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  • 1.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    300 år av Johannespassionen: Särart och universalitet i ett totalkonstverk2024In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Akt der Verzweiflung?: Einmal mehr soll ein ehemaliger Premierminister in Pakistan fertig gemacht werden2024In: Suedasien, ISSN 0933-5196Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Lindgren Hjälm, Miriam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. St Ignatios Coll, Södertälje, Sweden.;EHS, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Adang, Camilla
    Tel Aviv Univ, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Ala' al-Dīn al-Bāji's (d. 714/1314) critique of the Pentateuch and the plurality of Christian Bible recensions2024In: Collectanea Christiana Orientalia, ISSN 1697-2104, E-ISSN 2386-7442, Vol. 21, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the Muslim legal scholar and theologian `Al & amacr;' alDin al-B & amacr;ji (631-714/1233-1314) and his polemic against the Pentateuch, which he read in at least two Christian Arabic translations that were in use among R & umacr;m Orthodox Christians (Melkites). It aims to identify the recensions of the Pentateuch that al-B & amacr;ji had access to, and to understand how the differences between these recensions contributed to his view that the shared Jewish and Christian scripture had undergone changes. The article suggests that alB & aacute;ji used a combination of arguments to undermine especially the Christian reception of divine revelation, pointing out apparent inconsistencies and illogicalities in the biblical stories themselves as well as text -critical cruxes caused by discrepancies between different versions that circulated side by side within the Eastern Christian communities. Finally, some of the "irrationalities" he describes seem to be particular of the copies of the texts he had in front of him.

  • 4.
    Károly, László
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    An Old Uigur medical fragment in Syriac script2024In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 73, p. 28-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Museum of Asian Art in Berlin holds a single-folio fragment (shelf-mark M 152) of an Old Uigur medical text written in the Syriac script. It is the only known manuscript in the entire collection of Old Uigur texts of the Church of the East that deals with medicine. The present article provides a new edition of the fragment including a transliteration, transcription, English translation, commentary and glossary.

  • 5.
    Dahllöf, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Author gender and text characteristics in contemporary Swedish fiction2024In: Language and Literature, ISSN 0963-9470, E-ISSN 1461-7293, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 69-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study addresses the question of to what extent and how authors’ gender is reflected in the textual properties of bestselling fiction in Swedish during the period 2015–2020. The empirical material was a corpus of 235 female-authored books and 214 male-authored works. The analysis of the texts departed from text property measures targeting grammatical and lexical aspects of language use. Differences between the genders were analysed using the probability of superiority measure in combination with a threshold criterion. The results suggest that authors of bestselling fiction in the Swedish book market to a high degree engage in forms of gender performance when they compose their texts. The differences could in most cases be interpreted as conforming to patterns that have previously been reported for other languages and categories of language use. The gender performance to a large extent agreed with traditional stereotypes about the interests of women and men. There were also differences in grammar-related stylistic preferences. Among the female themes, positive emotion and social interaction were prominent. The male examples include weapons and animosity, as well as numerical quantification. A more grammar-related tendency is that male authors tend to package a larger fraction of their text into noun phrases.

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  • 6.
    Öberg, Linnéa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Beyond Language Scores: How Language Exposure Informs Assessment of Nonword Repetition, Vocabulary and Narrative Macrostructure in Bilingual Turkish/Swedish Children with and without Developmental Language Disorder2024In: Children, E-ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As in many other countries, baseline data concerning the linguistic development of bilingual children in Sweden are lacking, and suitable methods for identifying developmental language disorder (DLD) in bilinguals are lacking as well. This study presents reference data from 108 typically developing (TD) Turkish/Swedish-speaking children aged 4;0–8;1, for a range of language tasks developed specifically for the assessment of bilinguals (LITMUS test battery, COST Action IS0804). We report on different types of nonword repetition (NWR) tasks (language-specific and language-independent), receptive and expressive vocabulary (Cross-Linguistic Lexical Tasks, CLTs), and narrative macrostructure comprehension and production (Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives, MAIN) in Turkish, the children’s home language, and in Swedish, the language of schooling and society. Performance was investigated in relation to age, language exposure, type of task, and (for NWR and narratives) vocabulary size. There was a positive development with age for all tasks, but effects of language exposure and vocabulary size differed between tasks. Six bilingual Turkish/Swedish children with DLD were individually compared to the TD children. TD/DLD performance overlapped substantially, particularly for NWR, and more so for the production than the comprehension tasks. Surprisingly, the discriminatory potential was poor for both language-specific and language-independent NWR. DLD case studies underscored the importance of interpreting language scores in relation to exposure history, and the need for an increased emphasis on functional language skills as reported by parents and teachers when assessing and diagnosing DLD in bilinguals.

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  • 7.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Das Gespenst der Freiheit in Nepal2024In: Suedasien, ISSN 0933-5196Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Die Qual der Wahl: Pakistan bekommt eine neue Regierung2024In: Suedasien, ISSN 0933-5196Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Cullhed, Eric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Har tandvärk någon plats i ett gott liv?2024In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 20-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Akita, Kimi
    et al.
    Nagoya Univ, Dept English Linguist, Furo Cho,Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 4648601, Japan..
    McLean, Bonnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Park, Jiyeon
    Namseoul Univ, Namseoul Inst Int Educ, 91 Daehak Ro, Cheonan 31020, Chungcheongnam, South Korea..
    Thompson, Arthur Lewis
    Univ Hong Kong, Dept Linguist, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Iconicity mediates semantic networks of sound symbolism2024In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 155, no 4, p. 2687-2697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One speech sound can be associated with multiple meanings through iconicity, indexicality, and/or systematicity. It was not until recently that this “pluripotentiality” of sound symbolism attracted serious attention, and it remains uninvestigated how pluripotentiality may arise. In the current study, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, and English speakers rated unfamiliar jewel names on three semantic scales: size, brightness, and hardness. The results showed language-specific and cross-linguistically shared pluripotential sound symbolism. Japanese speakers associated voiced stops with large and dark jewels, whereas Mandarin speakers associated [i] with small and bright jewels. Japanese, Mandarin, and English speakers also associated lip rounding with darkness and softness. These sound-symbolic meanings are unlikely to be obtained through metaphorical or metonymical extension, nor are they reported to colexify. Notably, in a purely semantic network without the mediation of lip rounding, softness can instead be associated with brightness, as illustrated by synesthetic metaphors such as yawaraka-na hizashi /jawaɾakanaçizaɕi/ “a gentle (lit. soft) sunshine” in Japanese. These findings suggest that the semantic networks of sound symbolism may not coincide with those of metaphor or metonymy. The current study summarizes the findings in the form of (phono)semantic maps to facilitate cross-linguistic comparisons of pluripotential sound symbolism.

  • 11.
    Tang, Gongbo
    et al.
    Beijing Language & Culture Univ, Sch Informat Sci, Beijing 100083, Peoples R China..
    Yousuf, Oreen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Beijing Language & Culture Univ, Sch Informat Sci, Beijing 100083, Peoples R China.
    Jin, Zeying
    Beijing Language & Culture Univ, Sch Informat Sci, Beijing 100083, Peoples R China..
    Improving BERTScore for Machine Translation Evaluation Through Contrastive Learning2024In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 12, p. 77739-77749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BERTScore is an automatic evaluation metric for machine translation. It calculates similarity scores between candidate and reference tokens through embeddings. The quality of embeddings is crucial, but embeddings of low-resource languages tend to be poor. Multilingual pre-trained models can transfer knowledge from rich-resource languages to low-resource languages, but embeddings from these models are not always well aligned. To improve BERTScore for low-resource languages, we attempt to align embeddings by fine-tuning pre-trained models via contrastive learning which shortens the distance between semantically similar sentences and increases the distance between dissimilar sentences. We experiment on Hausa, a low-resource language, in the WMT21 English-Hausa translation task. We conduct fine-tuning on three different pre-trained models (XLM-R, mBERT, LaBSE). Our experimental results show that our proposed method not only achieves higher correlation with human judgments than original BERTScore, but also surpass surface-based metrics such as BLEU, chrF, and the state-of-the-art metric COMET, when fine-tuning mBERT. Moreover, our proposed method generates better embeddings than pre-trained embedding models (E5, BGE, M3E) which are fine-tuned on different NLP tasks. We also extend our experiments to Chinese, a rich-resource language, in an English-Chinese translation task, and further confirms the effectiveness of our method.

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  • 12.
    Megyesi, Beáta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Tudor, Crina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Láng, Benedek
    Budapesti Muszaki es Gazdasagtudomanyi Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.
    Lehofer, Anna
    Budapesti Muszaki es Gazdasagtudomanyi Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.
    Kopal, Nils
    Universität Siegen, Siegen, Germany.
    de Leeuw, Karl
    Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Waldispühl, Michelle
    Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Keys with nomenclatures in the early modern Europe2024In: Cryptologia, ISSN 0161-1194, E-ISSN 1558-1586, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 97-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We give an overview of the development of European historical cipher keys originating from early Modern times. We describe the nature and the structure of the keys with a special focus on the nomenclatures. We analyze what was encoded and how and take into account chronological and regional differences. The study is based on the analysis of over 1,600 cipher keys, collected from archives and libraries in 10 European countries. We show that historical cipher keys evolved over time and became more secure, shown by the symbol set used for encoding, the code length and the code types presented in the key, the size of the nomenclature, as well as the diversity and complexity of linguistic entities that are chosen to be encoded.

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  • 13.
    de Heer, Mervi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Blokland, Rogier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Vesakoski, Outi
    University of Turku Department of Biology Turku Finland;University of Turku Department of Finnish language and Finno-Ugric linguistics Turku Finland.
    Loanwords in Basic Vocabulary as an Indicator of Borrowing Profiles2024In: Journal of Language Contact : Evolution of Languages, ISSN 1877-4091, E-ISSN 1955-2629, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 54-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loanwords carry information on linguistic interactions, and can also reveal (pre-)historicalpopulation contacts. The contact history of a particular language family is an essential component of historical linguistics, but it is also illuminating for integrative studies of the human past. However, data availability and the time-consuming nature of etymology mean that comprehensive research on loanword layers exists for relatively few languages, forcing us to rely on limited material for others. This paper compares the loanword layers in the basic and total vocabulary of six well-studied Uralic languages, assessing how accurately the borrowing profile in basic vocabulary reflects the full profile of a language. We define “borrowing profile” as the known contact history of a language reflected by its loanword layers. We demonstrate that the loanword layers in basic vocabulary provide an adequate cross-section of the full borrowing profile, although basic vocabulary manifests prehistoric contacts more strongly than more recent contacts.

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  • 14.
    Wan, Xinzheng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Localization Features of Early Swedish Chinese Teaching Materials and Their Impact and Implications2024In: Journal of research on international Chinse teaching and learning resources, ISSN 3005-9259, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes two foundational early textbooks in the history of Chinese language education in Sweden: Bernhard Karlgren’s Kinesisk Elementarbok (1948) and Göran Malmqvist’s Kinesiska är inte svårt (1974). Due to the medium of instruction being Swedish, these textbooks have received little scholarly attention. However, both textbooks exhibit some “localized” features, taking into consideration the specific needs of learners based on Swedish characteristics in learning Chinese. They open a “window” into Chinese culture, incorporating local cultural elements, and organize language elements with a core focus on Chinese–Swedish contrasts. The grammar explanations highlight sentence patterns, and vocabulary annotations prioritize morpheme-based translations, avoiding simple word-to-word equivalents. Chinese character instruction emphasizes character origin analysis and systematic learning. In addition, the textbooks reflect the editors’ deep love for Chinese culture. These “localized” ideas and practices have become a tradition, exerting a profound and continuing influence on Chinese language education in Sweden and even the Nordic region. They also provide insightful guidance for the development of new generations of Chinese textbooks.

  • 15.
    Hällzon, Patrick
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Slavist Turkol & Zirkumbalt Studien, Mainz, Germany.
    Ötkür, Zulhayat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Ståhlberg, Sabira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Making the most of scarce biological resources in the desert: Loptuq material culture in Eastern Turkestan around 19002024In: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, E-ISSN 1746-4269, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Most fisher-gatherer communities we know of utilized a limited number of natural resources for their livelihood. The Turkic-speaking Loptuq (exonym Loplik, Loplyk) in the Lower Tarim River basin, Taklamakan desert, Eastern Turkestan (Xinjiang), were no exception. Their habitat, the Lop Nor marsh and lake area, was surrounded by desert and very poor in plant species; the Loptuq had to make the most of a handful of available biological resources for housing, furniture, clothing and fabric, fishnets and traps, tools and other equipment. The taxa used by the Loptuq were documented by foreign explorers at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries, prior to the forced resettlement of the group in the 1950s and subsequent destruction of their language, lifestyle and culture.

    Methods and sources

    Ethnobiology explores the relationship between humans and their environment, including the use of biological resources for different purposes. In several aspects, historical ethnobiology is more challenging; it studies this relationship in the past and therefore cannot verify results with informants. As the present study discusses an extinct culture on the basis of literary and material sources, we apply a method called source pluralism. This approach allows the inclusion and combination of a wide range of data and materials, even scraps of information from various sources, with the aim to understand phenomena which are sparsely mentioned in historical records.

    Travel reports by Swedish, British, German, American and Russian explorers together with linguistic data provide the most important sources for understanding Loptuq interaction with the environment and its biota. Especially the large number of toponyms and phytonyms recorded by the Swedish explorer Sven Hedin and materials from his expeditions, including voucher specimens kept in Stockholm in the herbarium of the Swedish Natural History Museum, and objects of material culture in the collections of the Ethnographical Museum, are crucial for our analysis about local knowledge among the Loptuq. Illustrations and photographs provide us with additional information.

    Results

    The question of how the Loptuq managed to survive at the fringe of a desert, a marsh and a lake which changed its location, intrigued all foreign visitors to the Lop Nor. The Loptuq’s main livelihood was fishing, hunting and gathering, and their material culture provided by plants and other organic materials included their usage, consumption and trade. Only a handful of species formed the basis of the Loptuq material culture, but they had learned to use these specific plants for a variety of purposes. The most important of these were Lop hemp, Poacynum pictum (Schrenk) Baill., the riparian tree Euphrates poplar, Populus euphratica Olivier, and the aquatic common reed, Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. Several species of tamarisk were used for fuel and building fences. A few plants were also harvested for making foodstuffs such as snacks and potherbs. In addition, the Loptuq also used fur, bird skins, down, feathers, mammal bones and fish bones for their material needs. The habitat provided cultural ecological services such as motifs for their folklore, linguistic expressions and songs, and the Loptuq engaged in small-scale bartering of plant products and furs with itinerant traders, which ensured them with a supply of metal for making tools.

    Conclusion

    This article discusses the now extinct Loptuq material culture as it existed more than a hundred years ago, and how the scarce biological resources of their desert and marsh habitat were utilized. Loptuq adaptation strategies to the environment and local knowledge, transmitted over generations, which contributed to their survival and subsistence, were closely connected with the use of biological resources.

    For this study, a comprehensive approach has been adopted for the complex relationships between human, biota and landscape. The Loptuq are today largely ignored or deleted from history for political reasons and are seldom, if at all, mentioned in modern sources about the Lop Nor area. Their experience and knowledge, however, could be useful today, in a period of rapid climate change, for others living in or at the fringe of expanding deserts.

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  • 16.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Nachruf Hans-Georg Wieck (1928-2024)2024In: Suedasien, ISSN 0933-5196Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Sjökvist, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, University Library.
    On Literary Spoils of War in Private Libraries.: The Case of Rålamb at Länna Gård2024In: Biblioteka, ISSN 1506-3615, no 27 (36), p. 15-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Dong, Guojun
    et al.
    Bate, Andrew
    Haguinet, François
    Westman, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infection medicine.
    Dürlich, Luise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Department of Computer Science, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Kista, Sweden.
    Hviid, Anders
    Sessa, Maurizio
    Optimizing Signal Management in a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System: A Proof-of-Concept with COVID-19 Vaccines Using Signs, Symptoms, and Natural Language Processing2024In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) has already been challenged by an extreme increase in the number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) after the market introduction of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. Evidence from scientific literature suggests that when there is an extreme increase in the number of ICSRs recorded in spontaneous reporting databases (such as the VAERS), an accompanying increase in the number of disproportionality signals (sometimes referred to as ‘statistical alerts’) generated is expected.

    ObjectivesThe objective of this study was to develop a natural language processing (NLP)-based approach to optimize signal management by excluding disproportionality signals related to listed adverse events following immunization (AEFIs). COVID-19 vaccines were used as a proof-of-concept.

    MethodsThe VAERS was used as a data source, and the Finding Associated Concepts with Text Analysis (FACTA+) was used to extract signs and symptoms of listed AEFIs from MEDLINE for COVID-19 vaccines. Disproportionality analyses were conducted according to guidelines and recommendations provided by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By using signs and symptoms of listed AEFIs, we computed the proportion of disproportionality signals dismissed for COVID-19 vaccines using this approach. Nine NLP techniques, including Generative Pre-Trained Transformer 3.5 (GPT-3.5), were used to automatically retrieve Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms (MedDRA PTs) from signs and symptoms extracted from FACTA+.

    ResultsOverall, 17% of disproportionality signals for COVID-19 vaccines were dismissed as they reported signs and symptoms of listed AEFIs. Eight of nine NLP techniques used to automatically retrieve MedDRA PTs from signs and symptoms extracted from FACTA+ showed suboptimal performance. GPT-3.5 achieved an accuracy of 78% in correctly assigning MedDRA PTs.

    ConclusionOur approach reduced the need for manual exclusion of disproportionality signals related to listed AEFIs and may lead to better optimization of time and resources in signal management.

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  • 19.
    Dahllöf, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Orden som avslöjar författaren2024In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, Vol. 3, p. 55-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Papst Franciscus, der Friede in der Welt und der Krieg in der Ukraine2024In: Herder Korrespondenz, ISSN 2628-5622​Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Smarte Ergänzung zum Wetterbericht: Der Air Quality Index2024In: Suedasien, ISSN 0933-5196Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Jing, Yingqi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Widmer, Paul
    University of Zurich.
    Bickel, Balthasar
    University of Zurich.
    Word order evolves at similar rates in main and subordinate clauses: Corpus-based evidence from Indo-European2024In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 532-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In syntactic change, it remains an open issue whether word orders are more conservative or innovative in subordinate clauses compared with main clauses. Using 47 dependency-annotated corpora and Bayesian phylogenetic inference, we explore the evolution of S/V, V/O, and S/O orders across main and subordinate clauses in Indo-European. Our results reveal similar rates of change across clause types, with no evidence for any inherent conservatism of subordinate or main clauses. Our models also support evolutionary biases towards SV, VO, and SO orders, consistent with theories of dependency length minimization that favor verb-medial orders and with theories of a subject preference that favor SO orders. Finally, our results show that while the word order in the proto-language cannot be estimated with any reasonable degree of certainty, the early history of the family was dominated by a moderate preference for SVO orders, with substantial uncertainty between VO and OV orders in both main and subordinate clauses.

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  • 23.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.