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  • 1.
    Abbasian, Saeid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Integration på egen hand: En studie av invandrade kvinnoföretagare i Sverige2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The principal aim of this thesis is to discover and analyse the motives that make immigrant women start their own businesses in Sweden and to investigate whether this is a way to achieve integration in working life. The empirical material consists of two types of interviews. One type consisted of interviews with five experts on labour market issues, and the other of interviews with 16 female entrepreneurs of Iranian, Chilean and Turkish origin having their own business in the Greater Stockholm region. Results from the first set of interviews indicate that female immigrants who independently start their enterprise rely mainly on their own resources of power and abilities. They are either women with class resources such as higher educations, previous work experience, language abilities and economic savings, or young women with certificates from high schools or universities. The social environment where they grew up, the gender structure and gender roles in the family before and after immigration and time of residence in Sweden also influence the extent to which women immigrants can act independently. According to the experience of the experts, the motives for starting their business are either different structural reasons, e.g. unemployment, lack of suitable or well-paying jobs, lay-offs etc, or personal reasons such as having a meaningful occupation, to support the family, to earn money of their own, to be independent from men and strive for a better standard of living etc.

    Results from the second set of interviews indicate that the most important resource these women have used when establishing their businesses is class resources such as education and adequate training, different types of work experiences, human capital and in addition to this economic savings. For many of the women in this sample different structural reasons, like unemployment, lack of good job opportunities, discrimination on work places, merge with personal reasons such as strivings to achieve independence, being one’s own boss, to realize one’s plans and ambitions, when starting their business. Independent entrepreneurship is a good way for immigrant women to be integrated in working life especially if they start within certain branches. These are branches in which the women have appropriate university education or vocational training, previous work experience or which correspond to their personal interests. In addition immigrant women become more integrated if an education received abroad is treated as equivalent to the parallel Swedish education or degree. A further factor promoting integration is if they can fully exploit their capacities when developing their own businesses. These conditions help them to feel much more satisfaction in working life as women identify themselves with their actual profession and feel that they have found the “right place” for themselves in the society.

  • 2.
    Almstedt, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    En plats i planeringen: En studie av områden av riksintresse för det rörliga friluftslivet : [a study of areas of national importance for outdoor recreation]1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this study is physical planning for outdoor recreation - and the way outdoor recreation interplays and competes with other businesses. This thesis is a case-study of four areas of national importance in Sweden: Ljusnan, Indalsälven, Vindelälven och Kalixälven.

    The first aim of the study is to analyse the way the demand for outdoor recreation regarding the use of land and water is considered in physical planning as expressed in local planning documents. The study shows that outdoor recreation seen as a non-commercial activity is inferior in competing with other economic activities. It is in terms of tourism that outdoor recreation is given status on the local level.

    The second aim of the study, is to critically examine the criterions for classification of areas of national importance for outdoor recreation and to analyse the way these areas are used. This study shows that visitors to these areas do not visit them primarily because they were designated as areas of national importance for outdoorrecreation. In most cases the visitors had other objectives, for instance they were travelling through the area or they were visiting relatives or friends. The thesis therefore concludes that the use of recreational areas derives from random tourism.

    Distance and attractiveness of the area have been given as important criterions in the classification of an area as being of national importance for outdoor recreation. To evaluate the impact of distance and attractiveness on recreational travel, a log-linear analysis has been conducted. The results shows that both distance and attractiveness have a statistically measurable effect and therefore are able to explain part of the variations in visitor frequency.

  • 3.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Samtida bosättning på svensk landsbygd2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has two main aims. First, to describe population change and the growth of housingstock in the Swedish countryside. Secondly, to find possible explanations for these changes. The countryside is understood as the livingmilieu outside the builtup cities and localities (urban places).

    In line with the first aim, data on the population within and outside Swedish localities 1970-1 995, and individual data on the dwellings outside localities in East Central Sweden, are analysed. In line with the second aim the data on dwellings are supplemented by socioeconomic and demographic data on their residents.

    The study shows that the population outside built-up localities has been growing, particularly in the areas surrounding bigger cities. This is primarily due to an influx of families with children. Although many of them have converted existing second-homes into permanent dwellings, the dwelling-stock is growing even faster than the population. That is primarily due to young people leaving home.

    A British-inspired possible explanation based on the attractive force of the middle-class image of the rural idyll is rejected on empirical grounds. The same goes for an explanation in terms of low-budget detached housing. Explanations emphasising the reduced geographical restrictions on rural living (e. g. improved commuting possibilities) seem to fit the empirical data better. That does also implies that the attractions of the countryside as a living milieu should be sought for further back in history than in recent time. Sweden is a recently urbanised country where many people still have personal ties to a farmstead or village. It has also been argued that the national culture, for a number of reasons, is oriented towards nature and the rural.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Från Sorgedalen till Glädjehöjden – omgivningens betydelse för socioekonomisk karriär2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to analyse the significance of surroundings for an individual's socio-economic career in the form of education, occupational status and income. Guided by a social theoretical perspective the study reveals places of good fortune and places of few opportunities.

    The approach uses two empirical data sets. The first is a register database with in-dividuals in the Swedish municipalities of Gävle, Jönköping and Västerås. A cluster analysis was conducted and forms the physical and socio-demographic context of the 248 areas. The survey cohort consists of individuals born 1970, who lived at least five years in the same area during their adolescence. The most important finding is that the socio-demographic and physical context of the residential area of adolescence affects the subsequent socio-economical career. The second data set includes data from an interview study carried out with residents in the three municipalities. Inter-viewees speak to contextual effects on their socio-economic career and emphasised the importance of surroundings, especially for children.

    More specifically, the quantitative multi-level analyses showed that the individ-ual’s socio-demographic context during 1985-89 was significantly associated with his/her education in 1995. The individuals who lived in dwellings built during the Million Programme era had fewer years of education than others did and lower chances of being employed. Favourable places for a socio-economic career are those dominated by middle-class families where contextual effects towards higher educa-tion are evident. The income of an individual though can not be clearly considered as effected from the context in the residential area.

    The political implications of the study should be considered together with the nu-merous area-based programs in Sweden directed to improve conditions such as de-gree of occupation, education and income. Further studies on contextual effects can help to guide allocation of resources to schools and education in certain residential areas.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Performing Co-production: On the logic and practice of shopping at IKEA2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary western society has often been described as a “consumer society” in relation to the producer oriented form that characterised the industrial society. While consumer habits used to be seen as a reflection of a person’s occupational status or place in a stable societal hierarchy, it has now become recognised as a practice through which people’s identity and status is partially defined by the choices they make as consumers. This has not only changed the view of the consumer but also created a new role for economic actors. Instead of merely responding to demand they have been recognised as active participants in ongoing processes of socio-cultural transformation.

    In this thesis I develop a particular understanding of the relation between the activities taking place within consumer markets and specific processes of home making. With theoretical reference to a performative perspective on economic markets and using my own empirical study of the multinational retailer IKEA’s operation in the North East of England, the thesis describes shopping at IKEA as a situated encounter where economic exchange becomes framed as meaningful in particular ways. At IKEA, this process is specifically organised around a principle of co-production. By doing part of the work in terms of picking up and assembling flat-packed furniture, the consumers are offered a low price. Rather than being limited to this work, co-productivity is here identified as a “calculative” logic and practice that characterises and frames the shopping experience as a whole and creates a relation between the consumer and the retailer through the medium of the retail brand. The co-productive calculation established through the shopping experience then continues to make sense as part of ongoing processes of home making. It does so in ways that enhances the immediate, temporary and mobile aspects of the home. Hence, it is by linking the experience of shopping at IKEA and processes of home making that the relation between economic exchange and the ongoing processes of socio-cultural transformation is identified.

    Rather than answering a particular question, the research and analysis constitutes a specific approach to how economic exchange may be understood and offers some suggestions as to what this may entail in terms of how relations within economic markets may be organised.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lokala utvecklingsgrupper på landsbygden: Analys av några lokala utvecklingsgrupper i termer av platsrelaterad gemenskap, platsrelaterad social rörelse och systemintegrerad lokal organisation : [place-related communality, place-related social movement, s1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the thesis is to apply a model of place-related social and political processes to analyse certain local development groups and their organisation, function and 'anchoring' in their home communities, their relationships with the surrounding political system, and what opportunities and limitations they have for becoming a force for rural democratisation. The empirical material has been gathered through interviews with development group members, politicians and professional staff members in the municipalities of Vansbro, Växjö and Östhammar in Sweden. Jürgen Habermas theory of 'communicative action' is essential in the analysis ofspecific groups. The case studies show that local development politics, areas of activity and organisation are based on and strongly influenced by varying place-related conditions. The evolution of specific group's organisation is linked to the group's need for legitimacy in the community and to outside pressures for legality. This thesis shows that place-related communality is an necessary condition, from several different perspectives, for achieving dynamic local development and a place-related process of democratisation.

  • 7.
    Bergquist, Daniel A.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Colonised Coasts: Aquaculture and Emergy Flows in the World System: Cases from Sri Lanka and the Philippines2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis conceives aquaculture as a transfer of resources within and between different parts of the world system. It is argued that due to inappropriate human-nature interactions, resources tend to flow from the South to the North, as a process of coastal colonisation. To study this resource transfer, coastal aquaculture is ap-proached from a transdisciplinary perspective, integrating natural, social, economic and spatial aspects. By combining world system theory and general systems theory, a systems view is adopted to relate aquaculture to forces of global capitalism, and analyse interactions between social and ecological processes at local and global levels. Emergy (energy memory) synthesis and participatory research methodologies were applied to two cases of aquaculture in Sri Lanka and the Philippines; monocul-ture of the black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) and milkfish (Chanos chanos), and polyculture of the two species together with mudcrab (Scylla serrata). The study reveals that semi-intensive shrimp monoculture in Sri Lanka generates few benefits for poor local people, and depends much on external inputs such as fry, feed and fuels, which implies negative environmental effects at local as well as global levels. Extensive polyculture in the Philippines involves more local people, and implies lower dependence on external inputs. Still, since benefits accrue mostly to elites, and mangroves are negatively affected, neither case is viable for sustainable poverty alleviation. Nevertheless, the study offers several insights into how sustainability assessment may be more transdisciplinary, and points to several factors affecting sustainability and fairness in aquaculture; the most important being mangrove con-version, local people involvement, and dependence on external inputs. Given that mangrove conversion is counteracted, extensive polyculture practices may also prove more viable in times of decreasing resources availability, and if policies are developed that favour resource efficient polyculture, and local small-scale and re-source poor farmers, instead of the global North.

  • 8.
    Bergsten, Zara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Bättre framtidsutsikter? Blandade bostadsområden och grannskapseffekter: En analys av visioner och effekter av blandat boende2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally, the effect of social composition in urban neighbourhoods on individuals’ life opportunities has been given increased attention both by researchers and policymakers. Socially mixed neighbourhoods have been seen by policymakers as a measure to create better prerequisites for social upward movement and increased social integration. The international debate on neighbourhood effects has mainly focused on the impact of concentrated poverty, but there is a growing body of literature that has also addressed the question of social mix policies. However, in the Swedish context the research on social mix policies and neighbourhood effects are still quiet limited. Hence, there is a call for research on the effects of the Swedish social mix policy.

    The purpose of the present thesis was to analyse the policy aim and the implementation of such policy, and to analyse the effects of socially and physically mixed environments. Can socially and physically mixed environments create better opportunities for youth and young adults? To analyse the effects of the neighbourhood environment on individuals’ socioeconomic careers, advanced multilevel analysis methods has been used. These methods offer advantages for analysing neighbourhood effects, which the ordinary regression model can’t provide, as it can separate effects belonging to different contexts.

    The internationally research on social mix policy has shown mixed results. For this reason there has been widespread debate among researchers on the effects of socially mixed environments. This thesis shows that although the effects are limited, the neighbourhood environments have a significant effect on individuals’ future prospects. Individuals who have spent their childhood in socially and physically mixed environments, in general, perform better in school, have a greater probability of enrol in higher education, a lower probability of being unemployed and better income development than individuals who have been brought up in resource-poor areas. The study also shows that the neighbourhood environments as well as mixed neighbourhoods have differential effects for different groups.

  • 9.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Arbetskraftens rörlighet och klusterdynamik.: En studie av IT- och telekomklustren i Kista och Mjärdevi2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Labour mobility can in theory be an efficient channel for knowledge transfer between cluster firms, thus contributing to growth and competitiveness. In the thesis labour mobility in two Swedish ICT clusters is studied. The purpose of the thesis is to develop an understanding of processes of labour mobility in clusters and to investigate whether mobility can be regarded as a cluster advantage. Both interview data and extensive registry data are used in order to analyse processes of mobility at three levels: individual, firm and cluster level.

    The results show that labour mobility can to some extent be considered a cluster advantage for Swedish ICT firms, since cluster firms are likely to experience a higher level of labour mobility. It is also shown how mobility to and from the clusters contributes to the upgrading of formal competencies within cluster firms. However, the firms themselves are shown to rather focus on staff retention than turnover.

    To some degree, labour mobility in the Swedish clusters in focus is presumably constrained by the formal institutional framework, as well as by informal rules and agreements between cluster firms. It is argued nonetheless that the sheer potential for mobility and the viability of informal hiring practices in clusters may be viewed as cluster advantages, besides the actual extent of labour mobility.

  • 10.
    Bråmå, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Studies in the Dynamics of Residential Segregation2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In four scientific papers, this thesis investigates the processes, in terms of movements of individuals, that have produced, reproduced and transformed patterns of residential segregation in Swedish cities between 1990 and 2000.

    Paper 1 examines processes of immigrant concentration, and the role of the Swedish majority population in these processes. Neighbourhood transition and mobility are described and analysed for a selection of residential areas that have experienced increased immigrant concentration. The results show that low in-migration rate among Swedes, rather than high out-migration rate, has been the main driving force behind the production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas.

    Paper 2 investigates the hypothesis that distressed neighbourhoods retain their character of distress through selective migration. The socio-economic situations of in-migrants, out-migrants and stayers in the distressed neighbourhoods of Stockholm are analysed and compared, and the results show the hypothesis to be confirmed. The people who move in are more likely to be unemployed and dependent on social benefits, and have on average lower incomes than those who move out and those who remain in the neighbourhoods.

    Paper 3 further investigates the selective character of the out-migration from distressed neighbourhoods. One important conclusion is that the out-migration flow from the distressed residential areas is socio-economically and ethnically selective. When demographic and socio-economic differences are controlled for, the likelihood of leaving the distressed neighbourhoods is much lower for an immigrant than for a Swedish-born person.

    Paper 4 examines the migration flows of a whole city, Göteborg. The paper deals with some of the most common questions within segregation research; the degree of spatial concentration of different ethnic groups, processes of concentration and dispersal, the role of the minority enclaves as ports of entry to the local housing market, and how this differs between ethnic groups.

    List of papers
    1. "White flight?": The production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas in Swedish cities, 1990 – 2000
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"White flight?": The production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas in Swedish cities, 1990 – 2000
    2006 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1127-1146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates whether processes similar to 'White flight' and 'White avoidance', known from American research on residential segregation, have played a role in the increased concentration of immigrants that has affected many residential areas in Swedish cities during the 1990s. By means of a comprehensive and unique dataset, processes of neighbourhood transition and mobility are described and analysed for a selection of residential areas that have experienced increased immigrant concentration during the 1990s. The results show that 'Swedish avoidance', i.e. low in-migration rates among Swedes, rather than 'Swedish flight', i.e. high out-migration rates, has been the main driving-force behind the production and reproduction of immigrant concentration areas.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94007 (URN)10.1080/00420980500406736 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-02-20 Created: 2006-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Selective Migration in Swedish Distressed Neighbourhoods: Can Area-based Urban Policies Counteract Segregation Processes?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selective Migration in Swedish Distressed Neighbourhoods: Can Area-based Urban Policies Counteract Segregation Processes?
    2004 (English)In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 517-539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94008 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-02-20 Created: 2006-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Who leaves Sweden’s large housing estates?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who leaves Sweden’s large housing estates?
    2005 (English)In: Restructuring large housing estates in Europe, 2005, p. 169-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94009 (URN)1 86134 775 8 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2006-02-20 Created: 2006-02-20 Last updated: 2016-04-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Dynamics of ethnic residential segregation in Göteborg, Sweden, 1995 – 2000
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of ethnic residential segregation in Göteborg, Sweden, 1995 – 2000
    2008 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 101-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Most explanatory frameworks within segregation research interpret patterns of ethnic residential segregation as the result of how members of different ethnic groups have moved (or not moved) within the city and to the city from the surrounding world. Yet, few attempts have been made to proceed beyond relatively static accounts based on descriptions and analysis of patterns of segregation, to address more directly the dynamics behind the patterns. In this article, a longitudinal, individual-based data-set is used in order to analyse the dynamics, in terms of migration and natural population change, that have reproduced and transformed patterns of segregation in Göteborg (Gothenburg), Sweden, between 1995 and 2000. The analysis deals with questions concerning changes in the degree of concentration and dispersal of different minority groups, and the role of the minority enclaves as ports of entry to the local housing market for different groups. The findings have relevance for wider theoretical issues related to the interpretation and explanation of ethnic residential segregation.

    Keywords
    Ethnic residential segregation, Migration, Minority enclaves, Mobility, Segregation processes, Sweden
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94010 (URN)10.1002/psp.479 (DOI)000254664900003 ()
    Available from: 2006-02-20 Created: 2006-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Bugge, Markus M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Creative Distraction: The Digital Transformation of the Advertising Industry2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is primarily based on a case study on how the Internet affects the advertising industry in Oslo, Norway, and on how the digitization of advertising adds to our understanding of the geography of innovation and urban and regional development. The study argues that the Internet fundamentally changes and challenges the advertising industry, and that advertising merges into market communication and even user experience and product development. The interactive nature of the Internet and its parallel social and commercial worlds contribute to transcend the role of a traditional medium and to coalescence between production and consumption. Despite the fact that those involved in online and traditional advertising are located close to each other in Oslo, the extent of collective learning, knowledge externalities and innovation has been scarce. The study shows that the creative destruction of this industrial sector is ignited by actors outside the traditional advertising industry. Due to path dependency along one-way mass communication media incumbents within the advertising industry have left room for new actors, such as web agencies and technology consultants, to explore and take market share in online market communication services. The reconfiguration of market communication is regarded as the result of an industry mutation across advertising and ICT, and creates a need for bridging skills and competencies across creative, strategic and interactive domains. The implications of such an industry mutation across diverse sectors are used to discuss the evolutionary potential of the related variety perspective. The study argues that localized industrial change may be conceptualised in terms of a cyclical relationship between externalities from localisation economies and urbanisation economies respectively. The implications of the findings from the case study are in this way used to discuss more general drivers of urban and regional development.

    List of papers
    1. Lack of collective learning in online advertising in Oslo, Norway
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of collective learning in online advertising in Oslo, Norway
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The advertising industry is often seen as adaptable and flexible, and its work organisation and diverse project ecologies are assumed to nurture creativity, learning and innovation. The advertising industry in Oslo is currently going through a restructuring process of adapting to the Internet as an emerging media channel for marketing, but struggles to benefit from collective learning. The established advertising agencies have been reluctant regarding the new opportunities in Internet-based advertising, which has allowed for a set of smaller and specialized web agencies to emerge, and who now possess the best skills within interactive advertising. The paper argues that there are two parallel epistemic communities in the localized advertising industry. It is shown that the advertising industry seems to have been caught in a path dependent technological trajectory, and that in order for collective learning to unfold geographical proximity needs to be supplemented by cultural and epistemic proximity and compatibility.

    Keywords
    advertising, collective learning, Internet, knowledge, epistemic communities, path dependency
    National Category
    Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109860 (URN)
    Projects
    Creativity and Innovation in the Cultural Industries
    Available from: 2009-10-28 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2012-01-03Bibliographically approved
    2. Jacobian Cluster Mutation: From Advertising to Internet-based market communication
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jacobian Cluster Mutation: From Advertising to Internet-based market communication
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The advertising industry is currently undergoing a restructuring process, where traditional media like TV and print are being complemented and replaced by interactive advertising and market communication on the Internet. The paper discusses how this transformation process affects the structure and organisation of services within Internet-based market communication. Based on interviews with 50 respondents from advertising and beyond the paper argues that the multiple and interactive nature of the Internet medium represent opportunities and challenges for the advertising agencies that transcend their traditional role as developers of creative ideas and campaigns. It is argued that Internet-based market communication demands a convergence of creative, strategic and technical services which represents a new production and market communication space in which the end consumer plays a lead role. The paper suggests that technology driven transformation processes in the industrial agglomerations of advertising and ICT in Oslo can be viewed as an industrial mutation.

    Keywords
    cluster mutation, Oslo, interviews and employment statistics, advertising, Internet, diversity
    National Category
    Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109861 (URN)
    Projects
    Creativity and Innovation in the Cultural Industries
    Available from: 2009-10-28 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2012-01-03Bibliographically approved
    3. How industry mutations redefine related variety:  The case of Internet-based advertising
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How industry mutations redefine related variety:  The case of Internet-based advertising
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the distinction of the notion of diversity into related and unrelated, the related variety approach represents an interesting attempt to improve our understanding of industrial dynamics and economic growth. However, using the insights from a case study on Internet based market communication this study seeks to problematize how the related variety approach so far may be read as a somewhat static approach. Through a sample of businesses that offer services within Internet-based market communication, the study uncovers the range of actors who are de facto related to each other within these economic activities. This simple exercise reveals that actors who are de facto related would have been categorised as unrelated in the related variety approach. These actors used to be unrelated, but due to convergence of existing and new technologies they have become related. In this way the paper not only aims to document how this particular industrial field is developing, it also suggests that the related variety approach does not take into account how changing technological conditions continuously alter the composition of related and unrelated actors in the economy. The related variety approach may thus still have a potential to improve its ability to reflect actual relations among industrial actors in its analytical apparatus. The paper suggests alternative indicators that to a larger extent may be tackling how technological change constantly alters the degree of relatedness between various actors.

    Keywords
    related variety, advertising, new media, ICT, economic geography
    National Category
    Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109862 (URN)
    Projects
    Creativity and Innovation in the Cultural Industries
    Available from: 2009-10-28 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2012-01-03Bibliographically approved
    4. One Size Fits All?: Applying the Creative Class thesis onto a Nordic Context
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>One Size Fits All?: Applying the Creative Class thesis onto a Nordic Context
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The creative class thesis put forward by Florida (2002a) has in recent years been subject to vivid debate and criticism. This article applies the creative class thesis onto a Nordic context in order to examine whether Florida’s theory proves fruitful in a context different from the US. Based on qualitative data, the paper analyses the role of people climate and business climate for the location of the creative class and firms in three different kinds of regions in four Nordic countries. The analyses demonstrate that the people climate tends to be of secondary importance to the business climate in explaining the location of the Nordic creative class. This should be seen as a result of the urban hierarchy within the Nordic countries as well as a strong welfare policy, which ensures an equal distribution of public provision and supports dual career households. Together these factors diminish the role of people climate for location choices. The study also finds that the notion of people climate has different meanings in various places, and what attracts or repels the creative class depends on the life phases of the members of the creative class. The study raises concerns about the potential for applying the creative class approach beyond large city regions which limits its usability in regional planning.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109863 (URN)
    Projects
    Technology, Talent and Tolerance in European Cities
    Available from: 2009-10-28 Created: 2009-10-28 Last updated: 2012-01-03Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Dawidson, Karin E. K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Property fragmentation: Redistribution of land and housing during the Romanian democratisation process2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of democratisation in the early 1990s, the governments in Central and East Europe (CEE) had to decide how to deal with property that had been confiscated under state socialism. Nationalised housing and collectivised land were to a varying extent returned to former owners and their heirs by means of restitution, as well as being distributed to other citizens who were in possession of the users’ rights to such properties.

    This thesis examines the spatial impacts, in terms of ownership patterns, of the way the redistribution of nationalised housing and collectivised land has been dealt with politically and at the local level in post-socialist Romania. It also locates the Romanian property reforms in relation to those of the rest of CEE. The impact of political directives on the property redistribution is analysed in relation to both structural influences, such as democratisation and antecedent property regimes, and implementation patterns in varied place-contexts. The thesis demonstrates that restitution was stifled due to disagreements between leftist and rightist political blocs, with the latter arguing for restitution whilst their opponents wrote the first restitution laws. A re-privatisation law allowed for the public sale of nationalised housing to tenants and thereby blocked the implementation of a restitution law, thus constituting a dilemma for constitutional democracy. In liberal place-contexts in West Romania, these obstacles to housing restitution were in part avoided. By contrast, land restitution was most widespread in the east, a stronghold of the left. This was because the legislation gives priority to restitution in areas of this kind, where smaller land-holdings dominated prior to 1945. The left-wing government pursued an electoral strategy of distributing small properties to a large number of citizens, and to current users in particular. This resulted in a fragmentation of historical property.

    List of papers
    1. Redistribution of land in post-communist Romania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Redistribution of land in post-communist Romania
    2005 (English)In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 618-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A geographer discusses changes in the ownership of state and collectivized rural land in post-communist Romania. In an analysis based on historical and recent ownership data as well as on the author's interviews with 205 landholders from East and West Romania, local officials, as well as politicians, the study examines how the country's rural land has been redistributed after 1989. The combination of restitution and distribution is singled out as the unique feature of the Romanian land reform that sets it apart from the less equitable procedures adopted by other post-communist countries. Similarly different, as noted in the paper, is the high share of Romania's agricultural sector in the country's labor force.

    Keywords
    agriculture, land redistribution, Romania, privatization, restitution, Timisoara, Iasi
    National Category
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92327 (URN)10.2747/1538-7216.46.8.618 (DOI)000240212000004 ()
    Available from: 2004-11-03 Created: 2004-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Redistributing nationalized housing: Impacts on property patterns in Timişoara, Romania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Redistributing nationalized housing: Impacts on property patterns in Timişoara, Romania
    2004 (English)In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 134-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish geographer maps different types of re-privatization and their effects on ethnic and socio-economic property patterns in Timişoara, a relatively large urban center (ca. 334,000 inhabitants) in western Romania in which pre-socialist ownership was predominantly multi-ethnic. The study is based on an extensive survey conducted in 2003 covering 524 blocks of apartments that were nationalized during the socialist period, with one apartment in each block being studied in detail. The article focuses special attention on the practice of the restitution of nationalized housing to former owners, in an analysis based on interviews with the local and regional officials in Timişoara.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92328 (URN)10.2747/1538-7216.45.2.134 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-11-03 Created: 2004-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Property transformation in post-socialist space and place: The case of nationalised housing in Romania
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Property transformation in post-socialist space and place: The case of nationalised housing in Romania
    In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92329 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-11-03 Created: 2004-11-03Bibliographically approved
    4. Conflicts of interest in the restitution and privatisation of housing since the fall of socialism: The case of central Timişoara City - a problem of democracy?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conflicts of interest in the restitution and privatisation of housing since the fall of socialism: The case of central Timişoara City - a problem of democracy?
    2004 (English)In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 119-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The return of confiscated property to former owners has been stifled in Romania due to disagreements between leftist and rightist political blocs, with the latter arguing for restitution whilst the former, although arguing against restitution, wrote the r

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92330 (URN)10.1080/0966813032000161464 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-11-03 Created: 2004-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Fridholm, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Working Together: Exploring Relational Tensions in Swedish Academia2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the basic social conditions for high-quality university research, and focuses on research in science and technology in Sweden. Swedish research policy has adopted more of a market perspective on academic research and its role in society. This has meant the promotion of competition between researchers, increased focus on efficiency at universities, and attempts to make academia harmonize more with industry and other actors. How do such policies affect the variety of perspectives within the academic system? How do they affect the positions and identities of individual academics? These issues are discussed through the concept of "relational tensions". Relational tensions refer to social strains arising when interacting actors have different perspectives. Relational tensions can stimulate creativity, but may also cause unproductive conflicts. The discussion is underpinned by interviews with university researchers and a case study of Uppsala BIO-X, a program to commercialize university research in biotechnology. Typical cases of relational tensions are identified. These concern both interpersonal relations and differences between organized science and industry. A notable observation concerns potential frustration of individual academics, as competition and efficiency tends to make their positions and identities more contested. Researchers cope with relational tensions in three identified ways: socialization, seclusion, and lateral authority. Socialization is natural and often necessary, but reduces the variety of perspectives. Seclusion serves to retain variety and independence, but reduces interaction with others. Lateral authority is to formally or informally lend a researcher more authority, which improves the chance of maintaining a variety of perspectives without reducing interaction. The sustained usefulness of academic research arguably depends on its ability to foster and communicate a variety of perspectives. Hence, (i) promoting lateral authority seems fruitful within academia and in relations between academia and industry, and (ii) encouraging competition and efficiency may to some extent be counterproductive.

  • 14.
    Gentile, Michael
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Studies in the Transformation of Post-Soviet Cities: Case Studies from Kazakhstan2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the demise of central planning, post-Soviet cities have found themselves operating in a radically different economic climate. Contrary to the situation during the Soviet époque, market relations and the urban economy's adjustment thereto constitute the reality which urbanites face in their daily lives. For the vast majority, this reality has been harsh. Even so, market agency in post-Soviet cities is circumscribed by a physical infrastructure composed to foster its rejection, leading to an inevitable tension between Soviet legacy and the reality of the market economy. An overarching task of this dissertation is to contribute to a greater understanding of the new urban form which is emerging out of this tension. For this purpose, eight papers, using case studies from urban Kazakhstan, are brought together in order to shed light on recent urban developments in the former Soviet Union.Two broad themes are subject to particular attention: urbanisation and regional migration processes, and urban socio-spatial differentiation. Urbanisation is studied through the comparative analysis of census data from 1989 and 1999, from which a "closed city effect" pattern emerges. Sovietand post-Soviet era urban-bounf migrant characteristics are compared using survey data (N=3,136) collected by the author, demonstrating the existence of a significant ethnic transition within the migrant flow. Socio-spatial differentiation patterns are mapped and analysed for three Kazakh military-industrial case study cities (Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk), revealing significant spatial disparities which are principally explainable in light of the workings of the Soviet economy, and its built-in priority system. Market forces tend to accentuate them.

    List of papers
    1. Delayed Underurbanization and the Closed City Effect: the Case of Ust'-Kamenogorsk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delayed Underurbanization and the Closed City Effect: the Case of Ust'-Kamenogorsk
    2003 In: Eurasian Geography and Economics, ISSN 1538-7216, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 144-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91925 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Residential Segregation in a Medium-Sized Post-Soviet City: the Case of Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residential Segregation in a Medium-Sized Post-Soviet City: the Case of Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    2003 In: Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 589-605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91926 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Former Closed Cities and Urbanisation in the FSU: an Exploration in Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Former Closed Cities and Urbanisation in the FSU: an Exploration in Kazakhstan
    2004 (English)In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 263-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91927 (URN)10.1080/0966813042000190533 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Divided Post-Soviet Small Cities? Residential Segregation in Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk, Kazakhstan: Residential Segregation in Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk, Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Divided Post-Soviet Small Cities? Residential Segregation in Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk, Kazakhstan: Residential Segregation in Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk, Kazakhstan
    2004 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 117-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper maps and analyses ethnic and socio-economic residential segregation in two small post-Soviet mining and enrichment cities in Eastern Kazakhstan, Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk. The study is based on data collected by the author in collaboration with the Eastern Kazakhstan oblast' statistical authority in an extensive questionnaire survey carried out during January 2001. The paper investigates the linkages between the physical spatial structure of small post-Soviet cities and the socio-spatial landscape that has unfolded in their context, and attempts to identify the principal factors that underlie the observed segregation patterns.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91928 (URN)10.1111/j.0435-3684.2004.00157.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Segregation by Socio-Economic Status and Housing Quality in a Post-Soviet City: Evidence from Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Segregation by Socio-Economic Status and Housing Quality in a Post-Soviet City: Evidence from Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91929 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11Bibliographically approved
    6. Migration in Soviet and Post-Soviet Kazakhstan: with Evidence from the Cities of Eastern Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migration in Soviet and Post-Soviet Kazakhstan: with Evidence from the Cities of Eastern Kazakhstan
    Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91930 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11Bibliographically approved
    7. Urban Residential Preferences and Satisfaction in the Former Soviet Union: Results from a Survey in Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Residential Preferences and Satisfaction in the Former Soviet Union: Results from a Survey in Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
    2005 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 296-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and analyses the geography and structure of the neighborhoodresidential preferences and residential satisfaction of the inhabitants of the medium-sized,post-Soviet city of Ust’-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan (population ca. 300,000). It is based on aquestionnaire survey (N = 1516 + 320) conducted by the author in cooperation with the statisticalauthority of the Eastern Kazakhstan oblast’. At the aggregate level, the evidence that is presentedsuggests distinct preference patterns, and that the main focus of preference is on the city center.The geography of residential satisfaction is different. Differences in satisfaction have been foundbetween residents of housing built by former high-priority enterprises and those occupying mostof the remainder of the housing stock. These differences underscore the pervasive and continuingimportance of the legacy of Soviet economic and territorial planning, and the still ratherlimited changes that the marketization of the economy has been able to produce.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91931 (URN)10.2747/0272-3638.26.4.296 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    8. Urban Residential Preferences, Residential Satisfaction and Housing Quality in Two Small Cities in Kazakhstan: Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Residential Preferences, Residential Satisfaction and Housing Quality in Two Small Cities in Kazakhstan: Leninogorsk and Zyryanovsk
    2004 (English)In: Featuring the Quality of Urban Life in Contemporary Cities of Eastern and Western Europe / [ed] Sagan, I. and Czepczinski, M., Gdańsk: Bogucki Wydawnictwo Naukowe , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Gdańsk: Bogucki Wydawnictwo Naukowe, 2004
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91932 (URN)978-83-920835-0-4 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2004-05-11 Created: 2004-05-11 Last updated: 2013-05-29Bibliographically approved
  • 15.
    Grubbström, Ann
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sillar och mullvadar: Jordägande och etnicitet i Estlands svenskbygder 1816-19392003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation focuses on the Swedish minority that settled in Estonia in early medieval times. It illustrates the importance of linking the survival of an ethnic group with the issue of land ownership. The ethnic composition and settlement patterns of Swedes and Estonians are analysed from a long-term perspective. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the process of land purchase, which took place primarily at the end of the 19th century, and the land reform of 1919. The study is based on both archival sources and interview material. This has allowed for ethnic status, as recorded in various written documents, to be related to the population’s own views on ethnic identity.

    Research shows that the major in-migration of Estonians to the previously Swedish areas took place in connection with the transition from corvée duties to wage labour during the second half of the 19th century. Estonians generally lived close to the estates or as cottagers in the villages whereas the majority of the Swedish inhabitants were tenants. Land purchases led to an increase in the number of Estonian farm heads in a majority of the villages. Some of the Estonian families that bought farms were newcomers. Landless Estonian estate workers and cottagers were also given the opportunity to buy farms on the estates where they lived. Another factor that serves to explain the numerous Estonian land purchases is that a number of Swedes switched ethnic status, especially in connection with marriage.

    The land reform of 1919 did not generally lead to any more substantial in-migration of Estonians into the Swedish villages. It appears that the best opportunities for the retention of Swedish ethnicity were found in villages where few Estonians had purchased farms and where there was thus a high degree of continuity within the Swedish population. This study discusses the relations between Swedes and Estonians, or “herrings” and “moles” as they called each other in school. It analyses the ways in which the Swedish population group was influenced by the increasing size of the Estonian population and argues that Swedes who switched ethnic status and language could nonetheless retain a strong sense of their Swedish identity.

  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Martin E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    On Specifying and Estimating Economic Growth as a Spatial Process: Convergence, Inequality, and Migration2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis includes three self-contained papers. The first paper considers the effect of geographically dependent observations on cross-sectional growth convergence and proposes a way of decomposing the level of technology taking into account geographical variation in growth rates. It adopts spatial parametric methods; shows how and why a correlated errors approach may be implemented; and deals with both spatial heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. In the context of a cross-sectional test of convergence, geographical models and estimation procedures are then applied to data on per capita income amongst US states. The implication of a spatial approach compared to a non-spatial one in terms of bias and efficiency are discussed.

    The second paper addresses the question of whether or not there are any systematic geographical patterns in the distribution of income, and if so, how to deal with them. A spatial version of the well-known sigma convergence is derived. It is shown that the effects of geographical dependence on the evolution of inequality do not change the time-path configuration, but it can generate scale effects and possibly also mirror effects. Positive spatial dependence means that regions will form clusters of high and low income levels which become increasingly more differentiated. Statistical versions of the model are defined and procedures for fitting the models are described using spatial statistical methods. This is then demonstrated on per capita income amongst states in the U.S. 1940-1990.

    The third, and final, paper explores and discusses some aspects of migration in regard to regional economic growth convergence. Observed migration is considered to be the outcome of successful matching in the labour market. Of crucial importance to the matching processes is the speed of filling vacancies, which in turn depend on labour market conditions. Adjustment costs due to spatial mismatch in the labour market are suggested to affect the economic growth process. The relevance of such an approach in a setting of growth convergence is empirically investigated using aggregated data for the U.S. states. In order to capture the spatial aspects of the data, estimation is undertaken by simultaneously specified spatial Gaussian regression models.

  • 17.
    Hauge, Atle
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Dedicated Followers of Fashion: An Economic Geographic Analysis of the Swedish Fashion Industry2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion, as in the rest of the economy, the globalisation of taste, power and production now plays a major role. The industry is dominated by fashion capitals like Paris, London or New York, populated by star designers like Tom Ford, Karl Lagerfeld or Jean-Paul Gaultier and controlled through MNC giants like Prada, Gucci, DKNY and Dior, who together influence consumer preferences on a global scale. However, there are numerous smaller actors that compete successfully in the fashion industry. Sweden is one such example, where fashion is a growing.

    In this thesis, there is a focus on group of small and medium sized Swedish fashion firms with a brand focused business strategy. Their products are design intensive, but their main competitive advantage rests on the brand and brand management. This group of firms are proficient at ‘putting fashion into clothes’ (Weller 2004). In other words, their main competitive advantage rests neither on price, nor on the most experimental design. More exactly, they produce clothes for a fashion conscious but not too adventurous consumer group. In the thesis it is argued that they are better described as trend forerunners than as trend setters. The subject of this thesis is this group of firms within the Swedish fashion industry and the aim is to improve understanding of their innovation processes, competitiveness, and the systemic character of the business they are a part of.

    As with most other fashion firms in high cost countries, Swedish companies has outsourced the garment production. They secure their competitive edge through high value added activities like design, marketing and retail. This points to the fact that fashion has both material and immaterial dimensions: it relates to clothing, design, textile and quality, but also to consumers’ subjective feelings and attitudes towards the clothes and their brands. This is a study of the interface between these dimensions, with a focal point on the production of immaterial and symbolic value. The systemic nature of fashion can hardly be overestimated. This goes for both the practical part of clothes production, but also for the production of a belief system created not only by fashion producers but by a whole set of institutional actors. This thesis has an analysis of fashion firms’ relations to business partners, competitors, media, and consumers. It is argued that the nature of these relations is critical for competition and success.

    The thesis is a collection of papers, which illuminates different parts of innovation, competition and business strategies in the fashion industry. The papers cover the central activity areas for fashion firms: how branding is affecting industrial structure and innovation, how symbolic is value created, and how ‘cool’ is used as a strategic resource.

    List of papers
    1. A seamless industry?: Swedish fashion as an industrial system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A seamless industry?: Swedish fashion as an industrial system