huge malicious outcomes in contexts characterized by high levels of complexity and risk. For operators within organizations active in such contexts, effective change detection is a necessary step for functional feedback control in the pursuit of achieving specified goals. This thesis demonstrates examples of change detection failures from aviation, defence, healthcare, and road traffic.

    The purpose of the thesis is to present a support concept for enhanced change detection in complex and high risk contexts. The design requirements are primarily provided by the field of command and control. The main mechanisms behind the problems of change detection are identified as the psychological phenomena of change blindness and inattentional blindness. A theoretical foundation is presented regarding these phenomena, complemented with a review concerning orientation and capture of visual attention. The solution space for enhanced change detection is explored and a gap in the literature is identified; there is a need for a support concept which considers both blindness phenomena simultaneously. The thesis elaborates on a conceptual design; an adaptive attention aware system (A3S), based on cuing of visual attention.

    The thesis includes four experimental studies. The first examines the effects of instruction on change detection performance. The remaining studies evaluate the possibilities to orient visual attention by a non-obtrusive flash cue in a radar-like display, to compensate for inadequate expectations in a situation characterized by high levels of uncertainty. The participants’ performance is measured in accuracy (hit frequencies) and response times.

    The results indicate that; (a) instructions can affect change detection performance, (b) the bottom-up flash cue enhance change detection independent of perceptual load, (c) the flash cue enhance change detection in both static and dynamic environments, and (d) the flash cue is beneficial for change detection even when its position is outside foveal vision in relation to the changed target object. Design propositions for an A3S are presented, derived from the results of the thesis.

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