Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 1209
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abbott, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Innocenti, Paolo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Chippindale, Adam K.
    Morrow, Edward H.
    Epigenetics and Sex-Specific Fitness: An Experimental Test Using Male-Limited Evolution in Drosophila melanogaster2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, p. e70493-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When males and females have different fitness optima for the same trait but share loci, intralocus sexual conflict is likely to occur. Epigenetic mechanisms such as genomic imprinting (in which expression is altered according to parent-of-origin) and sex-specific maternal effects have been suggested as ways by which this conflict can be resolved. However these ideas have not yet been empirically tested. We designed an experimental evolution protocol in Drosophila melanogaster that enabled us to look for epigenetic effects on the X-chromosome-a hotspot for sexually antagonistic loci. We used special compound-X females to enforce father-to-son transmission of the X-chromosome for many generations, and compared fitness and gene expression levels between Control males, males with a Control X-chromosome that had undergone one generation of father-son transmission, and males with an X-chromosome that had undergone many generations of father-son transmission. Fitness differences were dramatic, with experimentally-evolved males approximately 20% greater than controls, and with males inheriting a non-evolved X from their father about 20% lower than controls. These data are consistent with both strong intralocus sexual conflict and misimprinting of the X-chromosome under paternal inheritance. However, expression differences suggested that reduced fitness under paternal X inheritance was largely due to deleterious maternal effects. Our data confirm the sexually-antagonistic nature of Drosophila's X-chromosome and suggest that the response to male-limited X-chromosome evolution entails compensatory evolution for maternal effects, and perhaps modification of other epigenetic effects via coevolution of the sex chromosomes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. Adamik, Peter
    et al.
    Emmenegger, Tamara
    Briedis, Martins
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Henshaw, Ian
    Krist, Milos
    Laaksonen, Toni
    Liechti, Felix
    Prochazka, Petr
    Salewski, Volker
    Hahn, Steffen
    Barrier crossing in small avian migrants: individual tracking reveals prolonged nocturnal flights into the day as a common migratory strategy2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 21560Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adams, Susan B.
    et al.
    US Forest Serv, USDA, Southern Res Stn, Ctr Bottomland Hardwoods Res, 1000 Front St, Oxford, MS 38655 USA..
    Hereford, Scott G.
    US Fish & Wildlife Serv, Mississippi Sandhill Crane Natl Wildlife Refuge, 7200 Crane Lane, Gautier, MS 39553 USA..
    Hyseni, Chaz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Burrow Densities of Primary Burrowing Crayfishes in Relation to Prescribed Fire and Mechanical Vegetation Treatments2021In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 13, no 13, article id 1854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fire suppression and other factors have drastically reduced wet prairie and pine savanna ecosystems on the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. Restoration of these open-canopy environments often targets one or several charismatic species, and semi-aquatic species such as burrowing crayfishes are often overlooked in these essentially terrestrial environments. We examined the relationship between primary burrowing crayfishes and three vegetation treatments implemented over at least the past two decades in the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Vegetation in the 12 study sites had been frequently burned, frequently mechanically treated, or infrequently managed. Creaserinus spp., primarily C. oryktes, dominated the crayfish assemblage in every site. We counted crayfish burrow openings and coarsely categorized vegetation characteristics in 90, 0.56-m(2) quadrats evenly distributed among six transects per site. The number of active burrow openings was negatively, exponentially related to both the percent cover of woody vegetation and the maximum height of woody vegetation in quadrats, and to the number of trees taller than 1.2 m per transect, indicating that woody plant encroachment was detrimental to the crayfishes. Results were consistent with several other studies from the eastern US, indicating that some primary burrowing crayfishes are habitat specialists adapted to open-canopy ecosystems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Problemet med "könsroller" kvarstår2013In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 1, p. 136-137Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    The "Sex Role" Concept: An Overview and Evaluation2013In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 461-470Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Sex roles" are intuitively associated to stereotypic female and male sexual strategies and in biology, the term "sex role" often relates to mating competition, mate choice or parental care. "Sex role reversals" imply that the usual typological pattern for a population or species is deviates from a norm, and the meaning of "sex role reversal" thus varies depending upon whatever is the usual pattern of sex-typical behavior in a given taxon. We identify several problems with the current use of the "sex role" concept. (1) It is typological and reflects stereotypic expectations of the sexes. (2) The term "sex role" parses continuous variation into only two categories, often obscuring overlap, between the sexes in behavior and morphology, and variability in relation to ecological circumstances. (3) Common generalizations such as "sex role as seen in nature" mask variation upon which selection may act. (4) The general meaning of "sex roles" in society (i.e. "socially and culturally defined prescriptions and beliefs about the behavior and emotions of men and women") is contrary to biological "sex role" concepts, so that confusing the two obscure science communication in society. We end by questioning the validity of the "sex role" concept in evolutionary biology and recommend replacing the term "sex role" with operational descriptions.

  • 6.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Vad kan vi lära av biologisk forskning om “könsroller”?2012In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 51-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ahnesjo, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Craig, J. F.
    The biology of Syngnathidae: pipefishes, seadragons and seahorses2011In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 1597-1602Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bokrecension av Retorik för naturvetare: skrivande som fördjupar lärandet2014In: Högre Utbildning, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 83-85Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Equal Opportunity for Sexual Evolution2011In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 641-642Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Mate Choice in Males and Females2010In: Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior / [ed] Michael D. Breed and Janice Moore, Oxford: Academic Press, 2010, p. 394-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding a ‘dream mate’ is important for fitness in many sexually reproducing animals because half the genome of the offspring will come from this mate. Individuals that choose their mates carefully may gain both direct benefits (i.e., good care, territories, and other resources) and indirect benefits (genes that improve offspring viability or attractiveness). Mate choices occur in both sexes and the same individuals can be both choosy and competitive. Mate choice and mating competition often result in sexual selection and the evolution of secondary sexual characters. Mate choice is interactive, context dependent, operates on multiple traits, and varies in time and space.

  • 11.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Seahorses and Their Relatives2010In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 308-309Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Forsgren, Elisabet
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning i Trondheim, Norway.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Enheten för biologisk mångfald och områdesskydd, Havs och Vattenmyndigheten, Göteborg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Zoologi, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Fiskbiologi, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU), Umeå.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Etologi, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Östlund Nilsson, Sara
    Nasjonalbiblioteket, Oslo, Norway.
    En beteende-ekologisk forskningsperiod på Klubbans biologiska station: Rapport från återträff med Doktorer som disputerade (1983-2001) på avhandlingar med fältarbete på Klubbans Biologiska station. I en värld av kantnålar, stubbar, spiggar och nudingar.2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We had the fortune as PhD-students and scientists in Animal Ecology at Uppsala University, to spend joyful and creative field work summers at Klubban Biological Station, during the 1980-90’s. A reunion in June 2018 resulted in this report highlighting research on pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs. Our research on these animals have provided novel insights and knowledge of the process of sexual selection and paternal care. These animals have, in many aspects, now become model organisms in evolutionary behavioral ecology in marine environments. Our list of publications provides many examples of how environmental factors influence how sexual selection and mate choice operate, how predictors like potential reproductive rates, operational sex ratios work and how male parental care is prominent in influencing selection. This research, that started at Klubban, has broadened our understanding of the ecological importance of shallow marine areas. The evolutionary understanding of how males and females can behave and how adaptive traits are selected in interaction with social and an increasingly changing ambient environment is in focus in our continued scientific endeavors. We have happily compiled this report illustrating how science and scientist can stimulate each other at a wonderful place like Klubban Biological Station, with the access to amazing organisms like pipefishes, gobies, sticklebacks and nudibranchs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Braga Goncalves, Ines
    Mate Choice in Males and Females2017In: Reference Module in Life Sciences, Elsevier, 2017, p. 394-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To find a “dream mate” is important for fitness in all sexually reproducing animals because half of the genome of one’s offspring comes from the chosen mate. Individuals that choose their mates may gain both direct benefits (ie, care or other resources) and indirect benefits (genes improving offspring viability or attractiveness). Mate choice occurs in males and females, and individuals may simultaneously be choosy and compete to be chosen. Processes that often result in sexual selection and in the evolution of secondary sexual characters. Mate choice is context-dependent, operates on multiple traits and varies in time and space.

  • 14.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Braga Goncalves, Ines
    Mate choice in males and females2019In: Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior / [ed] Choe J.C., Elsevier, 2019, 2, p. 432-440Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To find a “dream mate” is important for fitness in all sexually reproducing animals because half of the genome of one’soffspring comes from the chosen mate. Individuals that choose their mates may gain both direct benefits (i.e., care or other resources) and indirect benefits (genes that improve offspring viability or attractiveness). Mate choice occurs in males and females, and individuals may both be choosy and compete to be chosen. Both processes often result in sexual selection and in the evolution of secondary sexual characters. Mate choice is context-dependent, operates on multiple traits and varies in time and space.

  • 15.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Brealey, Jaelle C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Günter, Katerina P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Martinossi‑Allibert, Ivain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Morinay, Jennifer
    Siljestam, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Stångberg, Josefine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Vasconcelos, Paula
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Considering Gender‑Biased Assumptions in Evolutionary Biology2020In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 47, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Bussière, Luc
    University of Gothenburg.
    Evolution of Animal Mating Systems2021In: Oxford Bibliographies: Evolutionary Biology / [ed] Douglas J. Futuyma, Oxford University Press (OUP) , 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Forsgren, Elisabet
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Variation in sexual selection in fishes2008In: Fish Behaviour / [ed] Carin Magnhagen, Victoria A. Braithwaite, Elisabet Forsgren, B.G. Kapoor, Enfield: Science Publishers Inc., 2008, p. 303-335Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Gunilla
    Blue Center Gotland, Uppsala University, Visby, Sweden.
    Zuk, Marlene
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, St Paul, MN 55455 USA.
    Obituary: Staffan Ulfstrand2024In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 35, no 1, article id arad113Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Vasconcelos, Paula
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Recension: Cordelia Fine. Testosteron Rex: Myten om våra könade hjärnor2018In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 123-124Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Eriksson, D.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Larsson, K.
    EXPLOITATION COMPETITION INFLUENCES THE USE OF FORAGING SITES BY TITS - EXPERIMENTAL-EVIDENCE1987In: Ecology, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Eriksson, D.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Larsson, K.
    Exploitation competition influences the use of foraging sites by tits: experimental evidence.1987In: Ecology, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Eriksson, D.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN PIED AND COLLARED FLYCATCHERS - SEXUAL SELECTION AND SPECIATION THEORY1990In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 3, no 5-6, p. 375-389Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    GENETIC COMPONENT OF MORPHOLOGICAL-DIFFERENTIATION IN COAL TITS UNDER COMPETITIVE RELEASE1988In: Evolution, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 200-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Linden, M.
    Lundberg, A.
    INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION AND NICHE SHIFTS IN TITS AND THE GOLDCREST - AN EXPERIMENT1985In: Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 977-984Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Linden, M.
    Lundberg, A.
    Interspecific competition and niche shifts in tits and the goldcrest: an experiment.1985In: Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 977-984Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Breeding success and hybridization of collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, and pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca on Oland 19811982In: Calidris, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    ( Breeding success and hybridization of collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, and pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, on Oland 1981). | Hackningsframgang och forekomst av halsbandsflugsnappare Ficedula albicollis, svartvit flugsnappare Ficedula hypoleuca samt blandpar pa Oland 1981.1982In: Calidris, Vol. 2, no 82, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    DO FEMALES PREFER OLDER MALES IN POLYGYNOUS BIRD SPECIES1986In: American Naturalist, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY AND HERITABILITY ESTIMATES OF TARSUS LENGTH IN PIED AND COLLARED FLYCATCHERS1989In: Oikos, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 54-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Extra-pair paternity and heritability estimates of tarsus length in pied and collared flycatchers1989In: Oikos, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 54-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    High frequency of cuckoldry in pied and collared flycatchers.1984In: Oikos, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Hybridization and breeding success of collared and pied flycatchers on the island of Gotland.1982In: Auk, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    HYBRIDIZATION AND BREEDING SUCCESS OF COLLARED AND PIED FLYCATCHERS ON THE ISLAND OF GOTLAND1982In: Auk, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Interspecific competition and niche changes in tits ( Parus spp.): evaluation of nonexperimental data.1986In: American Naturalist, Vol. 127, no 6, p. 819-834Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION AND NICHE CHANGES IN TITS (PARUS SPP) - EVALUATION OF NONEXPERIMENTAL DATA1986In: American Naturalist, Vol. 127, no 6, p. 819-834Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    MALE COLORATION AND SPECIES RECOGNITION IN SYMPATRIC FLYCATCHERS1994In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, Vol. 256, no 1346, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    PHENOTYPIC SELECTION ON HERITABLE SIZE TRAITS - ENVIRONMENTAL VARIANCE AND GENETIC RESPONSE1990In: American Naturalist, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    WHY DO YOUNG PASSERINE BIRDS HAVE SHORTER WINGS THAN OLDER BIRDS1984In: Ibis, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 410-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Ulfstrand, S.
    HABITAT SHIFT OF THE WILLOW TIT PARUS MONTANUS IN THE ABSENCE OF THE MARSH TIT PARUS PALUSTRIS1985In: Ornis Scandinavica, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Alatalo, R. V.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lundberg, A.
    Ulfstrand, S.
    Habitat shift of the willow tit Parus montanus in the absence of the marsh tit Parus palustris.1985In: Ornis Scandinavica, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Alavioon, Ghazal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Garcia, Andrea Cabrera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    LeChatelier, Magali
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Maklakov, Alex A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich, Norfolk, England.
    Immler, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich, Norfolk, England.
    Selection for longer lived sperm within ejaculate reduces reproductive ageing in offspring2019In: Evolution Letters, E-ISSN 2056-3744, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Males produce numerous sperm in a single ejaculate that greatly outnumber their potential egg targets. Recent studies found that phenotypic and genotypic variation among sperm in a single ejaculate of a male affects the fitness and performance of the resulting offspring. Specifically, within-ejaculate sperm selection for sperm longevity increased the performance of the resulting offspring in several key life-history traits in early life. Because increased early-life reproductive performance often correlates with rapid ageing, it is possible that within-ejaculate sperm selection increases early-life fitness at the cost of accelerated senescence. Alternatively, within-ejaculate sperm selection could improve offspring quality throughout the life cycle, including reduced age-specific deterioration. We tested the two alternative hypotheses in an experimental setup using zebrafish Danio rerio. We found that within-ejaculate sperm selection for sperm longevity reduced age-specific deterioration of fecundity and offspring survival but had no effect on fertilization success in males. Remarkably, we found an opposing effect of within-ejaculate sperm selection on female fecundity, where selection for sperm longevity resulted in increased early-life performance followed by a slow decline, while females sired by unselected sperm started low but increased their fecundity with age. Intriguingly, within-ejaculate sperm selection also reduced the age-specific decline in fertilization success in females, suggesting that selection for sperm longevity improves at least some aspects of female reproductive ageing. These results demonstrate that within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype contributes to individual variation in animal life histories in the two sexes and may have important implications for assisted fertilization programs in livestock and humans.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Alavioon, Ghazal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Hotzy, Cosima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nakhro, Khriezhanuo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Rudolf, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Scofield, Douglas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Zajitschek, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Spanish Natl Res Council, Donana Biol Stn, Seville 41092, Spain.
    Maklakov, Alex A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England.
    Immler, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Univ East Anglia, Sch Biol Sci, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England.
    Haploid selection within a single ejaculate increases offspring fitness2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, no 30, p. 8053-8058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inescapable consequence of sex in eukaryotes is the evolution of a biphasic life cycle with alternating diploid and haploid phases. The occurrence of selection during the haploid phase can have far-reaching consequences for fundamental evolutionary processes including the rate of adaptation, the extent of inbreeding depression, and the load of deleterious mutations, as well as for applied research into fertilization technology. Although haploid selection is well established in plants, current dogma assumes that in animals, intact fertile sperm within a single ejaculate are equivalent at siring viable offspring. Using the zebrafish Danio rerio, we show that selection on phenotypic variation among intact fertile sperm within an ejaculate affects offspring fitness. Longer-lived sperm sired embryos with increased survival and a reduced number of apoptotic cells, and adult male offspring exhibited higher fitness. The effect on embryo viability was carried over into the second generation without further selection and was equally strong in both sexes. Sperm pools selected by motile phenotypes differed genetically at numerous sites throughout the genome. Our findings clearly link within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype to offspring fitness and sperm genotype in a vertebrate and have major implications for adaptive evolution.

  • 43.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Cibois, Alice
    Nat Hist Museum Geneva, Dept Mammal & Ornithol, CP 6434, CH-1211 Geneva 6, Switzerland..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zuccon, Dario
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Gelang, Magnus
    Gothenburg Nat Hist Museum, Box 7283, S-40235 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Nat Hist Museum Denmark, Zool Museum, Ctr Macroecol Evolut & Climate, Univ Pk 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Andersen, Michael
    Univ New Mexico, Dept Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA.;Univ New Mexico, Museum Southwestern Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Moyle, Robert
    Univ Kansas, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA.;Univ Kansas, Biodivers Inst, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Pasquet, Eric
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 127, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread Old World avian family Locustellidae ('grassbirds and allies') comprises 62 extant species in 11 genera. In the present study, we used one mitochondrial and, for most species, four nuclear loci to infer the phylogeny of this family. We analysed 59 species, including the five previously unsampled genera plus two genera that had not before been analysed in a densely sampled dataset. This study revealed extensive disagreement with current taxonomy; the genera Bradypterus, Locustella, Megalurus, Megalurulus and Schoenicola were all found to be non-monophyletic. Non-monophyly was particularly pronounced for Megalurus, which was widely scattered across the tree. Three of the five monotypic genera (Amphilais, Buettikoferella and Malia) were nested within other genera; one monotypic genus (Chaetornis) formed a Glade with one of the two species of Schoenicola; whereas the position of the fifth monotypic genus (Elaphrornis) was unresolved. Robsonius was confirmed as sister to the other genera. We propose a phylogenetically informed revision of genus-level taxonomy, including one new generic name. Finally, we highlight several non-monophyletic species complexes and deep intra-species divergences that point to conflict in taxonomy and suggest an underestimation of current species diversity in this group.

  • 44.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    de Juana, Eduardo
    Donald, Paul F.
    Suárez, Francisco
    Mediterranean Short-toed Lark (Alaudala rufescens)2023Other (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Donald, Paul F.
    Sharpe's Lark (Mirafra sharpii)2022Other (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Donald, Paul F.
    Turkestan Short-toed Lark (Alaudala heinei)2023Other (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, POB 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden; Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Jonsson, Knud A
    Jon, Fjeldså
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 140364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest thatAmaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100101 , China.
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Donald, Paul F
    Nymark, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Enbody, Erik D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA 95060 , USA.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Elisha, Emmanuel Barde
    Ndithia, Henry K
    Tieleman, B Irene
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Olsson, Urban
    Rancilhac, Loïs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Stervander, Martin
    Integrative taxonomy reveals unrecognised species diversity in African Corypha larks (Aves: Alaudidae)2023In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The species complex comprising the rufous-naped lark Corypha africana, Sharpe’s lark Corypha sharpii, the red-winged lark Corypha hypermetra, the Somali long-billed lark Corypha somalica and Ash’s lark Corypha ashi encompasses 31 recognised taxa across sub-Saharan Africa, many of which are extremely poorly known and some not observed for decades. Only 17 taxa have been studied molecularly and none comprehensively for morphology, vocalisations or other behaviours. Here, we undertake comprehensive integrative taxonomic analyses based on plumage and morphometrics (for 97% of the taxa), mitochondrial and nuclear loci (77%), ≤ 1.3 million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (68%), song (many described for the first time; 52%) and additional behavioural data (45%). All polytypic species as presently circumscribed are paraphyletic, with eight primary clades separated by ≤ 6.3–6.8 Myr, broadly supported by plumage, morphometrics, song and other behaviours. The most recent divergences concern sympatric taxon pairs usually treated as separate species, whereas the divergence of all clades including C. africana subspecies is as old as sister species pairs in other lark genera. We propose the recognition of nine instead of five species, while C. ashi is synonymised with C. somalica rochei as C. s. ashi. The geographical distributions are incompletely known, and although the nine species are generally para-/allopatric, some might be sympatric.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Enbody, Erik D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, 95060, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Crochet, Pierre-André
    Guillaumet, Alban
    Rancilhac, Loïs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Tieleman, B. Irene
    Olsson, Urban
    Donald, Paul F.
    Stervander, Martin
    Systematics of the avian family Alaudidae using multilocus and genomic data2023In: Avian Research, E-ISSN 2053-7166, Vol. 14, article id 100095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family Alaudidae, larks, comprises 93–100 species (depending on taxonomy) that are widely distributed across Africa and Eurasia, with single species extending their ranges to North and northernmost South America and Australia. A decade-old molecular phylogeny, comprising ∼80% of the species, revealed multiple cases of parallel evolution and large variation in rates of morphological evolution, which had misled taxonomists into creating many non-monophyletic genera. Here, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the larks, using a dataset covering one mitochondrial and 16 nuclear loci and comprising all except one of the currently recognised species as well as several recently proposed new species (in total 133 taxa; not all loci available for all species). We provide additional support using genome-wide markers to infer a genus-level phylogeny based on near-complete generic sampling (in total 51 samples of 44 taxa across 40 species). Our results confirm the previous findings of rampant morphological convergence and divergence, and reveal new cases of paraphyletic genera. We propose a new subfamily classification, and also that the genus Mirafra is divided into four genera to produce a more balanced generic classification of the Alaudidae. Our study supports recently proposed species splits as well as some recent lumps, while also questioning some of the latter. This comprehensive phylogeny will form an important basis for future studies, such as comparative studies of lark natural history, ecology, evolution and conservation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Delicate Prinia (Prinia lepida)2022Other (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 1209
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf