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  • 101.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Vazquez-Dominguez, Evaristo
    Cardelus, Clara
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Sala, M. Montserrat
    Lekunberri, Itziar
    Balague, Vanessa
    Vila-Costa, Maria
    Unrein, Fernando
    Massana, Ramon
    Simo, Rafel
    Gasol, Josep M.
    Factors controlling the year-round variability in carbon flux through bacteria in a coastal marine system2008In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 397-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from several years of monthly samplings are combined with a 1-year detailed study of carbon flux through bacteria at a NW Mediterranean coastal site to delineate the bacterial role in carbon use and to assess whether environmental factors or bacterial assemblage composition affected the in situ rates of bacterial carbon processing. Leucine (Leu) uptake rates [as an estimate of bacterial heterotrophic production (BHP)] showed high interannual variability but, on average, lower values were found in winter (around 50 pM Leu(-1) h(-1)) as compared to summer (around 150 pM Leu(-1) h(-1)). Leu-to-carbon conversion factors ranged from 0.9 to 3.6 kgC mol Leu(-1), with generally higher values in winter. Leu uptake was only weakly correlated to temperature, and over a full-year cycle (in 2003), Leu uptake peaked concomitantly with winter chlorophyll a (Chl a) maxima, and in periods of high ectoenzyme activities in spring and summer. This suggests that both low molecular weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) released by phytoplankton, and high molecular weight DOM in periods of low Chl a, can enhance BHP. Bacterial respiration (BR, range 7-48 mu g C l(-1) d(-1)) was not correlated to BHP or temperature, but was significantly correlated to DOC concentration. Total bacterial carbon demand (BHP plus BR) was only met by dissolved organic carbon produced by phytoplankton during the winter period. We measured bacterial growth efficiencies by the short-term and the long-term methods and they ranged from 3 to 42%, increasing during the phytoplankton blooms in winter (during the Chl a peaks), and in spring. Changes in bacterioplankton assemblage structure (as depicted by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) were not coupled to changes in ecosystem functioning, at least in bacterial carbon use.

  • 102.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zeder, Michael
    Harding, Tommy
    Pernthaler, Jakob
    Lovejoy, Connie
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pedros-Alio, Carlos
    Winter bloom of a rare betaproteobacteriurn in the Arctic Ocean2014In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 5, p. 425-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extremely low abundance microorganisms (members of the "rare biosphere") are believed to include dormant taxa, which can sporadically become abundant following environmental triggers. Yet, microbial transitions from rare to abundant have seldom been captured in situ, and it is uncertain how widespread these transitions are. A bloom of a single ribotype (>= 99% similarity in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene) of a widespread betaproteobacterium (Janthinobacterium sp.) occurred over 2 weeks in Arctic marine waters. The Janthinobactenum population was not detected microscopically in situ in January and early February, but suddenly appeared in the water column thereafter, eventually accounting for up to 20% of bacterial cells in mid February. During the bloom, this bacterium was detected at open water sites up to 50 km apart, being abundant down to more than 300 m. This event is one of the largest monospecific bacterial blooms reported in polar oceans. It is also remarkable because Betaproteobacteria are typically found only in low abundance in marine environments. In particular, Janthinobacterium were known from non-marine habitats and had previously been detected only in the rare biosphere of seawater samples, including the polar oceans. The Arctic Janthinobacterium formed mucilagenous monolayer aggregates after short (ca. 8 h) incubations, suggesting that biofilm formation may play a role in maintaining rare bacteria in pelagic marine environments. The spontaneous mass occurrence of this opportunistic rare taxon in polar waters during the energy-limited season extends current knowledge of how and when microbial transitions between rare and abundant occur in the ocean.

  • 103.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Andersson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    High archaeal diversity in Antarctic circumpolar deep waters2011In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 689-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaea are abundant in polar oceans but important ecological aspects of this group remain enigmatic, such as patterns of diversity and biogeography. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing population study of Antarctic archaea based on 198 bp fragments of the 16S rRNA gene, targeting different water masses across the Amundsen and Ross Seas. Our results suggest that archaeal community composition is strongly shaped by hydrography and significantly influenced by environmental parameters. Archaeal communities from cold continental shelf waters (SW) of the Ross Sea were similar over depth with a single thaumarchaeal phylotype dominating Antarctic surface waters (AASW) and deeper SW (contributing up to 80% of reads). However, this phylotype contributed less than 8% of reads in circumpolar deep waters (CDW). A related thaumarchaeon (98% identity) was almost absent in AASW, but contributed up to 30% of reads in CDW, suggesting ecological differentiation of closely related phylotypes. Significantly higher archaeal richness and evenness were observed in CDW, with Shannon indices (c. 2.5) twice as high as for AASW, and high contributions of Group II Euryarchaeota. Based on these results, we suggest that CDW is a hotspot of archaeal diversity and may play an important role in the dispersal of archaeal phylotypes to other oceanic water masses.

  • 104.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Waller, A. S.
    Mende, D. R.
    Bakker, K.
    Farnelid, H.
    Yager, P. L.
    Lovejoy, C.
    Tremblay, J. -E
    Potvin, M.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Estrada, M.
    Riemann, L.
    Bork, P.
    Pedrós-Alió, C.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Role for urea in nitrification by polar marine Archaea2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 44, p. 17989-17994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the high abundance of Archaea in the global ocean, their metabolism and biogeochemical roles remain largely unresolved. We investigated the population dynamics and metabolic activity of Thaumarchaeota in polar environments, where these microorganisms are particularly abundant and exhibit seasonal growth. Thaumarchaeota were more abundant in deep Arctic and Antarctic waters and grew throughout the winter at surface and deeper Arctic halocline waters. However, in situ single-cell activity measurements revealed a low activity of this group in the uptake of both leucine and bicarbonate (<5% Thaumarchaeota cells active), which is inconsistent with known heterotrophic and autotrophic thaumarchaeal lifestyles. These results suggested the existence of alternative sources of carbon and energy. Our analysis of an environmental metagenome from the Arctic winter revealed that Thaumarchaeota had pathways for ammonia oxidation and, unexpectedly, an abundance of genes involved in urea transport and degradation. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that most polar Thaumarchaeota had the potential to oxidize ammonia, and a large fraction of them had urease genes, enabling the use of urea to fuel nitrification. Thaumarchaeota from Arctic deep waters had a higher abundance of urease genes than those near the surface suggesting genetic differences between closely related archaeal populations. In situ measurements of urea uptake and concentration in Arctic waters showed that small-sized prokaryotes incorporated the carbon from urea, and the availability of urea was often higher than that of ammonium. Therefore, the degradation of urea may be a relevant pathway for Thaumarchaeota and other microorganisms exposed to the low-energy conditions of dark polar waters.

  • 105.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Cibois, Alice
    Nat Hist Museum Geneva, Dept Mammal & Ornithol, CP 6434, CH-1211 Geneva 6, Switzerland..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zuccon, Dario
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Gelang, Magnus
    Gothenburg Nat Hist Museum, Box 7283, S-40235 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Nat Hist Museum Denmark, Zool Museum, Ctr Macroecol Evolut & Climate, Univ Pk 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Andersen, Michael
    Univ New Mexico, Dept Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA.;Univ New Mexico, Museum Southwestern Biol, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Moyle, Robert
    Univ Kansas, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA.;Univ Kansas, Biodivers Inst, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Pasquet, Eric
    UMS MNHN CNRS 2700 Outils & Methodes Systemat Int, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France.;Sorbonne Univ, Museum Natl Hist Nat, UMR7205,EPHE, Inst Systemat,Evolut,Biodiversite,CNRS,MNHN,UPMC, CP 51,57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 05, France..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 127, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread Old World avian family Locustellidae ('grassbirds and allies') comprises 62 extant species in 11 genera. In the present study, we used one mitochondrial and, for most species, four nuclear loci to infer the phylogeny of this family. We analysed 59 species, including the five previously unsampled genera plus two genera that had not before been analysed in a densely sampled dataset. This study revealed extensive disagreement with current taxonomy; the genera Bradypterus, Locustella, Megalurus, Megalurulus and Schoenicola were all found to be non-monophyletic. Non-monophyly was particularly pronounced for Megalurus, which was widely scattered across the tree. Three of the five monotypic genera (Amphilais, Buettikoferella and Malia) were nested within other genera; one monotypic genus (Chaetornis) formed a Glade with one of the two species of Schoenicola; whereas the position of the fifth monotypic genus (Elaphrornis) was unresolved. Robsonius was confirmed as sister to the other genera. We propose a phylogenetically informed revision of genus-level taxonomy, including one new generic name. Finally, we highlight several non-monophyletic species complexes and deep intra-species divergences that point to conflict in taxonomy and suggest an underestimation of current species diversity in this group.

  • 106.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    de Juana, Eduardo
    Donald, Paul F.
    Suárez, Francisco
    Mediterranean Short-toed Lark (Alaudala rufescens)2023Other (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Donald, Paul F.
    Sharpe's Lark (Mirafra sharpii)2022Other (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Donald, Paul F.
    Turkestan Short-toed Lark (Alaudala heinei)2023Other (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, POB 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden; Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Jonsson, Knud A
    Jon, Fjeldså
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 140364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest thatAmaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

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  • 110.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100101 , China.
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Donald, Paul F
    Nymark, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Enbody, Erik D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA 95060 , USA.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Elisha, Emmanuel Barde
    Ndithia, Henry K
    Tieleman, B Irene
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Olsson, Urban
    Rancilhac, Loïs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Stervander, Martin
    Integrative taxonomy reveals unrecognised species diversity in African Corypha larks (Aves: Alaudidae)2023In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The species complex comprising the rufous-naped lark Corypha africana, Sharpe’s lark Corypha sharpii, the red-winged lark Corypha hypermetra, the Somali long-billed lark Corypha somalica and Ash’s lark Corypha ashi encompasses 31 recognised taxa across sub-Saharan Africa, many of which are extremely poorly known and some not observed for decades. Only 17 taxa have been studied molecularly and none comprehensively for morphology, vocalisations or other behaviours. Here, we undertake comprehensive integrative taxonomic analyses based on plumage and morphometrics (for 97% of the taxa), mitochondrial and nuclear loci (77%), ≤ 1.3 million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (68%), song (many described for the first time; 52%) and additional behavioural data (45%). All polytypic species as presently circumscribed are paraphyletic, with eight primary clades separated by ≤ 6.3–6.8 Myr, broadly supported by plumage, morphometrics, song and other behaviours. The most recent divergences concern sympatric taxon pairs usually treated as separate species, whereas the divergence of all clades including C. africana subspecies is as old as sister species pairs in other lark genera. We propose the recognition of nine instead of five species, while C. ashi is synonymised with C. somalica rochei as C. s. ashi. The geographical distributions are incompletely known, and although the nine species are generally para-/allopatric, some might be sympatric.

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  • 111.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Enbody, Erik D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, 95060, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Crochet, Pierre-André
    Guillaumet, Alban
    Rancilhac, Loïs
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Tieleman, B. Irene
    Olsson, Urban
    Donald, Paul F.
    Stervander, Martin
    Systematics of the avian family Alaudidae using multilocus and genomic data2023In: Avian Research, E-ISSN 2053-7166, Vol. 14, article id 100095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family Alaudidae, larks, comprises 93–100 species (depending on taxonomy) that are widely distributed across Africa and Eurasia, with single species extending their ranges to North and northernmost South America and Australia. A decade-old molecular phylogeny, comprising ∼80% of the species, revealed multiple cases of parallel evolution and large variation in rates of morphological evolution, which had misled taxonomists into creating many non-monophyletic genera. Here, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the larks, using a dataset covering one mitochondrial and 16 nuclear loci and comprising all except one of the currently recognised species as well as several recently proposed new species (in total 133 taxa; not all loci available for all species). We provide additional support using genome-wide markers to infer a genus-level phylogeny based on near-complete generic sampling (in total 51 samples of 44 taxa across 40 species). Our results confirm the previous findings of rampant morphological convergence and divergence, and reveal new cases of paraphyletic genera. We propose a new subfamily classification, and also that the genus Mirafra is divided into four genera to produce a more balanced generic classification of the Alaudidae. Our study supports recently proposed species splits as well as some recent lumps, while also questioning some of the latter. This comprehensive phylogeny will form an important basis for future studies, such as comparative studies of lark natural history, ecology, evolution and conservation.

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  • 112.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Delicate Prinia (Prinia lepida)2022Other (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA.;Michigan State Univ, MSU Museum, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA.;Nat Hist Museum, Nat Hist Museum Tring, Bird Grp, Akeman St, Tring HP23 6AP, England..
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.;Naturalis Biodivers Ctr, Darwinweg 4, NL-2333 CR Leiden, Netherlands..
    Dalvi, Shashank
    GKVK, Natl Ctr Biol Sci, Researchers Wildlife Conservat, F-21,Bellary Rd, Bengaluru 560065, Karnataka, India..
    Round, Philip D.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Rama 6 Rd, Bangkok 10400, Thailand..
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    COA, Endem Species Res Inst, High Altitude Expt Stn, Chi Chi, Taiwan..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Le Manh, Hung
    Grad Univ Sci & Technol, Vietnam Acad Sci & Technol, Inst Ecol & Biol Resources, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi, Vietnam..
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Multiple species within the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex revealed through an integrative taxonomic approach2020In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 936-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re-evaluated the taxonomy of the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex using molecular, morphological and vocal analyses. The extensive seasonal, sexual, age-related, geographical and taxon-specific variation in this complex has never before been adequately studied. As no previous genetic or vocal analyses have focused on this group, misinterpretation of taxonomic signals from limited conventional morphological study alone was likely. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we found that P. crinigera sensu lato (s.l.) comprises two non-sister groups of taxa (Himalayan crinigera and Chinese striata groups) that differ substantially morphologically and vocally and that are broadly sympatric in Yunnan Province, China. Prinia polychroa cooki (Myanmar) and P. p. rocki (southern Vietnam) are each morphologically, vocally and genetically distinct. Thai, Cambodian and Laotian populations formerly ascribed to P. p. cooki are morphologically and vocally most similar to and most closely related to Javan P. p. polychroa, and require a new name, proposed here. Prinia p. bangsi of Yunnan is part of the crinigera group rather than of P. polychroa, and hence there is no evidence for sympatry between P. polychroa s.l. and P. crinigera s.l., nor of the occurrence of P. polychroa in mainland China or Taiwan. We recommend the recognition of five species in the complex, with the following suggestions for new English names: Himalayan Prinia P. crinigera sensu stricto (s.s.; with subspecies striatula, crinigera, yunnanensis and bangsi); Chinese Prinia P. striata (subspecies catharia, parumstriata and striata); Burmese Prinia P. cooki (monotypic); Annam Prinia P. rocki (monotypic) and Deignan's Prinia P. polychroa s.s. (subspecies Javan polychroa and the new Southeast Asian taxon). This study underlines the importance of using multiple datasets for the elucidation of diversity of cryptic bird species and their evolutionary history and biogeography.

  • 114.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden; Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA;Michigan State Univ, MSU Museum, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA;Nat Hist Museum Tring, Bird Grp, Akeman St, Tring HP23 6AP, England.
    Xia, Canwei
    Beijing Normal Univ, Minist Educ, Coll Life Sci, Key Lab Biodivers & Ecol Engn, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Gothenburg Nat Hist Museum, Box 7283, S-40235 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Liu, Yang
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Life Sci, Dept Ecol, State Key Lab Biocontrol, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Guoling
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Life Sci, Dept Ecol, State Key Lab Biocontrol, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Min
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Hao, Yan
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Chao
    Cloud Mt Conservat, Dali 671003, Yunnan, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Jian
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Life Sci, Dept Ecol, State Key Lab Biocontrol, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Yao, Chengte
    COA, Endem Species Res Inst, High Altitude Expt Stn, Chi Chi 55244, Taiwan.
    Eaton, James A.
    Birdtour Asia, 17 Keats Ave, Derby DE23 4EE, England.
    Hutchinson, Robert
    Birdtour Asia, 17 Keats Ave, Derby DE23 4EE, England.
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Taxonomy of the White-browed Shortwing (Brachypteryx montana) complex on mainland Asia and Taiwan: an integrative approach supports recognition of three instead of one species2018In: Avian Research, ISSN 0005-2175, E-ISSN 2053-7166, Vol. 9, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The White-browed Shortwing (Brachypteryx montana) is widespread from the central Himalayas to the southeast Chinese mainland and the island of Taiwan, the Philippines and Indonesia. Multiple subspecies are recognised, and several of these have recently been suggested to be treated as separate species based on differences in morphology and songs.

    Methods: We here analyse plumage, morphometrics, songs, two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers, and geographical distributions of the two mainland Asian taxa B. m. cruralis and B. m. sinensis and the Taiwanese B. m. goodfellowi.

    Results: We conclude that these differ congruently in morphology, songs and DNA. Male B. m. goodfellowi is the most divergent in plumage (sexually monomorphic, unlike the two others; male similar to female), and B. m. cruralis and B. m. sinensis differ in male plumage maturation. The song of B. m. cruralis is strongly divergent from the others, whereas the songs of B. m. sinensis and B. m. goodfellowi are more similar to each other. Brachypteryx m. sinensis and B. m. goodfellowi are sisters, with an estimated divergence time 4.1 million years ago (mya; 95% highest posterior distribution [HPD] 2.8-5.5mya), and B. m. cruralis separated from these two 5.8mya (95% HPD 4.1-7.5mya). We also report notable range extensions of B. m. sinensis as well as sympatry between this taxon and B. m. cruralis in Sichuan Province, China. Brachypteryx m. montana from Java is found to be more closely related to Lesser Shortwing (B. leucophris) and Rusty-bellied Shortwing (B. hyperythra) than to the mainland Asian and Taiwanese taxa.

    Conclusion: Our data support a recent proposal to treat the three mainland Asian and Taiwanese taxa as three species, separate from B. montana sensu stricto: B. cruralis (central Himalayas to south central China and south Vietnam), B. sinensis (north central to southeastern part of mainland China) and B. goodfellowi (Taiwan Island).

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  • 115.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.;Michigan State Univ, MSU Museum, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.;Nat Hist Museum, Bird Grp, Tring, England..
    Xia, Canwei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Beijing Normal Univ, Coll Life Sci, Key Lab Biodivers Sci & Ecol Engn, Minist Educ, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Lijun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Liu, Chengyi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Magnusson, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Shafaeipour, Arya
    Univ Yasuj, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Yasuj, Iran..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Morphology, vocalizations, and mitochondrial DNA suggest that the Graceful Prinia is two species2021In: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 138, no 2, article id ukab014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prinias (Cisticolidae:Prinia) are resident warblers of open areas across Africa and Asia and include many polytypic species whose species limits have not been seriously reevaluated recently. Based on an integrative taxonomic analysis of morphology, song, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), we suggest that 2 species should be recognized in the Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) complex. In addition, our morphological analyses show the existence of a well-marked undescribed form in southeastern Somalia, which we name herein as a new subspecies. Prinia gracilisis a small, drab, long-tailed species with streaking above and plain pale underparts that has been suggested to fall into 2 groups: the southwestern nominate group (from Egypt to Oman) and the northeastern lepida group (from Turkey through India). However, the characters presented to justify this grouping are variable and show a mosaic pattern, and whether genetic and vocal differences exist is unknown. We found consistent between-group song differences, with the nominate group giving consistently longer inter-phrase intervals, whereas the members of the lepida group sing an essentially continuous reel. An mtDNA tree suggests a deep split between the nominate and lepida groups, with a coalescence time between these clades of similar to 2.2 million years ago. Vocal and mtDNA analyses provided evidence that the northeastern Arabian Peninsula taxon carpenteri belongs to the lepida group. We found that, of all the morphological characters proposed, only proportions and tail barring and spotting relatively consistently distinguish the 2 groups. However, these characters strongly suggest that the eastern Arabian Peninsula is populated by taxa of both the gracilis and lepida groups, in different areas, but we lack genetic and bioacoustic data to corroborate this. Although further study is needed in potential contact zones, we suggest that 2 species should be recognized in the P. gracilis complex, and we propose the retention of the English name Graceful Prinia for P. gracilis sensu stricto, while we suggest that P. lepida be known as Delicate Prinia.

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  • 116.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA.; Michigan State Univ, MSU Museum, E Lansing, MI 48864 USA.; Nat Hist Museum Tring, Bird Grp, Akeman St, Tring HP23 6AP, England.
    Zhao, Chao
    Cloud Mt Conservat, Dali 671003, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Jingzi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Dalvi, Shashank
    GKVK, Natl Ctr Biol Sci, Researchers Wildlife Conservat, F-21,Bellary Rd, Bengaluru 560065, Karnataka, India.
    Cai, Tianlong
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Guan, Yuyan
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Life Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Kalyakin, Mikhail V.
    Lomonosov Moscow State Univ, Zool Museum, Bolshaya Nikitskaya Str 2, Moscow 125009, Russia.
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Integrative taxonomy of the Plain-backed Thrush (Zoothera mollissima) complex (Aves, Turdidae) reveals cryptic species, including a new species2016In: Avian Research, E-ISSN 2053-7166, Vol. 7, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Plain-backed Thrush Zoothera mollissima breeds in the Himalayas and mountains of central China. It was long considered conspecific with the Long-tailed Thrush Zoothera dixoni, until these were shown to be broadly sympatric.

    Methods: We revise the Z. mollissimaZ. dixoni complex by integrating morphological, acoustic, genetic (two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers), ecological and distributional datasets.

    Results: In earlier field observations, we noted two very different song types of “Plain-backed” Thrush segregated by breeding habitat and elevation. Further integrative analyses congruently identify three groups: an alpine breeder in the Himalayas and Sichuan, China (“Alpine Thrush”); a forest breeder in the eastern Himalayas and northwest Yunnan (at least), China (“Himalayan Forest Thrush”); and a forest breeder in central Sichuan (“Sichuan Forest Thrush”). Alpine and Himalayan Forest Thrushes are broadly sympatric, but segregated by habitat and altitude, and the same is probably true also for Alpine and Sichuan Forest Thrushes. These three groups differ markedly in morphology and songs. In addition, DNA sequence data from three non-breeding specimens from Yunnan indicate that yet another lineage exists (“Yunnan Thrush”). However, we find no consistent morphological differences from Alpine Thrush, and its breeding range is unknown. Molecular phylogenetic analyses suggest that all four groups diverged at least a few million years ago, and identify Alpine Thrush and the putative “Yunnan Thrush” as sisters, and the two forest taxa as sisters. Cytochrome b divergences among the four Z. mollissima sensu lato (s.l.) clades are similar to those between any of them and Z. dixoni, and exceed that between the two congeneric outgroup species. We lectotypify the name Oreocincla rostrata Hodgson, 1845 with the Z. mollissima sensu stricto (s.s.) specimen long considered its type. No available name unambiguously pertains to the Himalayan Forest Thrush.

    Conclusions: The Plain-backed Thrush Z. mollissima s.l. comprises at least three species: Alpine Thrush Z. mollissima s.s., with a widespread alpine breeding distribution; Sichuan Forest Thrush Z. griseiceps, breeding in central Sichuan forests; and Himalayan Forest Thrush, breeding in the eastern Himalayas and northwest Yunnan (at least), which is described herein as a new species. “Yunnan Thrush” requires further study.

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  • 117.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Rheindt, Frank E.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Biol Sci, 16 Sci Dr 4, Singapore 117558, Singapore.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Min
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Jing
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Zhu, Xiaojia
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Gwee, Chyi Yin
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Biol Sci, 16 Sci Dr 4, Singapore 117558, Singapore.
    Hao, Yan
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Ohlson, Jan
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jia, Chenxi
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Prawiradilaga, Dewi M.
    Indonesian Inst Sci LIPI, Cibinong Sci Ctr, Res Ctr Biol, Jalan Raya Jakarta Bogor KM 46, Bogor 16911, Indonesia.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 463, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Complete species-level phylogeny of the leaf warbler (Aves: Phylloscopidae) radiation2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 126, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The leaf warbler radiation (Aves: Phylloscopidae) has undergone a c. 50% increase in the number of recognised species over the last three decades, mainly as a result of analyses of vocalisations and DNA. Using a multilocus dataset for all of the species in this family, and multispecies coalescent-based as well as concatenation methods, we provide the first complete species-level phylogeny for this important group, as well as an estimate of the timing of diversification. The most recent common ancestor for the family was dated at 11.7 million years ago (mya) (95% highest posterior density 9.8-13.7 mya), and divergence times between sister species ranged from 0.5 mya (0.3-0.8 mya) to 6.1 mya (4.8-7.5 mya). Based on our results, we support synonymising Seicercus with Phylloscopus, which results in a monogeneric Phylloscopidae. We discuss the pros and cons of this treatment, and we argue against proliferation of taxonomic names, and conclude that a large monogeneric Phylloscopidae leads to the fewest taxonomic changes compared to traditional classifications. We briefly discuss morphological evolution in the light of the phylogeny. The time calibrated phylogeny is a major improvement compared to previous studies based on a smaller number of species and loci and can provide a basis for future studies of other aspects of phylloscopid evolution.

  • 118.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Ryan, Peter
    Horsfield's Bushlark (Mirafra javanica)2022Other (Other academic)
  • 119. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Saitoh, Takema
    Williams, Dawn
    Nishiumi, Isao
    Shigeta, Yoshimitsu
    Ueda, Keisuke
    Irestedt, Martin
    Björklund, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Olsson, Urban
    The Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis - three anciently separated cryptic species revealed2011In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 153, no 2, p. 395-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis breeds across the northern Palaearctic and northwestern-most Nearctic, from northern Scandinavia to Alaska, extending south to southern Japan, and winters in Southeast Asia, the Philippines and Indonesia. Several subspecies have been described based on subtle morphological characteristics, although the taxonomy varies considerably among different authors. A recent study (T. Saitoh et al. (2010) BMC Evol. Biol. 10: 35) identified three main mitochondrial DNA clades, corresponding to: (1) continental Eurasia and Alaska, (2) south Kamchatka, Sakhalin and northeast Hokkaido, and (3) most of Japan (Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu). These three clades were estimated to have diverged during the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene (border at c. 2.6 million years ago). Differences in morphometrics have also been reported among members of the three clades (T. Saitoh et al. (2008) Ornithol. Sci. 7: 135-142). Here we analyse songs and calls from throughout the range of the Arctic Warbler, and conclude that these differ markedly and consistently among the populations representing the three mitochondrial clades. Kurile populations, for which no sequence data are available, are shown to belong to the second clade. To determine the correct application of available scientific names, mitochondrial DNA was sequenced from three name-bearing type specimens collected on migration or in the winter quarters. Based on the congruent variation in mitochondrial DNA, morphology and vocalizations, we propose that three species be recognized: Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis (sensu stricto) (continental Eurasia and Alaska), Kamchatka Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus examinandus (Kamchatka (at least the southern part), Sakhalin, Hokkaido and Kurile Islands), and Japanese Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus xanthodryas (Japan except Hokkaido).

  • 120.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sundev, Gombobaatar
    Mongolian Short-toed Lark (Calandrella dukhunensis)2021Other (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Sundev, Gombobaatar
    Natl Univ Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar 210646a,POB 537, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.;Mongolian Ornithol Soc, Ulaanbaatar 210646a,POB 537, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia..
    Mongolian Short-toed LarkCalandrella dukhunensis, an overlooked East Asian species2021In: Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 2193-7192, E-ISSN 2193-7206, Vol. 162, no 1, p. 165-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eastern subspecies of Greater Short-toed LarkCalandrella brachydactyla dukhunensishas recently been considered a separate species,Calandrella dukhunensis, by several authors based on molecular data. We present supporting evidence for this treatment based on studies of morphology, vocalisations and song-flight, and also present new data on other aspects of its biology based on field studies. We show that its breeding distribution is considerably smaller than previously thought, and is restricted to the eastern half of Mongolia and, marginally, neighbouring parts of China and perhaps Russia.

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  • 122.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sundev, Gombobaatar
    Donald, Paul F.
    Asian Short-toed Lark (Alaudala cheleensis)2023Other (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    van Linschooten, Jip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Donald, Paul F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, Downing St, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, England..
    Sundev, Gombobaatar
    Natl Univ Mongolia, POB 537,Ulaanbaatar 210646a, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.;Mongolian Ornithol Soc, POB 537,Ulaanbaatar 210646a, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia..
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Dept Biol, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Zool Innovat, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Ghorbani, Fatemeh
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Dept Biol, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Zool Innovat, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Shafaeipour, Arya
    Univ Yasuj, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Yasuj, Iran..
    van den Berg, Arnoud
    Sound Approach, Duinlustparkweg 98, NL-2082 EG Santpoort Zuid, Netherlands..
    Robb, Magnus
    Sound Approach, Rua Dr Pedro Almeida Lima 6, P-2710122 Sintra, Portugal..
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Dept Biol, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Zool Innovat, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Wei, Chentao
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Life Sci, Dept Ecol, State Key Lab Biocontrol, Guangzhou 510275, Peoples R China..
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Oxelman, Bengt
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Box 461, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olsson, Urban
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Systemat & Biodivers, Box 463, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Box 461, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Multiple species delimitation approaches applied to the avian lark genus Alaudala2021In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 154, article id 106994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species delimitation has advanced from a purely phenotypic exercise to a branch of science that integrates multiple sources of data to identify independently evolving lineages that can be treated as species. We here test species limits in the avian Lesser Short-toed Lark Alaudala rufesens-Sand Lark A. raytal complex, which has an intricate taxonomic history, ranging from a single to three recognised species, with different inclusiveness in different treatments. Our integrative taxonomic approach is based on a combination of DNA sequences, plumage, biometrics, songs, song-flights, geographical distributions, habitat, and bioclimatic data, and using various methods including a species delimitation program (STACEY) based on the multispecies coalescent model. We propose that four species should be recognised: Lesser Short-toed Lark A. rufescens (sensu stricto), Heine's Short-toed Lark A. heinei, Asian Short-toed Lark A. cheleensis and Sand Lark A. raytal. There is also some evidence suggesting lineage separation within A. cheleensis and A. raytal, but additional data are required to evaluate this. The species delimitation based on STACEY agrees well with the non-genetic data. Although computer-based species delimitation programs can be useful in identifying independently evolving lineages, we stress that whenever possible, species hypotheses proposed by these programs should be tested by independent, non-genetic data. Our results highlight the difficulty and subjectivity of delimiting lineages and species, especially at early stages in the speciation process.

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  • 124.
    Alström-Rapaport, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics.
    Leskinen, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics.
    Parnilo, Pekka
    Seasonal variation in the mode of reproduction of Ulva intestinalis in a brackish water environment2010In: Aquatic Botany, ISSN 0304-3770, E-ISSN 1879-1522, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 244-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the reproductive modes of Viva intestinalis in the inner part of the Baltic Sea during three consecutive years by using five microsatellite loci to estimate the relative abundance of diploid sporophytes and haploid gametophytes. Our results suggest that both diploid sporophytes and haploid gametophytes occur regularly in the Baltic Sea. The ratio of haploid to diploid individuals changes with seasons. Sporophytes are more abundant than gametophytes throughout the year, but the proportion of haploids increases from 10% in early summer to 35% in September. The over-wintering takes primarily place as diploid spores released by sporophytes. The sporophytes appear to reproduce both sexually and asexually in the Baltic Sea, since clones were found for this life phase. The fraction of individuals which belonged to an apparent diploid clone was higher in spring (62%) than in autumn (33%). We also found evidence for asexual clones in haploid gametophytes. The presence of both diploid and haploid individuals and the pattern of genetic and genotypic diversity provide evidence of sexual reproduction in the Baltic Sea. Thus the sporophytes and gametophytes do not function as two reproductively separate units. Compared with many other algal species with a reduced reproductive cycle in low salinity, U. intestinalis differs by having a multitude of reproductive modes also in the brackish water Baltic Sea, which can in part explain the dynamic propagation and high adaptability of the species.

  • 125.
    Amaya-Marquez, Marisol
    et al.
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Inst Ciencias Nat, Bogota 111321, Colombia.
    Tusso Gomez, Sergio
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Div Evolutionary Biol, Fac Biol, 82152 Grosshaderner Str, Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Hernandez, Juan
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Inst Ciencias Nat, Bogota 111321, Colombia.
    Dario Jimenez, Juan
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Inst Ciencias Nat, Bogota 111321, Colombia.
    Wells, Harrington
    Tulsa Univ, Dept Biol, Tulsa, OK 74104 USA.
    Abramson, Charles, I
    Oklahoma State Univ, Dept Psychol, Stillwater, OK 74078 USA.
    Olfactory Learning in the Stingless Bee Melipona eburnea Friese (Apidae: Meliponini)2019In: Insects, E-ISSN 2075-4450, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfactory learning and floral scents are co-adaptive traits in the plant-pollinator relationship. However, how scent relates to cognition and learning in the diverse group of Neotropical stingless bees is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the ability of Melipona eburnea to be conditioned to scent using the proboscis extension reflex (PER) protocol. Stingless bees did not show PER while harnessed but were able to be PER conditioned to scent when free-to-move in a mini-cage (fmPER). We evaluated the effect of: 1) unconditioned stimulus (US) reward, and 2) previous scent-reward associations on olfactory learning performance. When using unscented-US, PER-responses were low on day 1, but using scented-US reward the olfactory PER-response increased on day 1. On day 2 PER performance greatly increased in bees that previously had experienced the same odor and reward combination, while bees that experienced a different odor on day 2 showed poor olfactory learning. Bees showed higher olfactory PER conditioning to guava than to mango odor. The effect of the unconditioned stimulus reward was not a significant factor in the model on day 2. This indicates that olfactory learning performance can increase via either taste receptors or accumulated experience with the same odor. Our results have application in agriculture and pollination ecology.

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  • 126.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Fishing for Females: Sensory Exploitation in the Swordtail Characin2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate choice plays an important role in sexual selection and speciation. The evolution of mate choice is intriguing in cases where choosy individuals gain little except for genetic material from the mate and where the trait used as a criterion for the choice is costly to its bearer. The sensory exploitation hypothesis is an interesting idea that applies to such cases because it suggests that sexual preferences may arise as side-effects of preferences that are under selection in other contexts. The role of mate choice in speciation is strong but is debated because the reasons for population divergence in mate preferences and sexual traits are sometimes hard to explain. Also in this context sensory exploitation offers a potential explanation in that a link between natural and sexual selection may result in divergence in sexual selection whenever populations differ in natural selection.

    In this thesis, I test several aspects of this hypothesis in a species of fish, the swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei). In this species males display a flag-like ornament that grows from the operculum. Because females respond to this ornament by biting at it, it has been proposed to act as a food-mimic. By manipulating female food type and quantity, and testing the resulting female preference for the male ornament, I find support for the theory that the preference has evolved through sensory exploitation and that females indeed appear to relate the ornament to a food item. Furthermore, I show that sensory exploitation can lead to morphological divergence among natural populations in this species. Apart from the flag-ornament, other courtship signals are also investigated. The results show that the relative importance of different signals may vary depending on receiver motivation. This suggests that various aspects of both male courtship signals and the conditions during which they are being signalled should be considered to gain a full understanding of mate choice and its role in sexual selection and speciation.

    List of papers
    1. Does female feeding motivation affect the response to a food-mimicking male ornament in the swordtail characin Corynopoma riisei?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does female feeding motivation affect the response to a food-mimicking male ornament in the swordtail characin Corynopoma riisei?
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 343-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Female response to various aspects of male trait morphology and the effect of female feeding motivation were investigated in the swordtail characin Corynopoma riisei, a species where males are equipped with a flag-like food-mimicking ornament that grows from the operculum. Unfed females responded more strongly to the male ornament and showed a stronger preference for larger ornaments than did fed females. Females were shown not to discriminate between artificial male ornaments of either undamaged or damaged shape.

    Keywords
    diet, mate preference, plasticity, sensory exploitation, signalling
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206572 (URN)10.1111/jfb.12175 (DOI)000322547900007 ()
    Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Sensory exploitation and plasticity in female mate choice in the swordtail characin
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory exploitation and plasticity in female mate choice in the swordtail characin
    2013 (English)In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 891-898Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive research in the field of sexual selection, the evolutionary origin and maintenance of preferences for sexual ornaments are still debated. Recent studies have pointed out that plasticity in mate choice might be more common than previously thought, but little is still known about the factors that affect such plasticity. The swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei, is a tropical fish species in which males use a food-mimicking ornament to attract females. We tested whether ecological factors, more specifically prior foraging experience, can affect female preference for male ornaments. For this, we habituated females on a diet consisting of either red-coloured food or standard-coloured green food items and then we tested whether female preferences for artificially red-coloured male ornaments matched their previous foraging experience. We found a strong effect of food treatment: females trained on red food showed a stronger response to males with red-coloured ornaments than females trained on green food. Our results show that ecological variation can generate divergence of female preferences for male ornaments and that the response in preference to environmental change can be rapid if the bias is partly learnt.

    Keywords
    Corynopoma riisei, diet, mate choice, sensory exploitation, sexual selection, swordtail characin
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-203305 (URN)10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.02.001 (DOI)000319332000004 ()
    Available from: 2013-07-08 Created: 2013-07-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Diversification of a Food-Mimicking Male Ornament via Sensory Drive
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversification of a Food-Mimicking Male Ornament via Sensory Drive
    2012 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 22, no 15, p. 1440-1443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary divergence of sexual signals is often important during the formation of new animal species, but our understanding of the origin of signal diversity is limited [1, 2]. Sensory drive, the optimization of communication signal efficiency through matching to the local environment, has been highlighted as a potential promoter of diversification and speciation [3]. The swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei) is a tropical fish in which males display a flag-like ornament that elicits female foraging behavior during courtship. We show that the shape of the male ornament covaries with female diet across natural populations. More specifically, natural populations in which the female diet is more dominated by ants exhibit male ornaments more similar to the shape of an ant. Feeding experiments confirm that females habituated to a diet of ants prefer to bite at male ornaments from populations with a diet more dominated by ants. Our results show that the male ornament functions as a "fishing lure" that is diversifying in shape to match local variation in female search images employed during foraging. This direct link between variation in female feeding ecology and the evolutionary diversification of male sexual ornaments suggests that sensory drive may be a common engine of signal divergence.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181121 (URN)10.1016/j.cub.2012.05.050 (DOI)000307415000026 ()
    Available from: 2012-09-19 Created: 2012-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Courtship signalling with a labile bilateral signal: males show their best side
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Courtship signalling with a labile bilateral signal: males show their best side
    2009 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 63, no 12, p. 1717-1725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetries in courtship signals can result from both developmental instability during ontogeny and from temporary or permanent damage following mating, fighting, or interactions with predators. These two types of asymmetries, which can be divided into fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and damage asymmetry (DA), have both been suggested to play an important role in mate choice as potential honest indicators of phenotypic and/or genetic quality, while at the same time, DA may affect ornament asymmetry in a random manner. Interestingly, despite the massive research effort that has been devoted to the study of asymmetry during the past decades, very little is known about how an individual's behaviour relates to asymmetry. Here, we measure and characterise asymmetry in morphological courtship signals in Corynopoma riisei, a fish where males carry elaborate paddle-like appendices on each side of the body that they display in front of females during courtship. Moreover, we investigate whether male courtship display, employing this bilateral morphological trait, reflects trait asymmetry. Finally, we assess whether males respond to phenotypic manipulations of DA with corresponding changes in courtship behaviour. We show that male display behaviour is asymmetric in a manner that reflects asymmetry of their morphological courtship trait and that male display behaviour responds to manipulations of asymmetry of these paddles. Our results thus suggest that males preferentially use their best side and, hence, that males respond adaptively to temporary changes in signal trait asymmetry.

    Keywords
    Sexual signalling, Sexual selection, Lateralization, Mate choice, Sensory bias, Indicator, Self-awareness
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-127482 (URN)10.1007/s00265-009-0785-7 (DOI)000270684200003 ()
    Available from: 2010-07-15 Created: 2010-07-13 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Multiple male sexual signals and female responsiveness in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple male sexual signals and female responsiveness in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei
    2015 (English)In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 98, no 7, p. 1731-1740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the courtship process, multiple signals are often used between the signaller and the receiver. Here we describe female response to multiple male visual morphological and behavioural signals in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei. The swordtail characin is a species in which males display several morphological ornaments as well as a rich courtship repertoire. Our results show that high courtship intensity was associated with an increased female response towards the male ornament, increased number of mating attempts and a reduction in female aggression. The morphological aspects investigated here did not seem to correlate with female response. This may indicate that, when both behaviour and morphology are considered simultaneously, courtship behaviour may have priority over morphological cues in this species.

    Keywords
    courtship, multiple signalling, visual cues, morphology, mate choice
    National Category
    Evolutionary Biology
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207333 (URN)10.1007/s10641-015-0388-2 (DOI)000355620700001 ()
    Available from: 2013-09-12 Created: 2013-09-12 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
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  • 127.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Arnqvist, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Courtship signalling with a labile bilateral signal: males show their best side2009In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 63, no 12, p. 1717-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymmetries in courtship signals can result from both developmental instability during ontogeny and from temporary or permanent damage following mating, fighting, or interactions with predators. These two types of asymmetries, which can be divided into fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and damage asymmetry (DA), have both been suggested to play an important role in mate choice as potential honest indicators of phenotypic and/or genetic quality, while at the same time, DA may affect ornament asymmetry in a random manner. Interestingly, despite the massive research effort that has been devoted to the study of asymmetry during the past decades, very little is known about how an individual's behaviour relates to asymmetry. Here, we measure and characterise asymmetry in morphological courtship signals in Corynopoma riisei, a fish where males carry elaborate paddle-like appendices on each side of the body that they display in front of females during courtship. Moreover, we investigate whether male courtship display, employing this bilateral morphological trait, reflects trait asymmetry. Finally, we assess whether males respond to phenotypic manipulations of DA with corresponding changes in courtship behaviour. We show that male display behaviour is asymmetric in a manner that reflects asymmetry of their morphological courtship trait and that male display behaviour responds to manipulations of asymmetry of these paddles. Our results thus suggest that males preferentially use their best side and, hence, that males respond adaptively to temporary changes in signal trait asymmetry.

  • 128.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Gonzalez-Voyer, A.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Evolution of egg dummies in Tanganyikan cichlid fishes: the roles of parental care and sexual selection2013In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 2369-2382Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual selection has been suggested to be an important driver of speciation in cichlid fishes of the Great Lakes of Africa, and the presence of male egg dummies is proposed to have played a key role. Here, we investigate how mouthbrooding and egg dummies have evolved in Tanganyikan cichlids, the lineage which seeded the other African radiations, with a special emphasis on the egg dummies. Using modern phylogenetic comparative analyses and a phylogeny including 86% of the 200 described species, we provide formal evidence demonstrating correlated evolution between mouthbrooding and egg dummies in Tanganyikan cichlids. These results concur with existing evidence, suggesting that egg dummies have evolved through sensory exploitation. We also demonstrate that there is a strong evolutionary correlation between the presence of egg dummies and both pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection. Moreover, egg dummy evolution was contingent on the intensity of pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection in Tanganyikan cichlids. In sum, our results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis of egg dummies evolving through sensory exploitation and highlight the role of sexual selection in favouring the evolution and maintenance of this trait.

  • 129.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Hallsson, Lara R.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Male Courtship Pheromones Affect Female Behaviour in the Swordtail Characin ( Corynopoma riisei)2014In: Ethology, ISSN 0179-1613, E-ISSN 1439-0310, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheromones constitute an important cue used by both males and females during courtship. Here, we investigate the effect of male pheromones on female behaviour in the swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei), a species of fish where males have a caudal pheromone gland which has been suggested to affect female behaviour during courtship. We subjected female C.riisei to male courtship pheromones and investigated the effect on both female behaviour and brain serotonergic activity levels compared to a control group. While no difference in serotonergic activity was found, the pheromone-treated females showed lower stress levels compared to the control group. Furthermore, pheromone-treated females increased locomotor activity over time, while a decrease in locomotor activity was observed in the control group. These results suggest that the male courtship pheromones may serve to reduce female stress and increase female activity, possibly to aid males in gaining access to females and facilitating sperm transfer.

  • 130.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    A test of sensory exploitation in the swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei) based on colour matchingbetween female prey and a male ornament2014In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 247-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensory exploitation hypothesis states that pre-existing biases in female sensory systems may generate strong selection on male signals to match such biases. As environmental conditions differ between populations, sexual preferences resulting from natural selection are expected to vary as well. The swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei) is a species in which males carry a flag-like ornament growing from the operculum that has been proposed to function as a prey mimic to attract females. Here, we investigated if female plasticity in feeding preferences is associated with plasticity in preference for an artificial male ornament in this species. Females were trained for 10 days by offering them differently coloured food items and were then tested for changes in preferences for differently coloured artificial male ornaments according to foraging experience. We found a rapid and pronounced change in female preference for the colouration of the artificial ornament according to food training. Thus our results support the possibility that sensory exploitation may act as a driving force for female preferences for male ornaments in this species.

  • 131.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Does female feeding motivation affect the response to a food-mimicking male ornament in the swordtail characin Corynopoma riisei?2013In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 343-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Female response to various aspects of male trait morphology and the effect of female feeding motivation were investigated in the swordtail characin Corynopoma riisei, a species where males are equipped with a flag-like food-mimicking ornament that grows from the operculum. Unfed females responded more strongly to the male ornament and showed a stronger preference for larger ornaments than did fed females. Females were shown not to discriminate between artificial male ornaments of either undamaged or damaged shape.

  • 132.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Multiple male sexual signals and female responsiveness in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei2015In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 98, no 7, p. 1731-1740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the courtship process, multiple signals are often used between the signaller and the receiver. Here we describe female response to multiple male visual morphological and behavioural signals in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei. The swordtail characin is a species in which males display several morphological ornaments as well as a rich courtship repertoire. Our results show that high courtship intensity was associated with an increased female response towards the male ornament, increased number of mating attempts and a reduction in female aggression. The morphological aspects investigated here did not seem to correlate with female response. This may indicate that, when both behaviour and morphology are considered simultaneously, courtship behaviour may have priority over morphological cues in this species.

  • 133.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lindqvist, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sensory exploitation and plasticity in female mate choice in the swordtail characin2013In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 891-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive research in the field of sexual selection, the evolutionary origin and maintenance of preferences for sexual ornaments are still debated. Recent studies have pointed out that plasticity in mate choice might be more common than previously thought, but little is still known about the factors that affect such plasticity. The swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei, is a tropical fish species in which males use a food-mimicking ornament to attract females. We tested whether ecological factors, more specifically prior foraging experience, can affect female preference for male ornaments. For this, we habituated females on a diet consisting of either red-coloured food or standard-coloured green food items and then we tested whether female preferences for artificially red-coloured male ornaments matched their previous foraging experience. We found a strong effect of food treatment: females trained on red food showed a stronger response to males with red-coloured ornaments than females trained on green food. Our results show that ecological variation can generate divergence of female preferences for male ornaments and that the response in preference to environmental change can be rapid if the bias is partly learnt.

  • 134.
    Ament-Velásquez, S. Lorena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Stockholm University.
    Vogan, Aaron A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Granger-Farbos, Alexandra
    Institut de Biochimie et de Génétique Cellulaire, UMR 5095 CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, France.
    Bastiaans, Eric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University & Research, Droeven-daalsesteeg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Martinossi-Allibert, Ivain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Saupe, Sven J.
    Institut de Biochimie et de Génétique Cellulaire, UMR 5095 CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, France.
    de Groot, Suzette
    Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University & Research, Droeven-daalsesteeg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Lascoux, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Debets, Alfons J. M.
    Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University & Research, Droeven-daalsesteeg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Clavé, Corinne
    Institut de Biochimie et de Génétique Cellulaire, UMR 5095 CNRS, Uni-versité de Bordeaux, France.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Allorecognition genes drive reproductive isolation in Podospora anserina2022In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 910-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allorecognition, the capacity to discriminate self from conspecific non-self, is a ubiquitous organismal feature typically governed by genes evolving under balancing selection. Here, we show that in the fungus Podospora anserina, allorecognition loci controlling vegetative incompatibility (het genes), define two reproductively isolated groups through pleiotropic effects on sexual compatibility. These two groups emerge from the antagonistic interactions of the unlinked loci het-r (encoding a NOD-like receptor) and het-v (encoding a methyltransferase and an MLKL/HeLo domain protein). Using a combination of genetic and ecological data, supported by simulations, we provide a concrete and molecularly defined example whereby the origin and coexistence of reproductively isolated groups in sympatry is driven by pleiotropic genes under balancing selection.

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  • 135. Ament-Velásquez, Sandra Lorena
    et al.
    Vogan, Aaron A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Hartmann, Fanny
    Gautier, Valérie
    Silar, Philippe
    Giraud, Tatiana
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    The evolution of the allorecognition gene repertoire in the Podospora anserina species complexManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Across the Tree of Life, self/non-self recognition is typically achieved through highly polymorphic loci under balancing selection. In fungi, vegetative conspecific recognition, or allorecognition, is defined by the compatibility interactions between loci known as het genes. In this study we explore the evolution of the het genes in the model fungus Podospora anserina and its closest relatives (the Podospora anserina species complex). First, we used chromosome-level genome assemblies to resolve their phylogenetic relationships. We found that the species in the complex are well defined but diversified recently and rapidly, leading to high degrees of conflict at deep branches of the phylogeny. Unlike typical orthologous genes from the complex, some allorecognition genes (het-z and het-s) show trans-species polymorphism, a hallmark of long-term balancing selection. By contrast, the het genes belonging to the HNWD family exhibit a high turn-over, with losses and duplications happening often. In particular, the species P. pseudocomata has a considerable increase of HNWD genes. Unexpectedly, we show that the HNWD paralogs have clean defined boundaries flanked by a target site duplication (TSD), implicating a DNA transposon-like mechanism in the genesis of new duplicates. Overall, our data highlights the diversity of evolutionary histories behind individual self/non-self recognition genes at short evolutionary timescales.

  • 136. Amer, M.
    et al.
    Tyler, A.
    Fouda, T.
    Hunter, P.
    Elmetwalli, A.
    Wilson, C.
    Vallejo-Marin, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Spectral characteristics for estimation heavy metals accumulation in wheat plants and grain2017In: Scientific Papers-Series Management Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants would the start with step of a metal's pathway starting with the dirt on heterotrophic creatures for example, such that animals and humans, thus the substance from claiming metallic follow components for eatable parts of a plant representable accessible load of these metals that might enter those natural way of life through plants. Around metal elements, Cu and Zn would micro nutrients as they are essential in trace concentrations for physiological processes in plants. Furthermore consequently would a critical part from the soil-plant-food continuum. Therefor this study aimed to analysing the performance of multivariate hyperspectral vegetation indices of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in estimating the accumulation of these elements in plant dry mutter and the final product of Egyptian wheat crop irrigated with high concentrations of Zn and Cu. We applied five concentrations for each element (0.05, 20, 40, 100, and 150 ppm of Zn) and (0.02, 8, 10, 12, and 15 ppm of Cu) to a controlled greenhouse experiment to examine the effect of these concentrations on plant spectral characteristics and study the possibility of using spectroradiometry measurements for identifying the grain content of these metals. The results demonstrated that The hyperspectral vegetation indices had a potential for monitoring Zn concentration in the plant dry matter. NPCI and PSSR had a highest correlation with Cu phytoaccumulation into the grains with highest significant level (P-Value < 0.01) and (r) values (-0.39, -0.42).

  • 137.
    Amininasab, Seyed Mehdi
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Behav & Physiol Ecol, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands.;Behbahan Khatam Alanbia Univ Technol, Dept Environm Sci, Behbahan, Iran..
    Xu, Charles C. Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Univ Groningen, Behav & Physiol Ecol, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands..
    Kingma, Sjouke A.
    Univ Groningen, Behav & Physiol Ecol, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands..
    Komdeur, Jan
    Univ Groningen, Behav & Physiol Ecol, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands..
    Effect of tree logging on reproductive performance in Blue Tits (Cyanistes caeruleus)2017In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 158, no 1, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For birds, habitat quality is largely determined by local vegetation, and reproductive performance can therefore be negatively influenced by anthropogenic activities. A tree logging event enabled us to examine the effect of removing trees of different maturities and types on the reproductive performance of Blue Tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Against expectations, only the logging of small coniferous trees, but not larger and deciduous trees, was associated with a reduction in the number of eggs laid, whereas logging had no significant effect on lay date. Therefore, we conclude that modest logging activity has no or limited negative influence on Blue Tit reproductive performance.

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  • 138.
    Anandhi, Aavudai
    et al.
    Florida A&M Univ, Coll Agr & Food Sci, Biol Syst Engn, Tallahassee, FL 32307 USA;Florida A&M Univ, Coll Agr & Food Sci, Ctr Water Resources, Tallahassee, FL 32307 USA.
    Pierson, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Frei, Allan
    CUNY, Hunter Coll, Dept Geog, New York, NY 10065 USA;CUNY, CUNY Inst Sustainable Cities, New York, NY 10065 USA.
    Evaluation of Climate Model Performance for Water Supply Studies: Case Study for New York City2019In: Journal of water resources planning and management, ISSN 0733-9496, E-ISSN 1943-5452, Vol. 145, no 8, article id 06019006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating the suitability of data from global climate models (GCMs) for use as input in water supply models is an important step in the larger task of evaluating the effects of climate change on water resources management such as that of water supply operations. The purpose of this paper is to present the process by which GCMs were evaluated and incorporated into the New York City (NYC) water supply's planning activities and to provide conclusions regarding the overall effectiveness of the ranking procedure used in the evaluation. A suite of GCMs participating in Phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) were evaluated for use in climate change projections in the watersheds of the NYC water supply that provide 90% of the water consumed by NYC. GCM data were aggregated using the seven land-grid points surrounding NYC watersheds, and these data with a daily timestep were evaluated seasonally using probability-based skill scores for various combinations of five meteorological variables (precipitation, average, maximum and minimum temperatures, and wind speed). These are the key variables for the NYC water supply because they affect the timing and magnitude of water, energy, sediment, and nutrient fluxes into the reservoirs as well as in simulating watershed hydrology and reservoir hydrodynamics. We attempted to choose a subset of GCMs based on the average of several skill metrics that compared baseline (20C3M) GCM results to observations. Skill metrics for the study indicate that the skill in simulating the frequency distributions of measured data is highest for temperature and lowest for wind. However, our attempts to identify the best model or subgroup of models were not successful because we found that no single model performs best when considering all of the variables and seasons.

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  • 139.
    Anderson, Bruce
    et al.
    Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch Univ., Cape Town, South Africa..
    Pannell, John
    Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Billiard, Sylvain
    University Lille, CNRS, UMR 8198 – Evo-Eco-Paleo, 59000 Lille, France..
    Burgarella, Concetta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    de Boer, Hugo
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Dufay, Mathilde
    CEFE, University Montpellier, CNRS, University Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, Ephe, IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Helmstetter, Andrew J.
    FRB – CESAB, 5 Rue de l’École de Médecine, 34000 Montpellier, France..
    Méndez, Marcos
    Area of Biodiversity and Conservation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain..
    Otto, Sarah P.
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Roze, Denis
    IRL 3614, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29688 Roscoff Cedex, France..
    Sauquet, Hervé
    National Herbarium of New South Wales, Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia.;Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Schoen, Daniel
    Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada..
    Schönenberger, Jürg
    Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, 1030 Vienna, Austria..
    Vallejo‐Marín, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana
    Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0225, USA..
    Käfer, Jos
    Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive UMR 5558, 69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Glemin, Sylvain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. CNRS, Ecosystèmes Biodiversité Evolution (Université de Rennes), 35000 Rennes, France.
    Opposing effects of plant traits on diversification2023In: iScience, E-ISSN 2589-0042, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 106362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species diversity can vary dramatically across lineages due to differences in speciation and extinction rates. Here, we explore the effects of several plant traits on diversification, finding that most traits have opposing effects on diversification. For example, outcrossing may increase the efficacy of selection and adaptation but also decrease mate availability, two processes with contrasting effects on lineage persistence. Such opposing trait effects can manifest as differences in diversification rates that depend on ecological context, spatiotemporal scale, and associations with other traits. The complexity of pathways linking traits to diversification suggests that the mechanistic underpinnings behind their correlations may be difficult to interpret with any certainty, and context dependence means that the effects of specific traits on diversification are likely to differ across multiple lineages and timescales. This calls for taxonomically and context-controlled approaches to studies that correlate traits and diversification.

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  • 140.
    Anderson, Jennifer L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nieuwenhuis, Bart P. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Division of Evolutionary Biology, Faculty of Biology, Ludwig- Maximilians-Universität München.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Asexual reproduction and growth rate: independent and plastic lifehistory traits in Neurospora crassa2019In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 780-788Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 141. Anderson, Tovi M.
    et al.
    vonHoldt, Bridgett M.
    Candille, Sophie I.
    Musiani, Marco
    Greco, Claudia
    Stahler, Daniel R.
    Smith, Douglas W.
    Padhukasahasram, Badri
    Randi, Ettore
    Leonard, Jennifer A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bustamante, Carlos D.
    Ostrander, Elaine A.
    Tang, Hua
    Wayne, Robert K.
    Barsh, Gregory S.
    Molecular and Evolutionary History of Melanism in North American Gray Wolves2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, no 5919, p. 1339-1343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphological diversity within closely related species is an essential aspect of evolution and adaptation. Mutations in the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) gene contribute to pigmentary diversity in natural populations of fish, birds, and many mammals. However, melanism in the gray wolf, Canis lupus, is caused by a different melanocortin pathway component, the K locus, that encodes a beta-defensin protein that acts as an alternative ligand for Mc1r. We show that the melanistic K locus mutation in North American wolves derives from past hybridization with domestic dogs, has risen to high frequency in forested habitats, and exhibits a molecular signature of positive selection. The same mutation also causes melanism in the coyote, Canis latrans, and in Italian gray wolves, and hence our results demonstrate how traits selected in domesticated species can influence the morphological diversity of their wild relatives.

  • 142.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Div Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sundbom, Marcus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Div Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Div Populat Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lack of trophic polymorphism despite substantial genetic differentiation in sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations2017In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 643-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sympatric populations occur in many freshwater fish species; such populations are typically detected through morphological distinctions that are often coupled to food niche and genetic separations. In salmonids, trophic and genetically separate sympatric populations have been reported in landlocked Arctic char, whitefish and brown trout. In Arctic char and brown trout rare cases of sympatric, genetically distinct populations have been detected based on genetic data alone, with no apparent morphological differences, that is cryptic structuring. It remains unknown whether such cryptic, sympatric structuring can be coupled to food niche separation. Here, we perform an extensive screening for trophic divergence of two genetically divergent, seemingly cryptic, sympatric brown trout populations documented to remain in stable sympatry over several decades in two interconnected, tiny mountain lakes in a nature reserve in central Sweden. We investigate body shape, body length, gill raker metrics, breeding status and diet (stomach content analysis and stable isotopes) in these populations. We find small significant differences for body shape, body size and breeding status, and no evidence of food niche separation between these two populations. In contrast, fish in the two lakes differed in body shape, diet, and nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures despite no genetic difference between lakes. These genetically divergent populations apparently coexist using the same food resources and showing the same adaptive plasticity to the local food niches of the two separate lakes. Such observations have not been reported previously but may be more common than recognised as genetic screenings are necessary to detect the structures.

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  • 143.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Pelve, Erik A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Lindeberg, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Bernander, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Replication-biased genome organisation in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus2010In: BMC Genomics, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 11, p. 454-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Species of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus harbour three replication origins in their single circular chromosome that are synchronously initiated during replication. Results: We demonstrate that global gene expression in two Sulfolobus species is highly biased, such that early replicating genome regions are more highly expressed at all three origins. The bias by far exceeds what would be anticipated by gene dosage effects alone. In addition, early replicating regions are denser in archaeal core genes (enriched in essential functions), display lower intergenic distances, and are devoid of mobile genetic elements. Conclusion: The strong replication-biased structuring of the Sulfolobus chromosome implies that the multiple replication origins serve purposes other than simply shortening the time required for replication. The higher-level chromosomal organisation could be of importance for minimizing the impact of DNA damage, and may also be linked to transcriptional regulation.

  • 144. Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Sobek, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Comparison of a mass balance and an ecosystem model approach when evaluating the carbon cycling in a lake ecosystem2006In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 145. Andersson, M. S.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    GLYCOSYLATED HEMOGLOBIN - A NEW MEASURE OF CONDITION IN BIRDS1995In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, Vol. 260, no 1359, p. 299-303Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Abundance data adaptation experiment2017Data set
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  • 147.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bacterial abundance data from sterilization experiment2017Data set
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  • 148.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Extent and limitations of functional redundancy among bacterial communities towards dissolved organic matter2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key processes in the carbon cycle on our planet is the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic environments. The use of organic matter by bacteria links energy from DOM to higher trophic levels of the ecosystem when bacteria are consumed by other organisms. This is referred to as the microbial loop. In this thesis I examined if the communities were functionally redundant in their ability to utilize organic matter, or if variation in bacterial composition and richness is of importance. To test this overarching question several experiments were conducted that include methods such as illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for taxonomic identification of bacterial communities, flow cytometry to follow the growth of communities and spectroscopic measurement to describe the composition of the organic matter pool. Initially we demonstrated how to optimally sterilize organic matter for experimental studies in order to preserve its natural complexity. In further experiments we found that bacterial communities are redundant in their utilization of organic matter and can maintain optimal performance towards a range of organic matter pools. Related to this we found that pre-adaptation to organic matter played a small role as communities performed equally well regardless of their environmental history. We saw a small effect of richness and composition of bacterial communities on the efficiency of organic matter use, but conclude that this is of minor importance relative to abiotic factors. Still, we also show that organic matter can put strong selection pressure on bacterial communities with regards to richness and composition. Additionally we found that the supply rate of a carbon compound greatly influenced the energy utilization of the compound, i.e. a higher growth rate can be maintained if substrate is delivered in pulses relative to a continuous flow. Finally we conclude that the variation in bacterial communities is unlikely to have a major influence on carbon cycling in boreal lakes, but to enable a finer understanding, the genetics underlying the carbon utilization needs to be further explored. 

    List of papers
    1. Effects of sterilization on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) composition and bacterial utilization of DOC from lakes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of sterilization on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) composition and bacterial utilization of DOC from lakes
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    2018 (English)In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 199-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Sterilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an essential step in research on interactions between DOC and organisms, for example where the effect of different microbial communities on DOC is studied or vice versa. However, few studies have gone beyond acknowledging that sterilization of DOC influences its characteristics. Here, we aimed to provide further knowledge that enables scientists to better tailor their sterilization methods to their research question. To meet this aim, we conducted a sterilization experiment with DOC from 4 boreal lakes treated with 4 sterilization methods, i.e. 2 filtrations (0.2 µm, 0.1 µm) and 2 autoclaving approaches (single and double autoclaving with a single pH adjustment). Quantity and spectroscopic properties of DOC, before and after sterilization, were studied, and DOC was further tested as a substrate for bacterial growth. We found that the filtration methods better preserved the different DOC measures. In contrast, autoclaving caused major inconsistent shifts in both qualitative and quantitative measures of DOC, as well as an increase of the maximum abundance of bacteria in growth experiments. Nonetheless, there remains a trade-off between retaining the quality of DOC and achieving sterile conditions. Therefore, the sterilization method of choice should be guided by the scientific question at hand.

    Keywords
    sterilization, autoclave, filtration, dissolved organic carbon, excitation emission matrices, parallel factor analysis
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Research subject
    Microbiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331676 (URN)10.3354/ame01890 (DOI)000454321300006 ()
    Note

    Title in Thesis list of papers: Effects of sterilization on composition and bacterial utilization of dissolved organic carbon

    Available from: 2017-10-16 Created: 2017-10-16 Last updated: 2021-03-25Bibliographically approved
    2. Influence of pulsed and continuous substrate inputs on freshwater bacterial community composition and functioning in bioreactors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of pulsed and continuous substrate inputs on freshwater bacterial community composition and functioning in bioreactors
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    2017 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 5078-5087Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aquatic environments are typically not homogenous, but characterized by changing substrate concentration gradients and nutrient patches. This heterogeneity in substrate availability creates a multitude of niches allowing bacteria with different substrate utilization strategies to hypothetically coexist even when competing for the same substrate. To study the impact of heterogeneous distribution of organic substrates on bacterioplankton, bioreactors with freshwater bacterial communities were fed artificial freshwater medium with acetate supplied either continuously or in pulses. After a month-long incubation, bacterial biomass and community-level substrate uptake rates were twice as high in the pulsed treatment compared to the continuously fed reactors even if the same total amount of acetate was supplied to both treatments. The composition of the bacterial communities emerging in the two treatments differed significantly with specific taxa overrepresented in the respective treatments. The higher estimated growth yield in cultures that received pulsed substrate inputs, imply that such conditions enable bacteria to use resources more efficiently for biomass production. This finding agrees with established concepts of basal maintenance energy requirements and high energetic costs to assimilate substrates at low concentration. Our results further imply that degradation of organic matter is influenced by temporal and spatial heterogeneity in substrate availability. 

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275178 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.13979 (DOI)000418352800021 ()29124844 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3892
    Available from: 2016-02-01 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2022-01-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Response and effect interactions between bacterial communities and organic matter
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response and effect interactions between bacterial communities and organic matter
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) is crucial for the global carbon cycling. Despite decades of research there are, however, few consistent patterns regarding the relationship between bacterial diversity and community composition and DOM. Here we hypothesized that one reason for such inconsistences among studies is that bacterial communities can adapt to a DOM source over time, whereby a change in the functioning of a community can be, at least partly, decoupled from its composition and diversity. To test this idea we performed a reciprocal transplant experiment with medium (i.e. DOM source) and bacterial communities from two boreal lakes. In this experiment the two communities were allowed to adapt to their indigenous and their foreign source of DOM over 42 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC) was measured throughout the experiment. In addition we measured the capacity of the communities to use DOM, in repeated short (5 days) separated bioassays. The results show a response of bacterial community composition to the DOM sources which was influenced by the origin of the community. In contrast, we could not show an effect of BCC on DOM-processing and functional performance. Indeed, communities of different origin processed the two DOM sources equally well even at the beginning of the experiment. This work demonstrates that the DOM pool can be a strong selective force for BCC but not vice versa. 

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331696 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-23
    4. The relative importance of richness and BCC for DOC degradation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relative importance of richness and BCC for DOC degradation
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of biodiversity has been of primary interest for ecologist the last 20 years, giving rise to biodiversity ecosystem function (BEF) studies. Within the traditional field of ecology reoccurring patterns have emerged but within microbial ecology the importance of species richness for functioning is still poorly understood with few consistent patterns. In this study we examined the effect of species richness for dissolved organic matter degradation in lakes. This was examined within a smaller span of species richness compared to what is typically in microbial BEF experiments. Bacterial communities of reduced species richness were exposed to a range of DOC environments to test if reduced richness changed the functioning of communities and if the effect was similar among DOC environments. This was conducted in a full factorial design of 3 levels, with 6 dilutions, 5 media and 3 inocula resulting in 90 treatments. Overall, richness and community composition appeared to have effects on DOC degradation, but these effects were minor compared to the variation caused by the different DOC sources. Further, the importance of species richness varied among media and, thus, the chemical complexity of the environment influenced the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship. 

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Research subject
    Microbiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331693 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-23
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  • 149.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Spectroscopic data / carbon quality measurements1987Data set
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  • 150.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Berga, Mercè
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    The spatial structure of bacterial communities is influenced by historical environmental conditions2014In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1134-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial structure of ecological communities, including that of bacteria, is often influenced by species sorting by contemporary environmental conditions. Moreover, historical processes, i.e., ecological and evolutionary events that have occurred at some point in the past, such as dispersal limitation, drift, priority effects, or selection by past environmental conditions, can be important, but are generally investigated much less. Here, we conducted a field study using 16 rock pools, where we specifically compared the importance of past vs. contemporary environmental conditions for bacterial community structure by correlating present differences in bacterial community composition among pools to environmental conditions measured on the same day, as well as to those measured 2, 4, 6, and 8 d earlier. The results prove that selection by past environmental conditions exists, since we were able to show that bacterial communities are, to a greater extent, an imprint of past compared to contemporary environmental conditions. We suggest that this is the result of a combination of different mechanisms, including priority effects that cause rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions of taxa that have been initially selected by past environmental conditions, and slower rates of turnover in community composition compared to environmental conditions.

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