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  • 1.
    Achermann, Sheila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Prediction in Typical and Atypical Development2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Forming predictions about what is going to happen next is a crucial ability that develops early in life. Theory and some empirical evidence suggest that predictive abilities may be impaired in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The overarching aim of this thesis is to investigate early measures of prediction in relation to concurrent and later outcomes in typical and atypical development, with a particular focus on ASD and related behavioral problems.

    In Study I, we used motion capture technology to examine prospective motor control and its relationship to executive functions in typically developing 18-month-olds. Our findings showed that motor control is associated with executive functioning in infancy.

    Study II investigated motor control in infants at low and elevated likelihood for ASD and examined how these measures relate to later development. We found group differences as well as similarities in motor control in 10-months-olds with and without a familial history of ASD. Early motor measures were related to general developmental level, but not ASD symptomatology in toddlerhood.

    Using eye tracking, Study III examined how infants with later ASD and neurotypical infants form predictions about visual object motion. Our findings indicated that infants with later ASD were able to form predictions about object motion and adapt to simple changes in motion patterns, and that their performance did not differ from the performance of neurotypical infants.

    In Study IV, we surveyed parents about their experiences during participation in an infant sibling study of ASD as a first step to understanding the benefits and risks associated with this type of research. Parents were generally positive about their experiences both from their own perspective as well as, the child’s perspective.

    This thesis illustrates the potential of using advanced technology, such as motion tracking and eye tracking, to study and compare prediction in typical and atypical development. It points to the important role of prediction and motor control for child development, but fails to find a specific link to ASD.

    List of papers
    1. An Embodied Account of Early Executive-Function Development: Prospective Motor Control in Infancy Is Related to Inhibition and Working Memory
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Embodied Account of Early Executive-Function Development: Prospective Motor Control in Infancy Is Related to Inhibition and Working Memory
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1600-1610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of executive functioning for later life outcomes, along with its potential to be positively affected by intervention programs, motivates the need to find early markers of executive functioning. In this study, 18-month-olds performed three executive-function tasksinvolving simple inhibition, working memory, and more complex inhibitionand a motion-capture task assessing prospective motor control during reaching. We demonstrated that prospective motor control, as measured by the peak velocity of the first movement unit, is related to infants' performance on simple-inhibition and working memory tasks. The current study provides evidence that motor control and executive functioning are intertwined early in life, which suggests an embodied perspective on executive-functioning development. We argue that executive functions and prospective motor control develop from a common source and a single motive: to control action. This is the first demonstration that low-level movement planning is related to higher-order executive control early in life.

    Keywords
    prospective motor control, motor development, executive functions, reaching, infancy
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314054 (URN)10.1177/0956797616667447 (DOI)000390582500006 ()
    Funder
    EU, European Research Council, 312292
    Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-26 Last updated: 2020-04-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Motor Atypicalities in Infancy are Associated with General Developmental Level at Two Years, but Not Autistic Symptoms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motor Atypicalities in Infancy are Associated with General Developmental Level at Two Years, but Not Autistic Symptoms
    (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408578 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-04-08 Created: 2020-04-08 Last updated: 2020-04-08
    3. Updating Expectations about Unexpected Object Motion in Infants Later Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Updating Expectations about Unexpected Object Motion in Infants Later Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    2021 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 4186-4198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In typical development, infants form predictions about future events based on incoming sensory information, which is essential for perception and goal-directed action. It has been suggested that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) make predictions differently compared to neurotypical individuals. We investigated how infants who later received an ASD diagnosis and neurotypical infants react to temporarily occluded moving objects that violate initial expectations about object motion. Our results indicate that infants regardless of clinical outcome react similarly to unexpected object motion patterns, both in terms of gaze shift latencies and pupillary responses. These findings indicate that the ability to update representations about such regularities in light of new information may not differ between typically developing infants and those with later ASD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Nature, 2021
    Keywords
    Infants, Autism spectrum disorder, Visual motion, Prediction, Eye tracking, Tolerance for uncertainty
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408576 (URN)10.1007/s10803-021-04876-2 (DOI)000613092100003 ()33517525 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-1802:1Swedish Research Council, 2018-06232
    Available from: 2020-04-08 Created: 2020-04-08 Last updated: 2023-07-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study of autism spectrum disorder
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study of autism spectrum disorder
    2020 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 69, article id 101454Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Prospective longitudinal studies of infant siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) play an important role in advancing our knowledge about early developmental pathways in ASD. Despite this clear benefit, currently little is known about potential risks or disadvantages for participating families. As a first step in addressing this issue, we asked parents about their experiences from participating in an infant sibling study.

    Method:

    Eighty-eight families responded to a questionnaire examining parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study. The questions assessed parents' satisfaction with the study, the child's perceived satisfaction, and the parents' motivation for participating. The study included parents of two groups, (1) infants with an older sibling diagnosed with ASD (HR, high risk, n = 43) and (2) infants with no familial history of ASD (LR, low risk, n = 21).

    Results:

    The results indicated that parents are generally positive about study participation and few disadvantages were reported. This pattern was mirrored when splitting parents' responses into the two groups. There was no indication for group differences between parents of infants at high risk and low risk for ASD.

    Conclusion:

    Our findings present a first step into understanding parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study. Most parents were satisfied with participation in the study and only few disadvantages were reported. Our results have implications for ethical discussions about benefits and risks regarding infant sibling studies in various fields.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier BV, 2020
    Keywords
    Autism spectrum disorder, Infant siblings, Early identification, Ethics, Risk factors
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400748 (URN)10.1016/j.rasd.2019.101454 (DOI)000501403800001 ()
    Funder
    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-1802:1Swedish Research Council, 2015-03670
    Available from: 2020-01-03 Created: 2020-01-03 Last updated: 2021-09-01Bibliographically approved
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  • 2.
    Achermann, Sheila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bolte, Sven
    Karolinska Inst & Reg Stockholm, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Ctr Psychiat Res, Karolinska Inst KIND,Ctr Neurodev Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden;Curtin Univ, Sch Occupat Therapy Social Work & Speech Pathol, Essential Partner Autism CRC, Curtin Autism Res Grp, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS). Karolinska Inst & Reg Stockholm, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Ctr Psychiat Res, Karolinska Inst KIND,Ctr Neurodev Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study of autism spectrum disorder2020In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 69, article id 101454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Prospective longitudinal studies of infant siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) play an important role in advancing our knowledge about early developmental pathways in ASD. Despite this clear benefit, currently little is known about potential risks or disadvantages for participating families. As a first step in addressing this issue, we asked parents about their experiences from participating in an infant sibling study.

    Method:

    Eighty-eight families responded to a questionnaire examining parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study. The questions assessed parents' satisfaction with the study, the child's perceived satisfaction, and the parents' motivation for participating. The study included parents of two groups, (1) infants with an older sibling diagnosed with ASD (HR, high risk, n = 43) and (2) infants with no familial history of ASD (LR, low risk, n = 21).

    Results:

    The results indicated that parents are generally positive about study participation and few disadvantages were reported. This pattern was mirrored when splitting parents' responses into the two groups. There was no indication for group differences between parents of infants at high risk and low risk for ASD.

    Conclusion:

    Our findings present a first step into understanding parents' experiences from participating in an infant sibling study. Most parents were satisfied with participation in the study and only few disadvantages were reported. Our results have implications for ethical discussions about benefits and risks regarding infant sibling studies in various fields.

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  • 3.
    Achermann, Sheila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS). Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bölte, Sven
    Nyström, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Updating Expectations about Unexpected Object Motion in Infants Later Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder2021In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 4186-4198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In typical development, infants form predictions about future events based on incoming sensory information, which is essential for perception and goal-directed action. It has been suggested that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) make predictions differently compared to neurotypical individuals. We investigated how infants who later received an ASD diagnosis and neurotypical infants react to temporarily occluded moving objects that violate initial expectations about object motion. Our results indicate that infants regardless of clinical outcome react similarly to unexpected object motion patterns, both in terms of gaze shift latencies and pupillary responses. These findings indicate that the ability to update representations about such regularities in light of new information may not differ between typically developing infants and those with later ASD.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Achermann, Sheila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Pär
    Bölte, Sven
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Motor Atypicalities in Infancy are Associated with General Developmental Level at Two Years, but Not Autistic SymptomsIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahlskog, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Extraversion Probably Does Not Cause Political Participation. Evidence from Two Genetically Informed Designs2023In: Political Psychology, ISSN 0162-895X, E-ISSN 1467-9221, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1301-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial literature in political psychology has emphasized the importance of personality traits for understanding differences in political participation. One such trait is extraversion. However, the causal status of this relationship is complicated by a number of issues, not least genetic confounding stemming from the heritability of both personality traits and political participation. This study confirms the well-established naive relationship between extraversion and participation, but goes on with (a) a discordant MZ twin design and (b) a new approach using measured genetic variation, or a polygenic index, in the given trait (extraversion) to assess the causal nature of this relationship. First, utilizing variation in extraversion and participation within identical twin pairs shows that twins with higher extraversion do not participate more. Second, random variation within fraternal twin pairs in a polygenic index of extraversion does predict trait extraversion, but does not predict political participation. In summary, previously identified associations between extraversion and political participation are not likely to be causal, but instead reflect common underlying familial factors.

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  • 6.
    Alfonsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Olsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Hursti, Timo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Motivation and Treatment Credibility Predicts Dropout, Treatment Adherence, and Clinical Outcomes in an Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.2016In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 18, no 3, article id e52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In previous research, variables such as age, education, treatment credibility, and therapeutic alliance have shown to affect patients' treatment adherence and outcome in Internet-based psychotherapy. A more detailed understanding of how such variables are associated with different measures of adherence and clinical outcomes may help in designing more effective online therapy.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate demographical, psychological, and treatment-specific variables that could predict dropout, treatment adherence, and treatment outcomes in a study of online relaxation for mild to moderate stress symptoms.

    Methods: Participant dropout and attrition as well as data from self-report instruments completed before, during, and after the online relaxation program were analyzed. Multiple linear and logistical regression analyses were conducted to predict early dropout, overall attrition, online treatment progress, number of registered relaxation exercises, posttreatment symptom levels, and reliable improvement.

    Results: Dropout was significantly predicted by treatment credibility, whereas overall attrition was associated with reporting a focus on immediate consequences and experiencing a low level of intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Treatment progress was predicted by education level and treatment credibility, whereas number of registered relaxation exercises was associated with experiencing intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Posttreatment stress symptoms were positively predicted by feeling external pressure to participate in the treatment and negatively predicted by treatment credibility. Reporting reliable symptom improvement after treatment was predicted by treatment credibility and therapeutic bond.

    Conclusions: This study confirmed that treatment credibility and a good working alliance are factors associated with successful Internet-based psychotherapy. Further, the study showed that measuring adherence in different ways provides somewhat different results, which underscore the importance of carefully defining treatment adherence in psychotherapy research. Lastly, the results suggest that finding the treatment interesting and engaging may help patients carry through with the intervention and complete prescribed assignments, a result that may help guide the design of future interventions.

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  • 7.
    Alm, Per A
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stuttering, emotions, and heart rate during anticipatory anxiety:: a critical review2004In: Journal of fluency disorders, ISSN 0094-730X, E-ISSN 1873-801X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons who stutter often report their stuttering is influenced by emotional reactions, yet the nature of such relation is still unclear. Psychophysiological studies of stuttering have failed to find any major association between stuttering and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. A review of published studies of heart rate in relation to stressful speech situations indicate that adults who stutter tend to show a paradoxical reduction of heart rate compared with nonstuttering persons. Reduction of heart rate has also been observed in humans and mammals during anticipation of an unpleasant stimulus, and is proposed to be an indication of anticipatory anxiety resulting in a “freezing response” with parasympathetic inhibition of the heart rate. It is suggested that speech-related anticipatory anxiety in persons who stutter is likely to be a secondary, conditioned reaction based on previous experiences of stuttering.

  • 8.
    Ander, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Engvall, Gunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hedström, Mariann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Lyhagen, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Development of health-related quality of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression among persons diagnosed with cancer during adolescence: a 10-year follow-up study2016In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 582-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The main aim was to investigate the development of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and symptoms of anxiety and depression in a cohort diagnosed with cancer during adolescence from shortly after up to 10 years after diagnosis.

    Methods: Participants (n = 61) completed the SF-36 and the HADS shortly; six, 12, and 18 months; and two, three, four, and 10 years (n = 28) after diagnosis. Polynomial change trajectories were used to model development.

    Results: Polynomial change trajectories showed an initial increase which abated over time into a decrease which abated over time for the SF-36 subscales Mental Health and Vitality; an initial decline which abated over time into an increase for HADS anxiety; and an initial decline which abated over time into an increase which abated over time for HADS depression. The SF-36 mental component summary showed no change from two to 10 years after diagnosis whereas the SF-36 physical component summary showed an increase from two years after diagnosis which declined over time. Ten years after diagnosis 29% reported possible anxiety.

    Conclusions: Development of HRQOL and symptoms of anxiety and depression appears to be nonlinear among persons diagnosed with cancer during adolescence. Well into permanent survivorship an increase in symptoms of anxiety is shown and approximately a third of the participants report possible anxiety. The findings indicate the need for: studies designed to pinpoint the times of highest psychological risk, clinical follow-up focusing on psychological problems, and development of effective psychological interventions for survivors of adolescent cancer

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  • 9. Andersson, C.
    et al.
    Gajecki, M.
    Öjehagen, A.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Automated telephone interventions for problematic alcohol use in clinical and population samples: A randomized controlled trial NCT01958359 NCT2017In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThe primary objective was to evaluate 6-month outcomes for brief and extensive automated telephony interventions targeting problematic alcohol use, in comparison to an assessment-only control group. The secondary objective was to compare levels of problematic alcohol use (hazardous, harmful or probable dependence), gender and age among study participants from clinical psychiatric and addiction outpatient settings and from population-based telephone helpline users and Internet help-seeker samples.

    ResultsThe Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was used for screening of problematic alcohol use and 6-month follow-up assessment. A total of 248 of help-seekers with at least hazardous use (AUDIT scores of ≥ 6/≥ 8 for women/men) were recruited from clinical and general population settings. Minor recruitment group differences were identified with respect to AUDIT scores and age at baseline. One hundred and sixty persons (64.5%) did not complete the follow-up assessment. The attrition group had a higher proportion of probable dependence (71% vs. 56%; p = 0.025), and higher scores on the total AUDIT, and its subscales for alcohol consumption and alcohol problems. At follow up, within-group problem levels had declined across all three groups, but there were no significant between-group differences.

    Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01958359, Registered October 9, 2013. Retrospectively registered

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  • 10.
    Andersson, Christina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden..
    Bergsten, Katja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norbäck, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Rask, Karin
    Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Einhorn, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Osika, Walter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The effectiveness of smartphone compassion training on stress among Swedish university students: A pilot randomized trial2021In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 927-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a 6-week smartphone compassion training intervention on mental health.

    Method: Fifty-seven Swedish university students (mean age = 25, SD = 5) reporting high levels of stress were randomized to compassion training (n = 23), mindfulness (n = 19), or waitlist (n = 15).

    Result: Multilevel models indicated that both compassion and mindfulness training increased self-compassion compared to the waitlist, while only compassion significantly reduced stress. Between-group effect sizes for compassion compared to waitlist were large for both self-compassion (d = 1.61) and stress (d = 0.94). Compassion and mindfulness did not differ significantly, but effect sizes were in favor of compassion. Secondary outcomes indicated positive effects on emotional awareness, while no effect was found for global psychological distress.

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that compassion training via a smartphone application can improve self-compassion and reduce stress among university students. Future studies in larger clinical samples are warranted.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Christina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mellner, Christin
    Stockholm Univ, Ctr Arts Business & Culture ABC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Einhorn, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindert Bergsten, Katja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenström, Emma
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Osika, Walter
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cultivating Compassion and Reducing Stress and Mental Ill-Health in Employees-A Randomized Controlled Study2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 748140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress and mental ill-health carry considerable costs for both individuals and organizations. Although interventions targeting compassion and self-compassion have been shown to reduce stress and benefit mental health, related research in organizational settings is limited. We investigated the effects of a 6-week psychological intervention utilizing compassion training on stress, mental health, and self-compassion. Forty-nine employees of two organizations were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 25) or a physical exercise control condition (n = 24). Multilevel growth models showed that stress (p = 0.04) and mental ill-health (p = 0.02) decreased over 3 months in both groups (pre-intervention to follow-up: Cohen's d = -0.46 and d = 0.33, respectively), while self-compassion only increased in the intervention group (p = 0.03, between group d = 0.53). There were no significant effects on life satisfaction in any of the groups (p > 0.53). The findings show promising results regarding the ability of compassion training within organizations to decrease stress and mental ill-health and increase self-compassion.

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  • 12.
    Andersson, Isabell E. K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Realism of confidence and phenomenological reports are not congruent indicators of mode of apprehension in visual discrimination of relative mass2009In: Ecological psychology, ISSN 1040-7413, E-ISSN 1532-6969, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 218-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In visual judgments of relative mass of colliding objects observers may function in either a perceptual or an inferential mode of apprehension (Runeson, Juslin, & Olsson, 2000). This finding was based on participants’ over/underconfidence in their judgments. Also phenomenological mode reports, for which participants indicated whether they “saw” or “inferred” the relative mass in each trial, have been used as mode indicators (Andersson, Kreegipuu, Allik, & Runeson, 2009). The present study showed that over/underconfidence and mode reports are not congruent as mode indicators: in Experiments 1 and 2, participants’ over/ underconfidence was about the same in “saw” and “inferred” trials. Furthermore, in Experiment 3, unexpectedly judgments of relative exit-speed did not engender underconfidence. Hence, one or both indicators do not well enough distinguish the modes of apprehension.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Isabell E. K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Runeson, Sverker
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Realism of confidence, modes of apprehension, and variable-use in visual discrimination of relative mass2008In: Ecological psychology, ISSN 1040-7413, E-ISSN 1532-6969, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In dynamic event perception, one issue is whether direct perception or cue-based inferences explains learning and performance. For visual discrimination of relative mass of colliding objects, Runeson, Juslin, and Olsson (2000) found that observers change from an inferential to a direct-perceptual mode of apprehension during practice, as indicated by lower confidence in their judgments. Unlike Runeson et al. (2000), we scored confidence against the variables used in individual blocks and analyzed collision-subsets, thereby counteracting inflated confidence scores. A majority of 40 novice participants used a nonspecifying variable and functioned inferentially, as indicated by realistic confidence. Five novices used the mass-ratio invariant and were overconfident therein. Ten participants received feedback based on the most-used nonspecifying variable. Despite feedback suggesting specificity of the variable, they continued to use the variable inferentially. After practice based on the invariant, 7 out of 10 used the invariant. An unexpected  dearth of underconfidence for invariant usage is explained by fluctuations in variable usage. Methodological problems in the use of confidence as a mode indicator are discussed.

  • 14.
    Andersson Konke, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Early Self-Regulation in Infant Siblings: Specific and Shared Associations to Emerging Autism and Co-ocurring ADHD2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to examine aspects of self-regulation and the emergence of co-occurring autism and ADHD traits early in life, to enhance our understanding of specific and shared mechanisms underlying these conditions. Previous studies have shown that vulnerabilities in temperament and executive functions (EF) are closely related to both conditions, with overlapping as well as specific features associated to each phenotype. However, most previous studies focus on older children, and it is unclear if specific and shared markers are evident already before symptoms of autism and ADHD emerge. By using an infant-sibling design we were able to follow infants with a family history of autism and/or ADHD, before clinical symptoms emerge.  Study I and II focused on infant temperament as either predictors of later autistic and/or ADHD traits or as being predicted by familial quantitative traits, to understand specific and shared associations to autistic and ADHD traits. In Study I, we examined if temperament traits in 1.5-year olds predict autism and ADHD traits at 3 years. Parent-rated temperament showed specific associations to autistic or ADHD traits, respectively. We found some overlap in regulation difficulties across both trait domains. In Study II, we explored the possibility to use probands’ autistic and ADHD traits to predict temperament traits in their 10-month old infant siblings (a between-individual design). We found that higher levels of probands’ autistic symptoms were specifically associated to lower levels of infant sibling’s approach, whereas higher levels of proband’s ADHD symptoms were specifically associated to increased activity levels in the infant siblings. Proband autism and ADHD traits thus provide unique information about the infant siblings’ temperament. Study III focused on specific and shared links between executive functions and deferred gratification and concurrent associations to autistic traits, ADHD traits, and adaptive behaviors in 3-year-olds. We found that deferred gratification may function as a protective factor, moderating autistic traits and adaptive behaviors and thus act as a buffer for adaptive behaviors Together, these studies contribute to our understanding of specific and shared early aspects of self-regulation and their associations to autistic and/or ADHD traits.

    List of papers
    1. How Does Temperament in Toddlers at Elevated Likelihood for Autism Relate to Symptoms of Autism and ADHD at Three Years of Age?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Does Temperament in Toddlers at Elevated Likelihood for Autism Relate to Symptoms of Autism and ADHD at Three Years of Age?
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    2022 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 995-1006Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated longitudinal associations between parent-rated temperament, observed exuberance and accelerometer activity level at 18-months and symptoms of ASD and ADHD at 36-months in a sample of 54 children at elevated likelihood for ASD. For the specific parent-rated temperament scales, most observed significant associations appeared to be specific for either ASD or ADHD symptoms. Indeed, by controlling for overlapping symptoms a different pattern of associations emerged. These results illustrate how temperamental measures may signal risk for later ASD versus ADHD symptomatology in infants at elevated likelihood for ASD. In addition, they indicate the potential of adopting a broader view on neurodevelopmental disorders by investigating not only ASD traits, but also co-occurring disorders such as ADHD in samples of elevated likelihood for ASD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Nature, 2022
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-440247 (URN)10.1007/s10803-021-05001-z (DOI)000640169200001 ()33852084 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2023-10-09Bibliographically approved
    2. Using the Infant Sibling-Design to Explore Associations Between Autism and ADHD Traits in Probands and Temperament in the Younger Siblings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the Infant Sibling-Design to Explore Associations Between Autism and ADHD Traits in Probands and Temperament in the Younger Siblings
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    2023 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to use the infant sibling design to explore whether proband traits of autism and ADHD could provide information about their infant sibling’s temperament. This could help us to gain information about the extent to which infant temperament traits are differentially associated with autism and ADHD traits. We used parent-ratings of autistic traits and ADHD traits (CRS-3) in older siblings diagnosed with autism (age range 4 to 19 years), and their infant siblings’ temperament traits (IBQ) at 9 months of age in 216 sibling pairs from two sites (BASIS, UK, and EASE, Sweden) to examine associations across siblings. We found specific, but modest, associations across siblings after controlling for sex, age, developmental level and site. Proband autistic traits were specifically related to low levels of approach in the infant siblings, with infant developmental level explaining part of the variance in infant approach. Proband ADHD traits were specifically related to high levels of infant activity even after controlling for covariates. Our findings suggest that proband traits of autism and ADHD carry information for infant sibling’s temperament, indicating that inherited liability may influence early emerging behaviours in infant siblings. The impact of sex, age, developmental level and site are discussed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2023
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-506947 (URN)10.1007/s10803-023-06047-x (DOI)001016138600002 ()37355531 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-1802:1Uppsala UniversityEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 2007-2013
    Available from: 2023-06-30 Created: 2023-06-30 Last updated: 2023-10-09
    3. Deferred Gratification as a Protective factor for Autistic Symptom-Adaptive Behavior Associations in 3-Year-Olds
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deferred Gratification as a Protective factor for Autistic Symptom-Adaptive Behavior Associations in 3-Year-Olds
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with ASD and/or ADHD often struggle with tasks that demand executive functioning (EF) and deferred gratification. However, whether children with a family history of ASD and/or ADHD differ on these types of tasks in comparison to peers with a family history of typical likelihood is not known. In addition, little is known about the specificity of these domains in relation to autistic traits, ADHD traits and adaptive behaviors early in life and whether deferred gratification and strong EF skills may function as protective factors in the trait-adaptive behaviour association.

    Methods:  A total of 77 infant siblings at 3 years of age participated in the study and we examined the effect of type of family history -FH-ASD, FH-ASD/ADHD and family history of typical likelihood FH-TL- on EF performance, deferred gratification skills and adaptive behaviors, as well as specific and shared associations, including moderation effects. Measures included behavioral lab-tasks (common EF and deferred gratification), parent-rated adaptive behavior using VABS, and clinician ratings using ADOS-2 (autistic symptoms) and ADHD DSM-5 Rating Scale (ADHD RS). 

    Results: Lower levels of deferred gratification was specifically related to adaptive behavior, while lower level performance on common EF was specific for ADHD traits and adaptive behavior. Finally, deferred gratification moderated the association between autistic symptoms and adaptive behavior, in that stronger ability to defer gratification attenuated the association between autistic traits and adaptive functions. 

    Conclusions: In terms of specificity, we found unique associations between deferred gratification and autistic traits, and between common EF and ADHD traits. Finally, the results are in line with the idea that strong EF may act as a protective factor for children with an elevated likelihood of ASD and/or ADHD. However, our findings point at more affective than cognitive aspects of EF as particularly important for attenuating the association between autistic traits and adaptive behaviors. 

    Keywords
    Executive Functions, Deferred Gratification, Adaptive Behavior, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
    National Category
    Psychology Psychiatry
    Research subject
    Psychology; Psychology; Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-513306 (URN)
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationStiftelsen Sunnerdahls HandikappfondRiksbankens JubileumsfondEuropean Commission, H2020 project CANDY
    Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-10-09
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  • 15.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden.
    Stillesjö, Sara
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden.
    Juslin, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Wirebring, Linnea Karlsson
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden.
    Neurocognitive processes underlying heuristic and normative probability judgments2020In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 196, article id 104153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Judging two events in combination (A&B) as more probable than one of the events (A) is known as a conjunction fallacy. According to dual-process explanations of human judgment and decision making, the fallacy is due to the application of a heuristic, associative cognitive process. Avoiding the fallacy has been suggested to require the recruitment of a separate process that can apply normative rules. We investigated these assumptions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during conjunction tasks. Judgments, whether correct or not, engaged a network of brain regions identical to that engaged during similarity judgments. Avoidance of the conjunction fallacy additionally, and uniquely, involved a fronto-parietal network previously linked to supervisory, analytic control processes. The results lend credibility to the idea that incorrect probability judgments are the result of a representativeness heuristic that requires additional neurocognitive resources to avoid.

  • 16.
    Arweström Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Vad är det trafikledarna gör som automationen inte klarar?: Tågtrafikstyrning med människan i centrum2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 17.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, p. 44-50Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, p. 37-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 19. Asberg Johnels, Jakob
    et al.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Miniscalco, Carmela
    Face-Viewing Patterns in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Speaking up for the Role of Language Comprehension.2014In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 2246-2252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to examine whether viewing patterns toward the mouth, eyes, and nonmouth-noneyes areas differed between young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children when viewing a person speaking. The role of language comprehension in such viewing patterns was also examined.

    Method: Eleven children with ASD (approximately 4.5 years old) and 29 TD toddlers (approximately 2.5 years old) participated. The groups were matched on language comprehension raw scores from the Reynell Developmental Language Scales III. All children viewed short films of a woman speaking while their eye movements were recorded with eye-tracking equipment.

    Results: Children with ASD spent proportionally less time viewing the mouth and more time viewing the nonmouth-noneyes areas. Time viewing the eyes did not differ between groups. Increased mouth viewing was associated with lower language comprehension in the group with ASD.

    Conclusion: Variability in language comprehension is an important factor to monitor when interpreting face-viewing patterns in young children with ASD, particularly with regard to mouth viewing. The results may help explain divergent findings in this field of research.

  • 20.
    Aslin, Richard N.
    et al.
    Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Fox, Nathan A.
    Univ Maryland, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Lewkowicz, David J.
    Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Maurer, Daphne
    McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada..
    Nelson, Charles A.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Multiple pathways to developmental continuity in infant cognition2023In: Trends in cognitive sciences, ISSN 1364-6613, E-ISSN 1879-307X, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 692-693Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Astor, Kim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thiele, Maleen
    Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Anthropol, Dept Comparat Cultural Psychol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gaze following emergence relies on both perceptual cues and social awareness2021In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 60, article id 101121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of research have emphasized the significance of gaze following in early development. Yet, the developmental origin of this ability has remained poorly understood. We tested the claims made by two prominent theoretical perspectives to answer whether infants gaze following response is based on perceptual (motion of the head) or social cues (gaze direction). We found that 12-month-olds (N = 30) are able to inhibit motion cues and exclusively follow the direction of others' gaze. Six- (N = 29) and 4-month-olds (N = 30) can follow gaze, with a sensitivity to both perceptual and social cues. These results align with the perceptual narrowing hypothesis of gaze following emergence, suggesting that social and perceptual cueing are non-exclusive paths to early developing gaze following.

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  • 22. Aue, Tatjana
    et al.
    Kress, Laura
    Bristle, Mirko
    Schuepbach, Laurent
    Different measures of optimism-attention bias interactions: Do they converge?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Axelsson, Emma L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, 2308, Australia.
    Fawcett, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Humans' Pupillary Contagion Extends to Cats and Dogs2021In: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5016, E-ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 16, no 1-2, p. 153-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When viewing pupil sizes change, our own pupil sizes change, a phenomenon known as pupillary contagion. This involuntary response is reliable between humans, but can be affected by familiarity and empathy. We investigated whether the pupillary contagion response occurs for humans viewing familiar species - cats and dogs - and whether it is modulated by preferences for particular species. Pupil sizes were measured while viewing cat, dog, and human images with small, medium, and large pupils. Trait empathy, cat and dog affiliation and experience were subsequently measured. There was an image pupil size effect, but this did not vary by species. There was greater pupil size change to cats and dogs than to humans, but this might have been due to the varying size and appearance of the cats and dogs. Greater dog affiliation was also associated with smaller overall pupil size change to dogs and larger change to humans, but this did not interact with image pupil size. Dog affiliation might be associated with less arousal to dog images. In sum, pupillary contagion responses indicate a spontaneous transfer of information about internal states and the findings suggest that humans are sensitive to this across species, regardless of individual preference.

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  • 24.
    Axelsson, Emma L.
    et al.
    Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia..
    Moore, Derek G.
    Faculty of Health and Education, University of Greenwich, London, UK.; School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK..
    Murphy, Elizabeth M.
    School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK..
    Goodwin, Julia E.
    School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK..
    Clifford, Brian R.
    School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK..
    The role of bodies in infants’ categorical representations of humans and non-human animals2018In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 27, no 6, article id e2112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate whether bodies are useful cues in infants' category formations, 7-month-old infants were familiarized to images of humans or non-human animals followed by test pairs comprising a familiar category image and a hybrid image with a novel category body. Infants familiarized to humans did not demonstrate a novelty preference for hybrid stimuli with non-human animal bodies. Infants familiarized with non-human animals demonstrated a novelty preference for hybrid stimuli with human bodies, suggesting that there is an asymmetry in infants' category formations of bodies. Compared with infants familiarized to non-human animals, the infants familiarized to humans had a higher proportional fixation count to bodies during familiarization, but the lack of preference for novel category bodies at test suggests that 7-month-old infants' representations of the features of human bodies are likely still developing and they are more likely to form a summary-based categorical representation of non-human animals.

  • 25.
    Balkenius, Christian
    et al.
    Lund Univ Cognit Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Fawcett, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Johansson, Birger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Lund Univ Cognit Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Pupillary Correlates of Emotion and Cognition: A Computational Model2019In: 2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference On Neural Engineering (NER), IEEE, 2019, p. 903-907Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to controlling the influx of light to the retina, the pupil also reacts as a result of cognitive and emotional processing. This makes it possible to use pupil dilation as an index for cognitive effort and emotional arousal. We show how an extended version of a computational model of pupil dilation can account for pupillary contagion effects where the pupil of an observer dilates upon seeing another person with dilated pupils. We also show how the model can reproduce the effects of cognitive effort in a math exercise. Furthermore, we investigate how the model can account for different explanations for the abnormal pupil response seen in individuals with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder. The reported computer simulations illustrate the usefulness of system-level models of the brain in addressing complex cognitive and emotional phenomena.

  • 26. Bark, Mats
    et al.
    Heide, Mats
    Langen, Maria
    Nygren, Else
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction. Människa-datorinteraktion.
    Intranätboken: från elektronisk anslagstavla till dagligt arbetsverktyg2002Book (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Boken handlar inte om tekniken bakom intranät eller hur man implementerar ett intranät, utan fokuserar på "mjuka" saker som innehåll, kommunikation, organisation, kultur, lärande och gränssnitt. Den visar på de möjligheter och svårigheter det innebär att skapa system som stödjer individens och organisationens processer.

    Intranätboken kan läsas från pärm till pärm, men man kan också välja att läsa de kapitel man är mest intresserad av, eftersom de är fristående. Varje författare har skrivit om den del av intranät hon/han behärskar bäst. Boken rör sig från det övergripande och något mer teoretiska till en fallstudie av portalutvecklingen inom Telia, och avslutas med en mer handgriplig diskussion om vikten av att skapa användarvänliga webblösningar. Perspektivet är snarare utifrån en vidareutveckling av ett befintligt intranät än en start av ett nytt.

    Boken är främst avsedd för dem som arbetar med webbfrågor inom något större organisationer, men är även tänkt för högskole-/universitetskurser i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap, företagsekonomi och informatik.

  • 27.
    Barradas, Gonçalo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sakka, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    When words matter: A cross-cultural perspective on lyrics and their relationship to musical emotions2022In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 650-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have investigated emotional reactions to instrumental music. However, studies on the effect of lyrics on emotions are limited. Previous studies suggest that the importance of lyrics may vary cross-culturally. The aim of this study was twofold: to investigate the effects of lyrics on aroused emotions and psychological mechanisms with music and to explore whether these differ cross-culturally. Fifty participants from Portugal and Sweden listened to six musical stimuli based on two songs, one representing each culture. These were presented in three versions each: the original, an instrumental, and the instrumental version with lyrics on the screen. The Portuguese and Swedish participants differed notably: the presence of lyrics did not affect listeners' happiness in neither group as predicted, but did increase sadness, albeit only in the Portuguese group. Lyrics also increased nostalgia for the Portuguese listeners as predicted and surprise-astonishment for the Swedish listeners. Regarding the mechanisms, lyrics increased the activation of episodic memory in both groups, and the activation of evaluative conditioning, contagion, and visual imagery in the Portuguese group. The present study indicates that lyrics have an effect on musical emotions and mechanisms which vary between groups of different cultural backgrounds.

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  • 28. Bell, Simon
    et al.
    van Zon, Roland
    Van Herzele, Ann
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Health benefits of nature experience: Implications of practice for research2011In: Forests, trees, and human health / [ed] Nilsson, Kjell, Marcus Sangster, Christos Gallis, Terry Hartig, Sjerp de Vries, Klaus Seeland & Jasper Schipperijn, Dordrecht: Springer , 2011, 1st Edition, p. 183-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29. Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Broman, J. -E
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Haglund, K.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 1, SIArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Berggren, Mathias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kaati, Lisa
    Pelzer, Björn
    Stiff, Harald
    Lundmark, Lukas
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Generalizability of Machine Learning Models of Personality across Two Text Domains2024In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 217, article id 112465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine learning of high-dimensional models have received attention for their ability to predict psychological variables, such as personality. However, it has been less examined to what degree such models are capable of generalizing across domains. Across two text domains (Reddit message and personal essays), compared to low-dimensional- and theoretical models, atheoretical high-dimensional models provided superior predictive accuracy within but poor/non-significant predictive accuracy across domains. Thus, complex models depended more on the specifics of the trained domain. Further, when examining predictors of models, few survived across domains. We argue that theory remains important when conducting prediction-focused studies and that research on both high- and low-dimensional models benefit from establishing conditions under which they generalize.

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  • 31.
    Bergh, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Prejudiced Personalities Revisited: On the Nature of (Generalized) Prejudice2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the media, one type of prejudice is often discussed as isolated from other types of prejudice. For example, after Breivik’s massacre, intolerance toward Muslims was intensely debated (for good reasons). However, his manifesto also disclosed extreme attitudes towards women and gays, a fact which passed without much notice. Still, in understanding why some individuals are so extremely intolerant compared to others, the psychological unity underlying different kinds of prejudice (e.g., racism, sexism) needs to be considered. This psychological unity, referred to as generalized prejudice, provided the starting point for personality theories on prejudice because it suggests that some people are simply more biased than other people in principle. Today it is well known that two basic personality characteristics, agreeableness and openness to new experiences, are powerful predictors of prejudice. However, more precisely what these variables can, versus cannot, explain has received little attention. Consequently, the aim of this thesis was to provide a more fine-grained analysis of generalized prejudice and its personality roots. Paper I demonstrated that personality mainly accounts for variance shared by several prejudice targets (generalized prejudice) whereas group membership mainly predicts unique variance in prejudice towards a particular target group. Thus, personality and group membership factors explain prejudice for different reason, and do not contradict each other. Paper II demonstrated, across three studies, that agreeableness and openness to experience are related to self-reported (explicit) prejudice, but not automatically expressed (implicit) biases. Personality seems informative about who chooses to express devaluing sentiments, but not who harbors spontaneous biases. Finally, Paper III examined the assumption that personality explains (explicit) generalized prejudice because some people simply favor their own group over all other groups (ethnocentrism). Providing the first direct test of this assumption, the results from three studies suggest that while agreeableness and openness to experience explain generalized prejudice, they do not account for purely ethnocentric attitudes. This indicates a fundamental difference between ethnocentrism and generalized prejudice. All in all, self-reported personality seems to have little to do with spontaneous group negativity or simple ingroup favoritism. However, personality strongly predicts deliberate and verbalized devaluation of disadvantaged groups.

    List of papers
    1. Generalized prejudice: Common and specific components
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Generalized prejudice: Common and specific components
    2011 (English)In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 57-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Psychology
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-141035 (URN)10.1177/0956797610390384 (DOI)000294708600012 ()
    Available from: 2011-01-10 Created: 2011-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. The Personality Underpinnings of Explicit and Implicit Generalized Prejudice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Personality Underpinnings of Explicit and Implicit Generalized Prejudice
    2012 (English)In: Social Psychology and Personality Science, ISSN 1948-5506, E-ISSN 1948-5514, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 614-621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of prejudice as a tendency that can be generalized from one target to another and the personality–prejudice relationship have been widely examined using explicit measures. However, less is known about this tendency and its relation to personality for implicit prejudice measures, like the implicit association test (IAT). Three studies including explicit and corresponding implicit prejudice measures toward various target groups confirmed a generalized factor for both types of measures with a stronger common component for the explicit factor. Personality was significantly related to the explicit measures only. Also, the personality and prejudice measures were unrelated to explicit and implicit attitudes toward an irrelevant target which rules out potential method confound. These results indicate that explicit and implicit prejudice measures tap different psychological constructs relating differently to the individual’s self-reported personality. The findings have implications for the debate on whether IAT scores reflect personally endorsed attitudes.

    Keywords
    personality, generalized prejudice, implicit association test, cultural stereotypes, personal attitudes
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-208609 (URN)10.1177/1948550611432937 (DOI)000208936600013 ()
    Available from: 2013-10-25 Created: 2013-10-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Ethnocentric Personality: A 60-Year Old Myth?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnocentric Personality: A 60-Year Old Myth?
    (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    After World War II, researchers began searching for a prejudiced personality. This inquiry relied, and still relies, on interrelations between prejudice toward different targets (generalized prejudice) and correlations with ideology and personality variables. The conventional wisdom here became that some people are systematically more biased toward all outgroups (ethnocentrism). However, it is not conclusive that generalized prejudice reflect outgroup biases. For example, Gays and overweight people could be targeted by prejudice alike because they are minorities, not because they are outgroups. Based on three experiments employing the minimal group paradigm, this paper provides the first direct test of the ethnocentric personality assumption. We found that personality (Agreeableness & Openness to Experience) only accounted for a small share of the variance in ethnocentrism but, in line with previous research, a large share in generalized prejudice. We propose a re-evaluating the ethnocentric personality notion and a distinction between ethnocentrism and generalized prejudice.

    Keywords
    Ethnocentrism, generalized prejudice, personality, agreeableness, openness to experience
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210291 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2014-01-23Bibliographically approved
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  • 32.
    Bergh, Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ethnocentric Personality: A 60-Year Old Myth?Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After World War II, researchers began searching for a prejudiced personality. This inquiry relied, and still relies, on interrelations between prejudice toward different targets (generalized prejudice) and correlations with ideology and personality variables. The conventional wisdom here became that some people are systematically more biased toward all outgroups (ethnocentrism). However, it is not conclusive that generalized prejudice reflect outgroup biases. For example, Gays and overweight people could be targeted by prejudice alike because they are minorities, not because they are outgroups. Based on three experiments employing the minimal group paradigm, this paper provides the first direct test of the ethnocentric personality assumption. We found that personality (Agreeableness & Openness to Experience) only accounted for a small share of the variance in ethnocentrism but, in line with previous research, a large share in generalized prejudice. We propose a re-evaluating the ethnocentric personality notion and a distinction between ethnocentrism and generalized prejudice.

  • 33.
    Bergh, Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Personality Underpinnings of Explicit and Implicit Generalized Prejudice2012In: Social Psychology and Personality Science, ISSN 1948-5506, E-ISSN 1948-5514, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 614-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of prejudice as a tendency that can be generalized from one target to another and the personality–prejudice relationship have been widely examined using explicit measures. However, less is known about this tendency and its relation to personality for implicit prejudice measures, like the implicit association test (IAT). Three studies including explicit and corresponding implicit prejudice measures toward various target groups confirmed a generalized factor for both types of measures with a stronger common component for the explicit factor. Personality was significantly related to the explicit measures only. Also, the personality and prejudice measures were unrelated to explicit and implicit attitudes toward an irrelevant target which rules out potential method confound. These results indicate that explicit and implicit prejudice measures tap different psychological constructs relating differently to the individual’s self-reported personality. The findings have implications for the debate on whether IAT scores reflect personally endorsed attitudes.

  • 34.
    Bergh, Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brandt, Mark J.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Psychol, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Generalized Prejudice: Lessons about social power, ideological conflict, and levels of abstraction2023In: European Review of Social Psychology, ISSN 1046-3283, E-ISSN 1479-277X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 92-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prejudices tend to come as a package deal; people who are more racist tend to also be more sexist, and so on. Documentations of such attitudinal patterns - generalised prejudice - have a rich history, but the theoretical understanding thereof has been lagging. In recent years, we have seen clear theoretical advancement in the understanding of this phenomenon. We discuss classic premises in this research along with newer research that challenges some of the most ingrained ideas about generalised prejudice. For instance, we discuss research challenging the notions that generalised prejudice is an "us" versus "them" phenomenon, as well as a product of conservative ideology. We further argue that prejudice generalisations need to be studied at different levels of abstraction. Finally, we propose integrative perspectives on generalised and target-specific prejudice, with greater emphasis on processes of generalisation, rather than static generalised prejudice factors.

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  • 35.
    Bergh, Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, William James Hall,33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Reinstein, David
    Univ Exeter, Sch Business, Dept Econ, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Empathic and Numerate Giving: The Joint Effects of Victim Images and Charity Evaluations2021In: Social Psychology and Personality Science, ISSN 1948-5506, E-ISSN 1948-5514, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 407-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helping behaviors are often driven by emotional reactions to the suffering of particular individuals, but these behaviors do not seem to be upregulated when many people need help. In this article, we consider if these reactions are also "innumerate" to information about how charities spend their money. Across six experiments, we examined how images of identified victims interact with information about charity efficiency (money toward program) and effectiveness (program outcome). We further examined if the images primarily get people to donate (yes/no), while efficiency/effectiveness might provide a tuning mechanism for how much to give. Results showed that images influenced the propensity to donate and induced participants donate their full bonuses, indicating heuristic effects. Efficiency and effectiveness information had no effects on donations.

  • 36.
    Bergh, Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Sidanius, Jim
    Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Sibley, Chris G.
    Univ Auckland, Auckland 1, New Zealand..
    Dimensions of Social Dominance: Their Personality and Socio-political Correlates within a New Zealand Probability Sample2015In: NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 1179-7924, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) was introduced as a unidimensional construct predicting numerous socio-political attitudes. However, recent findings suggest that SDO is composed of two sub-dimensions: dominance (SDO-D) and anti-egalitarianism (SDO-E). Despite converging evidence concerning their empirical differentiability, there is little consensus on how to best define them. Thus, we examined the correlates of SDO-D and SDO-E using a broad array of personality, political, ethnic and gender issue variables within a New Zealand national probability sample (N = 5,741) with European and Maori participants. SDO-D primarily related to the personality trait of honesty-humility, hostile and benevolent sexism. SDO-E primarily related to political conservatism and pro-Maori policies. In many cases, the predictive power differed between SDO-D and SDO-E, and across ethnic groups.

  • 37.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fabian, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hjern, Anders
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Preschool children living in joint physical custody arrangements show less psychological symptoms than those living mostly or only with one parent2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 294-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Joint physical custody (JPC), where children spend about equal time in both parent's homes after parental separation, is increasing. The suitability of this practice for preschool children, with a need for predictability and continuity, has been questioned.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we used data on 3656 Swedish children aged three to five years living in intact families, JPC, mostly with one parent or single care. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, completed by parents and preschool teachers, as the outcome measure.

    RESULTS: Children in JPC showed less psychological problems than those living mostly (adjusted B 1.81; 95% CI [0.66 to 2.95]) or only with one parent (adjusted B 1.94; 95% CI [0.75 to 3.13]), in parental reports. In preschool teacher reports, the adjusted Betas were 1.27, 95% CI [0.14 to 2.40] and 1.41, 95% CI [0.24 to 2.58], respectively. In parental reports, children in JPC and those in intact families had similar outcomes, while teachers reported lower unadjusted symptom scores for children in intact families.

    CONCLUSION: Joint physical custody arrangements were not associated with more psychological symptoms in children aged 3-5, but longitudinal studies are needed to account for potential preseparation differences.

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  • 38.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies CHESS, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm Univ, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies CHESS, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm Univ, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Hlth Equ Studies CHESS, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    "We also communicate through a book in the diaper bag"-Separated parents' ways to coparent and promote adaptation of their 1-4 year olds in equal joint physical custody2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Joint physical custody (JPC) refers to a practice where children with separated parents share their time between the parents' respective homes. Studies on parents' views of JPC for young children are scarce. The aim of this interview study was to explore parents' perceptions on how they experience and practice equally shared JPC for their 1-4 year-olds in Sweden. Forty-six parents (18 fathers and 28 mothers) of 50 children (31 boys and 19 girls) under 5 years of age were interviewed. Parents were recruited through information in the media and represented a broad range of socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as both voluntary and court-ordered custody arrangements. The interviews were semi-structured and analyzed using systematic text condensation. Two themes emerged regarding the research question. In the first theme, Always free, never free, parents described their striving to coparent without a love relationship. While they appreciated the freedom of being a "half-time parent", doing things one's own way, they felt constrained by the long-term commitment to live close to and keep discussing child rearing issues with the ex-partner. Good communication was key and lessened parent's feelings of being cut-off from half of the child's life. When JPC was ordered by court or conflicts were intense, parents tried to have less contact and worried when the children were in the other home. The second theme, Is it right, is it good?, included descriptions of how the parents monitored the child's responses to the living arrangement and made changes to optimize their adjustment. Adaptations included visits for the child with the other parent mid-week, shared meals or adapting schedules. In conclusion, these parents worked hard to make JPC work and cause minimal damage to their children. Most parents were pleased with the arrangements with the notable exception of couples experiencing ongoing conflict.

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  • 39.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Att lära ut ett nytt sätt att tänka: utvärdering av Cognitive Skills-programmet i kriminalvården 1995-20002002Book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Auricular acupuncture as an auxiliary treatment for substance abusers a controlled study of the NADA-Acudetox protocol in two swedish prisons2001In: Deutsche Zeitschrift fur Akupunktur, Vol. 44, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    De fyra världarna i existentiell terapi: Några reflektioner om övervärlden2008In: Att leva- texter i existentiell psykologi och terapi / [ed] Dan Stiwne, Natur och kultur , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    E-HEALTH INTERVENTIONS FOR ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS2012In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Enhancing health among drug users in prison2004Book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    How does the princess feel when the story ends differently: The psychological health of divorced women with children2000In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 35, no 3-4, SIArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Hur mår prinsessan när sagan slutar annorlunda?: psykisk hälsa efter skilsmässa hos kvinnor med barn1998Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    INTRODUCTION TO MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING: TECHNIQUES, PROCESSES, AND PROFICIENCY2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    INTRODUCTION TO MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING: TECHNIQUES, PROCESSES, PROFICIENCY2018In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 25, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    IVR ASSESSMENT AND BRIEF INTERVENTION CONCERNING HAZARDOUS AND HARMFUL ALCOHOL USE2010In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 17, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kasta ut badvattnet men behåll barnet!2010In: Kriminalvård i praktiken: Strategier för att minska återfall i brott och missbruk, Studentlitteratur AB, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Reconviction outcomes among Swedish male probationers: Pattern analysis by substance use2005In: Probation Journal, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 296-299Article in journal (Refereed)
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