Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 50 of 50
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlberg, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Chapter 8 Neural Crest in Fossil Vertebrates:: What, If Anything, Can We Know?2020In: Evolving Neural Crest Cells / [ed] Brian Frank Eames, Daniel Meulemans Medeiros, Igor Adameyko, Taylor & Francis Group, 2020, 1, p. 1-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Caruso, Vanni
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Le Greves, Madeleine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fard, Shahrzad Shirazi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Alsiö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor Gene GPR178 Is Evolutionary Conserved and Altered in Response to Acute Changes in Food Intake2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0122061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of integral membrane proteins mediating physiological functions fundamental for survival, including energy homeostasis. A few years ago, an amino acid sequence of a novel GPCR gene was identified and named GPR178. In this study, we provide new insights regarding the biological significance of Gpr178 protein, investigating its evolutionary history and tissue distribution as well as examining the relationship between its expression level and feeding status. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated that GPR178 is highly conserved among all animal species investigated, and that GPR178 is not a member of a protein family. Real-time PCR and in situ hybridization revealed wide expression of Gpr178 mRNA in both the brain and periphery, with high expression density in the hypothalamus and brainstem, areas involved in the regulation of food intake. Hence, changes in receptor expression were assessed following several feeding paradigms including starvation and overfeeding. Short-term starvation (12-48h) or food restriction resulted in upregulation of Gpr178 mRNA expression in the brainstem, hypothalamus and prefrontal cortex. Conversely, short-term (48h) exposure to sucrose or Intralipid solutions downregulated Gpr178 mRNA in the brainstem; long-term exposure (10 days) to a palatable high-fat and high-sugar diet resulted in a downregulation of Gpr178 in the amygdala but not in the hypothalamus. Our results indicate that hypothalamic Gpr178 gene expression is altered during acute exposure to starvation or acute exposure to palatable food. Changes in gene expression following palatable diet consumption suggest a possible involvement of Gpr178 in the complex mechanisms of feeding reward.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Caruso, Vanni
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Univ Tasmania UTAS, Fac Pharm, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia..
    Sreedharan, Smitha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Carlini, Valeria P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology. Univ Nacl Cordoba, Fac Ciencias Quim Haya Torre & Medina Allende, Dept Farmacol, Ciudad Univ, RA-5016 Cordoba, Argentina..
    Jacobsson, Josefin A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hammer, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Crona, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Dept Psychopharmacol, Mannheim, Germany..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Natl Childhood Obes Ctr, Div Pediat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Heilig, Markus
    NIAAA, Lab Clin & Translat Studies, NIH, Bethesda, MD USA..
    de Barioglio, Susana R.
    Univ Nacl Cordoba, Fac Ciencias Quim Haya Torre & Medina Allende, Dept Farmacol, Ciudad Univ, RA-5016 Cordoba, Argentina..
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    mRNA GPR162 changes are associated with decreased food intake in rat, and its human genetic variants with impairments in glucose homeostasis in two Swedish cohorts2016In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 581, no 2, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of integral membrane proteins mediating intercellular interactions of fundamental physiological importance for survival including regulation of food intake, blood pressure, and hormonal sensing signaling, among other roles. Homeostatic alterations in the physiological status of GPCRs are often associated with underlying causes of disease, and to date, several orphan GPCRs are still uncharacterized. Findings from our previous study demonstrate that the Rhodopsin family protein GPR162 is widely expressed in GABAergic as well as other neurons within the mouse hippocampus, whereas extensive expression is observed in hypothalamus, amygdala, and ventral tegmental area, regions strictly interconnected and involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis and hedonic feeding. In this study, we provide a further anatomical characterization of GPR162 in mouse brain via in situ hybridization as well as detailed mRNA expression in a panel of rat tissues complementing a specie-specific mapping of the receptor. We also provide an attempt to demonstrate a functional implication of GPR162 in food intake-related behavior via antisense knockdown studies. Furthermore, we performed human genetic studies in which for the first time, variants of the GPR162 gene were associated with impairments in glucose homeostasis.

  • 4. Cerda-Reverter, JM
    et al.
    Haitina, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Schiöth, HB
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Peter, RE
    Gene structure of the goldfish agouti-signaling protein:: a putative role in the dorsla-ventral pigment pattern of fish2005In: Endocrinology, Vol. 146, no 3, p. 1597-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most successful chromatic adaptations in vertebrates is the dorsal-ventral pigment pattern in which the dorsal skin is darkly colored, whereas the ventrum is light. In fish, the latter pattern is achieved because a melanization inhibition factor inhibits melanoblast differentiation and supports iridophore proliferation in the ventrum. In rodents, the patterned pigmentation results from regional production of the agouti-signaling protein (ASP). This peptide controls the switch between production of eumelanin and pheomelanin by antagonizing alphaMSH effects on melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1 in the melanocytes. In addition, ASP inhibits the differentiation and proliferation of melanoblast. Thus, the mammalian ASP may be homologous to the poikilotherm melanization inhibition factor. By screening of a genomic library, we deduced the amino acid sequence of goldfish ASP. The ASP gene is a four-exon gene spanning 3097 bp that encodes a 125-amino acid precursor. Northern blot analysis identified two different ASP mRNAs in ventral skin of red- and black-pigmented and albino fish, but no expression levels were observed in the dorsal skin of the same fish. The dorsal-ventral expression polarity was also detected in both black dorsally pigmented fish and albino fish. Pharmacological studies demonstrate that goldfish ASP acts as a melanocortin antagonist at Fugu MC1R and goldfish MC4R. In addition, goldfish ASP inhibited Nle4, D-Phe7-MSH-stimulated pigment dispersion in medaka melanophores. Our studies support agouti signaling protein as the melanization inhibition factor, a key factor in the development of the dorsal-ventral pigment pattern in fish.

  • 5.
    Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie
    et al.
    Univ Montpellier, EPHE, CNRS, ISEM,IRD, Montpellier, France.
    Simion, Paul
    Univ Montpellier, EPHE, CNRS, ISEM,IRD, Montpellier, France.
    Venteo, Stephanie
    Univ Montpellier, St Eloi Hosp, Neurosci Inst Montpellier, Inserm UMR1051, Montpellier, France.
    Munoz, David
    Univ Concepcion, Fac Biol Sci, Dept Cell Biol, Concepcion, Chile.
    Marcellini, Sylvain
    Univ Concepcion, Fac Biol Sci, Dept Cell Biol, Concepcion, Chile.
    Mazan, Sylvie
    UPMC, Observ Oceanol, Sorbonne Univ, CNRS,UMR7232 Biol Integrat Organismes Marins, Banyuls Sur Mer, France.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Skeletal Mineralization in Association with Type X Collagen Expression Is an Ancestral Feature for Jawed Vertebrates2019In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 2265-2276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to characterize the molecular bases of mineralizing cell evolution, we targeted type X collagen, a nonfibrillar network forming collagen encoded by the Col10a1 gene. It is involved in the process of endochondral ossification in ray-finned fishes and tetrapods (Osteichthyes), but until now unknown in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes). We show that holocephalans and elasmobranchs have respectively five and six tandemly duplicated Col10a1 gene copies that display conserved genomic synteny with osteichthyan Col10a1 genes. All Col10a1 genes in the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula are expressed in ameloblasts and/or odontoblasts of teeth and scales, during the stages of extracellular matrix protein secretion and mineralization. Only one duplicate is expressed in the endoskeletal (vertebral) mineralizing tissues. We also show that the expression of type X collagen is present in teeth of two osteichthyans, the zebrafish Danio rerio and the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis, indicating an ancestral jawed vertebrate involvement of type X collagen in odontode formation. Our findings push the origin of Col10a1 gene prior to the divergence of osteichthyans and chondrichthyans, and demonstrate its ancestral association with mineralization of both the odontode skeleton and the endoskeleton.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Filipek-Gorniok, Beata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carlsson, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Habicher, Judith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ledin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The Ndst Gene Family in Zebrafish: Role of Ndst1b in Pharyngeal Arch Formation2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are ubiquitous components of the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane of metazoans. The sulfation pattern of the HS glycosaminoglycan chain is characteristic for each tissue and changes during development. The glucosaminyl N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (NDST) enzymes catalyze N-deacetylation and N-sulfation during HS biosynthesis and have a key role in designing the sulfation pattern. We here report on the presence of five NDST genes in zebrafish. Zebrafish ndst1a, ndst1b, ndst2a and ndst2b represent duplicated mammalian orthologues of NDST1 and NDST2 that arose through teleost specific genome duplication. Interestingly, the single zebrafish orthologue ndst3, is equally similar to tetrapod Ndst3 and Ndst4. It is likely that a local duplication in the common ancestor of lobe-finned fish and tetrapods gave rise to these two genes. All zebrafish Ndst genes showed distinct but partially overlapping expression patterns during embryonic development. Morpholino knockdown of ndst1b resulted in delayed development, craniofacial cartilage abnormalities, shortened body and pectoral fin length, resembling some of the features of the Ndst1 mouse knockout.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Filipek-Gorniok, Beata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Habicher, Judith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oliveira, Marta Bastos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ledin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Expression of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycosyltransferases during early zebrafish development2013In: Developmental Dynamics, ISSN 1058-8388, E-ISSN 1097-0177, Vol. 242, no 8, p. 964-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) proteoglycans present in the extracellular matrix have important structural and regulatory functions. Results: Six human genes have previously been shown to catalyze CS/DS polymerization. Here we show that one of these genes, chpf, is represented by two copies in the zebrafish genome, chpfa and chpfb, while the other five human CS/DS glycosyltransferases csgalnact1, csgalnact2, chpf2, chsy1, and chsy3 all have single zebrafish orthologues. The putative zebrafish CS/DS glycosyltransferases are spatially and temporally expressed. Interestingly, overlapping expression of multiple glycosyltransferases coincides with high CS/DS deposition. Finally, whereas the relative levels of the related polysaccharide HS reach steady-state at around 2 days post fertilization, there is a continued relative increase of the CS amounts per larvae during the first 6 days of development, matching the increased cartilage formation. Conclusions: There are 7 CS/DS glycosyltransferases in zebrafish, which, based on homology, can be divided into the CSGALNACT, CHSY, and CHPF families. The overlap between intense CS/DS production and the expression of multiple CS/DS glycosyltransferases suggests that efficient CS/DS biosynthesis requires a combination of several glycosyltransferases.

  • 8.
    Habicher, Judith
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Dierker, Tabea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ledin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Chondroitin / Dermatan Sulfate Modification Enzymes in Zebrafish Development2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0121957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) proteoglycans consist of unbranched sulfated polysaccharide chains of repeating GalNAc-GlcA/IdoA disaccharide units, attached to serine residues on specific proteins. The CS/DS proteoglycans are abundant in the extracellular matrix where they have essential functions in tissue development and homeostasis. In this report a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate genes coding for the enzymes that modify CS/DS is presented. We identify single orthologous genes in the zebrafish genome for the sulfotransferases chst7, chst11, chst13, chst14, chst15 and ust and the epimerase dse. In contrast, two copies were found for mammalian sulfotransferases CHST3 and CHST12 and the epimerase DSEL, named chst3a and chst3b, chst12a and chst12b, dsela and dselb, respectively. Expression of CS/DS modification enzymes is spatially and temporally regulated with a large variation between different genes. We found that CS/DS 4-O-sulfotransferases and 6-O-sulfotransferases as well as CS/DS epimerases show a strong and partly overlapping expression, whereas the expression is restricted for enzymes with ability to synthesize di-sulfated disaccharides. A structural analysis further showed that CS/DS sulfation increases during embryonic development mainly due to synthesis of 4-O-sulfated GalNAc while the proportion of 6-O-sulfated GalNAc increases in later developmental stages. Di-sulfated GalNAc synthesized by Chst15 and 2-O-sulfated GlcA/IdoA synthesized by Ust are rare, in accordance with the restricted expression of these enzymes. We also compared CS/DS composition with that of heparan sulfate (HS). Notably, CS/DS biosynthesis in early zebrafish development is more dynamic than HS biosynthesis. Furthermore, HS contains disaccharides with more than one sulfate group, which are virtually absent in CS/DS.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Molecular mechanism of articular cartilage establishment during the evolution of vertebrates2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Regulation of genes involved in the development of the pharyngeal arches2011In: Regulation of genes involved in the development of the pharyngeal arches, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The role of transcription factors during the development of craniofacial tendons and ligaments2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Utvecklingsbiologi-: komplexa processer när en ny individ blir till2018In: Fascinerande forskning / [ed] Reimegård, Lisa, Sweden: Nationellt resurscentrum för biologi och bioteknik , 2018, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 38-42Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie
    Montpellier University.
    Evolutionary Genomics of Odontode Tissues2023In: Odontodes: The Developmental and Evolutionary Building Blocks of Dentitions / [ed] Dongle Chen, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2023, 1, p. 41-Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teeth, scales, fin spines, and other odontodes are hot topics in evolutionary biology due to their great variation in number, shape, and anatomical localization in vertebrates as a result of different types of adaptations. Structural adaptation arose through variations in the composition of the enamel/enameloid and dentin layers that build up the mineralized components of teeth and other odontodes. These variations are known from both fossil and extant groups of vertebrates and rely on differences in the proteins secreted by the specialized odontode cells, ameloblasts, and odontoblasts.

    In this chapter, we focus on recent genomic and gene expression data to better understand the evolution of gene families engaged in the processes of secretion, mineralization, and maturation of odontode matrices. Our focus will be structural matrix proteins (collagenous and non-collagenous), calcium-interacting proteins necessary for mineralization, and proteins regulating matrix degradation over the course of tissue maturation.

  • 14.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Foord, Steven M.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Gloriam, David E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the dog genome is more similar to that in humans than rodents2009In: BMC Genomics, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 10, p. 24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The dog is an important model organism and it is considered to be closer to humans than rodents regarding metabolism and responses to drugs. The close relationship between humans and dogs over many centuries has lead to the diversity of the canine species, important genetic discoveries and an appreciation of the effects of old age in another species. The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the largest gene families in most mammals and the most exploited in terms of drug discovery. An accurate comparison of the GPCR repertoires in dog and human is valuable for the prediction of functional similarities and differences between the species.

    RESULTS

    We searched the dog genome for non-olfactory GPCRs and obtained 353 full-length GPCR gene sequences, 18 incomplete sequences and 13 pseudogenes. We established relationships between human, dog, rat and mouse GPCRs resolving orthologous pairs and species-specific duplicates. We found that 12 dog GPCR genes are missing in humans while 24 human GPCR genes are not part of the dog GPCR repertoire. There is a higher number of orthologous pairs between dog and human that are conserved as compared with either mouse or rat. In almost all cases the differences observed between the dog and human genomes coincide with other variations in the rodent species. Several GPCR gene expansions characteristic for rodents are not found in dog.

    CONCLUSION

    The repertoire of dog non-olfactory GPCRs is more similar to the repertoire in humans as compared with the one in rodents. The comparison of the dog, human and rodent repertoires revealed several examples of species-specific gene duplications and deletions. This information is useful in the selection of model organisms for pharmacological experiments.

  • 15.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Andersson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Lagerström, Malin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Larhammar, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 2.
    Larson, Earl T
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Cloning, tissue distribution, pharmacology and three-dimensional modelling of melanocortin receptors 4 and 5 in rainbow trout suggest close evolutionary relationship of these subtypes2004In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 380, no 2, p. 475-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is one of the most widely used fish species in aquaculture and physiological research. In the present paper, we report the first cloning, 3D (three-dimensional) modelling, pharmacological characterization and tissue distribution of two melanocortin (MC) receptors in rainbow trout. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that these receptors are orthologues of the human MC4 and MC5 receptors. We created 3D molecular models of these rainbow trout receptors and their human counterparts. These models suggest greater divergence between the two human receptors than between their rainbow trout counterparts. The pharmacological analyses demonstrated that ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) had surprisingly high affinity for the rainbow trout MC4 and MC5 receptors, whereas alpha-, beta- and gamma-MSH (melanocyte-stimulating hormone) had lower affinity. In second-messenger studies, the cyclic MSH analogues MTII and SHU9119 acted as potent agonist and antagonist respectively at the rainbow trout MC4 receptor, indicating that these ligands are suitable for physiological studies in rainbow trout. Interestingly, we found that the rainbow trout MC4 receptor has a natural high-affinity binding site for zinc ions (0.5 microM) indicating that zinc may play an evolutionary conserved role at this receptor. Reverse transcription PCR indicates that the rainbow trout receptors are expressed both in peripheral tissues and in the central nervous system, including the telencephalon, optic tectum and hypothalamus. Overall, this analysis indicates that the rainbow trout MC4 and MC5 receptors have more in common than their mammalian counterparts, which may suggest that these two receptors have a closer evolutionary relationship than the other MC receptor subtypes.

  • 16.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Pharmacological characterization of melanocortin receptors in fish suggests an important role for ACTH2005In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1040, no Apr, p. 337-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The melanocortin (MC) receptor subtypes have distinctive characteristic binding profiles. We found that the trout and Fugu MC4 receptors have similar affinity for α-MSH and β-MSH and a much higher affinity for ACTH than does the human MC4 receptor. The Fugu MC1 and the trout and Fugu MC5 receptors also have higher affinity for ACTH-derived peptides than α-, β-, or γ-MSH. It is tempting to speculate that ACTH-derived peptides may have played an important role as “original” ligands at the MC receptors, while the specificity of the different subtypes for the α-, β-, and γ-MSH peptides may have appeared at later stages during vertebrate evolution.

  • 17.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Takahashi, Akiyoshi
    Löwgren, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ringholm, Aneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Enberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kawauchi, Hiroshi
    Larson, Earl T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Functional characterization of two melanocortin (MC) receptors in lamprey showing orthology to the MC1 and MC4 receptor subtypes2007In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 7, p. 101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The melanocortin (MC) receptors have a key role in regulating body weight and pigmentation. They belong to the rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The purpose of this study was to identify ancestral MC receptors in agnathan, river lamprey.

    Results

    We report cloning of two MC receptors from river lamprey. The lamprey receptors, designated MCa and MCb, showed orthology to the MC1 and MC4 receptor subtypes, respectively. The molecular clock analysis suggested that lamprey MC receptor genes were not duplicated recently and diverged from each other more than 400 MYR ago. Expression and pharmacological characterization showed that the lamprey MCa receptor was able to bind and be activated by both lamprey and human MSH peptides. The lamprey MCa receptor had relatively high affinity for ACTH derived peptides similarly to the fish MC receptors. We found that both of the lamprey MC receptors were expressed in skin, while the MCb receptor was also found in liver, heart and skeletal muscle.

    Conclusion

    This study shows presence of MC receptors in agnathans indicating early signs of specific functions of melanocortin receptor subtypes.

  • 18.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Renström, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fourteen novel human members of mitochondrial solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) widely expressed in the central nervous system2006In: Genomics, ISSN 0888-7543, E-ISSN 1089-8646, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 779-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) are known to transport molecules over the mitochondrial membrane. In this paper we present 14 novel members of SLC25 family in human. These were provided with following gene symbols by the HGNC: SLC25A32, SLC25A33, SLC25A34. SLC25A35, SLC25A37, SLC25A38, SLC25A39, SLC25A40, SLC25A41, SLC25A42, SLC25A43, SLC25A44, SLC25A45, and SLC25A46. We also identified the orthologues for these genes in rat and mouse. Moreover, we found yeast orthologues for 9 of these genes and show that the predicted substrate binding residues are highly conserved in the human and yeast proteins. We performed a comprehensive tissue localization study for 9 of these genes on a panel of 30 rat tissues with quantitative real-time polymerse chain reaction. We detected their mRNA in a wide number of tissues, both in brain and in periphery. This study provides an overall roadmap of the repertoire of the SLC25 family in mammals. showing that there are at least 46 genes in the human genome coding for mitochondrial transporters.

  • 19.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Alsiö, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat2008In: BMC Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 9, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions.

    RESULTS

    In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique.

    CONCLUSION

    Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  • 20.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Qu, Qinming
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Identification of enamel matrix protein genes in the genome of spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ringholm, Aneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Kelly, Joanne
    Mundy, Nicholas I
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    High diversity in functional properties of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) in divergent primate species is more strongly associated with phylogeny than coat color2007In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 2001-2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have characterized the biochemical function of the melanocortin1 receptor (MC1R), a critical regulator of melanin synthesis,from 9 phylogenetically diverse primate species with varyingcoat colors. There is substantial diversity in melanocyte-stimulatinghormone (MSH) binding affinity and basal levels of activityin the cloned MC1Rs. MSH binding was lost independently in lemurand New World monkey lineages, whereas high basal levels ofMC1R activity occur in lemurs and some New World monkeys andOld World monkeys. Highest levels of basal activity were foundin the MC1R of ruffed lemurs, which have the E94K mutation thatleads to constitutive activation in other species. In 3 species(2 lemurs and the howler monkey), we report the novel findingthat binding and inhibition of MC1R by agouti signaling protein(ASIP) can occur when MSH binding has been lost, thus enablingcontinuing regulation of the melanin type via ASIP expression.Together, these findings can explain the previous paradox ofa predominantly pheomelanic coat in the red ruffed lemur (Vareciarubra). The presence of a functional, MSH-responsive MC1R inorangutan demonstrates that the mechanism of red hair generationin this ape is different from the prevalent mechanism in Europeanhuman populations. Overall, we have found unexpected diversityin MC1R function among primates and show that the evolutionof the regulatory control of MC1R activity occurs by independentvariation of 3 distinct mechanisms: basal MC1R activity, MSHbinding and activation, and ASIP binding and inhibition. Thisdiversity of function is broadly associated with primate phylogenyand does not have a simple relation to coat color phenotypewithin primate clades.

  • 22.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Takahashi, Akiyoshi
    Holmén, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Enberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Further evidence for ancient role of ACTH peptides at melanocortin (MC) receptors; pharmacology of dogfish and lamprey peptides at dogfish MC receptors2007In: Peptides, ISSN 0196-9781, E-ISSN 1873-5169, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 798-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cloning of melanocortin (MC) receptors in distant species has provided us tools to get insight in how the ligand–receptors interactions in the MC system have evolved. We have however lacked studies on pharmacology of native ancient melanocortin peptides at the ancient MC receptors. In this paper we synthesized melanocortin peptides from both the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and tested them on the MC3 and MC4 receptors from spiny dogfish. The results show that both the dogfish and lamprey ACTH peptides have similar or higher affinity than the dogfish α-, β- and γ-MSH peptides to the dogfish MC3 and MC4 receptors. Moreover, both the dogfish and lamprey ACTH peptides have more than 10-fold higher affinity than α-MSH to the dogfish MC4 receptor. We also show that dogfish δ-MSH is able to bind to MC receptors and its potency is higher than of dogfish β-MSH, which is considered to be its precursor. Our results provide the first evidence that native ACTH ligands from dogfish and lamprey have a preference above native MSH peptides to ancient version of the MC3 and MC4 receptors. This further strengthens the hypotheses that the ligand contributing to the first version of the melanocortin ligand-receptor system resembled ACTH.

  • 23.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Identification of six putative human transporters with structural similarity to the drug transporter SLC22 family2007In: Genomics, ISSN 0888-7543, E-ISSN 1089-8646, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 595-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solute carrier family 22 (SLC22) is a large family of organic cation and anion transporters. These are transmembrane proteins expressed predominantly in kidneys and liver and mediate the uptake and excretion of environmental toxins, endogenous substances, and drugs from the body. Through a comprehensive database search we identified six human proteins not yet cloned or annotated in the reference sequence databases. Five of these belong to the SLC22 family, SLC22A20, SLC22A23, SLC22A24, SLC22A25, and SPNS3, and the sixth gene, SVOPL, is a paralog to the synaptic vesicle protein SVOP. We identified the orthologs for these genes in mouse and rat and additional homologous proteins and performed the first phylogenetic analysis on the entire SLC22 family in human, mouse, and rat. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic analysis which showed that SVOP and SV2A-C are, in a comparison with all vertebrate proteins, most similar to the SLC22 family. Finally, we performed a tissue localization study on 15 genes on a panel of 30 rat tissues using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

  • 24.
    Jerve, Anna
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Biol Dept, Silwood Pk Campus, Ascot, Berks, England.
    Qu, Qinming
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Univ Ottawa, Ctr Adv Res Environm Genom, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Sanchez, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Grenoble, France.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Vascularization and odontode structure of a dorsal ridge spine of Romundina stellina Ørvig 19752017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two types of dermal skeletons in jawed vertebrates: placoderms and osteichthyans carry large bony plates (macromery), whereas chondrichthyans and acanthodians are covered by small scales (micromery). Fin spines are one of the last large dermal structures found on micromeric taxa and offer a potential source of histology and morphology that can be compared to those found on macromeric groups. Dermal fin spines offer a variety of morphology but aspects of their growth modes and homology are unclear. Here, we provide detailed descriptions of the microstructure and growth of a dorsal ridge spine from the acanthothoracid placoderm, Romundina stellina, using virtual three-dimensional paleohistological datasets. From these data we identify several layers of dentine ornamentation covering the lateral surfaces of the spine and reconstructed their growth pattern. We show that this spine likely grew posteriorly and proximally from a narrow portion of bone located along the leading edge of the spine. The spine is similarly constructed to the scales with a few exceptions, including the absence of polarized fibers distributed throughout the bone and the presence of a thin layer of perichondral bone. The composition of the spine (semidentine odontodes, dermal bone, perichondral bone) is identical to that of the Romundina dermal plates. These results illustrate the similarities and differences between the dermal tissues in Romundina and indicate that the spine grew differently from the dentinous fin spines from extant and fossil chondrichthyans. The morphology and histology of Romundina is most similar to the fin spine of the probable stem osteichthyan Lophosteus, with a well-developed inner cellular bony base and star-shaped odontodes on the surface. Results from these studies will undoubtedly have impact on our understanding of fossil fin spine histology and evolution, contributing to the on-going revision of early gnathostome phylogeny.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Klovins, Janis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Fridmanis, Davids
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Kilianova, Z
    Kapa, Ivo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    Gallo-Payet, N
    Schiöth, HB
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 3.
    The melanocortin system in Fugu: determination of POMC/AGRP/MCR gene repertoire and synteny, as well as pharmacology and anatomical distribution of the MCRs2004In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 563-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The G-protein-coupled melanocortin receptors (MCRs) play an important role in a variety of essential functions such as the regulation of pigmentation, energy homeostasis, and steroid production. We performed a comprehensive characterization of the MC system in Fugu (Takifugu rubripes). We show that Fugu has an AGRP gene with high degree of conservation in the C-terminal region in addition to a POMC gene lacking gamma-MSH. The Fugu genome contains single copies of four MCRs, whereas the MC3R is missing. The MC2R and MC5R are found in tandem and remarkably contain one and two introns, respectively. We suggest that these introns were inserted through a reverse splicing mechanism into the DRY motif that is widely conserved through GPCRs. We were able to assemble large blocks around the MCRs in Fugu, showing remarkable synteny with human chromosomes 16 and 18. Detailed pharmacological characterization showed that ACTH had surprisingly high affinity for the Fugu MC1R and MC4R, whereas alpha-MSH had lower affinity. We also showed that the MC2R gene in Fugu codes for an ACTH receptor, which did not respond to alpha-MSH. All the Fugu receptors were able to couple functionally to cAMP production in line with the mammalian orthologs. The anatomical characterization shows that the MC2R is expressed in the brain in addition to the head-kidney, whereas the MC4R and MC5R are found in both brain regions and peripheral tissues. This is the first comprehensive genomic and functional characterization of a GPCR family within the Fugu genome. The study shows that some parts of the MC system are highly conserved through vertebrate evolution, such as regions in POMC coding for ACTH, alpha-MSH, and beta-MSH, the C-terminal region of AGRP, key binding units within the MC1R, MC2R, MC4R, and MC5R, synteny blocks around the MCRs, pharmacological properties of the MC2R, whereas other parts in the system are either missing, such as the MC3R and gamma-MSH, or different as compared to mammals, such as the affinity of ACTH and MSH peptides to MC1R and MC4R and the anatomical expression pattern of the MCRs.

  • 26.
    Klovins, Janis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ringholm, Aneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Löwgren, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fridmanis, Davids
    Slaidina, Maija
    Stier, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Cloning of two melanocortin (MC) receptors in spiny dogfish: MC3 receptor in cartilaginous fish shows high affinity to ACTH-derived peptides while it has lower preference to gamma-MSH2004In: European Journal of Biochemistry, ISSN 0014-2956, E-ISSN 1432-1033, Vol. 271, no 21, p. 4320-4331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the cloning and characterization of two melanocortin receptors (MCRs) from the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) (Sac). Phylogenetic analysis shows that these shark receptors are orthologues of the MC3R and MC5R subtypes, sharing 65% and 70% overall amino acid identity with the human counterparts, respectively. The SacMC3R was expressed and pharmacologically characterized in HEK293 cells. The radioligand binding results show that this receptor has high affinity for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-derived peptides while it has comparable affinity for alpha- and beta-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), and slightly lower affinity for gamma-MSH when compared with the human orthologue. ACTH(1-24) has high potency in a second-messenger cAMP assay while alpha- and gamma-MSH had slightly lower potency in cells expressing the SacMC3R. We used receptor-enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) fusion to show the presence of SacMC3R in plasma membrane of Chinese hamster ovary and HEK293 cells but the SacMC5R was retained in intracellular compartments of these cells hindering pharmacological characterization. The anatomical distribution of the receptors were determined using reverse transcription PCR. The results showed that the SacMC3R is expressed in the hypothalamus, brain stem and telencephalon, optic tectum and olfactory bulbs, but not in the cerebellum of the spiny dogfish while the SacMC5R was found only in the same central regions. This report describes the first molecular characterization of a MC3R in fish. The study indicates that many of the important elements of the MC system existed before radiation of gnathostomes, early in vertebrate evolution, at least 450 million years ago.

  • 27.
    Lagerström, Malin C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fridmanis, Davids
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Ling, Maria K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Berglund, Magnus M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    High affinity agonistic metal ion binding sites within the melanocortin 4 receptor illustrate conformational change of transmembrane region 32003In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 278, no 51, p. 51521-51526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We created a molecular model of the human melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) and introduced a series of His residues into the receptor protein to form metal ion binding sites. We were able to insert micromolar affinity binding sites for zinc between transmembrane region (TM) 2 and TM3 where the metal ion alone was able to activate this peptide binding G-protein-coupled receptor. The exact conformation of the metal ion interactions allowed us to predict the orientation of the helices, and remodeling of the receptor protein indicated that Glu100 and Ile104 in TM2 and Asp122 and Ile125 in TM3 are directed toward a putative area of activation of the receptor. The molecular model suggests that a rotation of TM3 may be important for activation of the MC4R. Previous models of G-protein-coupled receptors have suggested that unlocking of a stabilizing interaction between the DRY motif, in the cytosolic part of TM3, and TM6 is important for the activation process. We suggest that this unlocking process may be facilitated through creation of a new interaction between TM3 and TM2 in the MC4R.

  • 28.
    Lagerström, Malin C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Rabe, Nadine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kalnina, Ineta
    Hellström, Anders R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Klovins, Janis
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The evolutionary history and tissue mapping of GPR123: specific CNS expression pattern predominantly in thalamic nuclei and regions containing large pyramidal cells2007In: Journal of Neurochemistry, ISSN 0022-3042, E-ISSN 1471-4159, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 1129-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes 33 receptors and is the second largest GPCR family. Most of these proteins are still orphans and fairly little is known of their tissue distribution and evolutionary context. We report the evolutionary history of the Adhesion family protein GPR123 as well as mapping of GPR123 mRNA expression in mouse and rat using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR, respectively. GPR123 was found to be well conserved within the vertebrate lineage, especially within the transmembrane regions and in the distal part of the cytoplasmic tail, containing a potential PDZ binding domain. The real-time PCR data indicates that GPR123 is predominantly expressed in CNS. The in situ data show high expression in thalamic nuclei and regions containing large pyramidal cells like cortex layers 5 and 6 and subiculum. Moreover, we found distinct expression in amygdala, hypothalamus, inferior olive and spinal cord. The CNS specific expression, together with the high sequence conservation between the vertebrate sequences investigated, indicate that GPR123 may have an important role in the regulation of neuronal signal transduction.

  • 29.
    Leurs, Nicolas
    et al.
    Univ Montpellier, EPHE, CNRS, ISEM,IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Martinand-Mari, Camille
    Univ Montpellier, EPHE, CNRS, ISEM,IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Venteo, Stephanie
    Univ Montpellier, Inst Neurosci Montpellier, St Eloi Hosp, Inserm UMR 1051, Montpellier, France..
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Debiais-Thibaud, Melanie
    Univ Montpellier, EPHE, CNRS, ISEM,IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Evolution of Matrix Gla and Bone Gla Protein Genes in Jawed Vertebrates2021In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 12, article id 620659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Matrix Gla protein (Mgp) and bone Gla protein (Bgp) are vitamin-K dependent proteins that bind calcium in their gamma-carboxylated versions in mammals. They are recognized as positive (Bgp) or negative (Mgp and Bgp) regulators of biomineralization in a number of tissues, including skeletal tissues of bony vertebrates. The Mgp/Bgp gene family is poorly known in cartilaginous fishes, which precludes the understanding of the evolution of the biomineralization toolkit at the emergence of jawed vertebrates. Here we took advantage of recently released genomic and transcriptomic data in cartilaginous fishes and described the genomic loci and gene expression patterns of the Mgp/Bgp gene family. We identified three genes, Mgp1, Mgp2, and Bgp, in cartilaginous fishes instead of the single previously reported Mgp gene. We describe their genomic loci, resulting in a dynamic evolutionary scenario for this gene family including several events of local (tandem) duplications, but also of translocation events, along jawed vertebrate evolution. We describe the expression patterns of Mgp1, Mgp2, and Bgp in embryonic stages covering organogenesis in the small-spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and present a comparative analysis with Mgp/Bgp family members previously described in bony vertebrates, highlighting ancestral features such as early embryonic, soft tissues, and neuronal expressions, but also derived features of cartilaginous fishes such as expression in fin supporting fibers. Our results support an ancestral function of Mgp in skeletal mineralization and a later derived function of Bgp in skeletal development that may be related to the divergence of bony vertebrates.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 30.
    Leyhr, Jake
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    A novel Mohawk enhancer drives species-dependent reporter expression in musculoskeletal system-associated tissues in zebrafish.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Leyhr, Jake
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Sanchez, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Grenoble, France..
    Dollman, Kathleen N.
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Grenoble, France..
    Tafforeau, Paul
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Grenoble, France..
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Enhanced contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography for describing skeleton-associated soft tissue defects in zebrafish mutants2023In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 14, article id 1108916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed histological analyses are desirable for zebrafish mutants that are models for human skeletal diseases, but traditional histological techniques are limited to two-dimensional thin sections with orientations highly dependent on careful sample preparation. On the other hand, techniques that provide three-dimensional (3D) datasets including mu CT scanning are typically limited to visualizing the bony skeleton and lack histological resolution. We combined diffusible iodine-based contrast enhancement (DICE) and propagation phase-contrast synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (PPC-SR mu CT) to image late larval and juvenile zebrafish, obtaining high-quality 3D virtual histology datasets of the mineralized skeleton and surrounding soft tissues. To demonstrate this technique, we used virtual histological thin sections and 3D segmentation to qualitatively and quantitatively compare wild-type zebrafish and nkx3.2(-/-) mutants to characterize novel soft-tissue phenotypes in the muscles and tendons of the jaw and ligaments of the Weberian apparatus, as well as the sinus perilymphaticus associated with the inner ear. We could observe disrupted fiber organization and tendons of the adductor mandibulae and protractor hyoideus muscles associated with the jaws, and show that despite this, the overall muscle volumes appeared unaffected. Ligaments associated with the malformed Weberian ossicles were mostly absent in nkx3.2(-/-) mutants, and the sinus perilymphaticus was severely constricted or absent as a result of the fused exoccipital and basioccipital elements. These soft-tissue phenotypes have implications for the physiology of nkx3.2(-/-) zebrafish, and demonstrate the promise of DICE-PPC-SR mu CT for histopathological investigations of bone-associated soft tissues in small-fish skeletal disease models and developmental studies more broadly.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Leyhr, Jake
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Waldmann, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Filipek-Górniok, Beata
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    A novel cis-regulatory element drives early expression of Nkx3.2 in the gnathostome primary jaw joint2022In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 11, article id e75749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of movable jaws was a major event during vertebrate evolution. The role of NK3 homeobox 2 (Nkx3.2) transcription factor in patterning the primary jaw joint of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) is well known, however knowledge about its regulatory mechanism is lacking. In this study, we report a proximal enhancer element of Nkx3.2 that is deeply conserved in most gnathostomes but undetectable in the jawless hagfish and lamprey. This enhancer is active in the developing jaw joint region of the zebrafish Danio rerio, and was thus designated as jaw joint regulatory sequence 1 (JRS1). We further show that JRS1 enhancer sequences from a range of gnathostome species, including a chondrichthyan and mammals, have the same activity in the jaw joint as the native zebrafish enhancer, indicating a high degree of functional conservation despite the divergence of cartilaginous and bony fish lineages or the transition of the primary jaw joint into the middle ear of mammals. Finally, we show that deletion of JRS1 from the zebrafish genome using CRISPR/Cas9 results in a significant reduction of early gene expression of nkx3.2 and leads to a transient jaw joint deformation and partial fusion. Emergence of this Nkx3.2 enhancer in early gnathostomes may have contributed to the origin and shaping of the articulating surfaces of vertebrate jaws.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Differential regulation of nuclear receptors, neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the hypothalamus and pituitary of food restricted rats2005In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food restriction is associated with a number of endocrine disturbances. We validated the experimental conditions for several house-keeping genes and determined the effects of 12 day 50% food restriction on hypothalamic and pituitary transcription of genes involved in different neuroendocrine systems, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 7 nuclear receptors and 12 neuropeptides and peptide hormones were investigated in the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus and the pituitary gland in rats. In the hypothalamus, food restriction reduced mRNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), thyrotropin-releasing factor (TRF), somatostatin, and increased that of neuropeptide Y (NPY). In the pituitary, the treatment reduced growth hormone (GH), luteinizing hormone beta (LHbeta) and thyrotropin beta, but increased ERalpha mRNA levels. The study provides a map of how food restriction affects the regulation of a number of transcripts involved in neuroendocrine control.

  • 34.
    Ling, Maria K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hotta, E
    Kilianova, Z
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ringholm, Aneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Johansson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Gallo-Payet, N
    Takeuchi, S
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The melanocortin receptor subtypes in chicken have high preference to ACTH-derived peptides2004In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 143, no 5, p. 626-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1 Melanocortin (MC) receptors are widely distributed throughout the body of chicken, like in mammals, and participate in a wide range of physiological functions. 2 To clarify the pharmacological impact of ligands acting in the MC system, we expressed the chicken MC1, MC2, MC3, MC4 and MC5 (cMC1-5) receptors in eukaryotic cells and performed comprehensive pharmacological characterization of the potency of endogenous and synthetic melanocortin peptides. 3 Remarkably, the cMC receptors displayed high affinity for ACTH-derived peptides and in general low affinity for alpha-MSH. It is evident that not only the cMC2 receptor but also the other cMC receptors interact with ACTH-derived peptide through an epitope beyond the sequence of alpha-MSH. 4 The synthetic ligand MTII was found to be a potent agonist whereas HS024 was a potent antagonist at the cMC4 receptor, indicating that these ligands are suitable for physiological studies in chicken. 5 We also show the presence of prohormone convertase 1 (PC1) and PC2 genes in chicken, and that these peptides are coexpressed with proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in various tissues.

  • 35.
    Ocampo Daza, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Univ Calif Merced, Sch Nat Sci, Merced, CA USA..
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Reconstruction of the Carbohydrate 6-O Sulfotransferase Gene Family Evolution in Vertebrates Reveals Novel Member, CHST16, Lost in Amniotes2020In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 993-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycosaminoglycans are sulfated polysaccharide molecules, essential for many biological processes. The 6-O sulfation of glycosaminoglycans is carried out by carbohydrate 6-O sulfotransferases (C6OSTs), previously named Gal/GalNAc/GlcNAc 6-O sulfotransferases. Here, for the first time, we present a detailed phylogenetic reconstruction, analysis of gene synteny conservation and propose an evolutionary scenario for the C6OST family in major vertebrate groups, including mammals, birds, nonavian reptiles, amphibians, lobe-finned fishes, ray-finned fishes, cartilaginous fishes, and jawless vertebrates. The C6OST gene expansion likely started early in the chordate lineage, giving rise to four ancestral genes after the divergence of tunicates and before the emergence of extant vertebrates. The two rounds of whole-genome duplication in early vertebrate evolution (1R/2R) only contributed two additional C6OST subtype genes, increasing the vertebrate repertoire from four genes to six, divided into two branches. The first branch includes CHST1 and CHST3 as well as a previously unrecognized subtype, CHST16 that was lost in amniotes. The second branch includes CHST2, CHST7, and CHST5. Subsequently, local duplications of CHST5 gave rise to CHST4 in the ancestor of tetrapods, and to CHST6 in the ancestor of primates. The teleost-specific gene duplicates were identified for CHST1, CHST2, and CHST3 and are result of whole-genome duplication (3R) in the teleost lineage. We could also detect multiple, more recent lineage-specific duplicates. Thus, the vertebrate repertoire of C6OST genes has been shaped by gene duplications and gene losses at several stages of vertebrate evolution, with implications for the evolution of skeleton, nervous system, and cell-cell interactions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Onsbring Gustafson, Henning
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Divergent expression patterns of teleost specific gene duplicates during the development of craniofacial tendons and ligaments2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Panara, Virginia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Yu, Oliver
    Peng, Di
    Skoczylas, Renae
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3.
    Staxäng, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hodik, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hogan, Benjamin M.
    Koltowska, Katarzyna
    Distinct cis-regulatory elements drive prox1a expression in specific lymphatic vascular bedsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Qu, Qingming
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zhu, Min
    Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    New genomic and fossil data illuminate the origin of enamel2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 526, no 7571, p. 108-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enamel, the hardest vertebrate tissue, covers the teeth of almost all sarcopterygians (lobe-finned bony fishes and tetrapods) as well as the scales and dermal bones of many fossil lobe-fins(1-5). Enamel deposition requires an organic matrix containing the unique enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) amelogenin (AMEL), enamelin (ENAM) and ameloblastin (AMBN)(6). Chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fishes) lack both enamel and EMP genes(7,8). Many fossil and a few living non-teleost actinopterygians (ray-finned bony fishes) such as the gar, Lepisosteus, have scales and dermal bones covered with a proposed enamel homologue called ganoine(1,9). However, no gene or transcript data for EMPs have been described from actinopterygians(10,11). Here we show that Psarolepis romeri, a bony fish from the the Early Devonian period, combines enamel-covered dermal odontodes on scales and skull bones with teeth of naked dentine, and that Lepisosteus oculatus (the spotted gar) has enam andambn genes that are expressed in the skin, probably associated with ganoine formation. The genetic evidence strengthens the hypothesis that ganoine is homologous with enamel. The fossil evidence, further supported by the Silurian bony fish Andreolepis, which has enamel-covered scales but teeth and odontodes on its dermal bones made of naked dentine(12-16), indicates that this tissue originated on the dermal skeleton, probably on the scales. It subsequently underwent heterotopic expansion across two highly conserved patterning boundaries (scales/head-shoulder and dermal/oral) within the odontode skeleton.

  • 39.
    Ryll, Bettina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Sanchez, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Tafforeau, Paul
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The genome of Callorhinchus and the fossil record: a new perspective on SCPP gene evolution in gnathostomes2014In: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 123-124Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fridmanis, Davids
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Unusual genomic structure: melanocortin receptors in fugu2005In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1040, p. 460-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The melanocortin (MC) receptors are found in five subtypes in mammals and chicken, while recent studies have shown that the Fugu (Takifugu rubripes) genome has only four MC receptors and the zebrafish genome has six subtypes. The MC3 receptor seems to be missing from the two closely related pufferfishes, Fugu and Tetraodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis). The MC2 and MC5 receptors in the pufferfish have introns. Moreover, these two receptors are found in a tandem that is remarkably conserved in several vertebrate species. Here, we speculate about the genomic origin of the MC receptors.

  • 41.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ling, Maria K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Ringholm, Aneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Cerda-Reverter, J M
    Klovins, Janis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Evolutionary conservation of the structural, pharmacological, and genomic characteristics of the melanocortin receptor subtypes2005In: Peptides, ISSN 0196-9781, E-ISSN 1873-5169, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1886-1900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have cloned melanocortin receptors (MCRs) from several species of fish. The MC4R and MC5R subtypes arose early in vertebrate evolution and their primary structure is remarkably conserved. Expression and pharmacological characterization of the MCRs in fish has revealed that they bind and respond to melanocortin peptides with high potency. Detailed characterization of the binding properties of the different subtypes suggests that MCRs in early vertebrates had preference for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides, while the high sensitivity for the shorter proopiomelanocortin (POMC) products, such as the α-, β-, and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), has appeared later, perhaps as the MCR subtypes gained more specialized functions. The MCR repertoire shows in general high similarities in their primary structures, while they are however not similar in terms of functional roles. The MCRs serve therefore as an interesting model family to understand the molecular mechanisms of how functions of the genes can diverge during evolution. In this review, we provide an overview of our recent studies on the cloning, expression, pharmacology, 3D modeling, and genomic studies of the MCRs in non-mammalian species.

  • 42.
    Sreedharan, Smitha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Carlini, Valeria P
    Departamento de Farmacología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Hammer, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Crona, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H
    Department of Psychopharmacology, Central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Levine, Allen S
    Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Minnesota Obesity Center.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Marcus, Claude
    Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute.
    Heilig, Marcus
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    de Barioglio, Susan R
    Departamento de Farmacología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    GPR162 is expressed in the hypothalamus and is involved in food intake related behaviour2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes about 270 non-olfactory receptors and is the largest family of GPCRs. About sixty non-olfactory Rhodopsin GPCRs are still orphans without known ligands, and fairly little is known about their functions. In this study, we present molecular, neuroanatomical, genetic and behavioral data implicating a Rhodopsin family protein, GPR162, in the regulation of food intake-related behaviour and glucose homeostasis. The real-time PCR data show that GPR162 is predominantly expressed in the CNS. The in situ hybridization results confirmed significant expression of GPR162 in several hypothalamic sites, amygdala, substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, among others regions. In line with the distribution of the GPR162 mRNA in the feeding circuitry, antisense oligo knockdown of GPR162 caused a significant reduction in food intake but no effect was observed towards reduction in body weight in rats. Our human genetics studies suggest that genetic variants of GPR162 affect glucose homeostasis. In conclusion, this study provides evidence linking the orphan GPR162 gene with the regulation of food intake-related behaviour.

  • 43.
    Sreedharan, Smitha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Sällman Almén, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Carlini, Valeria P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H
    Department of Psychopharmacology, Central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
    Heilig, Marcus
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    de Barioglio, Susan R
    Departamento de Farmacología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The G protein coupled receptor Gpr153 shares common evolutionary origin with Gpr162 and is highly expressed in central regions including the thalamus, cerebellum and the arcuate nucleus2011In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 278, no 24, p. 4881-4894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes the phylogenetic α-group consisting of about 100 human members. The α-group is the only group of GPCRs that has many receptors for biogenic amines which are major drug targets. Several members of this group are orphan receptors and their functions are elusive. In this study we present a detailed phylogenetic and anatomical characterization of the Gpr153 receptor and also attempted to study its functional role. We identified the homologue of GPR153 in the elephant shark genome and phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that Gpr162 originated from Gpr153, through a duplication event before the radiation of the amphibian lineage. Quantitative real time PCR study reveals wide spread expression of GPR153 in the CNS and all the peripheral tissues investigated. Detailed in situ hybridization on mouse brain showed specifically high expression in the thalamus, cerebellum and the arcuate nucleus. The antisense oligodeoxynucleotide knockdown of GPR153 caused a slight reduction in food intake and the elevated plus maze test showed significant reduction in the percentage of time spent in the centre square, which points towards a probable role in decision making. This report provides the first detailed characterization of the evolution, expression and as well as primary functional properties of the GPR153 gene.

  • 44.
    Stundl, Jan
    et al.
    CALTECH, Div Biol & Biol Engn, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.;Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Martik, Megan L.
    CALTECH, Div Biol & Biol Engn, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Mol & Cell Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Chen, Donglei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Raja, Desingu Ayyappa
    CALTECH, Div Biol & Biol Engn, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA..
    Franek, Roman
    Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Pospisilova, Anna
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Prague 12800, Czech Republic..
    Psenicka, Martin
    Univ South Bohemia Ceske Budejovice, Fac Fisheries & Protect Waters, Vodnany 38925, Czech Republic..
    Metscher, Brian D.
    Univ Vienna, Dept Evolutionary Biol, Theoret Biol Unit, A-1010 Vienna, Austria..
    Braasch, Ingo
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.;Michigan State Univ, Ecol Evolut & Behav Program, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Cerny, Robert
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Prague 12800, Czech Republic..
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Bronner, Marianne E.
    CALTECH, Div Biol & Biol Engn, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA..
    Ancient vertebrate dermal armor evolved from trunk neural crest2023In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 120, no 30, article id e2221120120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone is an evolutionary novelty of vertebrates, likely to have first emerged as part of ancestral dermal armor that consisted of osteogenic and odontogenic components. Whether these early vertebrate structures arose from mesoderm or neural crest cells has been a matter of considerable debate. To examine the developmental origin of the bony part of the dermal armor, we have performed in vivo lineage tracing in the sterlet sturgeon, a representative of nonteleost ray- finned fish that has retained an extensive postcranial dermal skeleton. The results definitively show that sterlet trunk neural crest cells give rise to osteoblasts of the scutes. Transcriptional profiling further reveals neural crest gene signature in sterlet scutes as well as bichir scales. Finally, histological and microCT analyses of ray- finned fish dermal armor show that their scales and scutes are formed by bone, dentin, and hypermineralized covering tissues, in various combinations, that resemble those of the first armored vertebrates. Taken together, our results support a primitive skeletogenic role for the neural crest along the entire body axis, that was later progressively restricted to the cranial region during vertebrate evolution. Thus, the neural crest was a crucial evolutionary innovation driving the origin and diversification of dermal armor along the entire body axis.

  • 45.
    Waldmann, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Characterization of synovial joint progenitor cells in zebrafish2017In: Characterization of synovial joint progenitor cells in zebrafish, 2017, p. 26-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Waldmann, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Leyhr, Jake
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Filipek-Gorniok, Beata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Genome Engineering Zebrafish, Science for Life Laboratory.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    An evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory element of nkx3.2 drives jaw joint-specific expression in zebrafishManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Waldmann, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Leyhr, Jake
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Science for Life Laboratory BioImage Informatics Facility.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Science for Life Laboratory BioImage Informatics Facility.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Science.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The Role of Gdf5 in the Development of the Zebrafish Fin Endoskeleton2022In: Developmental Dynamics, ISSN 1058-8388, E-ISSN 1097-0177, Vol. 251, no 9, p. 1535-1549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of the vertebrate skeleton requires a complex interaction of multiple factors to facilitate correct shaping and positioning of bones and joints. Growth and differentiation factor 5 (Gdf5), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family (TGF-beta) is involved in patterning appendicular skeletal elements including joints. Expression of gdf5 in zebrafish has been detected within the first pharyngeal arch jaw joint, fin mesenchyme condensations and segmentation zones in median fins, however little is known about the functional role of Gdf5 outside of Amniota. 

    We generated CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of gdf5 in zebrafish and analysed the resulting phenotype at different developmental stages. Homozygous gdf5 mutant zebrafish display truncated median fin endoskeletal elements and loss of posterior radials in the pectoral fins. 

    These findings are consistent with phenotypes observed in human and mouse appendicular skeleton in response to Gdf5 knockout, suggesting a broadly conserved role for Gdf5 in Osteichthyes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Waldmann, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Leyhr, Jake
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Science.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The Broad Role of Nkx3.2 in the Development of the Zebrafish Axial SkeletonManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor Nkx3.2 (Bapx1) is an important chondrocyte maturation inhibitor. Previous Nkx3.2 knock-down and overexpression studies in non-mammalian gnathostomes have focused on its role in primary jaw joint development, while little is known about the function of this gene in broader skeletal development. We generated CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of nkx3.2 in zebrafish and applied a range of techniques to characterize skeletal phenotypes at developmental stages from larva to adult, revealing fusions in bones of the occiput, the loss or deformation of bony elements derived from basiventral cartilages of the vertebrae, and an increased length of the proximal radials of the dorsal and anal fins. These phenotypes are reminiscent of Nkx3.2 knockout phenotypes in mammals, suggesting that the function of this gene in axial skeletal development is ancestral to osteichthyans. Our results highlight the broad role of nkx3.2 in zebrafish skeletal development and its context-specific functions in different skeletal elements.

  • 49.
    Waldmann, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Leyhr, Jake
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. BioImage Informatics Facility, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Science.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. BioImage Informatics Facility, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The broad role of Nkx3.2 in the development of the zebrafish axial skeleton2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 8, article id e0255953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor Nkx3.2 (Bapx1) is an important chondrocyte maturation inhibitor. Previous Nkx3.2 knockdown and overexpression studies in non-mammalian gnathostomes have focused on its role in primary jaw joint development, while the function of this gene in broader skeletal development is not fully described. We generated a mutant allele of nkx3.2 in zebrafish with CRISPR/Cas9 and applied a range of techniques to characterize skeletal phenotypes at developmental stages from larva to adult, revealing loss of the jaw joint, fusions in bones of the occiput, morphological changes in the Weberian apparatus, and the loss or deformation of bony elements derived from basiventral cartilages of the vertebrae. Axial phenotypes are reminiscent of Nkx3.2 knockout in mammals, suggesting that the function of this gene in axial skeletal development is ancestral to osteichthyans. Our results highlight the broad role of nkx3.2 in zebrafish skeletal development and its context-specific functions in different skeletal elements.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 50.
    Zhang, Hanqing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Waldmann, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Manuel, Remy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Boije: Zebrafish Neuronal Networks.
    Boije, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Boije: Zebrafish Neuronal Networks.
    Haitina, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    zOPT: an open source optical projection tomography system and methods for rapid 3D zebrafish imaging2020In: Biomedical Optics Express, E-ISSN 2156-7085, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 4290-4305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a 3D imaging alternative to conventional microscopy which allows imaging of millimeter-sized object with isotropic micrometer resolution. The zebrafish is an established model organism and an important tool used in genetic and chemical screening. The size and optical transparency of the embryo and larva makes them well suited for imaging using OPT. Here, we present an open-source implementation of an OPT platform, built around a customized sample stage, 3D-printed parts and open source algorithms optimized for the system. We developed a versatile automated workflow including a two-step image processing approach for correcting the center of rotation and generating accurate 3D reconstructions. Our results demonstrate high-quality 3D reconstruction using synthetic data as well as real data of live and fixed zebrafish. The presented 3D-printable OPT platform represents a fully open design, low-cost and rapid loading and unloading of samples. Our system offers the opportunity for researchers with different backgrounds to setup and run OPT for large scale experiments, particularly in studies using zebrafish larvae as their key model organism.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 50 of 50
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf