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  • 1. Abondolo, Daniel
    et al.
    Valijärvi, Riitta-Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages. University College London.
    Introduction to the Uralic languages, with special reference to Finnish and Hungarian2023In: The Uralic Languages / [ed] Daniel Abondolo & Riitta-Liisa Valijärvi, London: Routledge, 2023, 2, p. 1-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces the rest of the book by rapidly surveying the names of the Uralic languages and their speakers’ numbers, as well as discussing the relative size and age of the family and its nine branches. It outlines the prehistory of these branches and then goes on to sketch in outline the phonological and lexicogrammatical features that the editors think most interesting, problematic, suggestive, and instructive. The reader should come away from reading this chapter with an understanding of the four kinds of information contained in the rest of the book. These are (i) how and which speech sounds are used (vowels and vowel harmony, stress, consonants, and consonant gradation); (ii) how nouns and verbs change their shapes in sentences—case, number, and predestination (in nouns) and tense, mood, and object indexing (in verbs); (iii) how words are put together to make clauses and complex sentences; and (iv) how new words are made (derivation and compounding). The chapter also introduces the more important theoretical conventions that the editors have found most useful in characterizing Uralic languages. To make the chapter accessible to as wide as possible a readership, most of the terminology used is cast in a basic linguistic theory framework. 

  • 2. Abondolo, Daniel
    et al.
    Valijärvi, Riitta-LiisaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    The Uralic Languages: Second Edition2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Uralic Languages, second edition, is a reference book which brings together detailed discussions of the historical development and specialized linguistic structures and features of the languages in the Uralic family.

    The Uralic languages are spoken today in a vast geographical area stretching from Dalarna County in Sweden to Dudinka, Taimyr, Russia. There are currently approximately 50 languages in the group, the largest one among them being the state languages Finnish, Estonian, and Hungarian; other Uralic languages covered in the book are South Saami, Skolt Saami, Võro, Moksha Mordvin, Mari, Udmurt, Zyrian Komi, Mansi, Khanty, Nganasan, Forest and Tundra Enets, Nenets, and Selkup. The book also contains a chapter on Finnic languages, the reconstruction of Uralic, the history of Uralic studies, connections of Uralic to other language families, and language names, demographics, and degrees of endangerment. This second and thoroughly revised edition updates and augments the authoritative accounts of the first edition and reflects recent and ongoing developments in linguistics and the languages themselves, as well as our further enhanced understanding of the relations and patterns of influence between them. Each chapter combines modern linguistic analysis and documentary linguistics; a relatively uniform structure allows for easy typological comparison between the individual languages.

    Written by an international team of experts, The Uralic Languages will be invaluable to students and researchers within linguistics, folklore, and Siberian studies.

  • 3.
    Abreu Fernandes, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Language workout in bilingual mother-child interaction: A case study of heritage language practices in Russian-Swedish family talk2019In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 140, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines heritage language practices embedded in mundane family activities in a context of Russian-Swedish mother-child interaction. The analysis focuses on the organization and accomplishments of a variety of so-called home language lessons, here termed language workout. In mobilizing a teacher-talk register (e.g., corrections, questions with known answers, hyper-articulation), this practice resembles common language socialization practices in middle-class families. Its sequential organization (e.g. talk turns are coordinated with task turns; repetitions and expansion of the target linguistic item in the following turn) and consistent employment of a parent-talk register (e.g. diminutives) dialectically invoke educational and intimate, task- and language-oriented dimensions. The findings reveal that the realization of language policy in bilingual families relies not only on parental input and language choice, but also on the position of the child as a speaker and learner vis-à-vis the parent and ways in which the child is invited to put the target language into use. While family language policy research primarily uncovered how children challenge family language norms, this study highlights a format that allows for educational, affective and engaging exploration of bilingual language use with young children at home.

  • 4.
    Abreu Fernandes, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nurturing a heritage language: Language-centered practices in mother-child interactions in multilingual families2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated within research on language socialization and family language policy, this thesis explores how young children (2–4 years old) learn their heritage language in multilingual, transnational families, and how multilingualism becomes an integral part of family life. It draws on video-ethnographic fieldwork in three bi/multilingual families in Sweden with preschool-aged children where the mothers speak Russian and the parents aspire to raise children multilingually.

    Using a multimodal interactional analysis, the three studies identify and examine recurrent language practices that promote the children’s use of the heritage language, Russian, in mother-child interactions. They approach heritage language maintenance as embedded in mundane activities such as home language lessons during collaboratively accomplished chores (Study I), conversational storytelling during mealtime (Study II), and co-narration during literacy events (Study III).

    The analyses focus on the interactional organization of language learning agendas and heritage language socialization environments that are initiated by the mothers to scaffold their children’s learning and use of Russian. In particular, this study illuminates various ways to engage the children in collaborative Russian speech production, including mutually enjoyable embodied performances. Moreover, it is shown in detail how high expectations of children as heritage language speakers and learners and educational efforts are interactionally balanced through relational work.

    The findings suggest that the realization of family language policy to support heritage language development relies not only on consistent language choice, frequency of language use, and parental strategies and ideologies, but also on how language choice and language use are embedded in the ongoing activity, how activity formats are organized and appropriated by the children, the position of the child as a speaker vis-à-vis the parent, and affective alignments. The study uncovers an interplay of educational, relational, ideological, and pragmatic dimensions of heritage language socialization in the home. In this way, the thesis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of family language policy and children’s emergent multilingualism as integrated in everyday family life.

    List of papers
    1. Language workout in bilingual mother-child interaction: A case study of heritage language practices in Russian-Swedish family talk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language workout in bilingual mother-child interaction: A case study of heritage language practices in Russian-Swedish family talk
    2019 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 140, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines heritage language practices embedded in mundane family activities in a context of Russian-Swedish mother-child interaction. The analysis focuses on the organization and accomplishments of a variety of so-called home language lessons, here termed language workout. In mobilizing a teacher-talk register (e.g., corrections, questions with known answers, hyper-articulation), this practice resembles common language socialization practices in middle-class families. Its sequential organization (e.g. talk turns are coordinated with task turns; repetitions and expansion of the target linguistic item in the following turn) and consistent employment of a parent-talk register (e.g. diminutives) dialectically invoke educational and intimate, task- and language-oriented dimensions. The findings reveal that the realization of language policy in bilingual families relies not only on parental input and language choice, but also on the position of the child as a speaker and learner vis-à-vis the parent and ways in which the child is invited to put the target language into use. While family language policy research primarily uncovered how children challenge family language norms, this study highlights a format that allows for educational, affective and engaging exploration of bilingual language use with young children at home.

    Keywords
    Home language lesson, Language workout, Bilingual family interaction, Heritage language maintenance, Family language policy, Language socialization, Russian
    National Category
    General Language Studies and Linguistics Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377707 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2018.11.021 (DOI)000458097100007 ()
    Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2022-06-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Embodied performances and footings in a young child’s spontaneous participation in bilingual Russian–Swedish storytelling
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied performances and footings in a young child’s spontaneous participation in bilingual Russian–Swedish storytelling
    2019 (English)In: Research on Children and Social Interaction, ISSN 2057-5807, E-ISSN 2057-5815, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 36-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a multimodal interactional conversation analytic approach to explore a two-and-a-half-year-old child's spontaneous participation in the activity of telling personal experiences in the context of everyday bilingual mother-child interactions. The selected data draw from a video-ethnographic study of children in Swedish families with Russian-speaking mothers. The analysis focuses on a young child's storytelling activities as co-constructed interactional practices, calling attention to the role of embodied performances, affective alignments and footingsas central for the tellability of a story. It is found that the child's spontaneous tellings were orchestrated through shifts in footings involving embodied animations, reenactments and affective displays, including prosodic actions and exaggerations, dramatizations, laughter, sound effects, exploitations of langauge form and code-switching (Russian-Swedish). Various keing resources (for affective embodied stances) were collaboratively produced to strengthen affective alignments and to heighten the emotional significance of the narrated event, framing it as a playful and imagined joint activity. the findings demonstrate how a reflexive kind of agency emerges whereby the child's playful embodied performances and reenactments of past, present and imagined events provide a common ground for a joiintly performed open-ended bilingual storytelling performance.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Equinox Publishing, 2019
    Keywords
    young children, bilingual storytelling, footings, embodied performances, multimodal interactional analysis
    National Category
    General Language Studies and Linguistics
    Research subject
    Education; Linguistics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-472790 (URN)10.1558/rcsi.37297 (DOI)
    Available from: 2022-04-17 Created: 2022-04-17 Last updated: 2022-07-20Bibliographically approved
    3. Designedly incomplete utterances as prompts for co-narration in home literacy events with young multilingual children
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designedly incomplete utterances as prompts for co-narration in home literacy events with young multilingual children
    2022 (English)In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 71, article id 101089Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This video-ethnographic study investigates how designedly incomplete utterances (DIUs) are used during home literacy events in three bilingual families with young chidlren in Sweden to prompt collaborative storybook reading in the chidlren's heritage language, Russian. The multimodal interactional analyses uncover how DIUs, in concert with other semiotic resources, create a sequential environment to prompt chidlren's speech production  in relation to the text at hand, to negotiate language choice and alignment with an ongoing literacy project, and to creatively exploit the DIU structure to initiate storytelling. The findings moreover show that recurrent use of DIUs during reading of well-known to teh child texts with rhythm and rhyme allow for ritualized engagemnet in co-narration, in all contributing to children's socialization to oral performance in the heritage language. 

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2022
    Keywords
    designedly incomplete utterances, literacy events, bilingual children, family interaction, heritage language maintenance, Russian
    National Category
    General Language Studies and Linguistics
    Research subject
    Education; Linguistics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-472792 (URN)10.1016/j.linged.2022.101089 (DOI)000872110400002 ()
    Available from: 2022-04-17 Created: 2022-04-17 Last updated: 2022-11-07Bibliographically approved
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  • 5.
    Abreu Fernandes, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Melander Bowden, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Designedly incomplete utterances as prompts for co-narration in home literacy events with young multilingual children2022In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 71, article id 101089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video-ethnographic study investigates how designedly incomplete utterances (DIUs) are used during home literacy events in three bilingual families with young chidlren in Sweden to prompt collaborative storybook reading in the chidlren's heritage language, Russian. The multimodal interactional analyses uncover how DIUs, in concert with other semiotic resources, create a sequential environment to prompt chidlren's speech production  in relation to the text at hand, to negotiate language choice and alignment with an ongoing literacy project, and to creatively exploit the DIU structure to initiate storytelling. The findings moreover show that recurrent use of DIUs during reading of well-known to teh child texts with rhythm and rhyme allow for ritualized engagemnet in co-narration, in all contributing to children's socialization to oral performance in the heritage language. 

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    fulltext
  • 6.
    Ackermann-Boström, Constanze
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    "Wenn ich schimpfe, dann schimpfe ich auf Russisch.": Fallstudie zu Sprache und Sprachgebrauch einer russlanddeutschen Aussiedlerin2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Att skriva i naturorienterande ämnen i skolan2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When children encounter new subjects in school, they are also faced with new ways of using language. Learning science thus means learning the language of science, and writing is one of the ways this is accomplished. The present study investigates writing in natural sciences in grades 5 and 8 in Swedish schools. Major theoretical influences for these investigations are found within the socio-cultural, dialogical and social semiotic perspectives on language use.

    The study is based on texts written by 97 students, interviews around these texts and observations from 16 different classroom practices. Writing is seen as a situated practice; therefore analysis is carried out of the activities surrounding the texts. The student texts are analysed in terms of genre and in relation to their abstraction, density and use of expansions. This analysis shows among other things that the texts show increasing abstraction and density with increasing age, whereas the text structure and the use of expansions do not increase.

    It is also argued that a central point in school writing must be the students’ way of talking about their texts. Analysis of interviews with the students is thus carried out in terms of text movability. The results from this analysis indicate that students find it difficult to talk about their texts. They find it hard to express the main content of the text, as well as to discuss it’s function and potential readers.

    Previous studies argue that writing constitutes a potential for learning. In the material studied in this thesis, this potential learning tool is not used to any large extent. To be able to participate in natural sciences in higher levels, students need to take part in practices where the specialized language of natural science is used in writing as well as in speech.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics. Uppsala University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Curriculum Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hur har du uppfattat det? En studie av den fenomenografiska ansatsen och dess förmåga att fånga elevens uppfattningar av lärobokstexter1998In: Papers, Uppsala: Department of Linguistics, Uppsala , 1998, Vol. 33, p. 39-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Curriculum Studies.
    ”I NO skriver man bara så man förstår.” Men hur skriver man, och hur förstår man? Expansioner och textrörlighet i elevtexter.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att lära sig ett nytt ämnesområde innebär även att lära sig det språk som används inom det området. Tidigare forskning visar att det är nödvändigt att lära sig att skriva inom till exempel de olika naturvetenskapliga genrerna för att bli en kompetent elev inom detta område (se t ex Halliday & Martin 1993, Wignell, 1998).

     

    I denna presentation vill jag närmare diskutera expansioner i texter skrivna av elever i skolår 5 och 8 i NO och SO-ämnena. Genom expansioner byggs semantiska relationer mellan händelser genom satser som definierar (’alltså’, ’med andra ord’), bygger ut (’och’, ’men’) eller specificerar (’sen’, ’för att’) den inledande satsen (Halliday & Matthiessen 2004).  Expansioner har diskuterats som en viktig del av den vetenskapliga diskursen, både i sig själva och även som ett uttryck för elevernas förståelse av vad de skriver (Keys 1999). I presentationen diskuterar jag graden av expansioner i texterna i relation till hur eleverna talar om sina texter, deras textrörlighet. Det visar sig bland annat att framför allt högpresterande elever har en högre textrörlighet i de texter som även har en högre grad av expansioner.

  • 10.
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Curriculum Studies.
    Om skrivande i naturorienterande ämnen: "Hon skrev upp vad vi skulle ha med på labbrapporten och sen så skrev vi det. Så var det inte så mycket mer än så."2010In: Symposium 2009: genrer och funktionellt språk i teori och praktik / [ed] Mikael Olofsson, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag , 2010, p. 176-188Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I kapitlet diskuteras en undersökning om elevers skrivande i naturorienterande ämnen, hur texterna ser ut och hur eleverna talar om de texter de skrivit. Resultaten diskuteras i relation till sådant som ämnesspråk och förståelse.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 11.
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Folkeryd, Jenny W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fel- men på olika sätt.: En analys av elevers felaktiga svar enligt PIRLS-provet.2013In: Läsning / [ed] Gustav Skar & Michael Tengberg, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ahman, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Actitudes y estereotipos hacia el lenguaje femenino, a través de una carta de autopresentación2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    El presente estudio investiga las actitudes,de parte de las mujeres, del uso de palabras, frases y la estructura de una carta de motivación. Se investigalos estereotipos que prevalecen a la hora de tomar su decisión al averiguar el género del autor/a de una carta de motivación. Se veía ideas similares tanto en lo que consideran habla femenino y habla masculino, como en la impresión general que tenían al leer las cartas de presentación del estudio. Los resultados nos ofrece una revelación delas actitudes y los estereotipos que están vinculados a,por una parte, el contenido de una carta de presentación, y, por otra parte, lo que se considera apropriado para el comportamiento tanto de los hombres, como para las mujeres.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics. Physics Education Research.
    Can you teach it in English? The Language Choice Debate in Swedish Higher Education.2004In: Integrating Content and Language: meeting the challenge of a multilingual higher education: proceedings of the ICL Conference, October 23-25 2003 / [ed] Robert Wilkinson, Maastricht: Universitaire Pers Maastricht , 2004, p. 97-108Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 14.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Disciplinary differences in the use of English2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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    castellon 2
  • 15.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Disciplinary Literacy2016Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 16.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Disciplinary Literacy: Theorising the Specialized Use of Language and other Modes in University Teaching and Learning2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disciplinary Literacy: Theorising the Specialized Use of Language and other Modes in University Teaching and Learning

    Abstract

    In this presentation I use the work of Basil Bernstein (Bernstein, 1990, 1999, 2000)to discuss the role of disciplinary differences in university teaching and learning.  Drawing from my own work on the theme of disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2012, 2013; Airey & Linder, 2008, 2011)I argue that all university lecturers are teachers of disciplinary literacy—even in monolingual settings. 

    I define disciplinary literacy as appropriate participation in the communicative practices of the discipline(Airey, 2011a, 2011b)and suggest that disciplinary literacy is developed for three specific sites (academy, workplace and society).  I will illustrate the multilingual and multimodal nature of disciplinary literacy with empirical evidence from a comparative study of the disciplinary literacy goals of Swedish and South African physics lecturers (Linder, Airey, Mayaba, & Webb, 2014). 

    Finally, I will conclude by demonstrating how two of Bernstein’s dichotomies: disciplinary knowledge structures (hierarchical vs horizontal) and disciplinary classification (singular vs region) can be used together with the disciplinary literacy triangle to better understand the literacy goals of particular disciplines 

    References

    Airey, J. (2009). Estimating bilingual scientific literacy in Sweden. International Journal of Content and Language Integrated   Learning, 1(2), 26-35. 

    Airey J. (2009). Science, Language and Literacy. Case Studies of Learning in Swedish University Physics. ActaUniversitatis  Upsaliensis. Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 81. Uppsala Retrieved 2009-04-27, from   http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

    Airey, J. (2010a). The ability of students to explain science concepts in two languages. Hermes - Journal of Language and   Communication Studies, 45, 35-49. 

    Airey, J. (2011a). Talking about Teaching in English. Swedish university lecturers' experiences of changing their teaching language.   Ibérica, 22(Fall), 35-54. 

    Airey, J. (2011b). Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education: Disciplinary Literacy and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning   Dynamic content and language collaboration in higher education: theory, research, and reflections(pp. 57-65). Cape Town,   South Africa: Cape Peninsula University of Technology.

    Airey, J. (2011c). The Disciplinary Literacy Discussion Matrix: A Heuristic Tool for Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education.   Across the disciplines, 8(3), unpaginated. Retrieved from http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/clil/airey.cfm

    Airey, J. (2011d). The relationship between teaching language and student learning in Swedish university physics. In B. Preisler, I.   Klitgård, & A.  Fabricius(Eds.), Language and learning in the international university: From English uniformity to diversity   and hybridity(pp. 3-18). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters. 

    Airey, J. (2012). “I don’t teach language.” The linguistic attitudes of physics lecturers in Sweden. AILA Review, 25(2012), 64–79. Airey, J. (2013). Disciplinary Literacy. In E. Lundqvist, L. Östman, & R. Säljö(Eds.), Scientific literacy – teoriochpraktik

       (pp. 41-58): Gleerups. 

    Airey, J. (2015). Social Semiotics in Higher Education: Examples from teaching and learning in undergraduate physics In: SACF   Singapore-Sweden Excellence Seminars, Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research in Higher   Education (STINT) , 2015 (pp. 103). urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266049.

    Airey, J. (2015). From stimulated recall to disciplinary literacy: Summarizing ten years of research into teaching and learning in   English. In SlobodankaDimova, Anna Kristina Hultgren, & Christian Jensen (Eds.), English-Medium Instruction in European   Higher Education. English in Europe, Volume 3(pp. 157-176): De GruyterMouton. 

    Airey, J. (2016). Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). In Hyland, K. &   Shaw, P. (Eds.), RoutledgeHandbook of English for Academic Purposes. (pp. 71-83) London: Routledge.

    Airey, J. (2017). CLIL: Combining Language and Content. ESP Today, 5(2), 297-302. 

    Airey, J., & Larsson, J. (2018). Developing Students’ Disciplinary Literacy? The Case of University Physics. In K.-S. Tang & K.   Danielsson(Eds.), Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education: Springer.

    Airey, J., Lauridsen, K., Raisanen, A., Salö, L., & Schwach, V. (2017). The Expansion of English-medium Instruction in the Nordic   Countries. Can Top-down University Language Policies Encourage Bottom-up Disciplinary Literacy Goals? Higher Education.   doi:10.1007/s10734-015-9950-2

    Bernstein, B. (1999). Vertical and horizontal discourse: An essay. British Journal of Sociology Education, 20(2), 157-173. 

    Bolton, K., & Kuteeva, M. (2012). English as an academic language at a Swedish university: parallel language use and the ‘threat’ of   English. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 33(5), 429-447. 

    Gee, J. P. (1991). What is literacy? In C. Mitchell & K. Weiler(Eds.), Rewriting literacy: Culture and the discourse of the other(pp.   3-11). New York: Bergin & Garvey. 

    Gibson, J. J. (1979). The theory of affordances The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception(pp. 127-143). Boston: Houghton   Miffin.

    Kuteeva, M., & Airey, J. (2014). Disciplinary Differences in the Use of English in Higher Education: Reflections on Recent Policy   Developments  Higher Education, 67(5), 533-549. doi:10.1007/s10734-013-9660-6

    Lea, Mary R., & Street, Brian V. (1998). Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher   Education, 23(2), 157-172. 

    Linder, A., Airey, J., Mayaba, N., & Webb, P. (2014). Fostering Disciplinary Literacy? South African Physics Lecturers’ Educational   Responses to their Students’ Lack of Representational Competence. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science   and Technology Education, 18(3), 242-252. doi:10.1080/10288457.2014.95329

    Lindström, C. (2011). Analysingknowledge and teaching practices in physics. Presentation 21 November 2011 Invited speaker:   Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden. 

    Martin, J. R. (2011). Bridging troubled waters: Interdisciplinarityand what makes it stick. In F. Christie & K. Maton(Eds.),   Disciplinarity(pp. 35-61). London: Continuum International Publishing. 

    Norris, Stephen P., & Phillips, Linda M. (2003). How literacy in its fundamental sense is central to scientific literacy. Science  Education, 87(2), 224-240. 

    Roberts, D. (2007). Scientific literacy/science literacy: Threats and opportunities. In S. K. Abell& N. G. Lederman (Eds.), Handbook  of research on science education(pp. 729-780). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Salö, L. (2010). Engelskaellersvenska? En kartläggning av språksituationen inom högre utbildning och forskning [English or Swedish? A survey of the language situation in higher education and research]. Stockholm: Språkrådet. 

    Swales, J., & Feak, C. (2004). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential tasks and skills. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan

    Thøgersen, J., & Airey, J. (2011). Lecturing undergraduate science in Danish and in English: A comparison of speaking rate and rhetorical style. English for Specific Purposes, 30(3), 209-221.

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  • 17.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    EAP, EMI or CLIL?: (English for Academic Purposes, English Medium Instruction or Content and Language Integrated Learning)2016In: Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Hyland, K. & Shaw, P., Milton Park: Routledge, 2016, p. 71-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    EMI, CLIL, EAP:What’s the difference?2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    EMI, CLIL, EAP: What’s the difference?

    Abstract

    In this presentation I will examine the differences between the terms EMI (English Medium Instruction, CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning and EAP (English for Academic Purposes). I will also discuss what it means to become disciplinary literate in a first, second and third language.

    References

    Airey, J. (2009). Estimating bilingual scientific literacy in Sweden. International Journal of Content and Language Integrated   Learning, 1(2), 26-35. 

    Airey J. (2009). Science, Language and Literacy. Case Studies of Learning in Swedish University Physics. ActaUniversitatis  Upsaliensis. Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 81. Uppsala Retrieved 2009-04-27, from   http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

    Airey, J. (2010). Närundervisningsspråketändrastill engelska[When the teaching language changes to English] Omundervisning  påengelska(pp. 57-64). Stockholm: HögskoleverketRapport 2010:15R

    Airey, J. (2010a). The ability of students to explain science concepts in two languages. Hermes - Journal of Language and   Communication Studies, 45, 35-49. 

    Airey, J. (2011a). Talking about Teaching in English. Swedish university lecturers' experiences of changing their teaching language.   Ibérica, 22(Fall), 35-54. 

    Airey, J. (2011b). Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education: Disciplinary Literacy and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning   Dynamic content and language collaboration in higher education: theory, research, and reflections(pp. 57-65). Cape Town,   South Africa: Cape Peninsula University of Technology.

    Airey, J. (2011c). The Disciplinary Literacy Discussion Matrix: A Heuristic Tool for Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education.   Across the disciplines, 8(3), unpaginated. Retrieved from http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/clil/airey.cfm

    Airey, J. (2011d). The relationship between teaching language and student learning in Swedish university physics. In B. Preisler, I.   Klitgård, & A.  Fabricius(Eds.), Language and learning in the international university: From English uniformity to diversity   and hybridity(pp. 3-18). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.

    Airey, J. (2012). “I don’t teach language.” The linguistic attitudes of physics lecturers in Sweden. AILA Review, 25(2012), 64–79. Airey, J. (2013). Disciplinary Literacy. In E. Lundqvist, L. Östman, & R. Säljö(Eds.), Scientific literacy – teori och praktik (pp. 41-58): Gleerups. 

    Airey, J. (2015). From stimulated recall to disciplinary literacy: Summarizing ten years of research into teaching and learning in   English. In SlobodankaDimova, Anna Kristina Hultgren, & Christian Jensen (Eds.), English-Medium Instruction in European   Higher Education. English in Europe, Volume 3(pp. 157-176): De GruyterMouton.

    Airey, J. (2016). Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). In Hyland, K. &   Shaw, P. (Eds.), RoutledgeHandbook of English for Academic Purposes. (pp. 71-83) London: Routledge.

    Airey, J. (2017). CLIL: Combining Language and Content. ESP Today, 5(2), 297-302. 

    Airey, J., & Larsson, J. (2018). Developing Students’ Disciplinary Literacy? The Case of University Physics. In K.-S. Tang & K.   Danielsson(Eds.), Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education: Springer.

    Airey, J., Lauridsen, K., Raisanen, A., Salö, L., & Schwach, V. (2017). The Expansion of English-medium Instruction in the Nordic   Countries. Can Top-down University Language Policies Encourage Bottom-up Disciplinary Literacy Goals? Higher Education.   doi:10.1007/s10734-015-9950-2

    Duff, P.A. (1997). Immersion in Hungary: an ELF experiment. In R. K. Johnson & M. Swain (Eds.), Immersion education:   International perspectives(pp. 19-43). Cambridge, UK: CUP.

    European Commission. (2003). Promoting Language Learning and Linguistic Diversity: An Action Plan 2004 – 2006.   http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2003:0449:FIN:EN:PDF

    Kuteeva, M., & Airey, J. (2014). Disciplinary Differences in the Use of English in Higher Education: Reflections on Recent Policy   Developments  Higher Education, 67(5), 533-549. doi:10.1007/s10734-013-9660-6

    Linder, A., Airey, J., Mayaba, N., & Webb, P. (2014). Fostering Disciplinary Literacy? South African Physics Lecturers’ Educational   Responses to their Students’ Lack of Representational Competence. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science   and Technology Education, 18(3), 242-252. doi:10.1080/10288457.2014.953294

    Marsh, Herbert. W., Hau, Kit-Tai., & Kong, Chit-Kwong. (2000). Late immersion and language of instruction (English vs. Chinese) in   Hong Kong high schools: Achievement growth in language and non-language subjects. Harvard Educational Review, 70(3),   302-346. 

    Met, M., & Lorenz, E. B. (1997). Lessons from U.S. immersion programs: Two decades of experience. In R. K. Johnson & M. Swain   (Eds.),Immersion education: International perspectives(pp. 243-264). Cambridge, UK: CUP.

    Thøgersen, J., & Airey, J. (2011). Lecturing undergraduate science in Danish and in English: A comparison of speaking rate and   rhetorical style. English for Specific Purposes, 30(3), 209-221.

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  • 19.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics. Physics Education Research.
    När undervisningsspråket blir engelska2006In: Språkvård, ISSN 0038-8440, no 4, p. 20-25Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Engelska blir vanligare och vanligare som undervisningsspråk i högre utbildning. Vad händer med ämnesinlärningen när undervisningsspråket blir engelska? John Airey har undersökt svenska fysikstudenter. Det behövs många goda råd för att undervisningen ska fungera.

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  • 20.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Teachers transitioning to teaching in English2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Castellon 1
  • 21. Airey, John
    Teaching and Learning in English: The experiences of students and teachers2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Airey 2014
  • 22.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The content lecturer and English-medium instruction (EMI): epilogue to the special issue on EMI in higher education2020In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 340-346Article in journal (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 23.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

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    Airey et al 2014
  • 24.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Kalmar University College.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Physics Didactics.
    Bilingual Scientific Literacy?: The Use of English in Swedish University Science Courses2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 145-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A direct consequence of the Bologna declaration on harmonisation of Europeaneducation has been an increase in the number of courses taught in English at Swedishuniversities. A worrying aspect of this development is the lack of research into the effectson disciplinary learning that may be related to changing the teaching language to Englishin this way. In fact, little is known at all about the complex inter-relationship betweenlanguage and learning. In this article we attempt to map out the types of parameters thatour research indicates would determine an appropriate language mix in one section ofSwedish higher education—natural science degree courses. We do this from theperspective of the overall goal of science education, which we suggest is the productionof scientifically literate graduates. Here we introduce a new term, bilingual scientificliteracy to describe the particular set of language-specific science skills that we hope tofoster within a given degree course. As an illustration of our constructs, we carry out asimple language audit of thirty Swedish undergraduate physics syllabuses, listing thetypes of input provided for students and the types of production expected from students inboth languages. We use this information to map out an ‘implied student’ for the courseswith respect to bilingual scientific literacy. The article finishes by identifying issues forfurther research in this area.

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    fulltext
  • 25.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics. Department of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics. Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Disciplinary learning in a second language: A case study from university physics2007In: Researching Content and Language Integration in Higher Education / [ed] Wilkinson, Robert and Zegers, Vera, Maastricht: Maastricht University Language Centre , 2007, p. 161-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a popular movement within Swedish universities and university colleges towards delivery of courses and degree programmes through the medium of English. This is particularly true in natural science, engineering and medicine where such teaching has been commonplace for some time. However, the rationale for using English as the language of instruction appears to be more a pragmatic response to outside pressures rather than a conscious educational decision. This situation has recently been challenged with the publication of the report of the Parliamentary Committee for the Swedish Language, Mål i Mun, which discusses the effects of so called domain losses to English.

     

    This paper gives an overview of the continuing debate surrounding teaching through the medium of English, and examines some of the research carried out in this area. In contrast to the wealth of studies carried out in the pre-university school world, very few studies have been identified at university level. One conclusion is that little appears to be known about what goes on when Swedish university students are taught in English by Swedish lecturers. The paper concludes by suggesting a number of research questions that need to be addressed in order to better understand this area. This paper will be of interest to anyone who teaches, or plans to teach, university subjects through the medium of English.

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  • 26.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics, Physics Didactics.
    Language and the Experience of Learning University Physics in Sweden2006In: European journal of physics, ISSN 0143-0807, E-ISSN 1361-6404, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 553-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study explores the relationship between the lecturing language (English or Swedish) and the related learning experiences of 22 undergraduate physics students at two Swedish universities. Students attended lectures in both English and Swedish as part of their regular undergraduate programme. These lectures were videotaped and students were then interviewed about their learning experiences using selected excerpts of the video in a process of stimulated recall. The study finds that although the students initially report no difference in their experience of learning physics when taught in Swedish or English, there are in fact some important differences which become apparent during stimulated recall. The pedagogical implications of these differences are discussed.

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  • 27.
    Ajjo, Lilaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Eternal Journey of the Human Mind: A study of ancient creation myths and comparison between different creation myths from different time periods2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study discusses the rise of mythological thinking, focusing on ancient Near Eastern creation myths and creation accounts in mythological works in particular, with additional material drawn from lists of gods and other sources. The similarities and differences between several creation myths are analyzed by means of a diachronic and comparative method, tracing the development of mythological thinking about creation over thousands of years. The study departs in the main from six ancient creation myths and accounts of creation from ancient Mesopotamia: three Sumerian compositions to form the vestiges of a Sumerian creation myth, and three Babylonian myths which contain accounts of creation. A comparison of similarities and differences between these compositions is performed. In a final section, a comparison is made with the Old Testament and the Quran’s creation account, where phrases from the latter two texts are compared to the earlier myths and accounts of creation to produce an understanding of which elements of creation in religions with modern day followers rest upon ancient Mesopotamian foundations.

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  • 28.
    Akita, Kimi
    et al.
    Nagoya Univ, Dept English Linguist, Furo Cho,Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 4648601, Japan..
    McLean, Bonnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Park, Jiyeon
    Namseoul Univ, Namseoul Inst Int Educ, 91 Daehak Ro, Cheonan 31020, Chungcheongnam, South Korea..
    Thompson, Arthur Lewis
    Univ Hong Kong, Dept Linguist, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Iconicity mediates semantic networks of sound symbolism2024In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 155, no 4, p. 2687-2697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One speech sound can be associated with multiple meanings through iconicity, indexicality, and/or systematicity. It was not until recently that this “pluripotentiality” of sound symbolism attracted serious attention, and it remains uninvestigated how pluripotentiality may arise. In the current study, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, and English speakers rated unfamiliar jewel names on three semantic scales: size, brightness, and hardness. The results showed language-specific and cross-linguistically shared pluripotential sound symbolism. Japanese speakers associated voiced stops with large and dark jewels, whereas Mandarin speakers associated [i] with small and bright jewels. Japanese, Mandarin, and English speakers also associated lip rounding with darkness and softness. These sound-symbolic meanings are unlikely to be obtained through metaphorical or metonymical extension, nor are they reported to colexify. Notably, in a purely semantic network without the mediation of lip rounding, softness can instead be associated with brightness, as illustrated by synesthetic metaphors such as yawaraka-na hizashi /jawaɾakanaçizaɕi/ “a gentle (lit. soft) sunshine” in Japanese. These findings suggest that the semantic networks of sound symbolism may not coincide with those of metaphor or metonymy. The current study summarizes the findings in the form of (phono)semantic maps to facilitate cross-linguistic comparisons of pluripotential sound symbolism.

  • 29.
    Aktürk Drake, Memet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Has language as resource been the basis for mother-tongue instruction in Sweden?: On the evolution of policy orientations towards a uniquely enduring bilingual policy2023In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the motivations that key policy documents have put forward as justifications for Sweden’s mother-tongue instruction in immigrant and historical minority languages as a multicultural policy that has endured for nearly half a century. The diachronic development of these motivations is analysed in four periods and interpreted with the help of Ruiz’s (1984) orientations in language planning. The corpus consists of 26 key policy documents making up the coordinative discourse among policy actors. Based on an innovative mix of qualitative and quantitative methods, the motivations are presented in a three-tiered taxonomy consisting of motivational units, themes and language-planning orientations. The results point to both continuity and change in how mother-tongue instruction has been justified over time. Confirming previous research, the results show that the language-as-resource orientation has played a central role in justifying both the establishment and the maintenance of mother-tongue instruction in Sweden and that language as right complemented this orientation. Furthermore, the study illustrates that the language-as-problem orientation need not always be detrimental to bilingualism and minority-language maintenance. Contrary to some claims in the literature, it is argued that language as extrinsic resource is not necessarily underpinned by neoliberalism, as there are also social liberal and conservative inroads to this orientation. The paper concludes that although the language-as-resource orientation plays an indispensable role in supporting bilingualism in education, not only the language-as-right orientation but also the language-as-problem orientation should not be neglected.

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  • 30.
    Aktürk Drake, Memet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Hur blev engelskt /w/ ett marginellt fonem i standardsvenskan?2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Många språk i världen har så kallade ”marginella fonem” d.v.s. fonem med begränsad distribution och/eller frekvens. En underkategori till dessa består av fonem importerade från andra språk genom lånord. Fenomenet är ganska vanligt eftersom vart femte språk i världen tycks ha minst ett importfonem (Maddieson 1984). Denna presentation kommer att fokusera på det engelska fonemet /w/ som kan förekomma i ansatsposition i uttalet av engelska lånord i svenskan. Med hjälp av uttalsbeskrivningarna i sju upplagor av Svenska Akademiens Ordlista från 1923 till 2015 kommer det att illustreras hur detta engelska segment blev ett marginellt fonem i svenskan. Importgraden för segmentet operationaliseras genom tilldelning av en siffra mellan 0 och 1 för varje möjlig förekomst i varje upplaga. Om ordet stavas med <v> eller om uttalsbeskrivningen bara innehåller [v] tilldelas värdet 0 (ingen import) i t.ex. vinsch eller tweed [tvid]. Tvärtom blir värdet 1 (full import) om uttalsbeskrivningen bara innehåller ett vanligt eller upphöjt ”o” i ansatsposition i t.ex. walkie-talkie [oåkitåki] eller tweet [toit]). Vid fall med två uttalsvarianter (w eller v) tilldelas [w] som första variant värdet 0,6 (partiell import) i t.ex. weekend [oikend / vikend] och som andra variant 0,4. Beräkningarna visar att import av /w/ började registreras i SAOL i och med upplagan 1986 då den genomsnittliga importgraden var 27 procent och har gradvis ökat till 68 procent år 2015. I analysen av senaste upplagan fanns det 50 ord med ett ansats-/w/ i originalformen och av dessa kunde hela 38 uttalas med ett importerat [w]. Dessutom har importgraden för /w/ i nyinlånade engelska ord varit 100 procent sedan 2006. Följaktligen finns det idag till och med minimala par som ”tvist vs. twist” och ”svisch vs. swish”. Denna diakrona utveckling kommer att förklaras med hjälp av begreppen kontaktintensitet (Thomason 2001) inom kontaktlingvistik och inlärningssvårighet inom andraspråksfonetik (Flege 1995).               

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  • 31.
    Aktürk Drake, Memet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Hur kan politiken förklara Sveriges framgång med hög andraspråksbehärskning?2020In: Lisetten, ISSN 1101-5128, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 12-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här populärvetenskapliga artikeln undersöker hur olika politikområden bidrar till den höga andraspråksbehärskningen bland vuxna andragenerationens turkar i Sverige som det stora europeiska forskningsprojektet The Integration of the European Second Generation har kommit fram till efter jämförelse med andragenerationens turkar i ytterligare tre västeuropeiska länder. Politikområden som diskuteras är integration, utbildning, bostad, arbetsmarknad och jämställdhet.   

  • 32.
    Aktürk Drake, Memet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Bijvoet, EllenUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.Ganuza, NataliaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.Sahlée, AnnaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språk och stil: tidskrift för svensk språkforskning: Tema Flerspråkighet2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 33.
    Alberto Morales, Oscar
    et al.
    Univ Andes, Merida, Venezuela..
    Perdomo, Bexi
    Toulouse Lautrec.
    Cassany, Daniel
    Univ Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain..
    Acevedo, Joel
    Univ Andes, Merida, Venezuela..
    Alvarez Ahlgren, Jhon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Estructura léxico-gramatical de títulos de artculos de investigación de odontología en español2020In: RLA. Revista de Lingüística Teórica y Aplicada, ISSN 0033-698X, E-ISSN 0718-4883, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 69-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze the syntactic structure and rhetorical function of 250 dentistry research articles titles in Spanish. Length, punctuation, lexical-grammatical structure, and styles of titles were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. It was found an average of 15.5 words per title; three types of titles: nominal (78%), compound (21.2%) and full-sentence titles (0.8%). Titles without punctuation predominated. 21.2% used colon and period to form compound titles predominated. It was observed that compound titles combine two rhetorical components: topic-method and topic-description. Uni-head nominal constructions (using mainly non-discipline-specific nouns) using prepositional phrases (100%), adjectives (29%), non-personal verbal phrases (28%) and relative clauses (4.4%) as postmodifiers predominated.

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  • 34.
    Alderson, J. Charles
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    McIntyre, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Implementing and evaluating a self-assessment mechanism for the web-based Language and Style course2006In: Language and Literature, ISSN 0963-9470, E-ISSN 1461-7293, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 291-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the project to design and implement a web-based mechanism for formative self-assessment, to be used as part of Mick Short's online stylistics course, Language and Style (see the preface to this issue for details). Using the self-assessment mechanism, students can compare their own performance on extended academic tasks (the stylistic analysis of three literary texts – a poem, a piece of prose fiction and a drama extract) with benchmarked sample answers. In this article we describe the process of developing benchmarks for the self-assessment mechanism and explain how this mechanism works in practice. Finally, we discuss students’ reactions to the self-assessment instruments, as part of our own assessment of their validity and pedagogical value.

  • 35. Alisaari, Jenni
    et al.
    Møller Daugaard, Line
    Dewilde, Joke
    Harju-Autti, Raisa
    Heikkola, Leena Maria
    Iversen, Jonas Yassin
    Kekki, Niina
    Pesonen, Sari
    Reath Warren, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Yli-Jokipii, Maija
    Mother tongue education in four Nordic countries: problem, right or resource?2023In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies, ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 52-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jenni Alisaari, University of Stockholm, Sweden & University of Turku, Finland Line Møller Daugaard, VIA University College, Denmark Joke Dewilde University of Oslo, NorwayRaisa Harju-Autti, Tampere University, Finland Leena Maria Heikkola, Åbo Akademi University, FinlandJonas Yassin Iversen, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences Niina Kekki, University of Turku, Finland Sari Pesonen, University of Stockholm, SwedenAnne Reath Warren, Uppsala University, Sweden Boglárka Straszer, Dalarna University, Sweden Maija Yli-Jokipii, Tampere University, FinlandThe Declaration of a Nordic Language Policy stipulates that all Nordic residents have the right to preserve and develop their mother tongue and their national minority languages. Hence, this article investigates the question of mother tongue education for linguistic minority students. Through four ‘telling cases’, the article explores how four Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, orient towards mother tongues, Indigenous and national minority languages in their educational policies. Drawing on Ruíz’ (1984) framework of orientations in language planning, we investigate the following question: In what ways are mother tongues framed as rights, resources, or problems in four telling cases of educational policy in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden? The analysis of the telling cases shows that although all four countries provide various forms of mother tongue education, thus apparently aligning with the intentions in the Declaration of a Nordic Language Policy, there are important differences between the provisions. Nevertheless, across the four countries, the official national languages are placed at the top of a language ideological hierarchy. The official national languages are followed by national minority languages as mother tongues. These languages are awarded rights but are not considered resources for the whole population (e.g., Ruíz, 1984). The Danish telling case inserts a supranational layer in the hierarchy, namely mother tongues with status as official languages in the European Union. The hierarchy of mother tongues thus reflects how some types of mother tongues are more readily granted rights and considered to be resources than others.

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  • 36.
    Allassonniere-Tang, Marc
    et al.
    Univ Lyon 2, Lab Dynam Language, UMR 5596, CNRS, Lyon, France..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The evolutionary trends of grammatical gender in Indo-Aryan languages2021In: Language Dynamics and Change, ISSN 2210-5824, E-ISSN 2210-5832, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 211-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper infers the processes of development and change of grammatical gender in Indo-Aryan languages using phylogenetic comparative methods. 48 Indo-Aryan languages are coded based on 44 presence-absence features relating to gender marking on the verbs, adjectives, personal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, and possessive pronouns. A Bayesian Reverse Jump Hyper Prior analysis, which infers the evolutionary dynamics of changes between feature values, gives results that are consistent with historical linguistic and typological studies on gender systems in Indo-Aryan languages and predicts the evolutionary trends of the features included in the dataset.

  • 37.
    Allassonniere-Tang, Marc
    et al.
    Univ Paris, CNRS, MNHN, EA UMR 7206, Paris, France..
    Lundgren, Olof
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Robbers, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Cronhamn, Sandra
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Larsson, Filip
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Her, One-Soon
    Tunghai Univ, Taichung, Taiwan..
    Hammarström, Harald
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Carling, Gerd
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Expansion by migration and diffusion by contact is a source to the global diversity of linguistic nominal categorization systems2021In: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, E-ISSN 2662-9992, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Languages of diverse structures and different families tend to share common patterns if they are spoken in geographic proximity. This convergence is often explained by horizontal diffusibility, which is typically ascribed to language contact. In such a scenario, speakers of two or more languages interact and influence each other's languages, and in this interaction, more grammaticalized features tend to be more resistant to diffusion compared to features of more lexical content. An alternative explanation is vertical heritability: languages in proximity often share genealogical descent. Here, we suggest that the geographic distribution of features globally can be explained by two major pathways, which are generally not distinguished within quantitative typological models: feature diffusion and language expansion. The first pathway corresponds to the contact scenario described above, while the second occurs when speakers of genetically related languages migrate. We take the worldwide distribution of nominal classification systems (grammatical gender, noun class, and classifier) as a case study to show that more grammaticalized systems, such as gender, and less grammaticalized systems, such as classifiers, are almost equally widespread, but the former spread more by language expansion historically, whereas the latter spread more by feature diffusion. Our results indicate that quantitative models measuring the areal diffusibility and stability of linguistic features are likely to be affected by language expansion that occurs by historical coincidence. We anticipate that our findings will support studies of language diversity in a more sophisticated way, with relevance to other parts of language, such as phonology.

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  • 38.
    Amir, Alia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English. Mid Sweden University.
    Communicating information about COVID-19 in different languages in the globalized world: A case study of Sweden2020In: Communicating information about COVID-19 in different languages in the globalized world: A case study of Sweden, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019, China reported coronavirus disease which has spread around the world since then (WHO, 2020). It has been named as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (WHO, 2020). While it has spread around the world because of being a highly infectious disease, each country has tackled the measure to contain the disease and protect its citizens in different ways. Sweden is a unique case in the European context which has not gone into any lockdown, but institutes of higher education have been closed since the middle of March and have turned to distance teaching. Similarly, high schools had been closed for Spring 2020, but in the Autumn, 2020 they had been reopened. The Public Health Agency (HSLF-FS 2020) as from 1 July 2020 issued the regulations and general guidelines with the aim of reducing the transmission of COVID-19 in restaurants, bars and cafés (2020:526). As a background, Swedish is the official language of Sweden, whereas it has five officially recognised minority languages, besides several migrant languages spoken in different language communities within its polity. English is taught at the compulsory school level in Sweden and is also an extramural language as well as lingua franca among various highly educated groups as well as Anglophone migrants. This study aims to study the discourses and language of the instructions displayed on the Public Health Agency’s website with a particular focus on English and globalization. According to Blommaert (2020), COVID-19 is a textbook example of contemporary globalization processes, which started as a health crisis but became an economic crisis as well as of mobility. Furthermore, according to Blommaert’s (2018) definition of globalization, it is a process of increasing interconnectedness between different parts of the world, creating global modes of organization and conduct. In a complete paradox, while mobility and local cultural phenomenon arise because of globalization and spread of COVID-19, English language was one of the main sources of information in many contexts as well as Sweden beside Swedish language being the main source. In this regard, this study will focus particularly on English. According to Canagarajah (1999), the use of English is dynamically negotiated, and its status in contextually modified in socially strategic ways, and in the process modifies the communicative and linguistic rules of English according to local cultural and ideological imperatives” (ibid, 1999:76), while Pennycook (2007) argues that the choices around moves into particular languages may be on pragmatic, aesthetic, or commercial grounds, but they are also political decisions to do with language, identity, and authenticity. With this theoretical background, the study argues a particular kind of English created post-COVID19 in each context.

  • 39.
    Amir, Alia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    “Making America Great Again!”: A membership categorisation analyses of Trump and Clinton’s talks during the election campaign about ethnicities and migration” in the US context.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates political discourse about ethnicities and migration in the political discourse by focusing on Trump and Clinton’s public talks comprising of debates, interviews and speeches. The data will be collected by downloading available debates and interviews from youtube from the year 2015. In the initial process, the data will be categorised according to the genres as the data set is huge. In the next stage, the data will be transcribed and analysed using membership categorisation analysis and multi-modal analyses. The main purpose of the study is to shed light on some of the distinguishing features of how ethnicities are talked about in the political discourse, what kind of conversational devices are used to create a particular ethnicity, how is migration talked about and contextualised.

  • 40.
    Amo Laffitte, Francisco Javier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Igualdad de género y sexismo en la música comercial hispanoamericana2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to relate Spanish America music with the research from Glick et Al (2000) in their study Beyond prejudice as simple antipathy, where they conclude that the level of sexism in a society correlates to that country's gender equality. To analyze this relationship, the ranking published by the UN on gender equality between countries has been used as source and the Spanish-American country that occupies the first place in the ranking in gender equality and the country that occupies the last were selected. Then, the first three top selling songs in these two countries have been analyzed to find out if the sexist content of these songs could differ, and thus see this correlation with the study by Glick et al (2000). The data obtained did not match with the first of the conclusions reached in said study regarding the correlation between the UN gender equality index and sexism in society. However, other conclusions, also stated in the aforementioned study, have matched due to a coincidence perhaps, for instance, in the type of sexist expressions. In the country with a better position in gender equality, the most successful songs had a greater number of hostile expressions against women. This could possibly be explained that as women achieve greater gender equality in society, they are also seen as a threat by some men and are consequently discriminated against in a hostile way, either by treating them as an object or by accusing them of using their feminine power against men. The conclusions coincidences between the present work and Glik et al (2000) work are been considered fortuitous.

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  • 41.
    Andersson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, German.
    Rev. of Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann: Geschichte der christlichen Kabbala. Bd 1–2 (2012–2013)2014In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 102-106Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Andersson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages. Romanska språk.
    Orientation frontale des déplacements médians: analyse contrastive suédois-français.2005In: Rôle et place des corpus en linguistique.: Actes du colloque JETOU’2005, Université de Toulouse Le Mirail 1-2 juillet 2005., 2005, p. 205-216Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Andersson, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    E-mpoliteness – creative impoliteness as an expression of digital social capital2023In: Journal of Politeness Research, ISSN 1612-5681, E-ISSN 1613-4877, Vol. 0, no 0Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Andersson, Marta
    Stockholms universitet, Engelska institutionen.
    Subjectivity of English connectives: A corpus and experimental investigation of forward causality signals in written language2019In: Empirical Studies of the Construction of Discourse / [ed] Óscar Loureda, Inés Recio Fernández, Laura Nadal, Adriana Cruz, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company , 2019, p. 299-317Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study sets out to investigate naturally produced English causal relations from the point of view of conceptual and linguistic features that contribute to their intended interpretations as Volitional or Non-volitional result. These features include two discourse connectives: 'as a result' and 'for this reason', and the extent of the overlap between the semantic information they encode and the relation type they mark.The paper reports on a mixed-method approach combining a corpus investigation of result relations in the British National Corpus (BNC) and two opinion-asking experiments conducted via the crowdsourcing marketplace – AmazonMechanical Turk (AMT). The findings demonstrate that despite their functional flexibility across different causal categories, English resultative connectives showsignificant tendencies to mark specific coherence relations. The converging methodology proves that expert linguistic intuitions are shared by ordinary language users and their notion of differences between causal event types.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Marta
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Engelska institutionen.
    Kurfali, Murathan
    Stockholms universitet, Avdelningen för datorlingvistik.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Avdelningen för datorlingvistik.
    A sentiment-annotated dataset of English causal connectives2020In: Proceedings of the 14th Linguistic Annotation Workshop / [ed] Stefanie Dipper, Amir Zeldes, 2020, p. 24-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the semantic prosody of three causal connectives: due to, owing to and because of in seven varieties of the English language. While research in the domain of English causality exists, we are not aware of studies that would cover the domain of causal connectives in English. Our claim is that connectives such as because of link two arguments, (at least) one of which will include a phrase that contributes to the interpretation of the relation as positive or negative, and hence define the prosody of the connective used. As our results demonstrate, the majority of the prosodies identified are negative for all three connectives; the proportions are stable across the varieties of English studied, and contrary to our expectations, we find no significant differences between the functions of the connectives and discourse preferences. Further, we investigate whether automatizing the sentiment annotation procedure via a simple language-model based classifier is possible. The initial results highlights the complexity of the task and the need for complicated systems, probably aided with other related datasets to achieve reasonable performance.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Marta
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Engelska institutionen.
    Spenader, Jennifer
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    RESULT and PURPOSE relations with and without 'so'2014In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 148, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coherence relations differ in their tendency to be explicitly marked. How such relations are recognized and what determines their tendency to be marked is a matter of debate. The connective so represents a special case: it can be used to signal RESULT coherence relations and the more specific cause-effect relation of PURPOSE, but overt marking has been claimed to be required for PURPOSE and optional for RESULT. We present written corpus and experimental results on the use of so that show that RESULT and PURPOSE with this connective can be reliably distinguished from each other, and that the modal auxiliaries can/could and will/would are strongly associated with PURPOSE. In the corpus study, PURPOSE always occurs with explicit so, while RESULT is often left unmarked. These results are in line with recent claims based on annotated corpus data that implicit (unmarked) and explicit (marked) coherence relations can be qualitatively different (e.g. Sporleder and Lascarides, 2008; Webber, 2009). However, in our experiments using strongly purposive event pairs, 35-40% of examples were identified as PURPOSE without a connective or a modal verb cue. We argue that the difference between the corpus results and the experimental results can be explained as a difference between the tasks of speakers and hearers, and we outline an explanation for how marking can be obligatory for PURPOSE relations and yet optional for RESULT. We also propose that nonveridicality seems to play a key role in a marking requirement for PURPOSE, and explain why the unusual marking pattern found makes it difficult to give a pragmatic account similar to more well-known language asymmetries.

  • 47.
    Andersson, Ottilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Commanding the Swedish roads: Non-verbal performatives in the grammar of road signs2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Road signs form a non-verbal semiotic system – by many encountered on a daily basis – that dictates the actions of the users of the road, in order to create a safe and efficient traffic environment. It is clear that road signs are not just ‘saying’ things but ‘doing’ something. This study examines the commanding and performative aspects of a set of Swedish road signs. The first part of the analysis is a detailed investigation of (the ‘grammar’ of) the warning sign, drawing on a theoretical framework of semiotics and Grice’s cooperative principle. The second part investigates the speech act status of warning signs, priority signs and prohibitory signs, by applying Searle’s taxonomy of illocutionary acts. Results show that the warning triangle is not arbitrary but iconically motivated, both in color and in form, and that the silhouettes vary on a number of parameters, including the perspective of their mapping, the degree of iconicity and the degree of ‘danger reality’. Warning signs, just like verbal warnings, are best categorized as directives, whereas priority and prohibitory signs, unlike verbal prohibitions, emerge as declarations. Ultimately, this raises questions regarding the limits of and the ‘translatability’ between verbal and non-verbal language.

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  • 48.
    Andersson, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    En björntjänt gör ju ingen glad, eller?: En undersökning om ungdomars förståelse och användning av idiom2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 49.
    Andrason, Alexander
    Stellenbosch University.
    The Gnomic qatal2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 5-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper offers a cognitive and typological approximation to the problem of the gnomic qatal. It demonstrates that the gnomic sense of the qatal can be chained to the remaining semantic potential of the gram by making use of certain typological templates or universals, i.e. by so-called gnomic branches of the anterior path. Given that, from a cross-linguistic perfective, certain subtypes of a present perfect (inclusive,frequentative, and experiential perfects, as well as an anti-perfect) naturally generate gnomic extensions (following a development referred to as “gnomic branches”), that the dominant portion of the semantic potential of the qatal covers the domain of a perfect, and finally that all the examples of the BH gnomic qatal (if derived from active roots) may be viewed as generated in prototypical perfect contexts (the gnomic use of the qatal stems from its use as an inclusive, frequentative, experiential, and anti-perfect),the gnomic value of the gram may be cognitively (both conceptually and diachronically) chained to the remaining sphere of its semantic network by employing the “gnomic branch” linkage. In this manner,the gnomic value ceases to be aberrant and, on the contrary, becomes a fully rational component of the semantic potential of the gram. As a result, we propose a model (a map) that in a more consistent and more holistic manner represents the semantics of the entire qatal category; it accounts for all the senses, the gnomic values included.

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  • 50.
    Anglemark, Linnéa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    John, Andrew
    Univ Melbourne, Econ, Melbourne Business Sch, Carlton, Vic, Australia.
    The Use of English-Language Business and Finance Terms in European Languages2018In: International Journal of Business Communication, ISSN 2329-4892, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 406-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is generally accepted that English is becoming the lingua franca of international business, the details of this process are not well understood. This article uses the Google Books corpus to provide both a quantitative and a qualitative investigation of the ways in which specific English business terms are penetrating major European languages. Some English business terms now appear to be firmly established in other languages, and can be classified as lexical borrowings, while the use of other terms is better described as code-switching.

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