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  • 1.
    Abbott, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Morrow, Edward H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Obtaining snapshots of genetic variation using hemiclonal analysis2011In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 359-368Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemiclones are naturally occurring or artificially produced individuals that share a single specific genetic haplotype. Natural hemiclones are produced via hybridization between two closely related species, whereas hemiclonal analysis in Drosophila is carried out in the laboratory via crosses with artificially created 'clone-generator' females with a specific genetic make-up. Hemiclonal analysis in Drosophila has been applied successfully to date to obtain measures of standing genetic variation for numerous traits. Here, we review the current hemiclonal literature and suggest future directions for hemiclonal research, including its application in molecular and genomic studies, and the adaptation of natural hemiclonal systems to carry out Drosophila-type studies of standing genetic variation.

  • 2.
    Ah-King, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    On anisogamy and the evolution of 'sex-roles'2013In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Editorial rejects?: Novelty, schnovelty!2013In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 448-449Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Because many journals are currently increasing the rate of pre-peer-review editorial rejects, the editorial criteria upon which such decisions are based are very important. Here, I spotlight 'novelty' as a criterion and argue that it is a very problematic decisive factor at this stage of the editorial process.

  • 4.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Mixed Models Offer No Freedom from Degress Of Freedom2020In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 329-335Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Statistics matter greatly in biology, whether we like it or not. As a discipline with an empirical inclination, we are faced with data every day and we rely on inferential statistical models to make sense of it and to provide us with novel insights. Much of the time, the growing level of complexity and sophistication of the models we put to use in ecology and evolution have led to more appropriate analyses of our data. However, this is not always the case. Here, I draw attention to a classic flaw in inferential statistics that has resurfaced in a new flavor as a result of increased reliance on complex linear mixed models -the multifaceted and disturbingly persistent problem of pseudoreplication.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Parental care: why, who and how much? Book review of "The evolution of Parental Care" by T. H. Clutton-Brock1992In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 67-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    The ups and downs of parental care2013In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 387-388Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Björklund, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lamarck, the Father of Evolutionary Ecology?2019In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 874-875Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lamarck realized life had evolved from simple to more complex forms, due to adaptation to a changing environment over time. Though he was wrong in many details, he got the overall picture right. Thus, he can be seen as the first evolutionary ecologist, connecting evolutionary change in organisms to their environment.

  • 8.
    Burki, Fabien
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Roger, Andrew J.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Halifax, NS, Canada;Dalhousie Univ, Ctr Comparat Genom & Evolutionary Bioinformat, Halifax, NS, Canada.
    Brown, Matthew W.
    Mississippi State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Mississippi State, MS 39762 USA;Mississippi State Univ, Inst Genom Biocomp & Biotechnol, Mississippi State, MS 39762 USA.
    Simpson, Alastair G. B.
    Dalhousie Univ, Ctr Comparat Genom & Evolutionary Bioinformat, Halifax, NS, Canada;Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax, NS, Canada.
    The New Tree of Eukaryotes2020In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 43-55Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For 15 years, the eukaryote Tree of Life (eToL) has been divided into five to eight major groupings, known as 'supergroups'. However, the tree has been profoundly rearranged during this time. The new eToL results from the widespread application of phylogenomics and numerous discoveries of major lineages of eukaryotes, mostly free-living heterotrophic protists. The evidence that supports the tree has transitioned from a synthesis of molecular phylogenetics and biological characters to purely molecular phylogenetics. Most current supergroups lack defining morphological or cell-biological characteristics, making the supergroup label even more arbitrary than before. Going forward, the combination of traditional culturing with maturing culture-free approaches and phylogenomics should accelerate the process of completing and resolving the eToL at its deepest levels.

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  • 9. Chapman, T
    et al.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bangham, J
    Rowe, L
    Response to Eberhard and Cordero, and Cordoba-Aguilar and Contreras-Garduno: sexual conflict and female choice2003In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 440-441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Chapman, T
    et al.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bangham, J
    Rowe, L
    Sexual conflict2003In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 41-47, article id PII S0169-5347(02)00004-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Clark, Timothy D.
    et al.
    Univ Tasmania, Hobart, Tas, Australia.;CSIRO Agr & Food, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Binning, Sandra A.
    Univ Neuchatel, Inst Biol, Neuchatel, Switzerland..
    Raby, Graham D.
    Univ Windsor, Great Lakes Inst Environm Res, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada..
    Speers-Roesch, Ben
    Univ New Brunswick, Dept Biol, St John, NB, Canada..
    Sundin, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jutfelt, Fredrik
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Roche, Dominique G.
    Univ Neuchatel, Inst Biol, Neuchatel, Switzerland..
    Scientific Misconduct: The Elephant in the Lab. A Response to Parker et al2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 899-900Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cunillera-Montcusi, David
    et al.
    WasserCluster Lunz Biol Stn GmbH, Lunz Am See, Austria.;Univ Barcelona, Freshwater Ecol Hydrol & Management Grp FEHM, Sect Ecol, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Barcelona, Spain..
    Beklioglu, Meryem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Canedo-Arguelles, Miguel
    Univ Barcelona, Freshwater Ecol Hydrol & Management Grp FEHM, Dept Biol Evolut Ecol & Ciencies Ambientals, Inst Recerca Aigua IdRA, Barcelona, Spain..
    Jeppesen, Erik
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Eoosci, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, WATEC, Aarhus, Denmark.;SinoDanish Ctr Educ & Res SDC, Aarhus, Denmark.;Middle East Tech Univ, Inst Marine Sci, Mersin, Turkey..
    Ptacnik, Robert
    WasserCluster Lunz Biol Stn GmbH, Lunz Am See, Austria..
    Amorim, Cihelio A.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Arnott, Shelley E.
    Queens Univ, Dept Biol, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Berger, Stella A.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries I, Dept Plankton & Microbial Ecol, Alten Fischerhuette 2, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany..
    Brucet, Sandra
    Cent Univ Catalonia, Univ Vic, Aquat Ecol Grp, Vic, Catalonia, Spain.;Catalan Inst Res & Adv Studies ICREA, Barcelona, Spain..
    Dugan, Hilary A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Ctr Limnol, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Gerhard, Miriam
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm ICBM, Schleusenstr 1, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Horvath, Zsofia
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Genet, Erken Lab, Noma Malmavagen 45, S-76173 Norrtalje, Sweden..
    Nejstgaard, Jens C.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries I, Dept Plankton & Microbial Ecol, Alten Fischerhuette 2, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany..
    Reinikainen, Marko
    Air Pollut & Climate Secretariat AirClim, Forsta Langgatan 18, S-41328 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Striebel, Maren
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm ICBM, Schleusenstr 1, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol Aquat Ecol, Ecol Bldg, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Vad, Csaba F.
    Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Aquat Ecol, Budapest, Hungary.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Leuven, Belgium..
    Zadereev, Egor
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biophys, Krasnoyarsk Sci Ctr, Siberian Branch, Akad Gorodok 50-50, Krasnoyarsk 660036, Russia.;Siberian Fed Univ, 79 Svobodniy Ave, Krasnoyarsk 660041, Russia..
    Matias, Miguel
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Madrid, Spain.;Univ Evora, Biodivers Res Chair, Med Mediterranean Inst Agr Environm & Dev, Evora, Portugal..
    Freshwater salinisation: a research agenda for a saltier world2022In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 440-453Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread salinisation of freshwater ecosystems poses a major threat to the biodiversity, functioning, and services that they provide. Human activities promote freshwater salinisation through multiple drivers (e.g., agriculture, resource extraction, urbanisation) that are amplified by climate change. Due to its complexity, we are still far from fully understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of freshwater salinisation. Here, we assess current research gaps and present a research agenda to guide future studies. We identified different gaps in taxonomic groups, levels of biological organisation, and geographic regions. We suggest focusing on global- and landscape-scale processes, functional approaches, genetic and molecular levels, and ecoevolutionary dynamics as key future avenues to predict the consequences of freshwater salinisation for ecosystems and human societies.

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  • 13.
    Dowling, Damian K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Friberg, Urban
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Evolutionary implications of non-neutral mitochondrial genetic variation2008In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 546-554Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was traditionally considered to be selectively neutral. However, an accumulating body of evidence indicates that this assumption is invalid. Furthermore, recent advances indicate that mtDNA polymorphism can be maintained within populations via selection on the joint mitochondrial-nuclear genotype. Here, we review the latest findings that show mitochondrial and cytoplasmic genetic variation for life-history traits and fitness. We highlight the key importance of the mitochondrial-nuclear interaction as a unit of selection and discuss the consequences of mitochondrially encoded fitness effects on several key evolutionary processes. Our goal is to draw attention to the profound, yet neglected, influence of the mitochondrial genome on the fields of ecology and evolution.

  • 14.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Evolutionary stasis: the stable chromosomes of birds2010In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 283-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolution at the molecular level is manifested in a variety of types of change in DNA sequences, including changes in the structure and organisation of chromosomes. However, in birds chromosomal evolution occurs at an unusually slow rate and recent whole-genome comparisons have shown that many chromosomes have remained more or less intact during avian evolution. Here I discuss progress in the development of genetic maps of natural bird populations, which has revealed that the evolutionary stasis of chromosomes often extends to conservation of gene order. The evolutionary stability of bird chromosomes, which might relate to a low frequency of transposable elements, will facilitate the transfer of genomic information from model to non-model organisms and might have a connection to the rarity of postzygotic incompatibilities observed in birds.

  • 15.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Genome sequencing and population genomics in non-model organisms2014In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 51-63Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput sequencing technologies are revolutionizing the life sciences. The past 12 months have seen a burst of genome sequences from non-model organisms, in each case representing a fundamental source of data of significant importance to biological research. This has bearing on several aspects of evolutionary biology, and we are now beginning to see patterns emerging from these studies. These include significant heterogeneity in the rate of recombination that affects adaptive evolution and base composition, the role of population size in adaptive evolution, and the importance of expansion of gene families in lineage-specific adaptation. Moreover, resequencing of population samples (population genomics) has enabled the identification of the genetic basis of critical phenotypes and cast light on the landscape of genomic divergence during speciation.

  • 16.
    Formenti, Giulio
    et al.
    Rockefeller Univ, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Theissinger, Kathrin
    LOEWE Ctr Translat Biodivers Genom LOEWE TBG, Georg Voigt Str 14-16, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Univ Koblenz Landau, Inst Environm Sci, Fortstr 7, D-76829 Landau, Germany.;Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Georg Voigt Str 14-16, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Fernandes, Carlos
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Ciencias, CE3C Ctr Ecol Evolut & Environm Changes, Dept Biol Anim, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.;Univ Lisbon, Fac Psicol, Alameda Univ, P-1649013 Lisbon, Portugal..
    Bista, Iliana
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Genet, Cambridge CB2 3EH, England.;Wellcome Sanger Inst, Hinxton, England..
    Bombarely, Aureliano
    Univ Milan, Via Celoria 26, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Bleidorn, Christoph
    Univ Gottingen, Dept Anim Evolut & Biodivers, Untere Karspule 2, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany..
    Ciofi, Claudio
    Univ Florence, Dept Biol, Via Madonna del Piano 6, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI, Italy..
    Crottini, Angelica
    Ctr Invest Biodiversidade & Recursos Genet, CIBIO InBio, Rua Padre Armando Quintas 7, P-4485661 Vairao, Portugal..
    Godoy, Jose A.
    CSIC, Estn Biol Donana, Av Americo Vespucio 26, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Malukiewicz, Joanna
    German Primate Ctr, Kellnerweg 4, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Mouton, Alice
    Univ Liege, InBios Conservat Genet Lab, Chemin Vallee 4, B-4000 Liege, Belgium..
    Oomen, Rebekah A.
    Univ Oslo, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Synth, Blindernveien 31, N-0371 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Agder, Ctr Coastal Res, Gimlemoen 25j, N-4630 Kristiansand, Norway..
    Paez, Sadye
    Rockefeller Univ, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Palsboll, Per J.
    Univ Groningen Nijenborgh, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands.;Ctr Coastal Studies, 5 Holway Ave, Provincetown, MA 02657 USA..
    Pampoulie, Christophe
    Marine & Freshwater Res Inst, Fornubudir 5, IS-220 Hanafjordur, Iceland..
    Ruiz-Lopez, Maria J.
    CSIC, Estn Biol Donana, Av Americo Vespucio 26, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Svardal, Hannes
    Univ Antwerp, Dept Biol, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium..
    Theofanopoulou, Constantina
    Rockefeller Univ, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    de Vries, Jan
    Univ Gottingen, Goettingen Ctr Mol Biosci GZMB, Inst Microbiol & Genet, Dept Appl Bioinformat,Campus Inst Data Sci CIDAS, Goldschmidtstr 1, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Waldvogel, Ann-Marie
    Univ Cologne, Inst Zool, Zulpicherstr 47b, D-50674 Cologne, Germany..
    Zhang, Guojie
    Univ Copenhagen, Villum Ctr Biodivers Genom, Dept Biol, Sect Ecol & Evolut, Build 3,Univ Pk 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.;BGI Shenzhen, China Natl Genebank, Jinsha Rd, Shenzhen 518083, Peoples R China..
    Mazzoni, Camila J.
    Leibniz Inst Zoo & Wildlife Res IZW, Alfred Kowalke Str 17, D-10315 Berlin, Germany..
    Jarvis, Erich D.
    Rockefeller Univ, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Balint, Miklos
    LOEWE Ctr Translat Biodivers Genom LOEWE TBG, Georg Voigt Str 14-16, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Georg Voigt Str 14-16, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Insect Biotechnol, Heinrich Buff Ring 26-32, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    The era of reference genomes in conservation genomics2022In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 197-202Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Progress in genome sequencing now enables the large-scale generation of reference genomes. Various international initiatives aim to generate reference genomes representing global biodiversity. These genomes provide unique insights into genomic diversity and architecture, thereby enabling comprehensive analyses of population and functional genomics, and are expected to revolutionize conservation genomics.

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  • 17. GIBSON, RM
    et al.
    HOGLUND, J
    COPYING AND SEXUAL SELECTION1992In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 229-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Gillson, Lindsey
    et al.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Biol Sci, Plant Conservat Unit, Cape Town, South Africa.;Univ York, Leverhulme Ctr Anthropocene Biodivers, York YO10 5DD, England..
    Hoffman, M. Timm
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Biol Sci, Plant Conservat Unit, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Gell, Peter A.
    Federat Univ, Future Reg Res Ctr, Ballarat, Australia..
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Bond, William J.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Biol Sci, Cape Town, South Africa..
    Trees, carbon, and the psychology of landscapes2024In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitigating climate change while safeguarding biodiversity and livelihoods is a major challenge. However, rampant afforestation threatens biodiversity and livelihoods, with questionable benefits to carbon storage. The narrative of landscape degradation is often applied without considering the history of the landscape. While some landscapes are undoubtedly deforested, others existed in open or mosaic states before human intervention, or have been deliberately maintained as such. In psychology, a 'fundamental attribution error' is made when characteristics are attributed without consideration of context or circumstances. We apply this concept to landscapes, and then propose a process that avoids attribution errors by testing a null hypothesis regarding past forest extent, using palaeoecology and other long-term data, alongside ecological and stakeholder knowledge.

  • 19.
    Gudmunds, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Khila, Abderrahman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Univ Lyon, Univ Claude Bernard Lyon, Ecole Normale Super Lyon, CNRS,Unite Mixte Rech 5242,Inst Genom Fonct Lyon, 46 Allee Italie, F-69364 Lyon 07, France..
    Husby, Arild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Functional genomic tools for emerging model species2022In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 1104-1115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies in the field of ecology and evolution aiming to connect genotype to phenotype rarely validate identified loci using functional tools. Recent develop-ments in RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas genome editing have dramatically increased the feasibility of functional validation. However, these methods come with specific challenges when applied to emerging model organisms, including limited spatial control of gene silencing, low knock-in efficiencies, and low throughput of functional validation. Moreover, many functional studies to date do not recapitulate eco-logically relevant variation, and this limits their scope for deeper insights into evolutionary processes. We therefore argue that increased use of gene editing by allelic replacement through homology-directed repair (HDR) would greatly benefit the field of ecology and evolution.

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  • 20. Hoffmann, AA
    et al.
    Merilä, Juha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Population Biology.
    Heritable variation and evolution under favourable and unfavourable conditions1999In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 96-101Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic variability in quantitative traits can change as a direct response to the environmental conditions in which they are expressed. Consequently, similar selection in different environments might not be equally effective in leading to adaptation. Several hypotheses, including recent ones that focus on the historical impact of selection on populations, predict that the expression of genetic variation will increase in unfavourable conditions. However, other hypotheses lead to the opposite prediction. Although a consensus is unlikely, recent Drosophila and bird studies suggest consistent trends for morphological traits under particular conditions.

  • 21.
    Immonen, Elina
    School of Biology, Centre for Evolution, Genes and Genomics, University of St Andrews.
    What do we need to know about speciation?2012In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 27-39Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speciation has been a major focus of evolutionary biology research in recent years, with many important advances. However, some of the traditional organising principles of the subject area no longer provide a satisfactory framework, such as the classification of speciation mechanisms by geographical context into allopatric, parapatric and sympatry classes. Therefore, we have asked where speciation research should be directed in the coming years. Here, we present a distillation of questions about the mechanisms of speciation, the genetic basis of speciation and the relationship between speciation and diversity. Our list of topics is not exhaustive; rather we aim to promote discussion on research priorities and on the common themes that underlie disparate speciation processes.

  • 22. Jansson, Mats
    et al.
    Persson, Lennart
    De Roos, André M.
    Jones, Roger I.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Terrestrial carbon and intraspecific size-variation shape lake ecosystems2007In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 316-322Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual models of lake ecosystem structure and function have generally assumed that energy in pelagic systems is derived from in situ photosynthesis and that its use by higher trophic levels depends on the average properties of individuals in consumer populations. These views are challenged by evidence that allochthonous subsidies of organic carbon greatly influence energy mobilization and transfer and the trophic structure of pelagic food webs, and that size variation within consumer species has major ramifications for lake community dynamics and structure. These discoveries represent conceptual shifts that have yet to be integrated into current views on lake ecosystems. Here, we assess key aspects of energy mobilization and size-structured community dynamics, and show how these processes are intertwined in pelagic food webs.

  • 23.
    Jensen, Evelyn L.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Diez-del-Molino, David
    Ctr Palaeogenet, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Univ Copenhagen, GLOBE Inst, Ctr Evolutionary Hologen, Copenhagen, Denmark.;NTNU, Univ Museum, Trondheim, Norway..
    Bertola, Laura D.
    Univ Copenhagen, Sect Computat & RNA Biol, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Borges, Filipa
    Univ NOVA Lisboa, Ctr Res Anthropol CRIA, Lisbon, Portugal.;Univ Exeter, Ctr Ecol & Conservat, Exeter, Devon, England.;Univ Porto, Res Ctr Biodivers & Genet Resources CIBIO InBIO, Porto, Portugal.;Inst Gulbenkian Ciencias, Oeiras, Portugal..
    Cubric-Curik, Vlatka
    Univ Zagreb, Dept Anim Sci, Fac Agr, Zagreb, Croatia..
    de Navascues, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Univ Montpellier, Montpellier SupAgro, CBGP, INRAE,CIRAD,IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Frandsen, Peter
    Copenhagen Zoo, Frederiksberg, Denmark..
    Heuertz, Myriam
    Univ Bordeaux, Biogeco, INRAE, F-33610 Cestas, France..
    Hvilsom, Christina
    Copenhagen Zoo, Frederiksberg, Denmark..
    Jimenez-Mena, Belen
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Sect Marine Living Resources, Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Miettinen, Antti
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Biol & Environm Sci, Organismal & Evolutionary Biol Res Programme, Helsinki, Finland..
    Moest, Markus
    Univ Innsbruck, Dept Ecol, Mol Ecol Grp, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Pecnerova, Patricia
    Univ Copenhagen, Sect Computat & RNA Biol, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Barnes, Ian
    Nat Hist Museum, Dept Earth Sci, London, England..
    Vernesi, Cristiano
    Fdn Edmund Machvia E Mach, Forest Ecol Unit, Res & Innovat Ctr, I-38010 San Michele All Adige 1, TN, Italy..
    Ancient and historical DNA in conservation policy2022In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 420-429Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although genetic diversity has been recognized as a key component of biodiversity since the first Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 1993, it has rarely been included in conservation policies and regulations. Even less appreciated is the role that ancient and historical DNA (aDNA and hDNA, respectively) could play in unlocking the temporal dimension of genetic diversity, allowing key conservation issues to be resolved, including setting baselines for intraspecies genetic diversity, estimating changes in effective population size (N-e), and identifying the genealogical continuity of populations. Here, we discuss how genetic information from ancient and historical specimens can play a central role in preserving biodiversity and highlight specific conservation policies that could incorporate such data to help countries meet their CBD obligations.

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    fulltext
  • 24.
    Jorgensen, Peter Sogaard
    et al.
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Global Econ Dynam & Biosphere, Box 50005, Stockholm 10405, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.;Arizona State Univ, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Folke, Carl
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Global Econ Dynam & Biosphere, Box 50005, Stockholm 10405, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.;Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, Box 50005, Stockholm 10405, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.;Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, Box 50005, Stockholm 10405, Sweden.;WorldFish, Jalan Batu Maung, Bayan Lepas 11960, Penang, Malaysia..
    Malmros, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden.;Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, Box 50005, Stockholm 10405, Sweden..
    Zorzet, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Aktipis, Athena
    Arizona State Univ, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA..
    Brown, Zachary
    North Carolina State Univ, Raleigh, NC USA..
    Corriere, Yves
    Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA..
    Downes, Sharon
    CSIRO Agr & Food, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Dunn, Robert R.
    North Carolina State Univ, Raleigh, NC USA..
    Epstein, Graham
    Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Frisvold, George
    Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA..
    Grohn, Yrjo
    Cornell Univ, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA..
    Gujar, Govind Tikaramsa
    Ex Indian Agr Res Inst, South Asia Biotechnol Ctr, New Delhi, India..
    Hawthorne, David
    Univ Maryland, Natl Socioenvironm Synth Ctr SESYNC, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Jasovsky, Dusan
    Uppsala Univ, ReAct Europe, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Klein, Eili Y.
    Ctr Dis Dynam Econ & Policy, Washington, DC USA.;Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Emergency Med, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Klein, Franziska
    Global Econ Dynam & Biosphere, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lhermie, Guillaume
    Cornell Univ, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA..
    Mota-Sanchez, David
    Michigan State Univ, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Omoto, Celso
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Scott, H. Morgan
    Texas A&M Univ, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Wemli, Didier
    Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Carroll, Scott P.
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Entomol & Nematol, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Coevolutionary Governance of Antibiotic and Pesticide Resistance2020In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 484-494Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of new biocides has dominated human responses to evolution of antibiotic and pesticide resistance. Increasing and uniform biocide use, the spread of resistance genes, and the lack of new classes of compounds indicate the importance of navigating toward more sustainable coevolutionary dynamics between human culture and species that evolve resistance. To inform this challenge, we introduce the concept of coevolutionary governance and propose three priorities for its implementation: (i) new norms and mental models for lowering use, (ii) diversifying practices to reduce directional selection, and (iii) investment in collective action institutions to govern connectivity. We highlight the availability of solutions that facilitate broader sustainable development, which for antibiotic resistance include improved sanitation and hygiene, strong health systems, and decreased meat consumption.

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  • 25.
    Kokko, Hanna
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Chaturvedi, Anurag
    Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Croll, Daniel
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Integrat Biol, Plant Pathol, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Fischer, Martin C.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Integrat Biol, Plant Ecol Genet, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Guillaume, Frederic
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Karrenberg, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Kerr, Ben
    Univ Washington, Dept Biol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Rolshausen, Gregor
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr BIK F, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Stapley, Jessica
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Ctr Adaptat Changing Environm, CH-8095 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Can Evolution Supply What Ecology Demands?2017In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 187-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simplistic view of the adaptive process pictures a hillside along which a population can climb: when ecological 'demands' change, evolution 'supplies' the variation needed for the population to climb to a new peak. Evolutionary ecologists point out that this simplistic view can be incomplete because the fitness landscape changes dynamically as the population evolves. Geneticists meanwhile have identified complexities relating to the nature of genetic varia-tion and its architecture, and the importance of epigenetic variation is under debate. In this review, we highlight how complexity in both ecological 'demands' and the evolutionary 'supply' influences organisms' ability to climb fitness landscapes that themselves change dynamically as evolution proceeds, and encourage new synthetic effort across research disciplines towards eco-logically realistic studies of adaptation.

  • 26.
    Kothawala, Dolly
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Kellerman, Anne M.
    National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Geochemistry Group and Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.
    Catalán, Núria
    Catalan Institute of Water Research (ICRA), H2O building, Emili Grahit 101, 17003 Girona, Spain.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Organic Matter Degradation across Ecosystem Boundaries: The Need for a Unified Conceptualization2021In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 113-122Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The global carbon cycle connects organic matter (OM) pools in soil, freshwater, and marine ecosystems with the atmosphere, thereby regulating their size and reactivity. Due to the complexity of biogeochemical processes and historically compartmentalized subdisciplines, ecosystem-specific conceptualizations of OM degradation have emerged independently of developments in other ecosystems. Recent discussions regarding the relative importance of molecular composition and ecosystem properties on OM degradation have diverged in opposing directions across subdisciplines, leaving our understanding inconsistent. Ecosystem-dependent theories are problematic since properties unique to an ecosystem may change in response to anthropogenic stressors, including climate change. The next breakthrough in our understanding of OM degradation requires a shift in focus towards developing a unified theory of controls on OM across ecosystems.

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    fulltext
  • 27.
    Le Rouzic, Arnaud
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Carlborg, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Evolutionary potential of hidden genetic variation2008In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 33-37Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of a population to respond to natural or artificial selection pressures is determined by the genetic architecture of the selected trait. It is now widely acknowledged that a substantial part of genetic variability can be buffered or released as the result of complex genetic interactions. However, the impact of hidden genetic diversity on phenotypic evolution is still not clear. Here, we argue that a common term to describe the impact of hidden genetic variation on phenotypic change is needed and will help to provide new insights into the contribution of different components of genetic architectures to the evolvability of a character. We introduce the 'genetic charge' concept, to describe how the architecture of a trait can be 'charged' with potential for evolutionary change that can later be 'discharged' in response to selection.

  • 28.
    Lindholm, Anna K.
    et al.
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Dyer, Kelly A.
    Univ Georgia, Dept Genet, Athens, GA 30602 USA..
    Firman, Renee C.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Anim Biol, Ctr Evolutionary Biol, Perth, WA 6009, Australia..
    Fishman, Lila
    Univ Montana, Div Biol Sci, Missoula, MT 59812 USA..
    Forstmeier, Wolfgang
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Dept Behav Ecol & Evolutionary Genet, D-82319 Seewiesen, Germany..
    Holman, Luke
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol, Div Ecol Evolut & Genet, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Knief, Ulrich
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Dept Behav Ecol & Evolutionary Genet, D-82319 Seewiesen, Germany..
    Kokko, Hanna
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Larracuente, Amanda M.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Biol, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Manser, Andri
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine
    Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris 11, CNRS, Evolut Genomes Comportement & Ecol,IRD, Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Petrosyan, Varos G.
    Russian Acad Sci, Severtsov Inst Ecol & Evolut, Moscow 119071, Russia..
    Pomiankowski, Andrew
    UCL, Dept Genet Evolut & Environm, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Presgraves, Daven C.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Biol, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Safronova, Larisa D.
    Russian Acad Sci, Severtsov Inst Ecol & Evolut, Moscow 119071, Russia..
    Sutter, Andreas
    Univ Zurich, Dept Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Unckless, Robert L.
    Cornell Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, Ithaca, NY USA..
    Verspoor, Rudi L.
    Univ Liverpool, Inst Integrat Biol, Liverpool L69 7ZB, Merseyside, England..
    Wedell, Nina
    Univ Exeter, Biosci, Cornwall Campus, Penryn TR10 9FE, Cornwall, England..
    Wilkinson, Gerald S.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Biol, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Price, Tom A. R.
    Univ Liverpool, Inst Integrat Biol, Liverpool L69 7ZB, Merseyside, England..
    The Ecology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Meiotic Drive2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 315-326Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meiotic drivers are genetic variants that selfishly manipulate the production of gametes to increase their own rate of transmission, often to the detriment of the rest of the genome and the individual that carries them. This genomic conflict potentially occurs whenever a diploid organism produces a haploid stage, and can have profound evolutionary impacts on gametogenesis, fertility, individual behaviour, mating system, population survival, and reproductive isolation. Multiple research teams are developing artificial drive systems for pest control, utilising the transmission advantage of drive to alter or exterminate target species. Here, we review current knowledge of how natural drive systems function, how drivers spread through natural populations, and the factors that limit their invasion.

  • 29.
    Logue, Jürg Brendan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mouquet, Nicolas
    Peter, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Hillebrand, Helmut
    Empirical approaches to metacommunities: a review and comparison with theory2011In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 482-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metacommunity theory has advanced understanding of how spatial dynamics and local interactions shape community structure and biodiversity. Here, we review empirical approaches to metacommunities, both observational and experimental, pertaining to how well they relate to and test theoretical metacommunity paradigms and how well they capture the realities of natural ecosystems. First, we show that the species-sorting and mass-effects paradigms are the most commonly tested and supported paradigms. Second, the dynamics observed can often be ascribed to two or more of the four non-exclusive paradigms. Third, empirical approaches relate only weakly to the concise assumptions and predictions made by the paradigms. Consequently, we suggest major avenues of improvement for empirical metacommunity approaches, including the integration across theoretical approaches and the incorporation of evolutionary and meta-ecosystem dynamics. We hope for metacommunity ecology to thereby bridge existing gaps between empirical and theoretical work, thus becoming a more powerful framework to understand dynamics across ecosystems.

  • 30.
    Mank, Judith E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Parallel divergence and degradation of the avian W sex chromosome2007In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 389-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex chromosomes are ubiquitous in birds but our understanding of how they originated and evolved has remained incomplete. Recent work by Tsuda et al. on tinamou and ratite birds suggests that, although all bird sex chromosomes evolved from the same pair of autosomes, the Z and W sex chromosomes have diverged from one another several times independently. This parallel evolution of the avian W presents a means for comparison in studies of sex chromosome evolution, which could help us understand more about the general forces that shape the development of all types of sex chromosome.

  • 31. Marie Curie SPECIATION Network, x
    What do we need to know about speciation?2012In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Miller, Elizabeth Theresa
    et al.
    Univ Oregon, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Eugene, OR USA.
    Svanbäck, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bohannan, Brendan J. M.
    Univ Oregon, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Eugene, OR USA.
    Microbiomes as Metacommunities: Understanding Host-Associated Microbes through Metacommunity Ecology2018In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 926-935Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in host-associated microbiomes has skyrocketed recently, yet our ability to explain microbiome variation has remained stubbornly low. Considering scales of interaction beyond the level of the individual host could lead to new insights. Metacommunity theory has many of the tools necessary for modeling multiscale processes and has been successfully applied to host microbiomes. However, the biotic nature of the host requires an expansion of theory to incorporate feedback between the habitat patch (host) and their local (microbial) community. This feedback can have unexpected effects, is predicted to be common, and can arise through a variety of mechanisms, including developmental, ecological, and evolutionary processes. We propose a new way forward for both metacommunity theory and host microbiome research that incorporates this feedback.

  • 33.
    Mills, James A.
    et al.
    10527A Skyline Dr, Coming, NY 14830 USA..
    Teplitsky, Celine
    Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris 04, CESCO, MNHN,CNRS,UMR7204, CP51,55 Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France.;Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, Campus CNRS,1919 Route Mende, F-34293 Montpellier 5, France..
    Arroyo, Beatriz
    UCLM, JCCM, CSIC, Inst Invest Recursos Cineget IREC, Ronda Toledo S-N, Real, Spain..
    Charmantier, Anne
    Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, Campus CNRS,1919 Route Mende, F-34293 Montpellier 5, France..
    Becker, Peter H.
    Inst Avian Res, Vogelwarte 21, D-26386 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Birkhead, Tim R.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Bize, Pierre
    Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Blumstein, Daniel T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 621 Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Bonenfant, Christophe
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, UMR 5558, 43 Blvd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Boutin, Stan
    Univ Alberta, Dept Biol Sci, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada..
    Bushuev, Andrey
    Moscow MV Lomonosov State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Vertebrate Zool, Leninskie Gory 1-12, Moscow 119234, Russia..
    Cam, Emmanuelle
    Univ Toulouse 3, ENFA, CNRS, EDB Lab Evolut & Div Biol,UMR 5174, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France..
    Cockburn, Andrew
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol, Dept Evolut Ecol & Genet, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Cote, Steeve D.
    Univ Laval, Dept Biol, 1045 Ave Med, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.;Univ Laval, Ctr Etud Nord, 1045 Ave Med, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada..
    Coulson, John C.
    29St Marys Close, Durham DH1 2ND, England..
    Daunt, Francis
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Bush Estate, Penicuik EH26 0QB, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Univ Munich, Dept Biol, Behav Ecol, Planegg Martinsried, Germany..
    Doligez, Blandine
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, UMR 5558, 43 Blvd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Drummond, Hugh
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Evolutionary Ecol Variat Res Grp, Seewiesen, Germany.;Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Dept Ecol Evolut, Inst Ecol, AP 70-275, Mexico City 04510, DF, Mexico..
    Espie, Richard H. M.
    Saskatchewan Minist Environm, Tech Resource Branch, 3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6, Canada..
    Festa-Bianchet, Marco
    Univ Sherbrooke, Dept Biol, 2500 Blvd Univ, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K 2R1, Canada..
    Frentiu, Francesca D.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia..
    Fitzpatrick, John W.
    Cornell Lab Omithol, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850 USA..
    Furness, Robert W.
    Univ Glasgow, Graham Kerr Bldg, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland..
    Gauthier, Gilles
    Univ Laval, Dept Biol, 1045 Ave Med, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.;Univ Laval, Ctr Etud Nord, 1045 Ave Med, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada..
    Grant, Peter R.
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolut Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA..
    Griesser, Michael
    Univ Zurich, Anthropol Inst & Museum, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Hansson, Bengt
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Ecol Bldg, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Harris, Michael P.
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Bush Estate, Penicuik EH26 0QB, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Jiguet, Frederic
    Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris 04, CESCO, MNHN,CNRS,UMR7204, CP51,55 Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Kjellander, Petter
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, Dept Ecol, SE-73091 Riddarhyttansn, Sweden..
    Korpimaki, Erkki
    Univ Turku, Dept Biol, Sect Ecol, FI-20014 Turku, Finland..
    Krebs, Charles J.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, 6270 Univ Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada..
    Lens, Luc
    Univ Ghent, Dept Biol, Terr Ecol Unit, Ledeganckstr 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Linnell, John D. C.
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res, POB 5685 Sluppen, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
    Low, Matthew
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    McAdam, Andrew
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Margalida, Antoni
    Univ Lleida, Fac Life Sci & Engn, E-25198 Lleida, Spain..
    Merila, Juha
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Biosci, Ecol Genet Res Unit, Bioctr 3, Viikinkaari 1, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Moller, Anders P.
    Equipe Div Ecol & Evolut Microbiennes, Lab Ecol Systemat & Evolut, Batiment 362, F-91405 Orsay, France..
    Nakagawa, Shinichi
    Univ New S Wales, Evolut & Ecol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ New S Wales, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Nilsson, Jan-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Nisbet, Ian C. T.
    ICT Nisbet & Co, 150 Alder Lane, Falmouth, MA 02556 USA..
    van Noordwijk, Arie J.
    Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Anim Ecol, NL-6700 AB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Oro, Daniel
    Inst Mediterrani Estudis Avangats IMEDEA CSIC UIB, Esporles Mallorca 07190, Spain..
    Part, Tomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Pelletier, Fanie
    Univ Sherbrooke, Dept Biol, 2500 Blvd Univ, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K 2R1, Canada..
    Potti, Jaime
    CSIC, Estn Biol Doliana, Dept Ecol Evolut, Ave Amer Vespuclo S-N, Seville, Spain..
    Pujol, Benoit
    Univ Toulouse 3, ENFA, CNRS, EDB Lab Evolut & Div Biol,UMR 5174, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France..
    Reale, Denis
    Univ Quebec, Dept Sci Biol, CP 8888 Succursale Ctr Ville, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada..
    Rockwell, Robert F.
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Vertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA..
    Ropert-Coudert, Yan
    Inst Pluridisciplinalre Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178, 23 Rue Becquerel, F-67087 Strasbourg, France..
    Roulin, Alexandre
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Thebaud, Christophe
    Univ Toulouse 3, ENFA, CNRS, EDB Lab Evolut & Div Biol,UMR 5174, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France..
    Sedinger, James S.
    Univ Nevada, Dept Nat Resources & Environm Sci, Reno, NV 89512 USA..
    Swenson, Jon E.
    Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, POB 5003, NO-1432 As, Norway.;Norwegian Inst Nat Res, POB 5685 Sluppen, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
    Visser, Marcel E.
    Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Dept Anim Ecol, NL-6700 AB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Wanless, Sarah
    Westneat, David F.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Biol, Ctr Ecol Evolut & Behav, Lexington, KY USA..
    Wilson, Alastair J.
    Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Ctr Ecol & Conservat, Cornwall Campus, Penryn TR10 9EZ, England..
    Zedrosser, Andreas
    Telemark Univ, Dept Environm & Hlth Studies, Fac Arts & Sci, N-3800 Bo I Telemark, Norway..
    Solutions for Archiving Data in Long-Term Studies: A Reply to Whitlock et al.2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 85-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Mills, James A.
    et al.
    Teplitsky, Celine
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, Dept Ecol & Gest Biodiversite, CNRS, MNHN,UPMC,UMR 7204, F-75231 Paris, France..
    Arroyo, Beatriz
    Inst Invest Recursos Cinegeticos IREC, CSIC, JCCM, UCLM, Cludad 13005, Real, Spain..
    Charmantier, Anne
    Ctr Ecol Fonctionnelle & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34293 Montpellier 5, France..
    Becker, Peter. H.
    Inst Avian Res, D-26386 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Birkhead, Tim R.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Bize, Pierre
    Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Blumstein, Daniel T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Bonenfant, Christophe
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, Lab Biomet & Biol Evolut, UMR 5558, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Boutin, Stan
    Univ Alberta, Dept Biol Sci, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada..
    Bushuev, Andrey
    Moscow MV Lomonosov State Univ, Dept Vertebrate Zool, Fac Biol, Moscow 119234, Russia..
    Cam, Emmanuelle
    Univ Toulouse 3, EDB Lab Evolut & Diversite Biol, CNRS, ENFA,UMR 5174, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France..
    Cockburn, Andrew
    Australian Natl Univ, Dept Evolut Ecol & Genet, Res Sch Biol, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Cote, Steeve D.
    Univ Laval, Dept Biol, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.;Univ Laval, Ctr Etudes Nord, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada..
    Coulson, John C.
    Daunt, Francis
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Penicuik EH26 0QB, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Univ Munich, Behav Ecol, Dept Biol, Martinsried, Germany.;Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Evolut Ecol Variat Res Grp, Seewiesen, Germany..
    Doligez, Blandine
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, Lab Biomet & Biol Evolut, UMR 5558, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Drummond, Hugh
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Dept Ecol Evolut, Inst Ecol, Mexico City 04510, DF, Mexico..
    Espie, Richard H. M.
    Saskatchewan Minist Environm, Tech Resource Branch, Regina, SK S4S 5W6, Canada..
    Festa-Bianchet, Marco
    Univ Sherbrooke, Dept Biol, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K 2R1, Canada..
    Frentiu, Francesca
    Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia..
    Fitzpatrick, John W.
    Cornell Lab Ornithol, Ithaca, NY 14850 USA..
    Furness, Robert W.
    Univ Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland..
    Garant, Dany
    Univ Sherbrooke, Dept Biol, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K 2R1, Canada..
    Gauthier, Gilles
    Univ Laval, Dept Biol, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.;Univ Laval, Ctr Etudes Nord, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada..
    Grant, Peter R.
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA..
    Griesser, Michael
    Univ Zurich, Anthropol Inst Museum, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Hansson, Bengt
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Harris, Michael P.
    Jiguet, Frederic
    Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris 04, CESCO, MNHN,CNRS,UMR7204, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Kjellander, Petter
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, Dept Ecol, S-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden..
    Korpimaki, Erkki
    Univ Turku, Dept Biol, Sect Ecol, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Krebs, Charles J.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada..
    Lens, Luc
    Univ Ghent, Terr Ecol Unit, Dept Biol, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Linne, John D. C.
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
    Low, Matthew
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    McAdam, Andrew
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Margalida, Antoni
    Univ Lleida, Fac Life Sci & Engn, Lleida 25198, Spain..
    Merila, Juha
    Univ Helsinki, Ecol Genet Res Unit, Dept Biosci, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Moller, Anders P.
    Lab Ecol Systernat & Evolut, Equipe Diversite Ecol & Evolut Microbiennes, F-91405 Orsay, France..
    Nakagawa, Shinichi
    Univ New S Wales, Evolut & Ecol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ New S Wales, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Nilsson, Jan-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Nisbet, Ian C. T.
    ITC Nisbet & Co, N Falmouth, MA 02556 USA..
    van Noordwijk, Arie J.
    Netherlands Inst Ecol N1OO KNAW, Dept Anim Ecol, NL-6700 AB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Oro, Daniel
    Inst Mediterrani Estudis Avangats IMEDEA CSIC UIB, Esporles 07190, Mallorca, Spain..
    Part, Tomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Pelletier, Fanie
    Univ Sherbrooke, Dept Biol, Sherbrooke, PQ J1K 2R1, Canada..
    Potti, Jaime
    Estac Biol Donana CSIC, Dept Ecol Evolutiva, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Pujol, Benoit
    Reale, Denis
    Univ Quebec, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada..
    Rockwel, Robert F.
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Vertebrate Zool, New York, NY 10024 USA..
    Ropert-Coudert, Yan
    CNRS, Inst Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, UMR7178, F-67087 Strasbourg, France..
    Roulin, Alexandre
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Sedinger, James S.
    Univ Nevada Reno, Dept Nat Resources & Environm Sci, Reno, NV 89512 USA..
    Swenson, Jon E.
    Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, N-1432 As, Norway.;Norwegian Inst Nat Res, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
    Thebaud, Christophe
    Univ Toulouse 3, EDB Lab Evolut & Diversite Biol, CNRS, ENFA,UMR 5174, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France..
    Visser, Marcel E.
    Wanless, Sarah
    Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Penicuik EH26 0QB, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Westneat, David F.
    Univ Kentucky, Dept Biol, Ctr Ecol Evolut & Behav, Lexington, KY USA..
    Wilson, Alastair J.
    Univ Exeter, Ctr Ecol & Conservat, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Penryn TR1O 9EZ, Cornwall, England..
    Zedrosser, Andreas
    Telemark Univ Coll, Fac Arts & Sci, Dept Environm & Hlth Studies, N-3800 Telemark, Norway..
    Archiving Primary Data: Solutions for Long-Term Studies2015In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 581-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent trend for journals to require open access to primary data included in publications has been embraced by many biologists, but has caused apprehension amongst researchers engaged in long-term ecological and evolutionary studies. A worldwide survey of 73 principal investigators (PIs) with long-term studies revealed positive attitudes towards sharing data with the agreement or involvement of the PI, and 93% of PIs have historically shared data. Only 8% were in favor of uncontrolled, open access to primary data while 63% expressed serious concern. We present here their viewpoint on an issue that can have non-trivial scientific consequences. We discuss potential costs of public data archiving and provide possible solutions to meet the needs of journals and researchers.

  • 35.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Is female sexual-behavior a neglected topic?1992In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 174-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Schaerer, Lukas
    et al.
    Rowe, Locke
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Anisogamy, chance and the evolution of sex roles2012In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 260-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, several authors have challenged the view that anisogamy, the defining feature of the sexes, is an important determinant of the evolution of sex roles. Sex roles are instead suggested to result from chance, or from non-heritable differences in life histories of females and males. Here, we take issue with these ideas. We note that random processes alone cannot cause consistent differences between the sexes, and that those differences between the sexes in life histories that affect the sex roles are themselves the result of sex-specific selection that can ultimately be traced back to anisogamy. To understand sex roles, one should ask how environmental variation and female male coevolution cause variation in sex-specific selection in the light of anisogamy.

  • 37.
    Shafer, Aaron B. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wolf, Jochen B. W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Alves, Paulo C.
    Bergström, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bruford, Michael W.
    Brannstrom, Ioana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Colling, Guy
    Dalen, Love
    De Meester, Luc
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fawcett, Katie D.
    Fior, Simone
    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad
    Hill, Jason A.
    Hoezel, A. Rus
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Jensen, Evelyn L.
    Krause, Johannes
    Kristensen, Torsten N.
    Kruetzen, Michael
    McKay, John K.
    Norman, Anita J.
    Ogden, Rob
    Österling, E. Martin
    Ouborg, N. Joop
    Piccolo, John
    Popovic, Danijela
    Primmer, Craig R.
    Reed, Floyd A.
    Roumet, Marie
    Salmona, Jordi
    Schenekar, Tamara
    Schwartz, Michael K.
    Segelbacher, Gernot
    Senn, Helen
    Thaulow, Jens
    Valtonen, Mia
    Veale, Andrew
    Vergeer, Philippine
    Vijay, Nagarjun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Vila, Caries
    Weissensteiner, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wennerstrom, Lovisa
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Zielinski, Piotr
    Genomics and the challenging translation into conservation practice2015In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 78-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global loss of biodiversity continues at an alarming rate. Genomic approaches have been suggested as a promising tool for conservation practice as scaling up to genome-wide data can improve traditional conservation genetic inferences and provide qualitatively novel insights. However, the generation of genomic data and subsequent analyses and interpretations remain challenging and largely confined to academic research in ecology and evolution. This generates a gap between basic research and applicable solutions for conservation managers faced with multifaceted problems. Before the real-world conservation potential of genomic research can be realized, we suggest that current infrastructures need to be modified, methods must mature, analytical pipelines need to be developed, and successful case studies must be disseminated to practitioners.

  • 38.
    Shafer, Aaron B. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wolf, Jochen B. W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Alves, Paulo C.
    Univ Porto, Ctr Invest Biodiversidade & Recursos Genet, P-4485661 Oporto, Portugal.;Fac Ciencias, P-4485661 Oporto, Portugal..
    Bergström, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Colling, Guy
    Musee Natl Hist Nat Luxembourg, Populat Biol, L-2160 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Bioinformat & Genet, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Meester, Luc
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fior, Simone
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Integrat Biol, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad
    Univ Guelph, Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Hoezel, A. Rus
    Univ Durham, Biol & Biomed Sci, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Jensen, Evelyn L.
    Univ British Columbia Okanagan, Biol, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada..
    Kruetzen, Michael
    Univ Zurich, Anthropol Inst & Museum, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Norman, Anita J.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Osterling, E. Martin
    Karlstad Univ, Biol, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Ouborg, N. Joop
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Expt Plant Ecol, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Piccolo, John
    Primmer, Craig R.
    Univ Turku, Biol, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Reed, Floyd A.
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Biol, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Roumet, Marie
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Integrat Biol, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Salmona, Jordi
    Inst Gulbenkian Ciencias, Populat & Conservat Genet Grp, P-2780156 Oeiras, Portugal..
    Schwartz, Michael K.
    USDA, Forest Serv, Rocky Mt Res Stn, Missoula, MT 59801 USA..
    Segelbacher, Gernot
    Univ Freiburg, Wildlife Ecol & Management, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany..
    Thaulow, Jens
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Freshwater Biol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway..
    Valtonen, Mia
    Univ Eastern Finland, Biol, Joensuu 80101, Finland..
    Vergeer, Philippine
    Wageningen Univ, Nat Conservat & Plant Ecol, NL-6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Weissensteiner, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm Univ, Zool, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vila, Carlese
    Estn Biol Donana, Conservat & Evolutionary Genet Grp, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Zielinski, Piotr
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
    Genomics in Conservation: Case Studies and Bridging the Gap between Data and Application Reply2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 83-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Shafer, Aaron B A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wolf, Jochen B W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Alves, Paulo C
    Bergström, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Colling, Guy
    Dalén, Love
    De Meester, Luc
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fior, Simone
    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad
    Hoezel, A. Rus
    Hoglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Jensen, Evelyn L
    Krützen, Michael
    Norman, Anita J.
    Osterling, E. Martin
    Ouborg, N. Joop
    Piccolo, John
    Primmer, Craig R
    Reed, Floyd A
    Roumet, Marie
    Salmona, Jordi
    Schwartz, Michael K
    Segelbacher, Gernot
    Thaulow, Jens
    Valtonen, Mia
    Vergeer, Philippine
    Weissensteiner, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Vilà, Carlese
    Zielińsk, Piotr
    Reply to Garner et al2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 83-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Stapley, Jessica
    et al.
    Reger, Julia
    Feulner, Philine G. D.
    Smadja, Carole
    Galindo, Juan
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Bennison, Clair
    Ball, Alexander D.
    Beckerman, Andrew P.
    Slate, Jon
    Adaptation genomics: the next generation2010In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 705-712Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the genetics of how organisms adapt to changing environments is a fundamental topic in modern evolutionary ecology. The field is currently progressing rapidly because of advances in genomics technologies, especially DNA sequencing. The aim of this review is to first briefly summarise how next generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed our ability to identify the genes underpinning adaptation. We then demonstrate how the application of these genomic tools to ecological model species means that we can start addressing some of the questions that( have puzzled ecological geneticists for decades such as: How many genes are involved in adaptation? What types of genetic: variation are responsible for adaptation? Does adaptation utilise pre-existing genetic variation or does it require new mutations to arise following an environmental change?

  • 41.
    Svensson, Erik, I
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Berger, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    The Role of Mutation Bias in Adaptive Evolution2019In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 422-434Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutational input is the ultimate source of genetic variation, but mutations are not thought to affect the direction of adaptive evolution. Recently, critics of standard evolutionary theory have questioned the random and non-directional nature of mutations, claiming that the mutational process can be adaptive in its own right. We discuss here mutation bias in adaptive evolution. We find little support for mutation bias as an independent force in adaptive evolution, although it can interact with selection under conditions of small population size and when standing genetic variation is limited, entirely consistent with standard evolutionary theory. We further emphasize that natural selection can shape the phenotypic effects of mutations, giving the false impression that directed mutations are driving adaptive evolution.

  • 42. Vincent, Amanda
    et al.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Pipefishes and seahorses: are they all sex-role reversed?1992In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 237-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The male pregnancy of pipefishes and seahorses has led to the inference that females compete most intensely for access to mates, because males limit female reproduction. However, recent work has shown that in different species either sex may be the predominant competitor for mates. In this family, there is an apparent association between the mating pattern and the sex roles: polygamous species show reversed sex roles whereas monogamous species exhibit 'conventional' sex roles. These studies emphasize that sex role reversal is not synonymous with male parental care.

  • 43. Williams, John W.
    et al.
    Spanbauer, Trisha L.
    Heintzman, Peter D.
    Blois, Jessica
    Capo, Eric
    Goring, Simon J.
    Monchamp, Marie-Eve
    Parducci, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Von Eggers, Jordan M.
    Alsos, Inger Greve
    Bowler, Chris
    Coolen, Marco J.L.
    Cullen, Nicola
    Crump, Sarah
    Epp, Laura Saskia
    Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio
    Grimm, Eric
    Herzschuh, Ulrike
    Mereghetti, Alessandro
    Meyer, Rachel Sarah
    Nota, Kevin
    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther
    Pérez, Vilma
    Shapiro, Beth
    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R.
    Wood, Jamie
    Strengthening global-change science by integrating aeDNA with paleoecoinformatics2023In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 946-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ancient environmental DNA (aeDNA) data are close to enabling insights into past global-scale biodiversity dynamics at unprecedented taxonomic extent and resolution. However, achieving this potential requires solutions that bridge bioinformatics and paleoecoinformatics. Essential needs include support for dynamic taxonomic inferences, dynamic age inferences, and precise stratigraphic depth. Moreover, aeDNA data are complex and heterogeneous, generated by dispersed researcher networks, with methods advancing rapidly. Hence, expert community governance and curation are essential to building high-value data resources. Immediate recommendations include uploading metabarcoding-based taxonomic inventories into paleoecoinformatic resources, building linkages among open bioinformatic and paleoecoinformatic data resources, harmonizing aeDNA processing workflows, and expanding community data governance. These advances will enable transformative insights into global-scale biodiversity dynamics during large environmental and anthropogenic changes.

1 - 43 of 43
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