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  • 1.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Gusic, IvanMalmö University.Höglund, KristineUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The Spatiality of Violence in Post-war Cities2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Lund University.
    Höglund, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The spatiality of violence in post-war cities2019In: Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal, ISSN 2380-2014, E-ISSN 2379-9978, Vol. 4, no 2-3, p. 81-93Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is urbanising rapidly and cities are increasingly held as the most important arenas for sustainable development. Cities emerging from war are no exception, but across the globe, many post-war cities are ravaged by residual or renewed violence, which threatens progress towards peace and stability. This collection of articles addresses why such violence happens, where and how it manifests, and how it can be prevented. It includes contributions that are informed by both post-war logics and urban particularities, that take intra-city dynamics into account, and that adopt a spatial analysis of the city. By bringing together contributions from different disciplinary backgrounds, all addressing the single issue of post-war violence in cities from a spatial perspective, the articles make a threefold contribution to the research agenda on violence in post-war cities. First, the articles nuance our understanding of the causes and forms of the uneven spatial distribution of violence, insecurities, and trauma within and across post-war cities. Second, the articles demonstrate how urban planning and the built environment shape and generate different forms of violence in post-war cities. Third, the articles explore the challenges, opportunities, and potential unintended consequences of conflict resolution in violent urban settings.

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  • 3.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Meye, Marie-Therese
    University of Mannheim.
    The bridge to violence – Mapping and understanding conflict-related violence in postwar Mitrovica2023In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, E-ISSN 1460-3578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can attention to spatial dynamics improve our understanding of where, how, and why conflict-related violence (CRV) concentrates within postwar cities such as Mitrovica? Like many other postwar cities, Mitrovica – one of Kosovo’s largest cities – remains affected by violence connected to the preceding war. This violence is not equally distributed across the city but rather concentrates to certain flashpoints while other sites are comparatively calm(er). To date, however, research on postwar cities has not fully explained such patterns, partly due to limitations in microlevel data. In this article we rely on novel georeferenced data on CRV, in combination with in-depth fieldwork, to map CRV in Mitrovica and explore the causes for its spatial clustering. Using this approach, we show that CRV concentrates at Mitrovica’s Main Bridge and explore this concentration using relational space as an analytical lens. The analysis contributes new insights into patterns of violence in Mitrovica, demonstrates the value of combining systematic data on the patterns of CRV with in-depth exploration into its underlying dynamics, and contributes to existing research on Mitrovica as well as on postwar cities and postwar violence more broadly.

  • 4.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Murtagh, Brendan
    School of Natural and Built Environment, Queen's University of Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.
    Postwar cities: Conceptualizing and mapping the research agenda2023In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 105, article id 102912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postwar cities are often dangerous, poorly functioning, and hurdles for peace. Current research on postwar cities, however, is largely based on a limited number of “paradigmatic” cases, without a shared understanding of the broader population of cases to which these belong. Important insights therefore remain uncontextualized vis-à-vis broader trends and have an unclear scope of generalizability. The purpose of this article is to promote a global comparativist research agenda that enables systematic research across a spectrum of research foci. First, we conceptualize the postwar city as a city which has experienced war, no longer does, but where fully consolidated peace is not yet present. Second, we operationalize and map postwar cities since 1989, identifying 273 such cities in 45 war-affected states. Third, we provided a typology of contestation in postwar cities. We end by highlighting how our approach advances the research agenda by enabling systematic study of postwar cities, capturing postwar cities more equally across the globe, bringing to the fore numerous understudied cases, and providing a stronger foundation for comparative analysis.

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  • 5.
    Elfversson, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Rokem, Jonathan
    School of Anthropology and Conservation, Kent Interdisciplinary Centre for Spatial Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.
    Peace in cities, peace through cities? Theorising and exploring geographies of peace in violently contested cities2023In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue explores geographies of peace in violently contested cities – cities where the socio-political order is contested by actors who use violence and repression to either challenge or reinforce the prevailing distribution of power and political, economic, and social control. The articles within the special issue theorise and explore where, when, how, and why urban conflicts manifest themselves in the context of contested cities. Together, they also uncover strategies and mechanisms that can break dynamics of violence and repression, lead to urban coexistence, and generate peaceful relations in cities, grounding their analyses in rich case studies of different violently contested cities. The special issue thereby advances the research front on violently contested cities by studying their previously underexplored constructive potential. Bringing together different disciplinary perspectives, the special issue speaks to broader issues of conflicted and conflict-driven urbanisation, political violence in cities, and wider processes of urban change.

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  • 6.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Department of Global Political Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Peace between Peace(s)? Urban Peace and the Coexistence of Antagonists in City Spaces2022In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 619-640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gusic, Ivan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    "Meme-Ing" Peace in Northern Ireland: Exploring the Everyday Politics of Internet Memes in Belfast Riots2023In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 17, p. 6312-6334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do Internet memes about political violence in postwar Belfast speak to or against the peacebuilding process in Northern Ireland? Our findings demonstrate three dominant ways in which memes engage with such violence: (a) poking fun at violence, (b) poking fun at rioters, and (c) normalizing violence. Memes poking fun at violence destabilize the banal nationalism underpinning the conflict in Northern Ireland, whereas memes poking fun at rioters position the sectarian (and/or socioeconomic) "other" as inferior. Memes that normalize violence do not necessarily entail a defeatist resignation to political violence-even if that might often be the case-as they also provide comic relief by constructing a shared identity in an otherwise divided city.

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  • 8.
    Murtagh, Brendan
    et al.
    School of Natural and Built Environment, David Keir Building, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Elfversson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Gusic, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Meye, Marie-Therese
    Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Urban restructuring and the reproduction of spaces of violence in Belfast2023In: Peacebuilding, ISSN 2164-7259, E-ISSN 2164-7267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper maps the distribution of post-conflict violence in Belfast and how it has restructured socially, economically and spatially. An end to hostilities and stable transition produces and is produced by a more complex set of distinctly urban assemblages, actors, resources and places. Bringing the ideas of ‘ordering’ into relation with assemblage theory, the paper suggests that explanations for the survival, volume, type and distribution of violence cannot be understood within exclusively ethnonational frames, identarian politics or military logics. In Belfast, the data reveal a more variegated map of peace and consumption; inner-city alienation and the intensification of division; as well as the emergence of new geographies of displaced violence. The paper concludes by emphasising the need to understand how urban processes and competing ethnic orders create highly differentiated spaces that explain the resilience of violence after hostilities have formally closed.

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