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  • 1.
    Angéus Kuoljok, Susanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Nominalavledningar på ahka i lulesamiskan1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Tünde
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Mellan två stolar: Författarskap i Sverige med ungerskspråkig bakgrund 1945–20152017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to map and analyse literature written by authors with a Hungarian-language background who moved to Sweden between 1945 and 2015, and who have published literary works in book format. From the perspective of the sociology of literature, this thesis focuses on publishing channels and possibilities, the authors’ and their works places in the literary value system and feed-back in the form of reviews, but also choice of language, theme, and genre. The approach of the research for this thesis is new in Hungarian and Swedish literary studies, as the literary works are analysed irrespective of the language in which they are written. The research corpus consists of both Hungarian and Swedish literary works and one book in English.

    The second chapter presents the research that Hungarian researchers have conducted on Hungarian migration literature and offers an overview of the questions and results arising from this research.

    The authors with a Hungarian-language background in Sweden were divided into four groups, based on the time of their migration to Sweden. Four chapters, which comprise the analytic part of the thesis, present and analyse the author groups and their literary activities regarding language, purpose of any code-switching, chosen theme, and genre. The first group consists of authors who migrated to Sweden during the decade after the Second World War (1945–1955). The second group came between 1956 and 1958 in the aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. The third group consists of Hungarians who moved to Sweden during the communist era, between 1959 and 1989. Finally, the fourth group came after the fall of communism (1990–2015). As many as half of the authors chose either Hungarian or Swedish as their language and there are surprisingly few authors working in both languages. The publishing channels depend on the literary works language and theme, and only half of the books have been published at established publishers.

    The literary works of these authors are categorized as Swedish-Hungarian migration literature. Literary history works until now have neglected these type of literatures, but it is imperative that the study of literature finds a way to acknowledge, include, position, and group them.

  • 3.
    Dugántsy, Mária
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Erzä-mordwinische rituelle Klagegesänge1991Book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fahlström, Susanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Form and philosophy in Sándor Weöres' poetry1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation, by presenting comprehensive analyses of six poems by the Hungarian poet Sándor Weöres, investigates the poetical forms and the poetical philosophies in these texts. The poems represent specific philosophic spheres of Weöres' poetry. The analyses emerge from the formal elements, and aim to shed light upon the structural coherences between the texts and their philosophical contexts. This method of analysis also complies with Weöres' views on the aesthetics of poetics and his method of writing, where form and structure always played an outstandingly important role. The complex methods used in the analyses are very much influenced by the views and methods of a text stylistics that looks at the literary work as a global entity. Taken together, these analyses illustrate the focal points of a remarkable poetical form and a most profound philosophical context in the poems of an outstanding Hungarian poet.

  • 5.
    Gröndahl, Satu M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Den ofullkomliga traditionen: bilden av Ingermanlands kvinnliga runotradition1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hesselbäck, André
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Tatar and Chuvash code-copies in Mari2005Book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Huss, Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Erste Hilfe für eine bedrohte Sprache: Wiederbelebungsmaßnahmen bei den norwegischen Lulesamen1996In: Lapponica et Uralica: 100 Jahre finnisch-ugrischer Unterricht an der Universität Uppsala : Vorträge am Jubiläumssymposium 20.-23. April 1994 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 1996, p. 71-78Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Huss, Leena Marjatta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Reversing language shift in the far North: linguistic revitalization in Northern Scandinavia and Finland1999Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past few decades, an ethnic revival movement covering a wide range of language revitalization efforts has spread across the northern parts of Scandinavia and Finland. This movement involves minority groups as different as the various Sami popul

  • 9.
    Huss, Leena Marjatta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Simultan tvåspråkighet i svensk-finsk kontex1991Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jansson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Sami language at home and at school: a fieldwork perspective2005Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    From Interaction to Grammar: Estonian Finite Verb Forms in Conversation2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to the research tradition of interactional linguistics. It demonstrates how interactional patterns and sequences of actions are, or emerge as, part of the syntagmatic structure of a language, and why the transitions from interaction to grammar as well as from content to function items, are to be regarded as gradual and continuous. Grammar may arise from discourse through frequent implementation of linguistic items in specific social actions that are carried out in certain sequential positions in conversation. The developments proposed for the items in this study, bear numerous similarities to the processes of grammaticalization.

    The data consists of 319 authentic phone calls, recorded in Estonia in 1997/98. All in all, more than 10 hours of talk has been examined, about two thirds of which consist of everyday calls between family members and friends. The rest are telemarketing calls from a newspaper publishing office.

    This is a predominantly qualitative study of 11 finite verb forms in Estonian that display features of development into pragmatic particles or adverbs. It is argued that in order to adequately account for how finite verb forms such as kuule ‘hear!’, ma ei tea ‘I don’t know’, tähendab ‘(it) means’, or oota ‘wait!’ come to be used as particles, it is necessary to look closely at what kinds of actions they frequently implement in the everyday life of the speakers. It is shown, for example, that the jussive form olgu ‘be’ implements conversational closings, and that tead ‘you know’ projects news deliveries and enhances interpersonal involvement. It is also shown that some of the items, such as ütleme ‘let’s say’ rather belong to the formal registers. Methodologically, the study applies conversation analysis with its detailed examination of pieces of recordings and respect to details contingent on each individual action sequence. The idea of gradual semantic change has been borrowed from grammaticalization theory. In addition, the arguments are supported by counts from the current corpus.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Lapponica et Uralica: 100 Jahre finnisch-ugrischer Unterricht an der Universität Uppsala : Vorträge am Jubiläumssymposium 20.-23. April 19941996Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lehto, Manja Irmeli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Ingrian Finnish: dialect preservation and change1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 14. Metuzāle-Kangere, Baiba
    Inheriting the 1990s: The Baltic Countries2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is a result of a project at Södertörn University College 2002–2004, the culminationof which was an international symposium held in September 2004. The contents comprise13 articles treating the complex situation in which Estonians, Latvians and Lithuaniansfound themselves on regaining national independence in 1991. As specialists in various fieldsof academic research, the authors describe the Post-Soviet situation in the Baltic countriesfrom their different perspectives. The articles focus on questions related to the identity ofthe self, language and other issues in the context of the problems faced by society in general.

  • 15.
    Nemvalts, Peep
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Case marking of subject phrases in modern standard Estonian1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Pugh, Stefan M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Systems in contact, system in motion: the assimilation of Russian verbs in the Baltic Finnic languages of Russia1999Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Raag, Raimo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Karl Bernhard Wiklund und Estland1996In: Lapponica et Uralica: 100 Jahre finnisch-ugrischer Unterricht an der Universität Uppsala : Vorträge am Jubiläumssymposium 20.-23. April 1994 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 1996, p. 399-411Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Raag, Raimo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Regionalism in Language Policy: The Case of Võru2010In: Inheriting the 1990s: The Baltic Countries / [ed] Baiba Metuzāle-Kangere, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2010, p. 131-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Raag, Virve
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    The effects of planned change on Estonian morphology1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is a contribution to the fascinating and highly controversial issue of language planning, i.e. intentional human intervention in language change. Language planning, as any intentional alteration of language, is always interconnected with questions of natural development and change in language. In order to detect the outcome of the processes initiated in Estonian language planning during the last century, the adoption and use in modern standard Estonian of four grammatical features launched by Estonian language reformers in the 1910s have been compared to the use of corresponding means of expression in written Estonian prior to the introduction of the new features. It appears that the adoption of the new modes of expression was conditioned by whether or not they were accepted by language planners, and whether or not they also were included in prescriptive dictionaries and school grammars.

  • 20.
    Raag, Virve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    The Sovietization and de-Sovietization of Estonian.2010In: Inheriting the 1990s: The Baltic Countries / [ed] Baiba Metuzale-Kangere, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2010, p. 106-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Raag, Virve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    The Sovietization and de-Sovietization of Estonian.2010In: Inheriting the 1990s: The Baltic Countries / [ed] Baiba Metuzale-Kangere, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2010, p. 106-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    "Ungerska för rötternas skull": Språkval och identitet bland andragenerationens ungrare i Sverige och Finland.2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a comparative sociolinguistic study which describes and compares language choice among people with Hungarian background in Sweden and Finland and studies their views on the importance of the Hungarian language and Hungarian cultural heritage for identity. The future prospects of language maintenance and language shift and differences between the Swedish-Hungarians and the Finnish-Hungarians are discussed.

    A survey was completed among 50 Swedish-Hungarian informants and 38 Finnish-Hungarian informants during 2006. The survey was supplemented by in-depth interviews with 15 informants during 2007.

    The majority language, either Swedish or Finnish, is much more active in the second-generation Hungarians’ lives than Hungarian is. Hungarian is mostly used in the domain of family relations. The language choices made today are dependent on the informant’s situation during childhood, particularly the parents’ usage of the language and the ability to learn and use Hungarian, chiefly gained through contact with the parents’ mother country and other Hungarian speakers.

    For some informants, having Hungarian roots forms the sole foundation for belonging, while for others it is this heritage combined with the culture, the ability to use the language or specific character traits. The Hungarian background is most often seen as a treasure offering diversity in life. Finnish-Hungarians are generally more positive about their Hungarian background, have better competence in the language and a greater awareness of the culture than Swedish-Hungarians. The Hungarian language plays a central though often symbolic role.

    The most important conditions for minority language preservation are language competence together with the desire and opportunity to use it; whereof the largest deficit among second-generation Hungarians is knowledge of the Hungarian language. Only one-fourth of the informants have all of the conditions necessary to be able to maintain the language, which means that Hungarian is an endangered minority language in Sweden and Finland.

  • 23.
    Söder, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Walk this way: Verbs of motion in three Finno-Ugric languages2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The verbs of motion in North Khanty, North Saarni and Hungarian, three genetically related, but geographically, culturally and historically separated languages, are analysed from a synchronic and diachronic point of view. The study is based on material deriving from informants and written sources in each language. The synchronic analysis, where the verbs are studied and categorised according to their semantic features, shows that these languages have similarities concerning the qualities and numbers of categories but that the languages diverge as far as the number of verbs in the category containing modified manners of movement are concerned. The diachronic study shows that verbs having basic meaning are more often preserved than verbs having a more peripheral meaning. It is also shown that deixis is genetically bound and preserved even though the language concerned has gone through considerable cultural change.

  • 24.
    Söderman, Tiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Lexical characteristics of the Estonian north eastern coastal dialect1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 25. Tikka, Toivo
    Vepsän suffiksoituneet postpositiot: kieliopillisiin sijoihin liittyvä suffiksoituminen1992Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Tillinger, Gabor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Samiska ord för ord: Att mäta lexikalt avstånd mellan språk2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the classical methods of language and dialect classification are based on a diachronic analysis of phonological differences between the language varieties concerned. Because of this fact, such classifications are not always a reliable basis for describing the current distances between varieties, since diachronic differences and similarities do not automatically produce the same results as synchronic comparisons. Furthermore, phonological coincidences do not have the same relevance as lexical ones when it comes to the level of mutual understanding, which must be regarded as an important factor in describing current linguistic distances. As one of the most important aims of this thesis, therefore, a new method is presented for the classification of genetically related linguistic varieties, based on synchronic lexical comparisons. The ultimate purpose of this lexical method is not to supersede the phonological approach, but to complement it.

    The research corpus consists primarily of a certain number of the most frequent words of the varieties analysed . This basic vocabulary is assumed to most adequately represent the lexicon of a language or a dialect. As a contrast, Swadesh words (i.e. notions belonging to the historical basic vocabulary, which have been expressed by words in languages for thousands of years) are also analysed, representing a different kind of basic vocabulary. The main aim of the study is to apply the new method to some of the Saami languages, as their linguistic classification has always been problematic – linguists have classified them using similar methods, but with differing results. As a reference to the new findings concerning varieties of Saami, the method has been applied to other Finno-Ugric languages and also, to some extent, to the North Germanic and a number of Romance languages.

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