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  • 1.
    Almbladh, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    Sefer Emeq ha-Bakha: The vale of tears : with the chronicle of the anonymous Corrector  / Joseph ha-Kohen ; introd., critical ed.1981Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Almbladh, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Studies in the book of Jonah1986Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kingship in the Early Mesopotamian Onomasticon 2800–2200 BCE2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of Sumerian and Old Akkadian personal names from 3rd millennium BCE Meso-potamia are known and documented. The present study inspects names containing the royal appellatives, Sumerian lugal and Akkadian śarrum. The study aims at uncovering the rela-tionships between personal names and the development of early historical kingship and reli-gious thought in the area.

    An overview of Sumerian and Old Akkadian names and name-giving serves as a starting point for semantic investigations of lugal- and śarrum-names. Sumerian and Old Akkadian names are to a large extent meaningful, and the literal meaning can be used to arrive at an understanding of the symbolic value, which led to the coining of the name. Discussions rely on comparable passages of contemporary and later written traditions.

    To facilitate discussion and comparisons between the languages, names are divided into semantic groups based on characteristic traits found in contemporary royal inscriptions and religious texts. Parallel constructions are noted whenever such constructions are known. Names are assigned human or divine referents when possible. A look at political and religious developments puts the distribution of certain name types over time and space into perspective. Local and regional traditions and types are displayed and related either to royal ideological traits or to theological speculation. Besides locally significant gods, a few other deities can be identified as referents in names. A brief statistical overview of different archives shows that names featuring the figure of the lugal experience an increase in popularity at the expense of  other types.

    A system of annotation gives approximate numbers for bearers of names belonging to the types investigated. Lists of attestations, which document date and archival context, form the basis for discussions and conclusions and make the material available for inspection and further exploration.

  • 4.
    Avraham, Gidon
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    A bridge of words: A term list based on the study and classification of compounding operations in Avot Yeshurun's later poetry (1974-1992) concerning the notion of bayit (home/house)1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to establish, describe and present a term list; based upon word level operations of Avot Yeshurun, as used within the framework of a given literary context (metonymy) and adapted by the poet to a given language environment (poems in New Hebrew).

    Aided by terminological methods of description, a classification of the poet's working terminology is conducted, based upon linguistic and, thematic categories, composed in the light of concept-oriented literary criticism in Israel, the issue of transnationality and the meta-time approach typical of holocaust literature.

    Considering established patterns and normative requirements for word formation in NH (sections 2.4 - 2.7) and presenting compounds according to the international standards ISO 10241:1992(E) and ISO/TC 37, terms in the resulting term list help bring into focus the poet's operations in the micro perspective and elucidate the act of compounding in which lexical representations of underlying concepts are linked together or transposed, to form Avot Yeshurun's working terminology. Examples for the interaction and systematic correspondence between literary themes and linguistic categories in Yeshurun's compounding serve to elucidate the usability of the suggested contextualising and presentation method and to teach us more about the contribution of Avot Yeshurun to Israeli Hebrew.

  • 5.
    Coghill, Eleanor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Cambridge.
    The Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Telkepe2018In: Semitic Linguistics and Manuscripts: A Liber Discipulorum in Honour of Professor Geoffrey Khan / [ed] Nadia Vidro, Ronny Vollandt, Esther-Miriam Wagner, Judith Olszowy-Schlanger, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018, p. 234-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Davidovich, Tal
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Mystery of the House of Royal Women2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on one of the groups of royal women in the OT who were considered the spouses of the king: the group of the royal pilagshim, who had a kind of secondary status in the household.

    Having pilagshim was not a privilege reserved to the kings, but was also practiced by other leaders, like the forefathers and the judges. One may assume continuity in the existence of this phenomenon in Ancient Israel. It encompasses several hundreds of women.

    In this work we studied the narrator’s descriptions of a phenomenon through his story telling and not necessarily a certain reality.

    The aim of this study is to shed light on the secondary status of royal women, especially one of the groups to which they belonged, the group called “royal pilagshim”. Although this group occupied a somewhat secondary place in the hierarchy in the house of royal women, it constituted one of the big groups of royal women in the palace, if not the biggest one, and some of the women belonging to this group had great importance both to the life in the palace and to the political events in the different kingdoms. By examining the different functions of these women in the palaces as they are described in the OT, some aspects of the life of royal women, not only those belonging to this particular group and not only those of secondary status, are revealed, and the hierarchy of women in the royal house is emphasised. Furthermore, reasons why some men became king while others did not; emerge from the results of the discussion about these women’s children. Thus, we can better understand the powers that controlled the kingdoms described in the OT both in the darkness of the night and in broad daylight.

    In this work we further study the possibilities of the existence of a special position among royal pilagshim, the “chief of pilagshim”.

    Our main interest is not in a particular text of the OT as such but rather in the phenomenon of a certain status of royal women who appear in the OT. Therefore, using only one method is not sufficient to accomplish our mission. Instead, a few approaches in combination are needed. The following methods have been chosen in order to complete this study:

    Philological analysis: Linguistic approach; literary approach; narrative analysis; and intertextuality.

  • 7.
    Erbes, Johann E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    The Peshitta and the versions: A study of the Peshitta variants in Joshua 1-5 in relation to their equivalents in the ancient versions1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation focuses on the relationship between the Peshitta readings and their equivalent readings in the ancient versions. The purpose of this study is to discover the possible influences of the Masoretic Text on the one hand, and the versions, especially the Septuagint, on the other. The material is too scarce to attempt creating a stemma. Therefore, as a starting point, it was decided to look into the matter from a purely formalistic point of view. The sources used were the Masoretic Text, medieval Hebrew manuscripts, Targum Jonathan, the Septuagint, the Syro-Hexapla, Coptic, Ethiopic, and Latin. In contrast to other such ndeavors, all the variant material in the most recent text editions available was included. The Septuagint variant material has been regrouped according to suggestions by J. Wm. Wevers. The investigation limits itself to all actual variants found in chapters l-5 in my Joshua edition for the Leiden Peshitta.

    The methodology was to assess the relevance of each of the 459 readings and discuss their place among the versional readings. Each of these readings is quoted in context, additional Peshitta variant information given, grouped and organized in such a way as to allow the reader to arrive at alternative solutions. The variants are then discussed in regard to various possible explanations or alternatives of translation technique. The presentation attempts to satisfy the specialized as well as the general reader.

    The conclusions, within the framework of a limited text corpus, are tentatively as following: The Peshitta most often follows the Masoretic Text. At times, the Peshitta agrees with Septuagint readings which only can have originated in the Septuagint. The Targum does not seem to have influenced the Peshitta. There are indications of contacts between the Peshitta and the Ethiopic Bible, an area needing further study. The Vulgate gives but little insight beyond the other versional material presented. Early Coptic readings (early 4th century A.D.) contribute to the verification of the antiquity of later medieval Greek readings. For the purposes of the modern Bible translator, the Peshitta has little to offer apart from where it is unique, and there, other explanations for versional contacts can be given.

  • 8.
    Eskhult, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Some features in the Hebrew of Johan Kemper2007In: The professorship of Semitic languages at Uppsala University 400 years: jubilee volume from a symposium held at the University Hall, 21-23 September 2005 / [ed] Bo Isaksson, Mats Eskhult, Gail Ramsay, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2007, p. 103-113Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eskhult, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Studies in verbal aspect and narrative technique in biblical Hebrew prose1990Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Frennesson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    "In a common rejoicing": Liturgical communion with angels in Qumran1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation contains a study of the conception of "liturgical communion with angels"-its prevalence and import-as expressed in the Qumran texts. The writer views these texts as constituting the remains of a "sectarian library", the literary heritage of an exclusive and excluding community, whose self-image would have been characterised by its functioning like the Temple and in the constant presence of God's angels. Eighteen different text excerpts are focused on, liturgical as well as non-liturgical, all somehow attesting to variously expressed conceptions of "liturgical communion with angels". The majority of texts, however, only refer to or presuppose this kind of conception. They confirm that there is such a thing as communion with angels, but do not in fact "put it into practice" liturgically. It is theory rather than practice. The Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice, however, are understood to be a liturgical text cycle, the very performance of which might have been seen as joining together humans and angels in common worship. Lastly examined is 4Q491 11 I, a very enigmatic fragment containing the remarkable claims of someone already seated in heaven, possibly an early literary example of a tradition related to man's actual transformation; a priestly tradition, an "offshoot" of which would in due time imply "unio liturgica" in and through an elect emissary. Although the conception of "liturgical communion with angels" as expressed in the Qumran texts is obviously multi-faceted in terms of "time and space", the study, nevertheless, concludes that, at least primarily, it should be described as the idea of apresent and an earthly phenomenon, as a privilege and an experience which was available toall Qumranites, an idea featuring and marking the whole of the community.

  • 11. Hagelia, Hallvard
    The Tel Dan inscription: a critical investigation of recent research on its palaeography and philology2006Book (Other academic)
  • 12. Holst, Søren
    Verbs and war scroll: studies in the Hebrew verbal system and the Qumran war scroll2008Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Circumstantial qualifiers in Arabic: A comparative Semitic approach to some uses of adjuncts in Classical Arabic based on the story of Taʾabbaṭa Šarrā2007In: The professorship of Semitic languages at Uppsala University 400 years: jubilee volume from a symposium held at the University Hall, 21-23 September 2005 / [ed] Bo Isaksson, Mats Eskhult, Gail Ramsay, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2007, p. 145-162Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    Studies in the language of Qoheleth. With special emphasis on the verbal system1987Book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Isaksson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Eskhult, MatsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Ramsay, GailUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Professorship of Semitic Languages at Uppsala University 400 years: Jubilee Volume from a Symposium held at the University Hall, 21-23 September 20052007Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kechrida, Hadi M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    Kitāb al-Luma fi-n-Naḥw: manuel de grammaire arabe1976Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Arabic Dialect of Tillo in the Region of Siirt: (south-eastern Turkey)2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study places special emphasis on socio-linguistic and language-contact phenomena. It concerns, however, a relatively unfamiliar example of involuntary cultural assimilation and probable extinction, which is not without relevance to current politics among great powers. Chapter 4 treats parts of syntax that are not common in dialectal studies, for example foreground and background of the narrative discourse, topicality hierarchy etc. The Arabic dialect of Tillo, in the region of Siirt in south-eastern Turkey, is spoken by a small isolated group of Arabs living mainly among Kurds but also among Turks. The latter represent the state of Turkey in the form of civil servants, police officers, army officers and other authorities. The official language is Turkish which is also the only language taught in schools. All television and radio programs are broadcast in Turkish, just as all newspapers are published in that language. Since Kurds constitute the vast majority in the region, north Kurdish (Kurmandji) is needed for daily conversation. Arabic has thus come to a standstill stage of development and at the same time lost status for the benefit primarily of Turkish but also of Kurdish. The Arabs are leaving Tillo and immigrating to the big cities in the western parts of the country. This migration is occurring so rapidly that the Arabs of Tillo are distressed that soon no Arabs will remain in the village. In the big cities, for instance Istanbul, the Arabs avoid speaking Arabic in order not to attract attention; they are afraid of being classified as tarrōr “terrorists”. The consequence of this socio-linguistic situation is that Tillo Arabic goes on losing its importance and becoming kaba “vulgar”, and since its development has already been arrested it seems destined to die out. Turkish impact on Tillo Arabic is immense. In accordance with Turkish phonology, the voiced consonants are pronounced voiceless in final position and in contact position before voiceless consonants. An epenthetic or prosthetic vowel is used to avoid a two-consonant cluster. Turkish particles such as the superlative particle en and the adverb hem “also, too” are often used in everyday life. Constructions similar to Turkish ones, such as compound nouns or possessive compounds, are used. The lexicon includes many borrowings and second borrowings. The latter means that a word was first borrowed into Turkish and from Turkish back into Tillo Arabic.

  • 18.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Arabic Dialect of Tillo in the Region of Siirt (South-eastern Turkey): Textbook2016Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Lindquist, Torkel
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    A War of Words2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to come to an understanding of the meanings of words pertaining to acts of political violence in modern Arabic and Hebrew. The semantics of these terms will be established by comparison between the meaning in dictionaries of modern and classical Arabic and Hebrew, the meaning in the Koran and the Bible as well as the meaning we extract from the context in the newspapers where the terminology is found. Furthermore, the aim is to find indirect Arab and Israeli definitions of terrorism through the study of journalistic discourse describing different kinds of violence. As such it focuses on legal in contrast to illegal violence and on how Israelis and Arabs use this terminology in their propaganda against ‘the enemy’.

    A method is tested, where we measure the frequency of terms that we find in the press and that we placed under the four titles of ‘the perpetrator’, ‘the victim’, ‘the act’ and ‘the name of the enemy’. Our later conclusions are based on this frequency and the established meaning. This method may be one way to reduce the risks of bias in research of media.

    Finally, the study examines Arab and Israeli press reactions to the events of 11/9 2001 and the, still continuing, ‘War on Terrorism’.

  • 20.
    Månsson, Anette
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Passage to a new wor(l)d: Exile and restoration in Mahmoud Darwish's writings 1960-19952003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on developments of the exile motive in the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish’s writings 1960-1995. The sources consist primarily of Darwish’s diwans of poetry and articles published in literary magazines. The theme of exile in Darwish’s writings is placed in relation to literary developments of the 20th century, especially early Modernism. Special reference is made to the use of religious mythology. Founding myths of the Abrahamitic religions - creation, the death and resurrection of Christ and Muhammad’s hijra - are particularly important. The study shows how Darwish places poetry in a position similar to that of religion in traditional society. The theoretical framework is provided by models of the religious rites de passage, based primarily on Mircea Eliade’s theory, but also on theories dealing with psychological responses to exile. Based on the rite de passage-pattern, three main strategies of responding to exile are dealt with: separation, liminality and reintegration. The study shows a gradual development of these three strategies in Darwish’s works. In the 1960s, a pattern of separation, representing the exclusion of physical and symbolical exile, is predominant. In the 1970s, liminal patterns and a quest for reintegration become the dominant models. Until 1982, the rite of passage is nearly always aborted. Only later, with the use of mythological models for “a new beginning” constituting an eschatological rupture with the past, the reintegration of self, world and word becomes possible in Darwish’s poetry.

  • 21.
    Nordquist, Gullög C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Eastern Mediterranean during the Late Bronze Age2007In: The professorship of Semitic languages at Uppsala University 400 years: jubilee volume from a symposium held at the University Hall, 21-23 September 2005 / [ed] Bo Isaksson, Mats Eskhult & Gail Ramsay, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2007, p. 163-177Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ottosson Bitar, Astrid
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    “I Can Do Nothing against the Wish of the Pen”: Studies in the Short Stories of Widād Sakākīnī2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the short story writing of the Lebanese/Syrian writer Widād Sakākīnī (1913-1991). Its primary aim is to discover how she was able to establish herself as a respected writer while keeping her distinctive character as a woman writer within a literary tradition that was strongly defined by patriarchal values and contained many misogynic elements. An additional aim of the study is to present Widād Sakākīnī’s life and milieu alongside her works.

    The study is based on the assumption that the fact that Widād Sakākīnī was a woman, that is, a representative of a normally silenced community, working within a literary tradition dominated by men, influenced both the form and the content of her writing. Theoretically the study has been influenced by Sandra Gilbert’s and Susan Gubar’s way of considering texts by early women writers as palimpsests; under the conventional and socially accepted surface deeper and less socially accepted levels of meaning can be found. With the help of structuralist theories (A.J. Greimas’ model for interpreting the narrative plot as interpreted by Pil Dahlerup, Irene Engelstad and Irene Iversen and used by them for studying texts written by women writers and Susan Sniader Lanser’s theories about women writers’ use of the narrative voice) as well as poststructuralist theories about intertextuality (Genette and Culler) the study has identified various literary strategies used by Widād Sakākīnī to conform to the dominant male discourse within which she was working while preserving her own identity as a woman writer. The study shows that she skillfully managed to create new, and sometimes, subversive meanings to traditional themes and motifs used in her texts.

  • 23.
    Pedersén, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Archives and libraries in the city of Assur: a survey of the material from the German excavations. Part I1985Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Pedersén, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Archives and libraries in the city of Assur: a survey of the material from the German excavations. Part II1986Book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Persenius, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    The manuscripts of parts 1 and 2 of Shams al-ʻulūm by Nashwān al-Ḥimyarī: a study of their relationship1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Speaking up with Yahoo: an Arabic e-mail novel2007In: The Professorship of Semitic Languages at Uppsala University 400 years: Jubilee Volume from a Symposium held at the University Hall, 21-23 September 2005 / [ed] Bo Isaksson, Mats Eskhult, Gail Ramsay, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2007, p. 179-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Riad, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    Kitāb al-ʼaxlāq wa-s-siyar ou Risāla fī mudāwāt an-nufūs wa-tahd̲īb al-ʼaxlāq wa-z-zuhd fī r-rad̲āʼil1980Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Riad, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    Studies in the Syriac preface1988Book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sauma, Assad
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Gregory Bar-Hebraeus's Commentary on the Book of Kings from his Storehouse of Mysteries: A Critical Edition with an English Translation, Introduction and Notes2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contains a critical edition with an English translation of the commentary on the Book of Kings which is a part of the exegetical work the Storehouse of Mysteries by the West-Syrian scholar John Bar-Hebraeus (1226-1286). The work is based on the oldest surviving manuscript of the Storehouse of Mysteries, manuscript Florence 230 (written 1278), collated with all manuscripts which are older than the 19th century. The study also contains a description of the manuscripts of the Storehouse of Mysteries and an investigation into the sources used by Bar-Hebraeus in his commentary. Also a short study of the Syriac exegesis in its east and west traditions is supplied.

  • 30.
    Svedlund, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    The Aramaic portions of the Pesiqta de Rab Kahana: according to MS Marshall Or. 24, the oldest known manuscript of the Pesiqta de Rab Kahana : with English translation, commentary and introduction1974Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Tezel, Aziz
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Comparative Etymological Studies in the Western Neo-Syriac (Turoyo) Lexicon: With Special Reference to Homonyms, Related Words and Borrowings with Cultural Signification2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a comparative study of words presenting etymological problems in the Western Neo-Syriac (Turoyo) lexicon, with the principal aim of providing new etymological solutions and suggestions and giving an account of the most common linguistic processes by which various changes are carried out in the individual words studied. For the first time all important homonyms in this language are investigated with regard to their origin and use. Further, numerous words with the same radicals but of different origin, Arabic cognates and other borrowings, influence also from Kurdish, related words with different radicals, doublets, words with cultural signification and compounds are examined. The prefix 'ad- and the endings -ad, -el and -al in some adverbial formations are discussed. The development of the beġadkefat is observed. New words, new forms, new meanings and dialectal differences are recorded. The study shows that sporadic changes, reduction of the long vowels which have lost their phonemic length in closed syllables, borrowings, neologisms and folk etymologies have given rise to a relatively small number of homonymous nouns and homonymous verbal stems whose use may contextually be kept separate by various means. Homonymous nouns and homonymous verbal stems common to all dialects are few. There is a good deal of homonymous verbal roots which, as a rule, occur in different verbal stems. Hence the verbal roots are of secondary importance in relation to verbal stems. Dissimilation and assimilation are two linguistic phenomena that lie behind many of the changes carried out in the words discussed in the study. Dissimilation plays a crucial part in the change r > l in words containing the succession -r-r-. Words originally containing one of the successions -r-r- and -l-l- may be subject to dissimilation also by syncope or by haplology. Contiguous regressive assimilation, where voiced sounds and voiceless ones may become devoiced and voiced, respectively, is a fairly common phenomenon. The change s > s, partial assimilation, is of frequent occurrence in words containing r and t. Total assimilation of n occurs in several words in which it does not appear. Metatheses are observed in words with the sounds l and r. Epenthetic consonants arise in words containing the dentals. Prostheses manifest themselves in some originally biradical nouns. The syllabic structure of the language shows considerable stability. Some trisyllabic words have been reduced to disyllabic ones.

  • 32.
    Tezel, Sina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Arabic Borrowings in Ṣūrayt/Ṭūrōyo within the Framework of Phonological Correspondences : In Comparison with other Semitic Languages2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A group of Semitic cognate roots within the framework of phonological correspondences contain one (or more) of the following Proto-Semitic consonants *g, *, *, *ṯ̣, *ḏ̣/ṣ́, *, *ġ, *ś, *š, which differ significantly in the various principal Semitic languages. Their Arabic reflexes are ǧ, , , , , , ġ, š, s. In Syriac and Ṭūrōyo they are reduced to g, t, d,, ʿ,, s, š. In almost every Semitic language one can encounter doublets of these roots, of which one is native, the other borrowed. The present study mainly deals with such roots and their derivatives, with Arabic borrowings of this category in Ṭūrōyo as the chief topic. The principal aim is to methodically and consistently identify and distinguish between native Ṭūrōyo roots and Arabic roots of this category, borrowed into Ṭūrōyo.

    For the first time the bulk of the Arabic borrowings of this category in Ṭūrōyo and other words of immediate interest to the topic have been investigated as a connected subject, and a large part of the Arabic lexical influence on Ṭūrōyo has been demonstrated. The semantic connections between the examined roots is highlighted. Great importance is attached to roots indicated only for Aramaic/Syriac and Arabic. Different meanings with certain native Ṭūrōyo roots, as compared to the meanings of their Aramaic/Syriac correspondences, are noted. Neologisms, new words, forms, and meanings are documented. Regularities and irregularities regarding bəġaḏkəfaṯ are discussed and explanations provided. Divergences from the pattern of phonological correspondences and different interpretations of the Semitic comparative elements in the comparative dictionaries are observed.

    The study shows that the Ṭūrōyo consonants g, t, d, , ʿ, , s, š have remained intact in relation to the above-mentioned Syriac consonants, and that Arabic root consonants in Arabic borrowings in Ṭūrōyo are not changed to conform to the native consonants. On the other hand, the majority of the above-mentioned Arabic sounds phonetically coincide with certain etymologically different native Ṭūrōyo consonants. Two of them, and , etymologically overlap. Even if limited in scope, the investigation shows that Ṭūrōyo has undergone extensive lexical influence from Arabic, to which should probably be attributed the absence of many native Aramaic/Syriac roots in Ṭūrōyo.

  • 33.
    Toll, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts.
    Kitāb al-Ǧauharatain al-ʻatîqatain al-mâʼiʻatain as-̣ṣafrâʼ waʼl-baiḍâʼ1968Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Vidro, Nadia
    et al.
    University College London.
    Vollandt, RonnyLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich.Wagner, Esther-MiriamWoolf Institute; University of Cambridge.Olszowy-Schlanger, JudithÉcole Pratique des Hautes Études-PSL; Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes-CNRS.
    Studies in Semitic Linguistics and Manuscripts: A Liber Discipulorum in Honour of Professor Geoffrey Khan2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Festschrift is a collection of papers in honour of Geoffrey Khan, the Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge, written by his former and current students and post-doctoral researchers. The work of Geoffrey Khan has had a tremendous impact on a vast array of domains of study, including Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic, Semitic grammar and linguistics, Bible vocalisation traditions, Cairo Genizah studies, palaeography, codicology and Arabic papyrology. This richness of investigated themes is reflected by the twenty-one papers in the present volume.

    The volume consists of two parts. Papers in Part 1, ‘Linguistics, Grammar and Exegesis’, propose new interpretations of biblical language phenomena, discuss medieval approaches to the grammar of Biblical Hebrew and the narrative structure of the Bible, describe early-modern developments in the Hebrew language, and document and analyse three dialects of North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic. Part 2, ‘Texts, Scribes and the Making of Books and Documents’, is dedicated to manuscripts and their production, and in particular to the work of scribes. All papers in this part centre around manuscripts discovered in the Cairo Genizah and other similar collections. While thematically diverse, all contributions are united by a common approach of focusing on a careful description of the ‘document’ – whether it is a manuscript or a recording of a speaker of a contemporary endangered language – prior to its interpretation in the light of the most recent ideas of the relevant disciplines.

  • 35.
    Witakowski, Witold
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages.
    The Syriac chronicle of Pseudo-Dionysius of Tel-Maḥre: a study in the history of historiography1987Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
1 - 35 of 35
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