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Ahnesjö, I., Kvarnemo, C., Rosenqvist, G. & Zuk, M. (2024). Obituary: Staffan Ulfstrand. Behavioral Ecology, 35(1), Article ID arad113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obituary: Staffan Ulfstrand
2024 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 35, no 1, article id arad113Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-524042 (URN)10.1093/beheco/arad113 (DOI)001155131500021 ()
Note

Biographical item

Available from: 2024-02-28 Created: 2024-02-28 Last updated: 2024-04-15Bibliographically approved
Günter, K. P., Ahnesjö, I. & Gullberg, A. (2023). "I try to encourage my students to think, read, and talk science": Intelligible identities in university teachers' figured worlds of higher education biology. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 60(6), 1195-1222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I try to encourage my students to think, read, and talk science": Intelligible identities in university teachers' figured worlds of higher education biology
2023 (English)In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 1195-1222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Higher education biology is often imagined, perceived, and described as having reached gender equality in terms of who gets to participate in disciplinary practices. However, like any other natural science discipline, higher education biology is a world whose landscapes are shaped by (re)productions of historical, cultural, and social norms. We explore these norms through the lens of identity, asking what identities are recognized by university biology teachers at a large Swedish university, analyzing 94 teaching statements written when applying for faculty positions in biology. We argue that in and through teaching statements, university biology teachers negotiate and perform overarching academic and disciplinary norms and discourses with the goal to present themselves as intelligible candidates. As statements of value, they thereby display implicit and explicit identities recognized in worlds of higher education biology. Using a discourse analytical framework, we identified two university teacher identities imagined as intelligible: Research Science Teachers and Facilitating Science Teachers. Research Science Teachers position research and associated masculine-coded competences as anchor points of biology practice. They consider researchers to be ultimate knowers and consequently to be best suitable for university teaching with the goal to recruit students into research. Facilitating Science Teachers, even though aware of the hegemonic position of research, disentangle imaginaries of what makes a researcher from what makes a university teacher. They transgress dominant imaginaries of research as the ultimate competence for themselves and students, and create spaces for alternative identity work. These findings contribute to a more nuanced understanding of (re)productive processes in science education, providing perspectives of how to together infract intergenerational (re)productions of hegemonic norms of doing science. Additionally, this study provides further evidence that higher education biology is not a gender-neutral higher education landscape.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
biology, discourse analysis, figured worlds, gender, higher education, science identity
National Category
Didactics Gender Studies
Research subject
Gender Studies; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-487704 (URN)10.1002/tea.21829 (DOI)000871203400001 ()
Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Ahnesjö, I. & Bussière, L. (2021). Evolution of Animal Mating Systems. In: Douglas J. Futuyma (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies: Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press (OUP)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of Animal Mating Systems
2021 (English)In: Oxford Bibliographies: Evolutionary Biology / [ed] Douglas J. Futuyma, Oxford University Press (OUP) , 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021
Series
Oxford Bibliographies
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-441601 (URN)10.1093/OBO/9780199941728-0136 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-04-30 Created: 2021-04-30 Last updated: 2021-05-03Bibliographically approved
Günter, K. P., Gullberg, A. & Ahnesjö, I. (2021). “Quite ironic that even I became a natural scientist”: Students' imagined identity trajectories in the Figured World of Higher Education Biology. Science Education, 105(5), 837-854
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Quite ironic that even I became a natural scientist”: Students' imagined identity trajectories in the Figured World of Higher Education Biology
2021 (English)In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 105, no 5, p. 837-854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studying biology entails negotiating knowledges, identities, and what paths, more or less well-trodden, to follow. Knowledges, identities, and paths within the very practices of science are fundamentally gendered and it is, therefore, critical to recognize when exploring students' learning and participation in natural sciences. Even though students' numbers in undergraduate Higher Education Biology are female-biased, it does not mean that gendered processes are absent. In this study, we focus on early undergraduate biology students' identity work at a Swedish university, analyzing 55 study motivation texts discursively. Embedded in a Figured Worlds framework, we explore how students imagined and authored themselves in(to) the Figured World of Higher Education Biology along two imagined identity trajectories, the Straight Biology Path and the Backpacking Biology Path. While the first and numerically dominant imagined trajectory entails typical stories of a scientific child striving toward a research career, the latter recognizes broad interests and biology competences to be collected in a backpack for transdisciplinary use. Students imagining the Backpacking Biology Path authored themselves in relation to and explicitly not as having a linear trajectory, which positions the Straight Biology Path as dominant and culturally recognized. Our findings reveal gendered myths about science practices present in Higher Education Biology, yet also contested through alternative imaginaries. We, thereby, show that it is crucial for Higher Biology and Science Education to be aware of how students imagine their trajectories and how they negotiate masculine norms of science to create spaces for diverse and alternative identity trajectories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
discourse analysis, figured worlds, gender, higher education biology, identity trajectories, identity work
National Category
Gender Studies Educational Sciences
Research subject
Gender Studies; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-448872 (URN)10.1002/sce.21673 (DOI)000670373700001 ()
Available from: 2021-07-09 Created: 2021-07-09 Last updated: 2024-02-12Bibliographically approved
Braga Goncalves, I., Ahnesjö, I. & Kvarnemo, C. (2020). Pipefish male pregnancy: Why do females prefer large mates?. Research Outreach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pipefish male pregnancy: Why do females prefer large mates?
2020 (English)In: Research OutreachArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-416196 (URN)
Available from: 2020-07-13 Created: 2020-07-13 Last updated: 2020-08-21Bibliographically approved
Ahnesjö, I. & Braga Goncalves, I. (2019). Mate choice in males and females (2ed.). In: Choe J.C. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior: (pp. 432-440). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mate choice in males and females
2019 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior / [ed] Choe J.C., Elsevier, 2019, 2, p. 432-440Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To find a “dream mate” is important for fitness in all sexually reproducing animals because half of the genome of one’soffspring comes from the chosen mate. Individuals that choose their mates may gain both direct benefits (i.e., care or other resources) and indirect benefits (genes that improve offspring viability or attractiveness). Mate choice occurs in males and females, and individuals may both be choosy and compete to be chosen. Both processes often result in sexual selection and in the evolution of secondary sexual characters. Mate choice is context-dependent, operates on multiple traits and varies in time and space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019 Edition: 2
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375677 (URN)9780128132517 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Nygård, M., Kvarnemo, C., Ahnesjö, I. & Braga Goncalves, I. (2019). Pipefish embryo oxygenation, survival, and development: egg size, male size, and temperature effects. Behavioral Ecology, 30(5), 1451-1460
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pipefish embryo oxygenation, survival, and development: egg size, male size, and temperature effects
2019 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1451-1460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In animals with uniparental care, the quality of care provided by one sex can deeply impact the reproductive success of both sexes. Studying variation in parental care quality within a species and which factors may affect it can, therefore, shed important light on patterns of mate choice and other reproductive decisions observed in nature. Using Syngnathus typhle, a pipefish species with extensive uniparental male care, with embryos developing inside a brood pouch during a lengthy pregnancy, we assessed how egg size (which correlates positively with female size), male size, and water temperature affect brooding traits that relate to male care quality, all measured on day 18, approximately 1/3, of the brooding period. We found that larger males brooded eggs at lower densities, and their embryos were heavier than those of small males independent of initial egg size. However, large males had lower embryo survival relative to small males. We found no effect of egg size or of paternal size on within-pouch oxygen levels, but oxygen levels were significantly higher in the bottom than the middle section of the pouch. Males that brooded at higher temperatures had lower pouch oxygen levels presumably because of higher embryo developmental rates, as more developed embryos consume more oxygen. Together, our results suggest that small and large males follow distinct paternal strategies: large males positively affect embryo size whereas small males favor embryo survival. As females prefer large mates, offspring size at independence may be more important to female fitness than offspring survival during development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Syngnathidae, body condition, brood reduction, embryo density, embryo size, embryo survival, male pregnancy, male size, oxygen provisioning
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397173 (URN)10.1093/beheco/arz101 (DOI)000493376400038 ()31592213 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-11-16 Created: 2019-11-16 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Ahnesjö, I., Berglund, A., Forsgren, E., Karlsson, A., Kvarnemo, C., Magnhagen, C., . . . Östlund Nilsson, S. (2018). En beteende-ekologisk forskningsperiod på Klubbans biologiska station: Rapport från återträff med Doktorer som disputerade (1983-2001) på avhandlingar med fältarbete på Klubbans Biologiska station. I en värld av kantnålar, stubbar, spiggar och nudingar.. Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>En beteende-ekologisk forskningsperiod på Klubbans biologiska station: Rapport från återträff med Doktorer som disputerade (1983-2001) på avhandlingar med fältarbete på Klubbans Biologiska station. I en värld av kantnålar, stubbar, spiggar och nudingar.
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

We had the fortune as PhD-students and scientists in Animal Ecology at Uppsala University, to spend joyful and creative field work summers at Klubban Biological Station, during the 1980-90’s. A reunion in June 2018 resulted in this report highlighting research on pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs. Our research on these animals have provided novel insights and knowledge of the process of sexual selection and paternal care. These animals have, in many aspects, now become model organisms in evolutionary behavioral ecology in marine environments. Our list of publications provides many examples of how environmental factors influence how sexual selection and mate choice operate, how predictors like potential reproductive rates, operational sex ratios work and how male parental care is prominent in influencing selection. This research, that started at Klubban, has broadened our understanding of the ecological importance of shallow marine areas. The evolutionary understanding of how males and females can behave and how adaptive traits are selected in interaction with social and an increasingly changing ambient environment is in focus in our continued scientific endeavors. We have happily compiled this report illustrating how science and scientist can stimulate each other at a wonderful place like Klubban Biological Station, with the access to amazing organisms like pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2018. p. 30
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376734 (URN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Ahnesjö, I. & Vasconcelos, P. (2018). Recension: Cordelia Fine. Testosteron Rex: Myten om våra könade hjärnor [Review]. Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, 39(4), 123-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recension: Cordelia Fine. Testosteron Rex: Myten om våra könade hjärnor
2018 (Swedish)In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 123-124Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397374 (URN)
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Tsuboi, M., Lim, A. C., Ooi, B. L., Yip, M. Y., Chong, V. C., Ahnesjö, I. & Kolm, N. (2017). Brain size evolution in pipefishes and seahorses: the role of feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30(1), 150-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain size evolution in pipefishes and seahorses: the role of feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brain size varies greatly at all taxonomic levels. Feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection have been proposed as key components in generating contemporary diversity in brain size across vertebrates. Analyses of brain size evolution have, however, been limited to lineages where males predominantly compete for mating and females choose mates. Here, we present the first original data set of brain sizes in pipefishes and seahorses (Syngnathidae) a group in which intense female mating competition occurs in many species. After controlling for the effect of shared ancestry and overall body size, brain size was positively correlated with relative snout length. Moreover, we found that females, on average, had 4.3% heavier brains than males and that polyandrous species demonstrated more pronounced (11.7%) female-biased brain size dimorphism. Our results suggest that adaptations for feeding on mobile prey items and sexual selection in females are important factors in brain size evolution of pipefishes and seahorses. Most importantly, our study supports the idea that sexual selection plays a major role in brain size evolution, regardless of on which sex sexual selection acts stronger.

Keywords
brain evolution, phylogenetic comparative analysis, pipefishes & seahorses, sexual selection & conflicts
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320072 (URN)10.1111/jeb.12995 (DOI)000394852200012 ()27748990 (PubMedID)
Funder
Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-3624
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9942-5687

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